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Henry Student Lounge Dedication...P2

Wrap-up of spring sports seasons...P8

SUMMER EDITION 2013 highlandernews.net

Leaving Behind a Legacy of Improvement By Arthur Dowell, Web Master

Sr. Jean Messaros, Vice President of Student Affairs and Director of Mercy Integration, stared out her office window and reflected on the campus, one that bares little resemblance to the one she saw 15 years earlier. Messaros’ gaze lingered over the green grass and the trees brimming with new spring growth, and the sight almost served as a metaphor for the colorful growth of the university at the hands of President Michael MacDowell and his wife Tina. “Michael has a great love for the campus and made it a priority for him to call it home,” she said. “He and Tina both saw greatness in the place and went about it in great measures over the years.” While MacDowell may be remembered for the significant building projects and additions to the campus grounds - including a full sports program - he is well known for his attentiveness to students and their families. Students and staff found MacDowell at as many events as he could attend - that was many, indeed. Whether it be a lecture in the Henry Student Lounge or a prominent person speaking in the Lemmond Theatre, MacDowell was there. The same goes for every open house and scholarly luncheon. MacDowell even had impromptu hallway visits with prospective students and families who toured campus for the first time. Junior Jimmy Dinkins, business administration major, remembers the first time his family met the president.

Dinkins and his family had attended an open house and the MacDowells had taken time for a friendly chat. “It just showed they cared about everybody who stepped foot on campus,” said Dinkins. “They didn’t just care about

MacDowell. “They are the reason I have enjoyed showing up to work every day for the last fifteen years.” MacDowell does not shy away from boasting about the accomplishments students have achieved. He takes a

a defeated record of 0-15. He does this to show that while he is in a position to lead, he is still an everyday person who the students can reach out to. While MacDowell inarguably gets much of the credit

look at the university and fall in love, just as he did. “The school will continue to grow and get better at everything it does,” he said. MacDowell plans to live in Bonita Springs, Fl., and he and his wife Tina will return every summer to their boathouse on Harvey’s Lake because they love the area and the people in it. When he closes his office door for the last time in July, he hopes to be remembered for “helping Misericordia University achieve recognition as an excellent liberal arts institution with emphasis on practical careers and reputation for serving others.” The love affair does not end. Dowella@misericordia.edu

Campus Construction From MacDowell:

ARTHUR DOWELL/THE HIGHLANDER

President Michael A. MacDowell poses for a photo in his Mercy Hall office. me as someone interested in coming to Misericordia, but they cared about everybody I was affiliated with.” A few months later, the Dinkins family had come back for a scholarship luncheon intended for parties of three. The family of four had makedo plans in mind so Dinkins could enjoy the luncheon without a problem. MacDowell then saw the family and remembered them for the stories they had shared. Without hesitation, MacDowell opened the meal to the entire group. “Everything I do is in the interest of the students,” said

sense of pride when he talks about community service in particular. “At Misericordia, we have students going all over the world,” said MacDowell. “They do this because they want to, not because they have to.” Messaros said his enthusiasm and desire went into bettering the lives of students searching for a place to enjoy and receive an education. A significant example of MacDowell’s support of enjoyment is the President’s Volleyball Tournament held every homecoming weekend. MacDowell leaves MU with

for the growth and beautification of campus, he will quickly turn the tables and give the credit to people he feels deserve it. “A lot of work went on behind the scenes to make it all possible,” he said. “We had some of the smartest and most creative people behind every step. They can really make anything happen when their minds are set to it.” MacDowell graduates with the class of 2013. He will hand the presidential torch to Dr. Thomas Botzman on July 1. MacDowell is certain the new president will take one close

-Mary Kintz Bevevino Library -Munson Center -Wachovia Amphitheater -Mercy Hall Renovation -Bell Tower -Anderson Athletic Complex/Manglesdorf Field -Tennis Courts -Idea Center & Auditorium -Lake Street Homes -McGowan Student Residence Hall -Renovations to Banks Student Life Center -Addition of Fitness Center in Anderson -Field House -MacDowell Hall -Renovated Student Lounge Total Cost: $50,124,000

A President’s House Fit for a Lady By Christa Porasky, Reporter

Renovations are underway on the president’s house as the new president, Dr. Thomas Botzman, prepares to move to the Back Mountain. The Lake Street house is undergoing a much-needed makeover this summer, with the help of Eric Nelson, Vice President of Finance and Administration. Nelson is working alongside Botzman and his wife to ensure that Botzman’s smooth move into the presidency includes a smooth move into the new house - and he is seeking the family’s input on the design - including colors and patterns. “I’ve worked with him and his wife. He’s actually said it’s not his decision, it’s his wife’s,” said Nelson. “So I’ve been dealing with Mrs. Botzman on what she wants, like colors of carpet, colors of paints, colors of appliances and everything.” Nelson said Mrs. Botzman has been very involved in the renovations, and he has been working with her to ensure he can meet the family’s needs. “We want to make it not just the president’s house, but the Botzman’s home.” The construction is necessary because the aging structure requires restoration. The entire project is estimated to cost $70,000, Nelson said, adding that the work should take five weeks to complete. Nelson said it’s also important to provide current

ELLEN HOFFMAN/THE HIGHLANDER

Above, the Presidents house sits on Lake Street before renovations begin to welcome the Botzmans. President Michael MacDowell and his wife Tina with the opportunity to comfortably move out. Construction crews will wait to begin work until the MacDowells go into retirement to avoid causing any damage to their current home and belongings. “They’re not just moving on; they are moving into retirement. We wanted to make that as smooth of a transition as possible.” Nelson said he learned during previous experiences that redoing a house with occupants inside could end badly.

“In a previous position that I had at another school, we actually did some renovations while the president and his wife were still there, and we had some issues with that and I didn’t want to relive those experiences. So we thought we’d do it in a clean-cut way.” Nelson said restoration work will include the replacement of a leaky roof as well as new wallpaper, carpets and appliances. “Of course we are going to replace the carpets, and the appliances in the kitchen are pretty dated,” said Nelson.

“We’ll just do a general cleaning of everything.” The home’s exterior needs less work than the interior, Nelson said. “Most of the house is pretty maintenance-free, but there are some areas that just have wood planking that need to be continually painted. Unfortunately, they are very high, like at the crown, so we’re going to finish that off so we don’t have to have it painted every five years,” said Nelson. Crews will also install central air-conditioning, which is a first for the house.

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“I guess at the time the house was built, the climate was a little cooler and they didn’t have to deal with having air conditioning,” he said. Nelson said the installation presented a safety issue because of the power supply and breakers, but the central air system will be quiet and efficient. “I think it is reasonable for the value of the house, and again it hasn’t been touched in 15 years, and I think it’s long overdue.” Nelson said that he wants to make the Botzmans feel as much at home as possible. When he bought his own house in Dallas, he said he wanted to create an environment that was personalized according to his needs. “I wanted to make it my own. I’m certainly not walking around on other people’s carpet. When you move into a house, you want to make it your own, not a generic house.” As Nelson works closely with the Botzman family, he looks forward to the beautiful house and the happiness it will bring. “I think they’ll be pleased with it,” Nelson said. The Botzman family will be the fourth presidential family to live in the Lake Street house. Poraskyc@misericordia.edu

President’s Farewell When people asked me what I will miss most about Misericordia I answered quickly. It is the students. For 15 years Tina and I have been both impressed and enamored with the students. On the whole they are bright, inquisitive, hard-working and dedicated. They seem not only to care about others but about those less fortunate in this community and well beyond. Clearly there have been changes at Misericordia in the past 15 years. There are new buildings, athletic venues, new teams, new programs and majors, faculty and staff, and a much larger campus. We even became a University. Tina and I always enjoy talking to alumni who returned to campus having not visited for 20 years or more. Almost all of them say they can’t believe all of the changes that have taken place. But when these same alumni walk around campus, talk to students, and visit their former professors they’re quick to conclude that while much has changed, much remains the same. The friendliness of the place, the willingness to help out a stranger, the smiles on the faces of most all they meet are what they remember. There are over 4,000 colleges and universities in the country. Each strives to “differentiate itself” from others. The spirit of our founders and sponsors, the Sisters of Mercy, have had a profound effect on this “College on the Hill.” Our collective passion to serve others combined with an overwhelming belief in their charisms of mercy, service, justice, and hospitality is truly unique. There are many colleges and universities that in structure, size, and background are very similar, but in one important way they differ. There is an almost palpable friendliness and “Mercy spirit” at Misericordia that distinguishes this special place from all the others. I’m always amazed by the number of students who are ready to help others in times of need. But I’m even more impressed that students here do not wait for a natural disaster or tragic occurrence to offer support. They do so every day. That spirit of giving back is the attribute about which I am most proud. Our staff, faculty, trustees and most particularly our students are always willing to lend a helping hand. As students progress through their courses of study their service to others becomes even more valuable because they are able to put their education and the enviable career preparation skills behind their desire to serve. Our 15 years here have been the best of our lives. Tina and I will remember with great fondness and affection the friends we made here, the great times we shared together, and the many occasions when we worked hard to make Misericordia even better than when we found it. Our most sincere desire for this small University is that the spirit of giving back will grow and enhance Misericordia‘s reputation. We know Dr. and Mrs. Botzman share these feelings and Misericordia will move smartly on to bigger and better accomplishments.

Boz Scaggs Headlines “Under the Stars”

Scaggs and the Emily Asher’s Garden Party will perform in the Wells Fargo Ampitheater for two concert events.

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Summer 2013

News

SLP STUDENTS RETURN FAVOR Laughter is medicine Highlander News Reports

First year Terrence Murgallis is a person who stutters. He knows how it feels to be teased and mocked or otherwise dismissed by some students. He’s experienced the anxiety associated with public speaking and, on numerous occasions, he’s wished he was “like everyone else.’’ “It made me want to hide it (stuttering) and it made me want to be like everyone else because they were calling me out on it,’’ he said. He knows how to control his communication disorder and wants to share his experiences with other people who stutter and their families through the MU Stuttering Support Group, which has been recognized as a local chapter by the National Stuttering Association (NSA). By using the airflow management technique that he learned as a graduate student in the five-year Master of Science degree program in speech-language pathology, he can manage his stuttering. Air-flow management is one of numerous strategies speechlanguage pathologists use to help people control their stuttering. Murgallis has been working on an ambitious two-pronged approach to help people who stutter and their loved ones. It began two years ago when he enrolled in the speechlanguage pathology program. His mission was to learn how to help others with communication disorders find their own voices by becoming a licensed speech-language pathologist. While working on his academic studies and receiving speech therapy at the university, he collaborated with several classmates to establish the Northeast Pennsylvania Chapter of the National Stuttering Association. The support group provides a safe and friendly atmosphere for people who stutter and those affected by stuttering – about 1 percent of the population stutters, according to The Stuttering Foundation. At

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bi-monthly meetings, people are able to meet others who stutter, share experiences, practice speaking skills, and work on moving forward with dignity and respect, according to the NSA mission statement. “When I was younger, it affected me. I took what other

COURTESY OF MU PUBLIC RELATIONS

SLP students Terrence Murgallis, left, and Midori Rodriguez participate in a clinical sessions in the Speech-Language and Hearing Center in John J. Passan Hall. people had to say to heart. Thinking back now, it would have been a lot easier in the long run if I knew what these people thought wasn’t true. With support, you are able to realize you are not alone and you’re not so different from everyone else.” Support for Murgallis came in the form of Midori Rodriquez, a graduate student in the speech-language pathology program and a co-leader of the NSA support group. Together they worked to expand the informal support group already in place to the only nationally recognized one in northeastern Pennsylvania. Rodriquez also developed the idea to use the air-flow management technique with Murgallis, who still had significant stuttering difficulties after 11 years of on-again and

Resident artist honored Highlander News Reports

Artist in Residence Skip Sensbach is one of four area ceramics professors who will have their work on display at the Northeast Pennsylvania Professors of Ceramic Arts exhibit at Moscow Clayworks in Moscow, Pa. Moscow Clayworks is a community-based and family-owned gallery for ceramic art featuring local and international artists. Owner Frank Goryl is the curator for this exhibit, which will spotlight the individual work of four area ceramic professors including Matt Povse, Marywood University; Jared Jaffee, Keystone College; Jean Adams, Wilkes University, and Sensbach. Sensbach teaches basic and advanced ceramics classes as part of the fine arts minor, and he offers non-credit classes in clay by hand and pottery wheel for both youth and adults. For this exhibit, he focuses on the contrast between nature and the influence that humans have had on the natural world. Sensbach holds a bachelor’s degree in visual communica-

off-again therapy. About 17 months after beginning therapy at the Speech-Language and Hearing Center, Murgallis decided to discontinue speech therapy after successfully learning how to manage it with his mentor’s assistance and his own determination.

tion and he began working in clay in 1994. He opened Green Dog Pottery in Dallas, in 1998. His studio work focuses on functional clay work. The 2012 winner of the Ruanne Graduate Award for Artistic Excellence, Sensbach’s ceramic work, both functional and sculptural, has been recognized in many regional shows including the the springtime Fine Arts Fiesta in Wilkes-Barre, and at the WSKG Art In Motion competition in Binghamton, N.Y. Recently, his work was accepted in the 2011 Art of the State exhibit at the State Museum in Harrisburg. The Northeast Pennsylvania Professors of Ceramic Arts exhibit will open with a free reception on Sunday, April 7 from 4 to 7 p.m. and will be on display through the end of June. Gallery hours are by appointment and can be arranged by phone (570) 3571627 or email moscowclayworks@gmail.com. Highland@misericorida.edu

“I really look up to her,’’ he said. “I think she is a mentor and a great clinician. I tell her all the time that I am very grateful that she came to Misericordia. She is not only a good therapist, but she is a good friend. She really pushes me to step out of my comfort zone to try new things. I attribute a lot of my success to trusting her.’’ Initially, a graduate clinician was utilizing stuttering modification strategies with Murgallis until Rodriguez took over the clinical sessions and rerouted treatment with the assistance of Glen Tellis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, board recognized fluency specialist and interim dean of the College of Health Sciences. It took a little while for Murgallis to feel comfort-

able with the new approach because it is not the easiest technique to perfect, according to Tellis. “His percentage of fluency has only increased since we began working on this technique,’’ said Rodriguez. “If you look back at his initial evaluation in March 2011, his whole demeanor has changed immensely. He has reduced all secondary behaviors of stuttering and has increased his eye contact.’’ There is no known cure for stuttering, so it is imperative for clinicians to find the right strategy for their clients. For Murgallis, therapeutic sessions did not yield immediate results. His speech became somewhat monotonous and he had to work to increase his intonation and loudness, while maintaining fluency. Rodriguez and Murgallis also worked on using his strategies outside the clinical setting in phone calls and going out into the community at various stores and practicing his speech in spontaneous conversations. “I am grateful for being his clinician. He has taught me so much about myself as a clinician as well as about people who stutter. He really opened my eyes to the cognitive and affective components of stuttering.’’ Murgallis is eager to begin his undergraduate clinical sessions. In the meantime, Murgallis and Rodriguez believe their support group has been a success due to its national recognition and growing participation from members of the regional community. “We have achieved a lot of success thus far,’’ said Rodriguez. “I believe in the idea of quality over quantity. If we can impact the lives of just a few people in a positive way, I believe that is more important than having a group of 50 members and having minimal impact.’’ Highland@misericordia.edu

The combination of an never bothered me again.’’ inspirational comment and As a child she led a very a brilliant smile enabled ocnormal, active lifestyle. cupational therapy major KaiAside from her therapeutic tlyn Sledzinski to overcome sessions with an occupational significant obstacles. therapist every other week “I’d rather laugh about at Shriner’s Hospital for it than cry about it,’’ said Children in Philadelphia, she Sledzinski. She communicates competed in gymnastics and this message both literally learned how to play the violin. and figuratively through their Today, the results of her positive attitudes. activities are obvious. Shadow After practices and comboxes hang on the walls in petitions, she’d repeat that her bedroom, displaying the meaning30 medals ful phrase. she earned in Their saygymnastics ing was not competiborn out of tions in an ill-tuned northeastern violin or Pennsylvania failing to and abroad stick a through her landing durvault and ing a floor floor routines. routine, They remind but rather her how “you from the can do anycondition thing’’ with known as a strong supcongenital port system amputation and positive that left attitude. her withExtracurout a right ricular activiforearm and ties enabled hand since COURTESY OF MU PUBLIC RELATIONS her to travel birth. to BethleKaitlyn Sledzinski, OT major The hem, Pa., condition, according to The Orlando, Fla., and many other Hospital for Sick Children in destinations as she performed Toronto, Canada, is rare. Only athletically and artistically as one in 20,000 children are a singer and violinist. Some of born with a congenital foreher performances were done arm amputation like Sledzinat fundraisers, such as the ski’s. Congenital amputation, Shriners. Her experiences led the loss of the arm and/or her to major in a health care hand due to incomplete develspecialty field. She feels her opment at birth, is believed to special circumstances will be caused by bleeding or blood benefit her future clients in a clots as the arm is developing myriad of ways. before birth, according to the “I feel like I have a better hospital. understanding than someone The congenital amputation, who has not had a disability she said, has been a blessing or a condition,’’ she said. “It’s in disguise for the sophomore. hard not to feel sympathetic. “I think it was about second I’m going to feel that way for grade when I really started some people, but I’m also not noticing. That’s when I was going to let them convince me having a hard time with it they cannot do something. I because a boy was picking on will help them find that confime. My mom, she told me to dence they need to have.’’ do a cartwheel, and that boy Highland@misericordia.edu

MU Exposure: Henry Student Lounge Dedication

MARY BOVE/THE HIGHLANDER

Frank and Dorothea Henry unveil the Henry Student Lounge sign on May 1 outside the newly renovated commuter lounge. The dedication ceremony consisted of a welcome by Kit Foley, Dean of Students, comments from senior Cory Chikowski, Commuter Council President, remarks from President Michael MacDowell and the dedication from John Metz, Board of Trustees. The lounge was renovated before the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year after an article ran in The Highlander about the upkeep of the previous building. The reports by Amber Gulla, graduate, earned her a Keystone Press award for honorable mention in a public service piece. The lounge is open to all students, mainly commuters, with faculty offices to Maria Cabrera and Gary Samuels.

INTEGRITY

STAFF

CONTRIBUTORS

Ellen Hoffman - Editor-in-Chief Nathan Brown Morgan Harding - Print Editor Daniella Devivo Bryce Edwards Shawn Kellmer - Web Editor Courtney Garloff Mary Bove - Multimedia Editor Arthur Dowell - Web Master Matt Hiscox Alexandria Smith - Content Manager Brittany Lovette Alexa Cholewa - Business Manager Gabriella Lengyel - Social Media Manager Melissa Sgroi - Advisor Misericordia University 301 Lake Street Dallas, PA 18612

CONTACT US

The Highlander works to produce up-to-date, clear, accurate reporting. If any information is inaccurate or not covered thoroughly, corrections and information will appear in this area. Opinions and views expressed in The Highlander in no way reflect those of Misericordia University or the Sisters of Mercy. The Highlander Staff welcomes students, faculty and reader response. The Highlander reserves the right to edit submissions for grammatical errors and length. All submissions must be signed. Letters to the Editor and/or materials for publication may be submitted by any reader. Items can be sent via e-mail.

Heather Mariscano MU Marketing Christa Porasky Tyler Rowe Taryn Talacka

The Highlander is a free, biweekly publication produced in conjunction with MU Communications Department. Any full-time student is encouraged to join the staff. We are a member of the American Scholastic Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press and the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association.

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SGA Spring Weekend

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Viewfinder: Great Hunt participants rock through the ages

Summer 2013 3

Clockwise, Great Hunt judges watch a video created by one of the teams during judgement on April 27 in Insalaco Hall. Teams had to bring all of their findings to be judged for points. First years Tori Dziedziak, Kayleigh Morein and Meghan Stack from the Nancy Screwslook over their list at the Great Hunt sleepover in Insalaco Hall. A Great Hunt team hangs out in their fort in Insalaco Hall during the sleep-in as part of the activities requirements. Some teams brought school work to work on during the nightlong event. Custodian Rick Frantz assisted the Fire Crackers by dressing up in a wedding dress and eating Crows candy on April 27 during the judgement part of the school’s scavenger hunt. TARYN TALACKA/THE HIGHLANDER

Big bites win contest MU Exposure: Students keep hands on van to win Highlander News Reports

Student Government Association helped students let off some steam during Spring Weekend events, including a wing eating contest in the Metz Dining Hall. The contestant who consumed the most wings in 120 seconds took home a $25 gift certificate to Pizza Perfect. “We are trying to get students to come and sign up for the event so it gives them a chance to come to the café and just let some steam off and pig out before finals,” said SGA officer Aaron Orchard. Eleven MU members competed in the wing eating contest with the hopes to win the grand prize and bragging rights. The SGA team wanted to create events that would intrigue students with the chance to win prizes. President Michael MacDowell and wife Tina were honored before the competition with an MVP award in volleyball. SGA president Catie Becker thanked the president and first lady for all

their hard work over the past 15 years and for always taking time to interact with the students. SGA officer Christelle Patrice read the official wing contest rules to the contestants after the MacDowells received their award. Rules included not being able to place the whole wing inside a contestant’s mouth and not being able to dunk the wing in water to reduce the heat. Students weren’t the only ones trying to score the Pizza Perfect gift card. Assistant Director of Campus Ministry Jeffery Passetti participated in the challenge and claimed the win. Passetti scarfed down 10 wings in the 120 seconds. Second place finishers had seven wings gobbled up in hopes to claim the top prize. Passetti thanked SGA for putting the competition together but said Campus Ministry will arrange a drawing or contest to raffle off the Pizza Perfect gift card. Highland@misericordia.edu

MARY BOVE/THE HIGHLANDER

Above, students listen to the rules from SGA president Catie Becker before the “Touch the Van” competition began on April 26. Students participated in the competition with the hopes of winning an iPad. Rules included no leaning, laying or sitting on the van. Participants were not allowed to touch the tires and one hand must be touching the van at all times to stay qualified for the winning. The final two participants earned iPad minis instead of the regular sized prize.

Viewfinder: Chain straight into record books

ELLEN HOFFMAN/THE HIGHLANDER

From top, sophomore Brad Thomas hurries to finish as many chicken wings as he can in 120 seconds during an SGA event during Spring Weekend in the Metz Dining Hall. Assistant Director of Campus Ministry is congratulated for winning the wing eating contest after finishing 10 wings. This was the first year for the wing eating competition.

Students connected 1,432 Crayola Erasable Markers end-toend creating a chain that measured 628 markers in length. Don Spencer, a surveyor with Borton-Lawson Engineering, volunteered his time and equipment to accurately measure the distance. His report, along with a video of the process and other documentation, will be submitted to the “Guinness Book of World Records” for confirmation. SGA purchased the markers for the event. Those not needed by university offices will be donated to local schools. HEATHER MARSICANO/THE HIGHLANDER


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Summer 2013

Security subject of lecture TRANSITION By Nathan Brown, Reporter

Students and faculty of the government law and national security program learned about national security issues facing the nation during a day-long event that featured Dr. Midori Yamanouchi Lecture Series speaker Francis Townsend, a renowned expert on national security. This day-long event kicked off with a luncheon and symposium. Dr. Christopher Stevens served as keynote speaker during this hour-long event and spoke about the difference between pre and post 9/11 national security strategies. “Is it a law enforcement matter? Is it more military kind of matter?” asked Dr. Brian Carso, chair of the government law and national security program. “How did the different administrations before and after 9/11 regard our overall national security?” As students ate lunch they mingled with speakers to gain insight about their postdegree careers. Following the luncheon and symposium, special guest panelists offered a discussion about the topics of the day. Panelists included Peter J. Smith, U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania; John J. Belcher, District Director for the U.S. Representative Lou Barletta; General Keith Martin, U.S. Army, retired; and Joe Broghamer, Senior Security Architect and Systems Engineer with the U.S. State Department of Homeland Security.

Following the panel discussion, select students participated in a master class with Frances Townsend, the

university’s second Lecture Series speaker. Townsend is one of the foremost figures in U.S. national

MARY BOVE/THE HIGHLANDER

Above, Francis Townsend, guest speaker of the second annual Midori Yamanouchi Lecture Series, addresses an audience in the Lemmond Theater on April 23.

security, having served as an assistant to President George W. Bush for Homeland Security, Counterterrorism, and chair of the Homeland Security Council from May 2004 to January 2008. She has also served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Combating Terrorism from May 2003 to May 2004. The event concluded later that evening with Townsend’s public lecture in Lemmond Theater. Townsend spoke about her long career in national security and offered details about her perspective on terrorism and counter terrorism. She also addressed the Boston Marathon bombing, which happened only a week earlier. First year Jeremy Way said it was a privilege to listen to Townsend’s perspective. “I think it was interesting to hear the personal experiences that she had to offer, and it was an educational experience to learn about national security issues and the current events that she talked about.” Townsend also discussed North Africa and Iran, and she explained how countries and governments become linked with terrorists due to their geographical locations and lenient governments. The annual Midori Lecture Series is held at the end of April and includes a master class for students, a luncheon and a lecture in Lemmond Theater. Brownn4@misericordia.edu

MacDowell encouraged Highlander changes By Ellen Hoffman, Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Michael MacDowell has built a foundation for the school community during his 15 years as university president, and one important component is The Highlander. MacDowell strongly supported The Highlander staff for the last seven years when communications department chairperson Dr. Melissa Sgroi joined the faculty. “I had tremendous support for the newspaper from my very first day on campus,” she said. Sgroi’s first job as the newspaper’s advisor was to embrace the Internet, and she worked with a staff of student editors to “create an online presence” for the newspaper and grow readership. After transforming The Highlander into highlandernews.net, she and her staff worked to redesign the print edition, most noticeably changing from a tabloid style to a broadsheet design. “One of the most elegant ways of presenting a newspaper is, I believe, in broadsheet format,” she said. “And of course that’s a more expensive way to print than a tabloid, which is why when you go around to different schools, what you’re most often going to see is the tabloid size, but

a more elegant and probably a more functional layout is in the broadsheet. It’s also more classic.” She requested school administrators’ support of her plans - which included a full color print edition - and received everything she needed. “Well, I believe that if you hire someone to do a job, like professor Sgroi who came in here as a professor of communications who had a lot of both electronic as well as print media experience that you should let them do the job,” MacDowell said. “If she says this has to be done, we do it. It doesn’t do much good to hire someone who is an expert and then tell them what to do.” Sgroi thanks MacDowell and the administration for giving students the freedom to learn and practice journalism, even when stories address sensitive topics. “Sometimes journalists can uncover things that could make people uncomfortable. That’s the nature of the business,” she said. “We have always had support for student learning on the newspaper. No one has ever said that we need to change what we’re doing in any way. In fact, the kind of feedback we get pretty regularly is that the students

are doing a wonderful job.” While the communications department works to prepare students for the real world professional media environment, it is sometimes difficult when the publisher is also the story in the headlines. “Sometimes people who have not worked in the professional mass media seem to think that going out of your way to bash the person who pays your bills or the institution that pays your bills, in other words your publisher, is what we do in the real world. That’s disconnected from the professional mass media,” Sgroi said. Sgroi said that while it may be tough at times, her newspaper staff covers controversial topics, even if they might not be what the publisher will want to see on the front page. She has to draw a line between pleasing administrators and teaching student journalists. “It’s not saying you’re not covering negative things,” she said, “but our philosophy is not ‘let’s bring down the man,’ the man being the institution that supports you. That would be disconnected from real world journalism.” MacDowell feels a student publication like The High-

lander is a vital part of the campus life. He knows times are changing and information is moving at a faster rate online, but he feels a newspaper is something that will live forever. “I’m still tactile,” he said of reading a print version of a newspaper. “I like to read The New York Times. I like to get print on my thumbs, and I like a paper. I am constantly at home ripping out articles to send to people. I mean I use the Internet. I go online to read the local papers, but I think it’s indispensable.” He understands that many students use social media sites as information sources, but he knows that The Highlander provides students with the information they need. “The paper is an integral part of the communications system around here.” MacDowell credits the success of the publication to the media professionals. “I think Dr. Sgroi and Professor Kimbrough have done an excellent job, and they are responsible for our success, not me - they and you, the students.” Hoffmae3@misericordia.edu

Everyone reprogram your television sets on campus and add channel 87.1 and you can watch what is happening on and off campus.

MCN 87 meets everyone Thursday @ 5pm. For more information email Station Manager Brittany Lovette, lovetteb@misericordia.edu or Faculty Advisor Dan Kimbrough, dkimbrou@misericordia.edu

COMMITTEE By Courtney Garloff, Reporter

The Presidential Transition Committee will be hard at work to help say good-bye to Dr. Michael MacDowell and help prepare Dr. Thomas Botzman to ease his way into Dallas, PA while students enjoy summer vacation. Members work to honor and thank MacDowell and his wife Tina for their 15 years of service and welcome Botzman, as they keep faculty, students and members of the university community involved and informed. “We set up several events for Dr. MacDowell such as a faculty farewell reception,” said history professor and Faculty Senate Chair Dr. David Wright. All groups of the Misericordia community will have their chance to say good-bye. Students held a thank you event on April 24 during which they presented a trophy to honor the president’s years of playing in the Spring Weekend volleyball tournament hosted by SGA, and to thank him for his service to the university. Faculty members held a farewell reception to honor the MacDowells on May 14. On June 1, the committee will hold a fundraising roast of MacDowell at the Mohegan Sun Casino in Wilkes-Barre. According to Staff Council Chair Martha Stevenson, committee members are also planning surprises to thank the MacDowells for their years of service. The committee is taking action to acclimate Botzman, the university’s 13th president, to the university community. Before his inauguration on Friday, November 15 Botzman will meet with members of student government, the faculty senate and university benefactors. “We really tried to brainstorm who are all the different people he should meet so when he arrives he knows people, and knows who does what and has some sense of the challenges we face and plans we have made,” said Wright. The transition committee sent the new president reading materials and information to brief him on everything the university is planning and facing. They also provided him with materials about the region.

According to the Charge to the Presidential Transition Committee, a document created by the Board of Trustees, the Presidential Transition Committee has four purposes. These include transitioning between retiring President MacDowell and welcoming President Botzman, celebrating the contributions of the retiring president, and introducing the new president to all aspects of the university and life at the university, and to see that the university community is able to be fully engaged in this important transition. “The goal of the committee is to provide a seamless transition from President MacDowell to Dr. Botzman, so that we have a sense that we have continuous leadership during the course of the transition,” said Wright. John Metz, Chair of the Board of Trustees, selected the members of the transition committee. Many members had previously served as members on the Presidential Selection Committee. Committee members’ addtional responsibilities include helping Botzman to meet with each member of the Board of Trustees, and to report to the Board of Trustees regularly about planned events. Wright said serving on the selection committee helped him to better understand the job of the president. “I got a better idea of what the job of the president is, the different stake holders that the president has to be in good communication with, wither it’s donors, the Sisters of Mercy, faculty, staff, students, alumni,” Wright said. The committee will work with Botzman until he officially takes office. The members serving on the presidential transition committee are Sister Mary Ann Dillon, Committee Chair; Chris Borton, Trustee; Sue Helwig, Vice President for University Advancement; David Wright Chair of the Faculty Senate; Martha Stevenson Staff Council Chair and Carol Fahnestock, Administrative Assistant to the President and Secretary to the Board of Trustees. Garloffc@misericordia.edu

Class of 2013 “You are educated. Your certification is in your degree. You may think of it as the ticket to the good life. Let me ask you to think of an alternative. Think of it as your ticket to change the world.” Tom Brokaw

Congratulations


highlandernews.net

Summer 2013 5

News

LGBTQ DISCUSSION Viewfinder: CGR Cougar Radio Rocks By Alexandria Smith, Copy Editor

Staff, students and members of the local community participated in discussion surrounding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer issues and experiences during ALLY Week. Though gay marriage is winning increasing support among lawmakers and citizens, people of the LGBTQ community still struggle to achieve acceptance. Kellin Tamagnini, Lehman resident and graduate of Lake-Lehman High School, is one of these people. A female-to-male transgendered individual, Tamagnini has become a spokesperson of sorts, speaking to different psychology classes about his experience with “transitioning” or undergoing steps to have his body match his gender identity. He attended classes of clinician and psychology professor Jeanne Schmid, who is very proud of his progress. “He spoke in my class yesterday in regards to transgender issues and apparently was a huge hit. Three different people emailed me that I don’t know in regards to his speech and asked us to come here (to Coffee and Conversation),” said Schmid. Tamagnini admits that though he is somewhat accustomed to speaking about his life as a transitioning femaleto-male transgendered person, he did not expect such a positive response from students. “I’m shocked that it went over so well, but I get a sense of satisfaction from it because I’m actually getting my point across. The reason I got into speaking was because I wanted to bring more awareness to transgender issues and I feel like speaking to the classes and coming here (to the Coffee and Conversation) that I’m getting that across,” said Tamagnini. This is mostly because “many Americans have a profound lack of understanding of what it means to be transgender,” according to the American Civil Liberties Union. This misunderstanding often leads to discriminatory barriers in society. Some of these barriers

include “difficulties meeting their basic needs (getting a job, housing, or health care) or in having their gender identity respected (like in the simple act of going to a public restroom).” Tamagnini admits that although his family is supportive there are problematic issues, including access to public restrooms, which he often avoids because he feels he does not “pass,” or blend in well as a man. He also has to cope with the possibility of victimization by perpetrators of hate crimes, he said. “It’s like, when I spoke in the classes, I got kind of nervous because, you don’t know if there’s going to be the one psycho in class who’s going to, like, stalk you on Facebook, find out where you are and jump you,” he said “So, you kind of have to figure out if want to do it, and if it pans out and you do it, you take the risk.” Schmid believes that what he is doing to promote understanding and acceptance of people with transgender identities is very positive. “I think that they (my students) learned a lot. It also helped to diffuse any sort of fear, or misunderstandings, or misinformation about what a transgender person is.” Schmid said “People really need to be educated on awareness and understanding on the humanity to what it’s like (to be transgendered), reduce the stigma, and develop a human-ness to the issues that makes people stigmatize.” Tagamini still feels very passionate about speaking out and advocating for transgender rights. “I feel like it’s worth it. Like I said, I feel that, people need to accept the T (in LGBTQ). Even in the (LGBTQ) community, the T is kind of shunned. It’s more focused on mostly gay men, and lesbians, and bisexuals, but you usually have people who leave the T out,” he said “So I feel like we need to have everyone become aware of this in the area because it’s so closed-minded and backwards.” Smitha10@misericordia.edu

Top, Who We Are performs their set on Saturday, April 27 during the Beats for a Benefit concert. Left, Yik lays down a beat during his slot. He was on of two rap artists to take the stage. Right, Chris Fields spits a sick rhyme. Below, junior MU student Cheyne Kulessa headlined the event with his deejay skills. Kulessa performed to open the show and to end the Benefit. This was the second year for the Beats for a Benefit concert which moved outdoors this year and picked up one additional act. Cougar IndiePendence, a compelation CD of local artists was sold at the Benefit for $10. BRYCE EDWARDS/THE HIGHLANDER

LGBTQ in Context: There are approximately 8.8 million gays and lesbians in the U.S. Approximately 1 million children in the U.S. are being raised by same-sex couples. An estimated 1 million lesbians and gays are military veterans

Visual literacy classes offered starting fall 2013 CAREERS GET MOVING By Brittany Lovette, Reporter

By Daniella Devivo, Reporter

Starting in the fall, professors will teach new classes in the Communications Department to expand students’ knowledge about visual design and its impact on society. Professors Douglas Martin and Jimmy May will each offer a new class in the 2013-14 academic year that helps students understand how visual art impacts society’s attitudes. Both Martin and May thought it was important to carry on with the pre-existing classes so that students would get a better understanding of what the next level classes entails. Martin will teach “Graphic Design: An Agent of Social Change” in the fall and said the course will examine propaganda and social justice throughout history. May will be teaching “Advanced Storytelling” which follows up on the work for students who have already taken Photojournalism. Both Martin and May’s classes deal with storytelling, just in different forms. “We are going to be exploring social injustice,” Martin said. “Anything that is an injustice to people of the world.” He then offered examples of the kind of propaganda he would be focusing on in the fall. “Wanted” posters or

Uncle Sam’s “I Want You” and other posters from World War II would be used as models for students to create similar posters. While May teaches two other classes, Fundamentals of Photography and Photojournalism, Advanced Storytelling would have a different structure. “There’s a big difference going into something,” May said. “You know you’re there for an hour and you’re shooting what you see and you get enough pictures to where you can guess the whole story.” MU offers a 485 class, which helps professors as well as students to accomplish more learning experiences in their academic future. COM 485 is a class, which any professor can create in order to expand their knowledge in creating new classes to help students get to the next level of their education. Any new class that is in the process of becoming part of the curriculum has to be brought down to the Chair of the Communications Department, Melissa Sgroi, so that she can approve the class syllabus. Officials then have to bring it down to the Academic Council to see if the class meets the goals and regula-

tions for the Communications Program. In previous years this method has worked, Martin has created an Advanced Graphic Design class, which is now part of the Communications Curriculum. The 485 class that was introduced in his favor had a very good out come, the class was full and the students really enjoyed his class and what the new Advanced Graphic Design class entailed. “With the Advanced Graphic Design class was one of them where they wanted to get to the next level, that higher understanding” said Martin. Advanced Graphic Design COM 317, is now offered in the fall of 2013. Officials encourages the use of 485’s to enhance student’s experiences, by giving them that choice of choosing what classes they would like to take and by also having professors who are willing to teach that specific class. Misericordia University is always looking to improve their learning techniques by constantly upgrading their technology, and by making sure that our students have the latest programs on the schools computers to expand the knowledge of students and

future students to come. By creating these new classes, Ccmmunications is opening up new windows for all students. Starting with one class becomes the first step in to creating multiple classes that will really help students in the long run. Amanda Ankner a communications junior is very interested in Public Relations, and enlightens on how much new classes are needed. “I have always been interested in Public Relations and I think a Communications Degree opens up a large number of career paths” said Ankner. Ankner is always willing to take the next step in her options here at Misericordia University and the 485 gives her that opportunity that she has longed for, in order to make her on campus experiences more enjoyable because it is something that she is interested in learning about. “I think the more our program has to offer, the more everyone benefits,” said Ankner. Devivod@misericordia.edu

The Insalaco Center for Career Development released its annual Career Moves Newsletter. The newsletter is a student run publication for which students write articles about topics that they feel are important for their peers. “But it’s really there to educate and entertain and it’s a peer-to-peer newsletter from a career development standpoint, and I would say that’s probably the most important thing,” said Carolyn Yencharis Corcoran, assistant director. The newsletter is written and designed by career peer assistants who work in the ICCD. Career peer assistants work to help others with resumes and cover letters. Three campus peer assistants and one intern worked at the ICCD this year, including Alyssa Leonard, junior OT major. She wrote about her experience during the Habitat for Humanity trip to Mobile Alabama. Kelsey Frasier, first year healthcare management, pre-DPT, wrote an advice article for pre-DPT students, and Sarah Pulice, first year business major, wrote an article that explained how students can vamp up their resumes with participation in extracurricular activities. ICCD intern Erin Mills, senior psychology

major, gave students tips about creating a professional look on social media accounts. “It’s pretty much up to us what we want to talk about. Anything that really talks about career building and internships anything like that goes,” said Leonard. Leonard chose to write about the Habitat for Humanity trip because she thinks working for the organization a great opportunity for students. “I had a lot of fun with it and there are definitely opportunities through Habitat for Humanity,” said Leonard. Volunteerism is important for everyone’s professional preparation, said Corcoran. “Volunteerism is a huge part of career development and it’s a great thing for your resume,” she said. Yencharis Corcoran feels it is most important to let students create the publication because it is addresses their personal experiences. “We career advisers in the center here can do presentations but if we did a newsletter like this, it would be completely different,” she said. “It’s really our students chance who work with us to communicate, educate and entertain students on the topics of career development.” Lovetteb@misericordia.edu


6 highlandernews.net

Summer 2013

Summer Events

Student on the Street MUSIC FILLS SUMMER NIGHT AIR As the class of 2013 takes their leave we ask students what they are looking forward to most during the summer months. If you have a question you would like us to ask, email us at Highland@misericordia.edu.

“I’m working at St. Francis Medical Center and lifeguarding,” said nursing major Doug Ranson.

“I am working at Geisinger Wyoming Valley over the summer,” said nursing major Jared Butala.

“I am going to Guyana for three weeks in the summer through Campus Ministry,” said education major Kirsten Fisher.

“This summer I’m working at a summer camp and I’m an orientation leader,” said education major Courtney Bieber.

“I am working at a summer camp for kids, Camp Chenawanda,” said PT major Brandon Stone.

“I’m working in Res Life doing conference work and serving as the summer RA,” said health care management major Aaron Orchard.

“I am going to the beach and working in a doctor’s office,” said math major Chelsea Morris.

“I’m interning for DIII Baseball Regionals at the RailRiders stadium in Scranton,” said sports management major Liz Graeber.

Highlander News Reports

Grammy Award-winner Boz era’s sound, featuring Muddy Scaggs will bring the unmisWaters, Memphis Slim, TBone takable blend of his blues, Walker and the Delta proved rock and jazz music to the to be very influential on his Wells Fargo Amphitheater career. as he headlines the annual In the 1960s, Scaggs started Under the Stars Summer Arts playing in bands as a high Festival on Saturday, July 13. school student in Dallas, TexThe festival also includes the as. Soon after entering college, Jazz in July concert featuring he decided instead to devote Emily Asher’s Garden Party himself to journeyman playing with guest Bria Skonberg on around campuses and variMonday, July 8. Both concerts ous clubs and resorts. Scaggs’ begin at 8 p.m. guitar and voice “The Memphis provided his Tour’’ is in supself-described port of Scaggs’ “ticket to ride’’ new studio as he left the album, “Memstates to travel phis,’’ his first in in Europe, the five years. His 32 Middle East show dates take and Asia. He him throughout developed a the country from club following in California to Sweden and beConnecticut and gan his recordfrom Texas to ing career there Florida, as well in 1965 with a as Canada. He solo album for puts a distinctive Polydor. touch on classic Yearning for hits like “Rainy COURTESY OF MU PUBLIC RELATIONS a blues and Night in GeorR&B band, Boz Scaggs gia,’’ “Corinna he traveled Corinna,’’ and “Mixed Up, to San Francisco, Calif., in Shook Up Girl,’’ as well as 1967. After a stint with fellow on a couple of originals. The Texan Steve Miller on several 13-tracks were recorded in albums, he signed a recording Memphis, Tenn., in three days contract with Atlantic Records at the city’s landmark Royal and debuted with Boz Scaggs, Studios. produced by friend and His smash hit, “Lowdown,’’ Rolling Stone founder, Jann earned Scaggs a Grammy Wenner. That record featured Award in 1975 for “Best R&B the renowned Muscle Shoals Song,’’ off the multi-platinum Rhythm Section, Duane release, “Silk Degrees.’’ The Allman, and the slow-burnalbum also featured hit songs to-high-heat track, “Loan “Lido Shuffle,’’ “What Can I Me a Dime.’’ Critical acclaim Say,’’ and “We’re All Alone.’’ followed as did his long-term Prior to his 1975 breakout relationship with the record album, Scaggs enjoyed critical label. acclaim and success with CoFollowing “Silk Degrees’’ lumbia Records. He recorded was “Down Two, Then Left,’’ seven albums with the record “Middle Man” and “Hits,’’ a label, including “Moments,’’ compilation that featured “Boz Scaggs and Band,’’ “My “Look What You’ve Done to Time,’’ and “Slow Dancer.’’ Me” from the motion picture, Those albums featured hit “Urban Cowboy.’’ Scaggs only songs such as “We Were recorded one album in the Always Sweethearts,’’ “Dinah 1980s, “Other Roads,’’ in 1987. Flo,’’ “You Make It So Hard,’’ “In 1980, I decided to take a and “Slow Dancer.’’ hiatus from the music busiRaised in small towns in ness,’’ he says, recalling his Oklahoma and Texas, Wildecision. “I had intended it to liam Royce “Boz’’ Scaggs took be a six-month break, but I up the guitar at age 13. The found when I got away from 1950s music scene proved it that I wasn’t ready to jump to be very influential on back in. I had family matters the aspiring musician as he to attend to. And at the botlistened to Top 40, R&B and tom of it all, I just didn’t have jazz music radio stations. The any music in me, no creative

urge at all. Music had become Amphitheater. a routine.’’ The Garden Party is a The nineties began what versatile musical ensemble led Scaggs calls chapter two of his by Asher’s sweet vocals. This career. An invitation by Steely band of all-stars from New Dan’s Donald Fagen to join York City’s vibrant early jazz his New York Rock and Soul scene draws on the repertoire Revue teamed Scaggs up with of Louis Armstrong’s enSteely Dan co-founder Walter chanting Hot Fives and Duke Becker, Michael McDonald Ellington’s sophisticated meloand Charles Brown among dies to the funky and soulful others. Scaggs also signed a music of New Orleans brass contract with Virgin Records bands. Longtime friends, coland made an album of original laborators and Northwest namaterial, “Some Change,’’ and tives, Asher and Skonberg are then the Grammy-nominated, joining forces for this special “Come on Home,’’ which was a night of hot summer music. collection of R&B classics and A trombonist and vocaloriginals. ist, Asher is a rising musical Scaggs’ jazz standards personality in the Big Apple, album, “But Beautiful,’’ was as she leads the Garden Party released on Gray Cat Records and The Masher Quartet, and and featured a traditional makes regular appearances quartet. It hit No. 1 on Billwith the Brooklyn-based board’s Jazz chart. His second Baby Soda Jazz Band. She jazz record, “Speak Low,’’ was toured North America with arranged and produced by Gil the groundbreaking Mighty Goldstein for Verve Records. Aphrodite Jazz Band and EuIt featured a string quartet rope with New Orleans’ Tuba with harp and woodwinds. Skinny. “I’m not a jazz Asher recorded musician or singand performed er,” Scaggs said, with Wycliffe “but it showed Gordon on his me a whole new “Hello Pops!” world of vocal extribute to Louis pression. It was Armstrong, and important to me is a member of in the way that I Nicholas Payperceive muton’s Television sic, in terms of Studio Orchesharmonics and in tra. Her bold, using my voice as expressive style an instrument. has led to sharThese records ing the stage were incredibly with Branford challenging, like Marsalis, Frank nothing I’d ever Wess, Anat CoCOURTESY OF MU PUBLIC RELATIONS done before.” hen and many Emily Asher New Yorker others. Emily’s magazine, debut album, commenting on Scaggs’ per“Dreams May Take You,’’ feaformance, called him, “one of tures Wycliffe Gordon, Philip the few middle-aged pop stars Dizack, Skonberg and seven to convincingly delve into the other outstanding musicians. Great American Songbook.” The album was officially reIn addition to touring exleased April 15, 2012. tensively with his own band, Tickets for the Under the Scaggs continues to work with Stars Summer Arts Festival Donald Fagen and Michael can be bought exclusively McDonald as The Dukes of through the MU Box Office at September, most recently (570) 674-6719. Tickets for the playing a 47-city tour to rave Starlight Concert with Boz reviews, performing their own Scaggs are $380 for festival material along with R&B and tables that seat six, $30 for soul classics. amphitheater tickets, $20 for On July 8 Emily Asher’s lawn seats. Garden Party with guest Bria Highland@misericordia.edu Skonberg will be featured during Jazz in July. The duo will perform at the Wells Fargo

DAGWOODS DELI & SUBS “I’m working at Cumberland Physical Therapy Center and going to Tybee Island, Georgia and Mrytle Beach,” said pysch/ PT major Katerina Kindig.

“I will be getting in shape for cross country season all summer,” said bio major Jeremy Osko.

MONDAY-SATURDAY 10 a.m. - 7p.m.

418 MARKET STREET KINGSTON PA 570-288-3550

Campus summer camps ready to prepare next gen students Highlander News Reports

Eight university programs will offer camps to high school juniors and seniors as an opportunity to experience and learn more about exciting professions. The Career Exploration Camps, which will be held in June, are a popular destination for students who want to explore both college campus life and potential careers. The university offers academic camps in nursing, business, teacher education, communications and media, speechlanguage pathology, occupational therapy, literature, and chemistry-biochemistry sciences. The Chemistry-Biochemistry Sciences Camp, June 2325, allows students to explore possible careers in forensic science, alternative energy, the pharmaceutical industry and more. The camp costs $90. For more information or to register, contact Dr. Anna Fedor, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, at afedor@misericordia. edu. The Nursing Pre-College Camp from June 23-25 is geared toward rising high

school seniors. It enables students to gain experience in the field of nursing through a mixture of clinical, laboratory, classroom and field experiences. Campers gain extensive hands-on experience in the profession and its many specialty fields through the latest interactive technology in the simulation laboratory in John J. Passan Hall, meet with nursing faculty and students, and tour clinical sites in the region. The cost of the camp is $90. For more information, contact Kathleen Devine Gelso, R.N., M.S.N., assistant professor of nursing, at kgelso@misericordia.edu. To register, please log on to www.misericordia.edu/nursingcamp. The Future Business Executives Camp will be held June 23-26. The Center for Economic and Entrepreneurship Education (CEEE), under the direction of Robert Williams, M.S., executive director, hosts the four-day, three-night interactive camp for high school students who are interested in understanding the fundamentals of economics and entrepreneurship. Participants at-

tend lectures by local business leaders and executives who share industry standards, innovations and expectations for new employees. Students will also be introduced to an economics curriculum that they will be able to access throughout the academic year. The camp costs $100. To register or to obtain more information, please log on to www.misericordia.edu/ceee or contact Mr. Williams, M.S., director of the Center for Economics and Entrepreneurship Education, at rwilliam@misericordia.edu. The Communications and Media Camp, June 23-26, offers students the opportunity to thoroughly explore careers in the professional mass media. Students create a television magazine show, learn studio and field production techniques, write newspaper feature stories and design a full-color newspaper. Afterward, they receive copies of the media products as the first entries in their preprofessional media portfolios. The camp is guided by faculty members of the Communications department who have decades of professional experi-

ence in television, radio, and print and broadcast journalism. The cost of the camp is $90. For more information or to register, contact Melissa Sgroi, Ed.D., chair of the Department of Communications, at msgroi@misericordia.edu. The Speech-Language Pathology Camp, June 23-26, enables campers to become familiar with the many career options in the growing field of speech-language pathology. Participants tour the department’s state-of-the-art academic facilities at John J. Passan Hall, learn about the career field from guest lecturers and tour a local health care facility to learn about the various settings in which speech-language pathologists are employed and the populations they serve. Speech-language pathologists are employed in schools, hospitals, nursing care facilities, home health care settings, outpatient care centers, day care centers for children and institutions of higher education. The camp costs $85. For more information or to register, contact Donna DiBlasi at ddiblasi@misericordia.edu.

The Literature Camp will be held June 23-26 with Rebecca Steinberger, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of English. The camp provides an opportunity to students to express their love for stories, poems, novels and the stage. Participants work with Misericordia faculty and students in a variety of workshop settings, including creative writing, literary adaptation, literature and pop culture, and literature in the multi-media age. The camp explores literature from around the world, including American, multi-ethnic and English literature, and looks at its use in popular culture such as Shakespeare in films. The camps costs $85. For more information or to register, contact Dr. Steinberger at rsteinbe@misericordia.edu. The Teacher Education Camp, June 23-25, provides an opportunity to learn about the education profession. Campers participate in hands-on sessions designed to introduce the future teachers to methods and strategies that educators use to make learning fun and to meet the

diverse needs of all learners. The camps costs $75. To register or to obtain more information, contact Rose Hometchko at rhometch@misericordia. edu. The Occupational Therapy Camp for rising high school seniors, June 23-26, provides extensive hands-on experience in an exciting health care specialty field by giving students an opportunity to learn about the occupational therapy profession, meeting faculty and students in the academic department, and touring clinical sites in Northeastern Pennsylvania where occupational therapists practice. Community site visits allow students to observe the wide range of services offered by therapists, including inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation services, hospital treatments and pediatric services. The camp costs $90. Contact Debbie Carey at or dcarey3@ misericordia.edu for more information or to register. To register online, please log on to www.misericordia.edu/ot and click on Career Exploration Camp. Highland@misericordia.edu


highlandernews.net

Summer 2013 7

Summer Events

Summer Calendar

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

June

Friday

Wednesday Thursday

Saturday 1

Peter Stern: PA from Above Aerial Photos

2

3

4

5

6

The 20th Annual Cecilia Meighan, RSN Institute of Law and Religious Life

7

9

10

11

12

13

14

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

29

Peter Stern: PA from Above Aerial Photos

23

Stuttering Support Group

Stuttering Support Group

8

Mom & Me Rock Climbing

15

Dad & Me Rock Climbing

Field Hockey Camp

Field Hockey Camp

25

26

27

28

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

BM Basketball Camp for Girls

BM Basketball Camp for Girls

BM Basketball Camp for Girls

24

BM Basketball Camp BM Basketball Camp for Girls for Girls Youth Clay Basics

Field Hockey Camp

Field Hockey Camp

Adult Clay Basics 1

Field Hockey Camp

First Year Orientation

First Year Orientation

July Sunday 30

Monday 1

Cougar Soccer Success Camp NEPA School of Alcohol & Drugs Conference

7

8

Northeast Youth Theatre Company Baseball Camp Under the Stars: Emily Asher

14

15

Tuesday 2

Youth Clay Basics

28

3

10

Stuttering Support

Northeast Youth Theatre Company

Northeast Youth Theatre Company

Baseball Camp

Baseball Camp

Youth Clay Basics

Adult Clay Basics 1

16

17

BM Basketball Camp BM Basketball Camp for Girls for Girls

Thursday

Friday

4

5

6

11

12

13

Northeast Youth Theatre Company

Northeast Youth Theatre Company

Baseball Camp

Baseball Camp

18

19

20

BM Basketball Camp for Girls

First Year Orientation

Cougar Soccer Success Camp

Cougar Soccer Success Camp

BM Basketball Camp for Girls

BM Basketball Camp for Girls First Year Orientation

First Year Orientation

24

25

26

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Adult Clay Basics 1 Stuttering Support Group

22

23

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Woodruff Basketball School for Boys

Youth Clay Basics

Adult Clay Basics 1

30

31

1

2

29

Saturday

NEPA School of Alcohol & Drugs Conference

NEPA School of Alcohol & Drugs Conference 9

Adult Clay Basics 1 Cougar Soccer Success Camp

Cougar Soccer Success Camp

Youth Clay Basics

21

Wednesday

Martial Arts Camp

Martial Arts Camp

Martial Arts Camp

Martial Arts Camp

Martial Arts Camp

The 45th Annual Institute on Sacred Scripture

The 45th Annual Institute on Sacred Scripture

The 45th Annual Institute on Sacred Scripture

The 45th Annual Institute on Sacred Scripture

The 45th Annual Institute on Sacred Scripture

Youth Clay Basics

Adult Clay Basics 1

Starlight Concert Boz Scaggs

27

3


8 highlandernews.net

Sports

Summer 2013

Cougar Sports 2012-2013 Seasons in Review

Highlander News Reports

FOOTBALL

VOLLEYBALL

MEN’S GOLF

MEN’S LACROSSE

BASEBALL

The football team completed its first season in university history. Finished the year with a record of 0-10. The year was a learning experience for not only the players but also the coaches. Now, the Cougars know what to expect going into the second season and what they need to work on. Although they didn’t end the season with a win, they did have a number of firsts. First year Dean Lucchesi scored the first touchdown in Cougar history against Lebanon Valley. The team hosted their first home game on Sep. 15 in front of more than 2,000 fans. Although they ended the game with a loss to Widener University they ended the day with the first football game played on Mangelsdorf Field.

The volleyball team finished with an 18-14 record, going 8-5 at home, and finished 4-3 against MAC competitors. Senior outside hitter Cailin McCullion moved into first place with the most kills in school history with 1,062. The team lost 3-0 in the semi-finals of the Freedom Conference Championships to Eastern to end the season. Sophomore Shelby Brochetti led the Cougars with eight kills during the semifinals and senior Kat LaBrie recorded seven. McCullion helped out with seven kills and 11 digs. McCullion was named to the All-Freedom first team while LaBrie and junior Nicole Korgeski were both recognized with honorable mention.

Senior Jeff Slanovec finished second and earned Rookie of the Year honors to lead the men’s golf team to a third place finish at the Freedom Conference championships at the Hershey Country Club. Slanovec shot a 77 to finish with a two-day total of 158 while junior Leo Moran recorded 169 for the two-day match to finish 16. They also finished second at an invitational hosted on MU’s grounds. The Cougars had a team total of 306 to finish two shots behind FDU-Florham.

The men’s lacrosse team, 107, await for word on earning an ECAC Tournament berth for the second consecutive season. At press time the men’s record sat at 4-2 in the MAC. The team clinched the second seed in the Championships with a win over Arcadia University but fell in the Freedom Conference title game to Eastern University 22-6. The team had seven players named to All Freedom Teams, seniors Drew Abatangelo, Kyle Calabro and Sean McGuigan, junior Nick Santillo and sophomore Patrick Johnson were named to the second team while juniors Jared Hunt and Matt Martins both earned honorable mention.

For the second straight season, MU dropped its Freedom Tournament opener, but rallied to win four straight games to claim the Freedom Championship and an automatic berth in the NCAA Championships. The baseball team beat DeSales 9-5 in Quakertown to win their third straight Freedom Conference title. The team had a record of 32-8 and went 18-3 in MAC play. First year Kyle Lindsay was named tournament MVP after the win against DeSales. During their “senior sendoff” the team recorded the win against local rival Wilkes University. High school teammates Andrew Tressa and Kenny Durling kept the magic together during their four years as Cougars ending with highly ranked stats. At press time the team was preparing for their first game in the NCAA Tournament.

MEN’S SOCCER The men’s soccer team finished with a record of 136-3, going 7-3 at home, and had a record against MAC competitors of 5-1-1. The team also won their second straight MAC championship, earning a spot in the playoffs where they lost 5-4 in the first round to Rochester University in a round of penalty kicks. Senior Andy Bush became the career leader in goals, 48, and points, 117, and earned the title of Freedom Conference Player of the Year. Bush also scored both goals in the win against Kings College in the Freedom Conference Semifinals. The Cougars recorded a 10-game unbeaten streak and posted five shutouts on their way to their fourth Freedom title in five years. While the team loses seven seniors for the fall 2013 season, they have high hopes to make it back to the NCAA DIII Championships.

WOMEN’S SOCCER The women’s soccer team recorded the best record in school history. The team finished with a record of 20-3-2 and made it all the way to the NCAA Division III Championships in Texas. The Cougars advanced to the Final Four but lost to Messiah College. The team was 8-1-1 at home while going 10-1-1 on the road. Head Coach Mark Stauffer was named the Division III Women’s Soccer Coach of the Year by National Soccer Coaches Association of America. Seniors Sam Helmstetter and Laura Roney battled throughout the season for the all-time career assist record. Helmstetter recorded the victory with 34 assists in the season and is also ranked second in MU history in points with 122 and in goals with 44. Roney became the fourth player in MU history to break 100 points. The team hopes to return to the NCAA DIII Championships in the fall for another battle for the top prize.

FIELD HOCKEY The field hockey team finished with a record of 4-15, and finished 4-10 at home and 1-6 against MAC opponents. The team was unsuccessful in defeating cross-town rivals Wilkes University and Kings College as well, but took Kings into double overtime on the road. The team ended their season on a high note by shutting out Marywood University at home. The Cougars recorded a 4-0 victory with the help of goalkeepers Haley Brandt and Grace Riker.

WOMEN’S GOLF First year Jillian Fife finished tied for 16th to lead the golf team to a third place finish at the MAC Championships. MU had a team total of 141 to finish in the middle of the six-team field. The Cougars had help from senior Erin Kain and first year Darian Reimer, both ending with 107, right behind Fife’s 106. The women’s team finished first at the MU Invitational with sophomore Alex Rice leading the team with a 93 while senior Lauren Clemson recorded a 95. The newly formed team looks to continue their success in the coming seasons.

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY The men’s cross country team finished sixth in MAC Championships and 20th out of 49 schools at NCAA Mid-East Regional. Sophomores AJ Limongelli and Dave McLean finished back-to-back to earn All-MAC honors at the MAC Championships. Limongelli went on to tie the 10th-fastest time in school history on his way to a 46th place at Regionals. With a number of returning runners the Cougars look forward to beginning the 2013 fall schedule.

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY At MAC’s, the women’s cross country team finished 5 out of 17 teams. They advanced to the NCAA Mid-East Regionals where they placed 22 out of 49 schools. Senior Marina Orrson finished first in every meet of the 2012 season. She earned All-Region and First-Team All-MAC honors. Earlier in the season she had a new career-best time of 22:23 in a third-place finish at the Gettysburg Invitational, the third-fastest time in MU history.

MEN’S BASKETBALL The men’s basketball team finished with an even 13-13 record. The Cougars went 9-3 at home, and 9-5 against MAC competition. The men’s team lost in the semi-finals of the Freedom Conference Championship to Delaware Valley. Sophomore Steve Ware led the Cougars with 19 points and 11 rebounds during the game against Del Val and senior Justin Grotevant added 12 points. The loss to Del Val was tough after ending the 2011 season after claiming their first Freedom Conference Championship and NCAA Tournament appearance. Junior Matt Greene and Ware were named to the All Freedom Team after their work during the 2012 season. The men look to score big again in the 2013 season.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The women’s basketball team went 12-13 on the season, 6-6 at home and a record of 6-8 against MAC competition. Although the women’s team did not make it to the playoffs they did have a number of highlights throughout the 2012 season. Tyann McDaniel ended her career with a triple-double with 14 points, 10 assists and 10 rebounds in her last game against Manhattanville on “Senior Appreciation Day.” The Cougars beat Manhattanville 88-70. Hannah Seely, McDaniel and Lauren Smicherko were named to the All-Freedom team. Seely was named to the second team and McDaniel and Smicherko received honorable mention. The team welcomed new head coach Allison Kern for her first coaching season at MU and look to work their way to Freedom play in the fall. The Cougars lose three teammates to graduation in May but look to come back strong in 2013.

MEN’S SWIMMING The men’s swimming team finished second at MAC Championships out of 11 schools. Junior Doug Ranson won his second-straight MAC Championship in the 200 breaststroke while first year Chris Gleason broke his second school record of the meet in the 1650 free with his sixth-place time of 16:58.52. Junior Matt Essington, first year Matt Cullen, Kolokithias and senior Adam Grzech closed the meet with a strong second-place finish in the 400 freestyle relay. Former teammate Jeff Clark was named to the MAC 100 All-Century Team for the 2004-12 era when teams were announced by the MAC office in March. Clark is a physical therapy graduate student.

WOMEN’S SWIMMING The women’s swimming team finished third at MAC Championships. The women held the first place spot after the first night of competition but fell the third by the end of the events. Junior Bree Grzech won a MAC Title in the 100 backstroke and first year Dani Blass won in the 100 breaststroke. Grzech broke her own school record from last year’s Championships with a time of 59.28 to earn the victory while Blass broke Alicia Bryk’s record from the 2011 Championships to take the title. Blass was also honored as the Middle Atlantic Conference Rookie of the Year.

WOMEN’S TENNIS The women’s tennis team finished the 2013 season with a winning record of 15-9 and 4-2 in MAC play. The women’s team advanced to the Freedom Conference championship match for the fifth straight year. The season came to an end with a 5-0 loss at Wilkes University in the Freedom Conference championship match. Wilkes swept in the doubles matches and won 6-0, 6-1 at second and third singles to clinch the victory. The Cougars finished as Freedom Conference runnerup for the fifth straight season. The women’s team worked hard with rookie head coach Justin Muthler.

MEN’S TENNIS The men’s tennis team ended with a record of 3-12 but ended the season with a win over Bryn Athyn. The men were defeated in all MAC play but look to improve for the upcoming season. The small team looks to expand for the 2014 season.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE The Cougars had a rough season, finishing 0-16 and 0-6 in Freedom Conference play. But that doesn’t mean the season is without some highlights. Junior Catie Viegas was selected as an All-Freedom honorable mention after ending the season second on the team in points, 41, goals, 36, and assists, 5, while also winning a team-best 37 draw controls. The team worked with new Head Coach Chrissy Trescavage during the 2013 season and look to make a comeback next season.

SOFTBALL The softball team ended the season with a 16-22 record and 6-8 in MAC play. The Cougars last game against Wilkes University ended in a rally. The team came from a 3-2 eight-inning loss in game one to defeat Wilkes 8-0 in six innings in the second game and split with the Lady Colonels in the season finale for both teams. Senior Caitlin Cromley was named First Team All-Freedom as a utility player. Senior Kat LaBrie earned second team honors as the designated player and first year Whitney Ellenberg earned honorable mention selection. The Cougars lose four seniors to end the 2013 season.

MEN’S TRACK & FIELD Junior Angelo Scaffido broke the school record in the javelin as the men’s track and field team competed in the 29th Annual Jim Taylor Invitational at Susquehanna University. First year Skyler Gerrity broke the MU pole vault record as the men’s track and field team competed at the Moravian College Coach P Invitational. Senior Joe Ardo set a new MU record in the hammer throw at the East Stroudsburg All-American Meet. The men’s team continues to expand and compete for more record-breaking times and scores.

WOMEN’S TRACK & FIELD The track & field team was ranked second in the MidAtlantic region according to USTFCCA rankings. The women’s team broke numerous records in the 2013 season. Senior Marina Orrson ran a school-record time of 2:17.73 to finish second in the 800m during the 29th Annual Jim Taylor Invitational at Susquehanna University. First year Amy Viti set a new record in the 400m with a second place finish while senior Steph Grow was right behind her with a third-place 1:00.61. The Cougars set three school records at the ECAC Indoor Championships. Junior Ashlee Ward tied for third to earn All-ECAC status with a school record in the high jump and Orrson added a school record with a fifth place finish in the mile. Grow finished ninth at 500m with a school record.

CHEERLEADING The cheerleading team finished fourth at the Universal Cheerleading Association National Championships at Disney’s Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, FL. The Cougars entered the final round in fifth place, but moved ahead of Riverside (CA) City College to place fourth and record their second consecutive top-five finish. The squad advanced to the finals thanks in part to a perfect crowd score in the semifinal round. Captians Alyssa McEntee and Amber Schmidt move on after graduation but the squad hopes to return to Orlando over winter break for another fight for a UCA National Championship.


News

highlandernews.net

Summer 2013

Tambur Field’s double header dedication

9

Highlander News Reports

The Cougar community officially dedicated Tambur Field on April 27 in between games of a doubleheader with Wilkes University to acknowledge the philanthropy and generosity of Robert L. Tambur, his family and the Tambur Family Foundation. “The Tambur family has always been generous with both their time and funds to many worthwhile projects and organizations, especially to Misericordia,’’ said president Michael A. MacDowell. “Robert’s son, Bobby Tamburro, serves on Council Misericordia, which is the University’s key outside advisory group. The dedication of Misericordia’s new baseball field in honor of the Tambur family exemplifies their dedication to the greater northeastern Pennsylvania community, to the Back Mountain and to Misericordia University. We are grateful for their support in so many ways.” Tambur Field is situated on about four acres of land adjacent to the John and Mary Metz Field House in the Anderson Outdoor Athletic

Complex near the North Gate of the upper campus. The construction of Tambur Field took 10 months to complete, from the clearing of a wooded area to the final laying of sod. The playing surface contains a special fescue blend. It was purchased from Tuckahoe Turf Farms of Hammonton, N.J., which also installed the turf. Tuckahoe Turf Farms has provided playing surfaces for numerous professional and collegiate ball parks and football fields, including Citizens Bank Park, Lincoln Field, Fenway Park, Citibank Park and many other facilities. Tambur Field’s playing surface was chosen because of its characteristics for athletic play and because it is maintenance friendly. Installed in June 2012, the Cougars baseball team did not play on the surface until the 2013 season to give the sod ample time to root. The infield dirt is a mixture known as “Custom Martin Infield Mix,’’ which has been used on collegiate fields throughout the northeast. The 15-foot warning track is made

of “Red Martin Track Mix.’’ The distance from home plate to the outfield fences ranges from 330 feet down the left and right field lines to 375 feet in right and left field, and 390 feet to straightaway center field. The $520,000 ball park also features an electronic scoreboard in straightaway left field, an irrigation system, sprinkler systems, individual bullpens for the home and away teams, as well as dugouts for the teams and bleachers for the fans. Tambur is the chairman and CEO of Tammac Financial Corp., Wilkes-Barre, as well as the president of the Athletic Club, Inc., Wilkes-Barre, and Blue Ridge Golf Club, Mountain Top. An active member of the community, the well-known entrepreneur is a past board member of the F.M. Kirby Center and served the Committee on Economic Growth. Tambur currently serves on the board of Franklin Security Bank, the Tambur Family Foundation and Hospice of the Sacred Heart. In 2010, the generosity of

Tambur and his family was recognized when the family was presented with the Award for Outstanding Philanthropist by the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Tambur and the Tambur Family Foundation have also supported other worthy causes throughout the region, including the United Way of Wyoming Valley, Geisinger Health System and Luzerne County Community College. Tambur is a trustee and general partner with Tammac Financial Corp. Besides his service on Council Misericordia, he is also a board member of the Tambur Foundation, Luzerne County Community College, Penn State Advisory Board and Wyoming Seminary. He is also a former board member of Leadership Wilkes-Barre and the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. Tambur and his wife, Virginia, have two children, Mr. Tamburro and Liza, and three grandchildren. Highland@misericordia.edu

have never tutored before often tutor core classes, according to Bruce Riley, Tutorial Coordinator and Learning Specialist. They are usually the last resort for the tutoring center. Riley will try to find a freshman as an alternative if he is unable to find an upperclassman tutor for a course that has a new instructor or is brand new. “Right out of the gate, we can’t use freshmen because they don’t have any classes that they’ve taken and they don’t have a GPA established,” said Riley. “However, after the first semester, we can start to use freshmen students to tutor, but even then, it’s typically the core classes.” Riley said the Student Success Center has more upperclassmen tutors than freshmen, but the number of freshmen tutors is “noteworthy.” The university welcomed the largest freshman class this past year, and Riley felt that number could have been

a contributing factor. “There’s been an awful lot of new faculty members coming in this year and last year,” said Riley. “I think with those two things combined, that

mended to tutor for those courses. The students must then participate in a faculty visitation during which they meet with faculty members and discuss the material they

COURTESY OF MU PUBLIC RELATIONS

Top, Robert L. Tambur, chairman and CEO of Tammac Financial Corp., throws out the first pitch of doubleheader game at Misericordia University as part of the dedication of Tambur Field. Bottom, Tambur Field is situated on approximately four acres of land adjacent to the John and Mary Metz Field House in the Anderson Outdoor Athletic Complex.

Student Success Center finds sometimes it takes a first year to do the job By Taryn Talacka, Reporter First years are serving as tutors at the Student Success Center because officials say they are sometimes most qualified. Kaleigh Killian, a first year secondary education English major, tutored calculus because the tutoring center was in need of help. She originally took the course with Professor Jerry Bradford and did well but tutored students who had Calculus with Professor Patrick Touhey. Killian found her situation odd because she was taking calculus in the fall semester with Bradford while she was tutoring students in her own class. “It was a little weird last semester because I was tutoring calculus while I was taking calculus, which is usually not allowed to happen,” said Killian. “They made exceptions for a couple of freshmen because they were so low on tutors.” Freshmen students who

TYLER ROWE/THE HIGHLANDER

Amelia Poplawski looks through notes to answer a question during a tutoring session in the Tutoring Center Hall. definitely plays into it.” Many freshman tutors assist students with courses that are offered for the first time. Riley gets in contact with professors to see who would be best for the job and then contacts students who were recom-

should cover in a tutoring session. Riley said the situation has happened before. Riley checks to see if a student is eligible to be a tutor if he or she is recommended for tutoring by professors. Riley said all tutors must have a

GPA of a 3.0 or better. “I don’t think it’s something I try to avoid,” said Riley. “If a student’s proficient in the material, and they’re able to tutor another student, I don’t think that would be a deterrent for me from scheduling a session like that.” Killian said her tutoring experience has been enjoyable and she has learned a lot. “I’ve learned that everyone here is really accepting because in high school, it’s taboo if you have a tutor,” she said. “You’re thought to not be as much as everyone else, but here, it really doesn’t matter.” Riley said that he is satisfied with the work of all of the tutors in the center, no matter if they are freshmen or upperclassmen. Many tutors have been working to get the College Reading and Language Association certification. “In order to achieve that, peer tutors have to have a certain number of training hours that they’ve received and a

certain number of tutoring hours that they’ve logged into the Student Success Center,” said Riley. “As they’re meeting that criteria, they’re becoming certified through CRLA, and this year, we’ve had quite a good number of peer tutors become certified.” Tutors who have received the certification usually stay on the job. Riley said he expects many of the freshman tutors to return next year. “We do have pretty good retention with our tutors,” said Riley. “I have not seen a situation where I have a large number of students who tutored one year drop off and just not tutor the next year.” Killian is one of the freshmen tutors who will be returning to the tutoring center. She was supposed to be a fine arts tutor before she was asked to tutor calculus, but the first opportunity fell through. Tutoring allows her to work on her teaching skills. Talackat@misericordia.edu


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News

Summer 2013 10


The Highlander  

Misericordia University's student run newspaper.

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