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Industrial Designer

2017 Portfolio


Design to me is about challenging limits by probing the un-obvious and the overlooked, done best not alone, but with some good company.


E D U C AT I O N National University of Singapore Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in Industrial Design (Highest Distinction) 2013 - 2017 Dean’s List Award for academic year 2013/2014 Semester 2 Dean’s List Award for academic year 2014/2015 Semester 2 Dean’s List Award for academic year 2015/2016 Semester 1 University Scholars Program Senior Honour Roll University Scholars Program President’s Honour Roll University of Illinois Urbana Champaign Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design 2016 Spring (Exchange Program) Raffles Institution (Junior College) GCE "A" Levels 2009 - 2010

WORK EXPERIENCE Karyn Lim Design Assistant July 2015 - August 2015 (2 months) National University of Singapore Undergraduate Research Assistant on Bio-mimicry March 2015 - August 2016 (1 yr 6 months) STUCK Design Consultancy Intern June 2016 - July 2016 (2 months)


While my experience lies in Industrial Design, I am most energized by opportunities to apply my design experience to new and unfamiliar areas.


CONTENTS

8

K.01

Product Design

Electric Kettle 40

Designated Smoking

Spatial Design

Point Re-Design 96

Erika

Experience Design

IKEA Store Experience 128

HealPac

Product Design

Wound Care Solution 156

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

Interactive Installation 172

DAX Wallet

Product Design

Kickstarter Project 212

Last Cradle

Product-Service Design

Design for Death 302

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

Design for Care Workers 336

Leathercraft

Product Design & Craft


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

8


Individual Project

13 Weeks

01.

K-01 Electric Kettle # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #Detailing #IdeasGeneration

BACK TO CONTENTS 9

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

10


Individual Project

13 Weeks

Developing a fresh aesthetic that resonates The aesthetics of a product contribute to how we feel when using or even just owning the product. How can we design an electric kettle with a fresh and original aesthetic that resonates with a significant segment of the population?

Client

Nil

Type

Product Design (Lifestyle)

Duration

13 Weeks

Team Size

Nil

11

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

12


Individual Project

13

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

14


Individual Project

13 Weeks

K-01 An electric kettle with a bold top cap that depresses completely as a “boil� button, giving a feeling of quick, pragmatic, efficient straightforwardness. The button pops back up to indicate the completion of boiling.

15

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

16


Individual Project

17

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

1

2

3

4

1

2

Depressing the cap activates the heating element

3

4

Once the water boils, the cap springs back up and the heating turns off

K.01

18


Individual Project

13 Weeks

1

3

2

1

19

3

Remove cap by pinching to release the catch

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

20


Individual Project

13 Weeks

Understanding the past to build the future The last thing we want is to do something that has already been done before without even realising it. I conducted a precedent study on related products to understand past and current approaches. Like the study of History, precedent studies do more than help identify pitfalls and best practices - they illuminate new pathways into the future.

21

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

Ideation Controlled Madness "What if we marry a kettle with a measuring tape?" "How many ways can we do a kettle handle?" "What would a kettle without a body look like?" "What would a kettle look like in a world without patience?" We believe that the most innovative ideas often do not come from linear, logical processes. Most people think linearly and logically. It takes a dosage of madness to get to a place where most people don't. To ideate with "controlled madness", I used various stimuli such as random objects, selfimposed restrictions, points of defiance, and imaginary scenarios. Feeling lousy about the amount of trashy ideas that come up was inevitable. To keep the flow going, I suppressed self-censorship by forcing myself through sketching “sprints�. Focusing on quantity was helpful in combating the tendency of becoming over-attached to initial ideas too early.

K.01

22


Individual Project

23

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

24


Individual Project

25

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

Individual Project, Team Effort K.01

26


Individual Project

13 Weeks

We believe that external feedback is important even for individual projects. Judgments tend to become sharper when there are more options to compare side-by-side with. During our weekly studio critiques, we put up everyone’s sketches on large boards to discuss what works and what doesn’t.

27

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

28


Individual Project

13 Weeks

Form follows Story "A kettle that is a kitchen trophy" "A kettle that is part of a mindfulness ritual" "A kettle that is your snappy kitchen sidekick" Stories encapsulate many things - the feelings evoked, the context, the type of characters involved etc. Objects that can tell a clear, fresh yet relatable story tend to resonate well with people. When reviewing my sketches, I try to tease out the stories that my sketches seem to tell.

"A kettle from a clockwork kitchen" I liked how this sentence evokes a rich way to see a kettle—it tickles my imagination. I could also see how some people would love to work in a kitchen that runs like a clockwork. This suggested a good likelihood of resonance. That line hence became the synthesizing force for the rest of the project.

29

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

Details, Details, Details. It is tempting to gloss over the nitty gritty details and settle for the first CAD. However, being disciplined about detail explorations do pay off. Small things such as aligning the top of the handle with the neck, adding an angle to the handle, tweaking the proportions etc add up. Only after comparing iterations side-by-side do you realise what you had been missing. Being rigorous about the details can be tedious. Knowing which tool works best for which situation helps to speed up the process.

K.01

30


Individual Project

31

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

K.01

Product Design

32


Individual Project

33

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

Working beyond the screen Designing behind a screen is quick, versatile, and comfortable. However, validation in physical space becomes crucial at some point because no way else can user-object interactions and sense of scales be evaluated.

K.01

34


Individual Project

35

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

We see best in real life Especially in the later refinement stages, there is no more reliable way of judging than to have physical prototypes in hand, scrutinising them from all angles, and letting our intuition tell us what feels right.

K.01

36


Individual Project

37

13 Weeks

K.01


Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT TYPE

Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT BACKGROUND

An exercise in concept generation, form derivation, and detailing

DURATION

13 Weeks

DELIVERABLES

Renders Physical Model

TEAM

Nil

YEAR

2015

K.01

Product Design

38


Individual Project

39

13 Weeks

K.01


Local Design Competition Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

40


Team Team Project Project

4 Weeks

02.

Designated Smoking Point Re-design #SpatialDesign #EthnographicResearch # Pu b l i c S p a c e s

BACK TO CONTENTS 41

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

42


Team Project

4 Weeks

"Better" Spaces for Considerate Smoking Designated Smoking Points (DSPs) were built to encourage smokers to puff only at these DSPs. The goal was to help more public spaces become smoke free. In 2015, a competition was organised to re-design the current DSPs and make them "better for users and all residents" in preparation for expansion of the DSPs.

Client

Nee Soon South Grassroots Organisation

Type

Spatial Design

Duration

4 Weeks

Team Size

5

43

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Reading the Ground Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

44


Team Project

4 Weeks

What makes a "better" DSP? To define that more precisely, we got down to work right away. We interviewed and observed the various stakeholders—smokers who use the DSPs, smokers who do not use the DSPs, non-smokers, residents, cleaners, the town council etc.

45

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

No space for group smoking

If you you aa If smokin smokin wastin wastin

Spatial Design

A lot of them still smoke wherever they want It's good that the second hand smoke This is kept away from us We don't want of ta to enforce, but mon It's so hot and stuffy, encourage who would want to Many stil smoke there? It's usually full of at the voi ashes that smokers flick while smoking It's too It's awkwar far away smoke so c others insid It gets dirty inside quickly

I don't see people usin

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

NON-SMOKERS

46

SMOKERS


are sitting sitting and and are ng, you you are are ng, ng time time ng

I tried to lean on the walls but they were not stable

Team Project

is a waste axpayers' ney

ll smoke id decks

rd to close to de

Kids sometimes get curious and go play with the wall

Cleaning the DSP is an extra job

smoke stub a

4 Weeks

It was de quickly w much th

That DSP is so isolated, why still have the walls?

Not bad, at least you can see some considerate smokers using it

It was a pilot test and now we want many to expand it ng

CLEANERS TOWN COUNCIL 47

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Defining Design Goals We took our prelinary findings from the field work and translated them into 3 main goals

1

2

FUNCTIONALITY

CONTEXTUAL SEN

Keep the smoke within the smoking point, away from the surrounding passersby

Aesthetic harmony with estates

Attract and encourage more smokers to use it

Demonstrate sensitivit attitudes. E.g. as a space for a co (smoking) within a sha design may raise eyebr

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

48


Team Project

4 Weeks

3

NSITIVITY

h the surrounding HDB

COST •

The design should be easy to manufacture, install and maintain.

ty to the community’s

ontroversial activity ared public space, a flashy rows.

49

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Analysisng the Current DSPs

1. FUNCTIONALITY Current DSPs are effective in keeping smoke from directly hitting passersbys. However, most smokers do not use them habitually, if at all.

2. CONTEXTUAL SENSITIVITY Most residents have no complaints about the DSP’s presence. However, some have noted that the DSP feels too makeshift to be a permanent part of the environment.

3. COST The current DSP can be installed at low cost because of its makeshift setup. However, its tendency to trap dirt makes maintenance difficult. Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

50


Team Project

51

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Analysisng the Current DSPs

MOST PERTINENT PROBLEM:

NEED TO ATTRACT MORE SMOKERS

Many smokers continue to puff wherever they see fit despite the DSPs being empty or nearly empty most of the time. If the DSPs do not attract usage, they simply become a symbol of squandered public funds. Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

52


Team Project

4 Weeks

(Top) Many cigarette butts found on top of bins everyday, indicating that many still smoke outside the DSPs (Bottom left and right) Smokers smoking near public walkways and seating

53

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

54


Team Project

4 Weeks

Why don't smokers puff at current DSPs? 3 main reasons were extracted based on a combination of interviews, observations, and role playing. They form the starting point for ideations.

55

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

1

Hot, Stifling and Dirty

DIFFICULT TO S DISPOSE

Poorly designed discourages pro

With its stifling and easily dirtied configuration, the current DSP design does not acknowledges the smokers' need for basic comfort during their smoke break.

O B S E R V AT I O N S

FRESH AIR & AN OUTSIDE VIEW Most users of the DSP were observed gravitating towards the entrance Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

56


Team Project

4 Weeks

LOW HEADROOM Low roofing contributes to the stifled feeling, exacerbated by the contained smoke

STUB AND

d bin oper disposal

ENCLOSED BY 3 WALLS FROM GROUND UP Ventilation is poor and it feels claustrophobic to be inside

CORNERS TRAP DIRT Made worse by people's tendency to spit or throw rubbish there

NO VISION THROUGH WALLS Corrugated polycarbonate sheets block vision, adding to the stifling feeling

FLICKED ASHES & CIGARETTE LITTER Ashes need to be flicked while smoking. Without a bin within reach, smokers tend to flick onto the floor or benches.

57

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

2

Too Intimate for Comfort The current design demonstrates poor sensitivity to social dynamics, making it awkward to enter the DSP when it ispartially occupied.

O B S E R V AT I O N S

PERSONAL SPACE Smokers always keep a distance from each other while smoking, even if it means standing outside the DSP. Something about smoking increases the personal space needed.

FLEXIBILITY IN WHERE YOU FACE Where avaialable, smokers take advantage of the (borrowed) portable chair's versatility to face wherever they want—away from strangers, or towards their friends. Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

58


Team Project

4 Weeks

BOXED UP Feels uncomfortable to be enclosed with other strangers in such a small space

3m

3m

59

SINGLE ENTRANCE/EXIT CREATES INERTIA TO ENTER

BENCHES AGAINST WALLS FORCES SMOKERS TO FACE INWARDS

Feels unwelcoming with its single (and often obstructed) entrance, especially when someone is sitting near the entrance

Feel awkard when gazes cross each other in such a small, confined space

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

3

Not Suitable for Quick Puffs Many smokers would rather lean than sit down for a puff, especially if it is going to be a quick one However, current DSPs do not accomodate this behavior.

O B S E R V AT I O N S

"IDLE" SMOKERS SIT This type of smokers like to choose a comfortable spot to sit, chill, and smoke.

"ON-THE-GO" SMOKERS LEAN This type of smokers just want a quick puff before returning to their routine. They like to lean on railings, lamposts­—any stable structure that is clean. They don't sit as sitting makes it harder to get back up from their smoke break. Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

60


Team Project

61

4 Weeks

WALLS UNSUITABLE FOR LEANING

ONLY ONE TYPE OF RESTING OPTION

Unstable and easily dirtied

If you're inside, it will be awkward if you don't sit on the bench

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

62


Team Project

4 Weeks

VALUE PROPOSITION An approachable smoking point which acknowledges the various habits of smokers, allowing for a comfortable enough experience and encouraging habitual usage.

63

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

64


Team Project

65

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

66


Team Project

67

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

68


Team Project

69

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

70


Team Project

71

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Maximising Perceived Openess We challenged the need for a complete enclosure since DSPs will always be located at least some distance away from main traffic anyway.

Spatial Design

OPEN CORNERS

Easier for smokers look outside and not feel so trapped

By sensibly breaking up the enclosure and making appropriate use of materials, we can maximise perceived openess while maintaining enough smoke separation.

OPEN BOTTOM Improves ventilation and perception of openness Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

72


to t

Team Project

4 Weeks

INCLINED ROOF Creates more headroom and makes the entrance feel more welcoming

ONE-WAY VISION FILM Allows users to look outside, improving perceived openness while providing sufficient privacy and shade

73

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Sit & Idle, Lean & Go Being sensitive to the different types of smokers creates a more accommodating DSP.

MULTIPLE S OPTIONS

Reduces aw you prefer to inside the DS

'IDLE' SMOKERS Chairs with back rests accommodate smokers who want to idle and smoke for longer periods ‘ON THE GO’ SMOKERS Bum rests positioned outside accommodate smokers who want a quick puff

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

74


Team Project

4 Weeks

SEATING

wkwardness if o stand/lean SP

75

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Stays Clean Easily The more open configuration does not trap dirt. Singapore's frequent tropical showers is harned to keep the DSP clean. The ash tray acknowledges the need to repeatedly flick ashes when smoking.

OPEN CORNERS Does not trap dirt, easier to clean

MAINTEINANCE FREE BUM RESTS Dirt does not linger on the round, metal bars

OPEN BOTTOM Does not trap dirt, easier to clean Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

76


Team Project

4 Weeks

EFFORTLESS DISPOSAL

EASY CLEARING

Large textured dish affords stubbing of cigarettes, flicking of ashes, and effortless disposal

Bottom latch releases for quick clearing

ASH TRAY NEAR SEATS Within immediate reach for flicking of ashes while smoking instead of on the floor

77

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

A More Approachable Space Flexibility of usage reduces awkwardness between strangers while still allowing friends to smoke together.

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

78


Team Project

4 Weeks

MULTIPLE ENTRANCES AND EXITS Easier to enter/exit. DSP feels more approachable especially when there are strangers inside

SPACE-BREAKING STRUCTURES

MULTI-DIRECTIONAL SEATING

Ash trays between seats divide the space, increasing perceived personal space

Round seats allow smokers to face wherever they feel most comfortable, accommodating both groups and individuals

79

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Adaptable to Location Every location is different—some are further from traffic, some are in the middle of a bustling area, some have narrower space allocation etc. The elements can be re-configured and optimised for each location.

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

80


Team Project

4 Weeks

Omission of unnecessary panels enables fitting into narrow spaces

Less panels for greater openness when further from human traffic

3 panels to shield off smoke from walkways nearby

81

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

82


Team Project

83

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

84


Team Project

85

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

86


Team Project

4 Weeks

Quick and Dirty Spatial Prototyping The best way to understand the effects of spatial adjustments is to experience them yourself. The limited time and resources meant that highfidelity prototypes were out of the question. So we made do with whatever we could salvage from our studio. 87

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Above: Original DSP signage

Clearer Visual Communication Many residents were initially confused by the DSP sign. Does the sign mean you can smoke in this area? Is smoking outside of the shelter allowed? The logo's similarity to the ubiquitous "no smoking" sign contributed to a large part of the confusion.

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

88


Team Project

SMOKING POINT

4 Weeks

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

Smoking Point

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

SMOKING POINT

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

SMOKING POINT

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

89

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Smoking Point 吸烟区 Kawasan Merokok

Simple and easy to understand 4 Languages essential Official and proper

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


STICKER ON BIN + PAINTING ON FLOOR Local Competition Submission Spatial Design (LONG TERM)

SMOKING AREA

If there is a gap between circle and dustbin, looks like the smoking areas with yellow box around the bin

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

Combining arrow and logo makes it look like this area is the smoking area

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

EA

IN PO D

T

Interesting top view, but not sure if will make sense from side?

30 SECONDS

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

TO SMOKING AREA

30 SECONDS TO SMOKING AREA

T IN PO AD

SM

SM

G

KIN E O AH

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

T

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

SM

SM

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

G

KIN E O AH

T

T

IN PO AD

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Maybe not having a cigarette icon better? Too many imageries of cigarettes may not be good. Or the icon could be more subtle

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

SMOKING AREA AHEAD

90


T

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

SM

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SM

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

Smoking here?

BEWARE OF ZOMBIES 4 Weeks

SM

T IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

T

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

Team Project

SM

SM

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

T IN PO G D A KIN E O AH SM

PAUSE

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

T

T

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

CAMPAIGN + AWARENESS

T

SM

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH SM

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH SM

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

T IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

T

This way to the safe house

T

T IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

T

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH SM

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH SM

SM

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SMOKING?

Smoking here?

BEWARE OF ZOMBIES

SM

OK

IN G

H POINT A

EA

D T

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

SM T O K A ING H EA P D OIN

SM

SM

SM

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

IN G

HE POINT A

T

T

AD

SM

OK

IN G

HE POINT A

SM

AD

CAMPAIGN + AWARENESS STUFF CAMPAIGN + AWARENESS STUFF SMOKING POINT

AD

OK

IN G

H POINT A

EA

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

D

SM

OK

IN G

H POINT A

EA

SM

D

OK

IN G

H POINT A

EA

D

SMOKING? SMOKING?

Smoking here? Smoking here?

BEWARE OF ZOMBIES BEWARE OF ZOMBIES

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SM

SM

This way to the This way to the safe house safe house

KIN O A

KIN E O AH G

IN PO AD

T T

OK

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

POINT

E AH

SM

SM

SM

SM

SM T

IN G

T

OK

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

P G D A KIN E O AH

SM

SMOKING POINT

SM

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

D

T

T

O

IN PO AD

EA

SMOKING?

IN

T

G

KIN E O AH

SM

H POINT A

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

T

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

SM

IN G

SM

T

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

SM

OK

U

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

This way to the safe house

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

SMOKING POINT AHEAD

YOUR AURA IS PAINFUL YOUR AURA IS PAINFUL

USE THE SMOKING POINT AHEAD USE THE SMOKING POINT AHEAD

T

IN PO G D A KIN E O AH

G

IN PO AD

KIN E O AH

SM

SM

SMOKING? SMOKING?

BEWARE OF MONEY SUCKERS

SMOKING?

SM O K A ING H EA P D OIN

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

SM

SM

OK

IN G

HE POINT A

AD

$$

$$

T

T

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

T

SAFE HOUSE DSP logo to be replaced withAHEAD final design. These are to be pasted on walls or floor SM

SM

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

O

SM

SM

O K A ING H EA P D OIN

D

D

KI

NG

POIN T A HEA

D

EA

POIN T A HEA

SM

H POINT A

NG

OK

IN G

IN G

KI

OK

O

H POINT A

SM

T

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

BEWARE OF MONEY SUCKERS

EA

D

$$

IN G

H POINT A

EA

O

D

KI

SM

OK

SM

NG

O

POIN T A HEA

D

KI

NG

POIN T A HEA

D

SAFE HOUSE AHEAD

SM

O

KI

NG

POIN T A HEA

D

SM

91

SM

O

KI

NG

POIN T A HEA

D

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design SMOKING POINT

$$


Local Competition Submission

Spatial Design

Stub Here

Stub Here

Make others happy. Puff at Smoking Points instead.

Many Smoking Points around. Why smoke here?

Stub Here

Stub Here

Approach: - Exploiting current behaviours, - Nudging smokers into new behaviours, - Spreading positive messages

Or Visit nearest Smoking Point Children around? Protect them by smoking at Smoking Points.

SAV E Us Y

EIGHBOUR RN S OU he smoking po ’ L i et

30

30

Sec

onds

to S m o k i n g

Po i

GS UN s nt

GS UN s nt

SAV E Us Y

NEIGHBOURS R OU he smoking po ’ L i et

Sec

onds

to S m o k i n g

Po i

nt

nt

Awareness Campaign We felt that more could be done to nudge smokers to use the DSPs. We were curious if placing messages on top of bins where smokers habitually stub out their cigarettes could strike a chord with smokers through this Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

touchpoint. So we tested it out. USER TEST RESULTS From our small one-day test (we were only granted one day of testing), we found that our 'smartalec' messages were too

complex for the type of implementation. Most smokers did not bother to stop for more than a second to read. For this to work, messages need to jump out more and be easily understood at one glance. 92


Team Project

93

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Local Competition Submission

PROJECT TYPE

Local Competition Submission

PROJECT BACKGROUND

A call for ideas to re-design the current DSPs and make them "better for users and all residents" in preperation for expansion of the DSPs4 Weeks

DURATION

4 Weeks

DELIVERABLES

Renders Material List Estimated Cost

TEAM

Lee Hsiao Fong Sim Hao Jie Tan Sei Yee Zhacharies Tan Rongli

YEAR

2015

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design

Spatial Design

94


Team Project

95

4 Weeks

Designated Smoking Point Re-Design


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

96


Team Project

3 Days

03.

Erika: IKEA Store Experience #ExperienceDesign # Fu t u re Co n c e p t #DesignSprint

1st Place Winner "Do you speak human?" Workshop by Space10 & IKEA

BACK TO CONTENTS 97

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

Backdrop: Conversational Interfaces are Advancing Fast From Space10 "Do you speak human?" workshop brief

Conversational interfaces have been around for years, but let’s face it: So far, they’ve been pretty dumb. Even the more sophisticated voice interfaces have relied on speech but somehow missed the power of dialogue. Ask any of the thought-leaders today, though, and you’ll hear the same refrain over and over: It’s different now. Nearly every major tech company — from Amazon to WeChat to Facebook to Google — is chasing the sort of conversational user interface that you’ve experienced in the movies. Dozens of startups around the world are in the game too. All are fighting to come out on top in the midst of a powerful shift in our relationship with technology. One day soon, you will talk to your devices the way you talk to your friends. And your devices will talk back. They will be able to hear what you say and figure out what you mean.

ERIKA

98


Team Project

99

3 Days

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

100


Team Project

3 Days

Imagining the Future of IKEA Stores with Conversational Interfaces How can IKEA make use of future conversational technology and AI to foster more meaningful interactions with people?

Client

IKEA

Type

Experience Design, Future Concept

Duration

3 Days

Team Size

4

101

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

102


Team Project

3 Days

Beyond Efficiency & Convenience A lot of technology today has enabled us to complete tasks much more efficiently and conveniently. However, it has not always made experiences “better”. UberEats allows us to get lunch without even stepping out of our house. Hit a button. 20 mins. A harried courrier hands you your food. You close the door. Eat. Is it more convenient? Definitely. Better? That’s debatable.

103

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

104


Team Project

3 Days

Celebrating the Magic of IKEA One of our favorite things about IKEA is that it’s not just a store to get stuff, it’s a place where we hang out, have fun, get inspired. We want to use conversational technology in a way that not just makes things easier, but also reinforces that magical quality of IKEA as a place where fond memories are created.

105

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

106


Team Project

3 Days

Opportunity to Re-Invent an Obsolete Icon As we talked about our other memories of IKEA, somebody brought up the IKEA pencil which immediately got everyone excited. Originally meant for making shopping lists, it has now become more of a souvenir. We found it a pity that something so iconic has lost its relevance. What if we can reinvent the IKEA pencil to once again take an active role in enhancing the in-store experience?

107

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

108


Team Project

109

3 Days

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

Your insider buddy to rediscovering the IKEA store experience ERIKA is an AI assistant that you can pick up once you enter IKEA’s stores. ERIKA converses with you via bone conduction technology and beamforming microphones. Rather than simply helping shoppers shop more easily and quickly, ERIKA focuses on elevating the social and immersive nature of IKEA stores.

ERIKA

110


Team Project

3 Days

Hi, i'm ERIKA! Anything I can do for you?

111

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

THE RUSHED SHOPPER

ERIKA

Experience Design

THE CU BROWS

112


Team Project

URIOUS SER

3 Days

GROUPS

Different User, Different Experience Sometimes you're at IKEA just to grab a container. Sometimes you're at IKEA to browse while waiting for a friend. Sometimes you're at IKEA just to have fun with your gang. ERIKA acknowledges that there are different types of IKEA experience and enhances each experience differently.

113

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

ERIKA, where can I find storage tubs?

Walk down the stairs and they're on your left

Do you have a bigger one?

Look to your left, bottom shelf!

ERIKA

114


Team Project

3 Days

THE RUSHED SHOPPER A store as big as IKEA can be frustrating to navigate when you're in a rush. Without having to keep looking down to check directions, ERIKA guides rushed shoppers to what they are looking for.

115

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

You've been lingering around this here for a while, would you like me to tell you more about the history behind this style of home?

woof! ERIKA

116


Team Project

3 Days

Hi, I'm from the Nockerby family ...

My designer was obsessed with clean lines and ...

THE CURIOUS BROWSER

117

The typical IKEA-goer revels in the time spent on browsing. By making the store come alive with a context sensitive audio layer, ERIKA adds a museum like dimension, enhances the browsing experience.

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

Group Sync!

MARCO! MARCO!

POLO! ERIKA

118


Team Project

3 Days

GROUPS Groups can sync their ERIKAs into one common dialogue, allowing everybody to be included in the same conversation. Certain areas become game zones waiting to be stumbled upon, transforming the IKEA store into a playground where fun memories with families and friends are made.

119

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

120


Team Project

3 Days

Magically Save Your Favourites Using ERIKA to "star" an item saves the item into a Pinterest-style board for further filtering or for the next phase of commitment.

121

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

122


Team Project

3 Days

Experience IKEA Through Different Eyes Various lifestyle-based ERIKAs allow users to experience the store in the shoes of different personas. For example, an Urban Nomad ERIKA would guide you through IKEA in a way an urban nomad would typically browse.

123

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

ERIKA

Experience Design

124


Team Project

3 Days

Fresh Thematic Conversations For example, during Chirstmas, the conversations and games with ERIKA can be tweaked to be more Christmas themed. This provides reasons to return to the IKEA store because fresh experiences always await.

125

ERIKA


Design Sprint Competition

Experience Design

PROJECT TYPE

Design Sprint Competition

PROJECT BACKGROUND

In collaboration with NUS Enterprise, Space10 (a Copenhagen based future living lab) invited students from four faculties — design, computing, business and engineering — and asked them how IKEA can use conversational tech and AI to foster meaningful interactions with people. The students were given three days to work on creative concepts for ways to integrate voice- or text-based conversational interfaces either within the IKEA customer experience or life at home in general.

DURATION

3 Days

DELIVERABLES

Concept Presentation

AWARDS

1st Place Winner

TEAM

Iliana Ishak Letitia Lim Ku Ga Eun

YEAR

2016

ERIKA

126


Team Project

127

3 Days

ERIKA


Undergraduate Studio Project

HealPac

Product Design

128


Team Project

11 Weeks

04.

HealPac: Wound Care Solution # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #Medical # Te c h n i c a l P r o t o t y p i n g

BACK TO CONTENTS 129

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

HealPac

Product Design

130


Team Project

11 Weeks

Filling the Gaps in Healthcare To create a wound care solution for patients with medium sized wounds (~2 to 5 cm) that need to be left open to heal

Client

NUH

Type

Product Design (Medical)

Duration

11 Weeks

Team Size

3

In collaboratation with National University Hospital Asst Prof Ngiam Kee Yuan

131

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

HealPac A portable, low-cost device that utilizes negative pressure to accelerate wound healing and reduce frequency of dressing changes for medium sized wounds.

HealPac

132


Team Project

133

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

HealPac

Product Design

134


Team Project

11 Weeks

THE PROBLEM Current conventional treatments for medium sized wounds are inconvenient

healing with open wound

wound becomes wet quickly

=

slower healing

=

+ dressing falls off easily

frequent dressing changes required at hospital

inconvenient

+ high accumulated costs

135

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

A PICTURE OF PATIENTS WITH MEDIUM SIZED WOUNDS

HealPac

136


Team Project

11 Weeks

Most patients with medium sized wounds are frustrated that they are almost able to get back to their normal, active lifestyle, but are held back by the (disruptive) need for frequent dressing changes

137

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

“My family depends on me for income. I have to go back to work as soon as possible!�

HealPac

138


Team Project

139

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

“My schedule is so packed, I cannot afford to go back to the hospital every day”

HealPac

140


Team Project

141

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

HealPac

Product Design

142


Team Project

11 Weeks

“I don’t want my wound dressing to get in my way. And I don’t want it to scare people”

143

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGY

Product Design

NEGATIVE PRESSURE TREATMENT AS A SOLUTION NEGATIVE PRESSURE: SUCTION ON WOUND

MECHANISM 1: Removes excess fluid

MECHANISM 2: Suction stimulates wound tissues

COMBINED EFFECT:

Reduces frequency of dressing changes

HealPac

+

Accelerates healing

144


Team Project

11 Weeks

LIMITATION CURRENT APPLICATIONS ARE DESIGNED FOR LARGER WOUNDS

Unjustified cost for medium sized wounds

+

Not designed to be truly portable — obtrusive in size and/or noise

Not suitable for medium sized wounds

145

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

DESIGN OPPORTUNITY:

NEGATIVE PRESSURE TREATMENT DESIGNED FOR MEDIUM SIZED WOUNDS HealPac

146


Team Project

147

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

DESIGN CONCEPT GIST:

DETACHABLE PUMP + FOAM DRESSING C L I C K TO P L AY V I D E O

HealPac

148


Team Project

11 Weeks

PUMP: SYRINGE + TWO VALVES

one way valve

one way valve

REMOVES FLUID

MANUAL PUMPING

MAINTAINS PRESSURE

CREATES PRESSURE

149

HealPac


UNOBTRUSIVE & SILENT Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

Ideal for patients with medium sized wounds who are more likely to be active while healing

HealPac

150


LOW COST + PORTABLE

Team Project

151

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

PROOF OF CONCEPT

Product Design

LEVEL OF PRESSURE

Capable of applying at least 70mmHg of pressure A manometer was set up to measure the pressure that can be applied by the healPac

Connected to HealPac system

99mmH20 or 72.8mmHg

HealPac

152


Team Project

11 Weeks

FREQUENCY OF RESET

Pressure maintains for at least 3 hours per reset We used a grapefruit to simulate a wound and clamped it to simulate exudation. We then applied our prototype to see how long the pressure can be maintained.

Start of test 18:01

153

20:00

20:38

Fully inflated 21:14

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT TYPE

Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Students collaborates with doctors from a University Hospital to generate and prototype solutions for problems identified by the doctors.

DURATION

11 Weeks

DELIVERABLES

Proof of Concept

TEAM

Chia Guo Xiang Grace Gandi

YEAR

2015

Product Design

In collaboratation with National University Hospital Asst Prof Ngiam Kee Yuan

HealPac

154


Team Project

155

11 Weeks

HealPac


Undergraduate Studio Project

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

156


Team Project

11 Weeks

05.

Pulse: Interactive Installation #Tinkering #Arduino #SiliconeCasting

BACK TO CONTENTS 157

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

158


Team Project

11 Weeks

What if Our World was Soft? By combining soft/elastic materials and electronics, this project aims to explore new possibilities of softness, elasticity and sticky interactions. The goal here is not to solve problems in the way most human-centered approaches seek to, but to attempt to uncover new product typologies and interactions through open-ended explorations and hands-on prototyping.

Client

Nil

Type

Exploratory Tinkering

Duration

11 Weeks

Team Size

3

159

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Exploratory Tinkering

PULSE A project inspired by soft robotics, “Pulse� is an interactive installation of synthetic creatures. Undisturbed, these creatures lay dormant on the floor of the tank. When one taps on the glass, the creatures come alive, pulsing upwards with each tap.

C L I C K TO P L AY V I D E O

Pulse

160


Team Project

161

11 Weeks

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

162


Team Project

163

11 Weeks

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Exploratory Tinkering

A Surreal Experience The resulting movements as these creatures swim up and down when somebody taps the glass turned out to be uncannily organic. This uncanniness is further accentuated by the resemblance these creatures share with real domesticated marine animals in terms of their ecosystem (both “live� in water tanks with an air pump serving as their lifeline). The result is a surreal yet intriguing experience.

Pulse

164


Team Project

1

11 Weeks

2

3

165

1

Upon awakening, the creature lights up and begins to inflate

2

Close up of an inflating

3

Curling and swimming

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Exploratory Tinkering

O

N

V I B R AT I O N + M O T I O N S E N S O R S

FL

A

TI

SOLEN

IN

VA LV

“ P U L S E ” I N S TA L L AT I O N

Pulse

166


Team Project

11 Weeks

ARDUINO

A I R S U P P LY

NOID

VES

D E F L AT I O N

COMPRESSOR

The creatures "swim" by having air pumped into them. A compressor supplies air to the creatures via tubes. An Arduino board regulates the air supply to control the “swimming” of the creatures Vibration and motion sensors determine which creature is being prodded at. The appropriate valve can then be activated, “waking up” the corresponding creature.

167

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

168


Team Project

169

11 Weeks

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT TYPE

Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Students first learn basic Arduino and silicone casting technique. They are then challenged to develop those skills further to design and prototype a creative manifestation of soft electronics.

DURATION

11 Weeks

DELIVERABLES

Experiencable Prototype

TEAM

Kelly Yap Eddy Tan

YEAR

2014

Pulse

Exploratory Tinkering

170


Team Project

171

11 Weeks

Pulse


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

172


Team Project

13 Weeks

06.

DAX Wallet Kickstarter Project # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #Marketing #Kickstarter #Entrepeunership

BACK TO CONTENTS 173

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

174


Team Project

13 Weeks

Kickstarting a Product Business The brief was to design a product, launch it on a crowd-funding platform, and then market it to garner enough funding to start manufacturing and kickstart a business around it.

Client

Nil

Type

Product Design (Lifestyle)

Duration

13 Weeks

Team Size

3

175

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

176


Team Project

177

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

178


Team Project

13 Weeks

CLICK FOR K I C K S TA R T E R LINK & VIDEO

The wallet with a trick up its sleeve Inspired by mobile app interfaces, DAX is a wallet that allows you to access your cards easily and beautifully. Simply pull the tab and watch your cards cascade out with a splash of colors!

179

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

Product Design

+

DAX

180


Team Project

13 Weeks

+

181

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

182


Team Project

183

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

184


Team Project

185

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

186


Team Project

13 Weeks

Experience Centric Wallets have remained largely the same for as long as we can remember. We wanted to re-imagine the wallet to offer a radical, fresh, and vibrant experience.

187

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

188


Team Project

189

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

190


Team Project

191

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

192


Team Project

193

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

194


Team Project

195

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

uU

Product Design

h h

DAX

196


Team Project

13 Weeks

Quality Comes with Quantity Everything, from the name choice to the logo design, were derived from an iterative process. Generating a large number of options help us be more sure that our choice will be an informed one.

197

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

198


Team Project

13 Weeks

RAISED $52,660 on

Mentioned in:

199

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

200


Team Project

13 Weeks

Finding the Right Factory We partnered with Allocacoc, a Dutch product design company based in Shanghai for production and distrubution. Because DAX is quite unique, it was challenging to find a factory with the required expertise. We visited numerous factories to discuss directly with them.

201

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

202


Team Project

13 Weeks

Delivered, but Not Satisfied We realised that getting access to factories with the advanced fabrication capabilities we needed was difficult because we did not have the negotiating power of a large enough company. Communication was also difficult because we had to do so remotely most of the time. We ended up making compromises so that we could deliver in time. Although we delivered, we felt that we could do much better in product quality.

203

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

204


Team Project

13 Weeks

DAX Reboot: Working More Closely with Manufacturers We took the lessons learnt and worked towards a version 2. This time we worked closely with the manufacturer from the start, understanding their limitations and working to resolve problems. We flew over to Shanghai more often which helped to move things more quickly. We will be shipping a free version 2 to all our original Kickstarter backers.

205

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

206


Team Project

207

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

DAX

Product Design

208


Team Project

13 Weeks

DAXv2 By tweaking material choices and revamping the construction method, we resolved the issues that plagued the first version, and made it look and feel sleeker than before. DAXv2 is entering production phase soon and will be available by the end of October.

209

DAX


Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT TYPE

Undergraduate Studio Project

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Students design, prototype, and market a product for a crowdfunding platform. If the project gets funded successfully, they will have to follow up accordingly.

DURATION

11 Weeks (campaign launch)

DELIVERABLES

Kickstarter Campaign

TEAM

Yeo Wan Jun Jeffery Bogue

YEAR

2015

DAX

Product Design

210


Team Project

211

13 Weeks

DAX


Undergraduate Thesis Project

Last Cradle

Product-Service Design

212


Individual Project

7 Months

07.

Last Cradle: Design for Death # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #ServiceDesign #SocialDesign #Research

BACK TO CONTENTS 213

Last Cradle


Undergraduate Thesis Project

Last Cradle

Product-Service Design

214


Individual Project

7 Months

Humanising the Way We Handle Death Clinical, cold, dehumanising. Those are some of the words used to describe how deceased people are transported from their site of death in many modern societies. This underbelly of our death practices exposes many modern societies' alienating and medicalised attitudes towards death. How do we move towards a healthier relationship with death? What is a healthier relationship with death? How might we achieve that through the design of our death practices? Client

NUS Thesis Project

Type

Product-Service Design, Research

Duration

7 months

Team Size

Nil In collaboratation with Ang Chin Moh Funeral Directors

215

Last Cradle


Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Researching Death To start off, I looked at books, academic papers, opinion pieces, documentaries, memoirs etc. Learning about death through a healthy variety of sources and mediums allowed me to understand the topic from a variety of perspectives—scholars, grievers, mortuary workers, nurses etc.

Corpses, conflict post-mortem pra CYRIL SCHAFER

Department of Anthropolog

Downloaded by [NUS National University of Singapore] at 01:26 06 August 2017

Why do death practices matter for the living? What is considered a healthy relationship with death? Where do death practices become most neglected? Who can we learn from? How are death practices being shaped today?

Mortality, Vol. 17, No.

ABSTRACT The personalisa mortuary shifts associated w have lamented a loss of mean others have evaluated this demographic profiles and c exploring three groups integra and bereaved people. Dra personalisation is a complex encountered in organising pos KEYWORDS:

funerals; fune

1. The personalisati

Recent discussions of p have undergone a prof funeral practices are c ‘creative’ productions th of earlier periods (Dick personal life, attributes interpretations of death shift in North America impersonal, cookie-cut mined, somber funeral these new funerals n simultaneously reinfor opportunity to form t highly rationalised soci Authors such as Rams appreciation’ ceremoni ingful, with Prothero

Correspondence: E-mail:

ISSN 1357-6275 (print) ISS http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13

Last Cradle

216


JASON CASTLE and WILLIAM L. PHILLIPS Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California, USA

This study explores the facilitative aspects of postfuneral rituals in the grief process. Participants included 50 adults who evaluated symbolic activities (rituals) in terms of helpfulness, aspects of those activities, and outcomes of performing such activities. Results con¢rmed (a) that appropriate rituals can facilitate adjustment to bereavement, (b) that some factors are particularly important for success of rituals, and (c) that performing rituals can have signi¢cant positive outcomes for participants.

One of the greatest challenges of being human is dealing with the grief caused by the death of a loved one. As painful as this experience may be, this article takes the position that grief is an initiation into the mystery of life, that it is transformative (e.g., Balk, 1999; Romano¡ & Terenzio, 1998; Moules, 1998; Parkes et al., 1996), and that it can have a positive impact on one’s life (e.g., Stroebe, 2001). Rather than an illness or misfortune to be overcome, grief can be viewed as an opportunity for personal change and growth (Gamino, Sewell, & Easterling, 2000; Stroebe & Schut, 1999; Hogan, Morse & Taso¤n, 1996; Parkes et al.,1996). The following ancient story, often encountered in the literature on grief, eloquently illustrates these points: Kisa Gotami was a woman who had lost her ¢rst-born son. Grief-stricken and clutching the body of her deceased son, she roamed the streets looking for medicine or an antidote that could restore her son to life. She ¢nally took the body to the Buddha. The Buddha listened to her pleas with compassion and said,‘‘Go enter the city, make the rounds of the entire city, beginning at the beginning, and in whatever home no one has ever died, from that house fetch tiny grains of mustard seed’’ (Burtt, 1982, p. 45). Kisa Received 5 May 2002; accepted 22 May 2002. Address correspondence to Jason Castle, 1306 Lincoln Avenue, San Rafael, CA 94901-2105, USA. E-mail: jason@castletype.com

41

4, November 2012

t and insignificance? A critical analysis of actices

Downloaded by [National University of Singapore. To view documents protected by DRM, please download plugin at http://www.tandfebooks.co

Individual Project

Downloaded by [NUS National University of Singapore] at 01:01 06 August 2017

GRIEF RITUALS: ASPECTS THAT FACILITATE ADJUSTMENT TO BEREAVEMENT

7 Months

HEALTH COMMUNICATION http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2016.1196519

DEFINING MOMENTS

Creating Possible … Aesthetically Engaging Life Amid Reminders Stephanie M. Pangborn Department of Communication, Clemson University

gy and Archaeology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

ation of post-mortem practices has been presented as one of the significant with secularisation in contemporary, western society. While some authors ningful, communal ritual (Crouch, 2004; Hunter, 2007; Wouters, 2002), shift as a positive development reflecting the realities of changing consumer demands. This paper critically examines personalisation by ally linked to post-mortem practices: funeral directors, secular celebrants awing on ethnographic research data, this discussion reveals that x term that frequently obscures the processes, meanings and difficulties st-mortem practices in contemporary New Zealand society.

eral directors; celebrants; personalisation; ritual

ion literature

post-mortem personalisation frequently assert that funerals found transformation in the past 30 years. Personalised commonly described as ‘authentic’, ‘individualistic’ and hat contrast markedly with the traditional religious funerals kinson, 2012). These constructions focus instead on the s and relationships of the deceased rather than religious h. Garces-Foley and Holcomb (2006, p. 208) argue that this a can be interpreted as a ‘constructive reaction against the tter, ostentatious, theologically focused, tradition-deterpractices of the twentieth century’. They go on to note that not only represent a strategy for self-expression but rce community bonds by providing people with the temporary communities, countering potential anomie in ietal contexts (Garces-Foley & Holcomb, 2006, p. 225). shaw (2010) have asserted that new celebratory (or ‘life ies; Rasmussen, 2007) are both empowering and mean(2001) noting that innovative rituals accompanying

cyril.schafer@otago.ac.nz

SN 1469-9885 (online)  2012 Taylor & Francis 3576275.2012.731724

217

Transporting the Dead A Booming but Lightly Regulated Industry

Photographs. Piano keys. Nature walks. Fingernails filled with paint. This was my life—a childhood of unceasing creativity. I constructed my world with fierce imagination. No one imposed limits on my visions of possibility. In fact, those who loved me often joined in these creative pursuits. I was captivated with the way it made me feel. In the midst of intense specialized training as an art major in college, however, the magic faded fast. Alone in my attempt to master skills—prioritizing finished products rather than enjoying the process with others—it no longer felt right. For two and a half years, I desperately fought to reclaim the joy. The emptiness was unsettling. I quit. Fifteen years later, as I sit penning this essay about my defining moments as a health communication scholar, I cannot help but be amazed and grateful that one of my greatest passions—a commitment to creativity and possibility—never gave up on me. Much of my work integrates imagination, creativity, art, music, and storytelling into settings often marginalized or simply unseen in our society. In my professional endeavors, I have joined with individuals, families, and care providers in profoundly vulnerable situations characterized by loss, decline, mortality, illness, and suffering—hospice homes, home hospice visits, family bereavement camps, senior living communities, and dementia care facilities. These moments have been filled with incredible people, fascinating life stories, and enriching experiences. During all of these moments, I have been forced to wrestle with the twists of fate in my personal life that continually affirm my dedication to these people, places, and professional priorities. My body, scarred by surgeries and affected by autoimmune issues, knows pain. My heart, having lost people I dearly loved to both sudden death and prolonged degenerative illness, knows suffering. My mind, wrestling to make sense of and survive the physical and emotional exhaustion of multiple miscarriages, knows loss, uncertainty, and anger. As I reflect upon the intermingling of these very private experiences and professional endeavors, one thing is clear: I have learned to appreciate life with a renewed understanding of the miracle that it truly is by embracing the aesthetic moments and relational connections that make it meaningful. I received a call the day Theresa was transferred to the hospice home. Her 19-year old sons, Josh and Joey, had requested my help with a photography session. The boys wanted keepsakes of their mother that contained no visible markers of her illness, an understandable but challenging request. Theresa had been unresponsive CONTACT Stephanie M. Pangborn

sruhl@clemson.edu

for hours in this hospital bed, connecte intravenous tubes delivering medicat needed in this state. The pain in th willingness to be present, to move cre this significant experience, was met wi The boys took turns covering devices delicately embraced their mother’s han and brushed her fingers across their fa were tattoos of the things she cherished the inside of her forearm being one mother’s love that they wanted to cher body, otherwise marred by illness and carried significant stories and bonds th diagnosis or impending death. In this sm ders of the devastating circumstance pu the boys relied upon the aesthetic exper to reconstruct a space that affirmed the

These moments linger with hau assumptions about what might yet be crises tempt us to believe there is not In Western medical contexts, hope clinical cure (Mattingly, 2010). Medi extend life expectancies, and even de illness. Nothing, though, changes the being human are aging, decline, and d cure. In his book Being Mortal, Atul vivid accounts of the consequences accept this reality. We have “turned dying into medical experiences, matte care professionals” (Gawande, 2014, p a professional act delivered by traine nated by a degree, specialty, and/or and sequester fundamental aspects o managing life, we forget that it still especially so in the midst of pain, suf We need to remember, as Matting despair does not disqualify individu worth living” (p. 19) or negate the op In light of this, one encouraging shift in I am grateful beyond measure is th appreciation of arts-based experience nent of holistic care, although much the physiological and psychological o intervention (for an overview see Stuc communication discipline, too, we hav in moving beyond the limitations o recognizing artistic representations a

Department of Communication, Clemson University, 404 Strode T

© 2016 Taylor & Francis

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Designing personal grief rituals: An analysis of symbolic objects and actions Corina Sasa and Alina Comanb a School of Computing and Communications, Institute for Social Futures, Lancaster University, Lancaster, Lancashire, UK; bFaculty of Sociology and Communication, University of Transilvania Brasov, Brasov, Romania

ABSTRACT

Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Personal grief rituals are beneficial in dealing with complicated grief, but challenging to design, as they require symbolic objects and actions meeting clients’ emotional needs. The authors reported interviews with 10 therapists with expertise in both grief therapy and grief rituals. Findings indicate three types of rituals supporting honoring, letting go, and self transformation, with the latter being particularly complex. Outcomes also point to a taxonomy of ritual objects for framing and remembering ritual experience, and for capturing and processing grief. Besides symbolic possessions, the authors identified other types of ritual objects including transformational and future-oriented ones. Symbolic actions include creative craft of ritual objects, respectful handling, disposal, and symbolic play. They conclude with theoretical implications of these findings, and a reflection on their value for tailored, creative co-design of grief rituals. In particular, several implications for designing grief rituals were identified that include accounting for the client’s need, selecting (or creating) the most appropriate objects and actions from the identified types, integrating principles of both grief and art/drama therapy, exploring clients’ affinity for the ancient elements as medium of disposal in letting go rituals, and the value of technology for recording and reflecting on ritual experience.

The end of the 20th century has witnessed an erosion of people’s trust in the authority of traditions and the power of institutions (Walter, 1996). This has led to an increased interest in alternative forms of interpreting the world and human experience. Postmodernism’s efforts to integrate the rational-irrational or mind-body polarities (Keenan, 2012) have been also reflected in people’s renewed interest in rituals. Rather than returning to traditional rituals, we have seen however a trend toward designing and adopting new rituals emphasizing pragmatism, playfulness, and creativity to ensure meaning making of self relevant events (Platvoet, 1995). Ritual studies scholars have noted that this trend toward personal rituals favors authentic, informal, and spontaneous emotional expression and sense-making (Lofland, 1985; Walter, 1994; Wouters, 2002). Grimes (2004) referred to the need to explore the development of rituals for meeting people’s specific needs, which formal religious rituals fail to address. Grimes (2000) also noted the emerging interest in constructing such novel rituals and the creativity required for alternative forms of ritualizing personal events that mark transitions in human lifecycle. In this article we focus on personal rituals, for which we agree with Schnell’s (2009) CONTACT Corina Sas corina@comp.lancs.ac.uk Lancashire, LA1 4WA, UK.

definition of rituals as formalized patterns of actions for constructing meaning from a personally relevant event. Whereas interest in novel rituals spans life transitions, those focusing on death and grief have received particular attention both from scholars of rituals studies and those of grief therapy (Gordon & Gordon, 1984; Jackson & Donovan, 1988; Littlewood, 1992). Emphasizing the importance of developing personally meaningful rituals, Moller (1996) noted that the sole reliance on individuals’ coping skills of dealing with death makes grief processing more challenging and intense (Moller, 1996). Noticeable efforts to support personal grief rituals have been made within the field of psychotherapy (Moore & Myerhoff, 1977; Grimes, 2004). Previous work has shown that successful rituals should meet specific therapeutic properties. We know little however about how to design grief rituals to meet these properties and in particular what symbolic objects and actions to use across ritual stages and ritual types. We report on interviews with 10 psychotherapists with expertise in grief rituals to investigate the following research questions: .� Which are the main types of grief rituals and their functions?

School of Computing and Communications, Institute for Social Futures, Lancaster University, Lancaster,

Department of Educa Loss Cli

This article summariz the elements necessary technique for grieving ‘‘maladaptive,’’ and s directly involving at directly and indirec psychotherapists are di

For the past 20 yea chotherapeutic strate the elements that ne therapeutic. Other The article’s focus w ence their grief as ‘‘s years into the proce grievers, soon afte death-related rituals and roadside memo The original ph for my dissertation (four women and on successful in moving of intense grief. Tw pected deaths of mo a long period of ‘‘cr brink of penury; a

The Rituals of Modern Death BY HAIDER JAVED WARRAICH

Received 12 Septembe Address corresponden Canada V8P 2T4. E-mail: n

© 2016 Taylor & Francis

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The Phone o Wind

Whispers to Lost Fam

The

0/14442213.2014.985605

n e w e ng l a n d j o u r na l

of

m e dic i n e

original article

, Managing Grief: The ontrol of Emotions in Rituals

Early Palliative Care for Patients with Metastatic Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Jennifer S. Temel, M.D., Joseph A. Greer, Ph.D., Alona Muzikansky, M.A., Emily R. Gallagher, R.N., Sonal Admane, M.B., B.S., M.P.H., Vicki A. Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., Constance M. Dahlin, A.P.N., Craig D. Blinderman, M.D., Juliet Jacobsen, M.D., William F. Pirl, M.D., M.P.H., J. Andrew Billings, M.D., and Thomas J. Lynch, M.D.

A bs t r ac t

th and mortuary rituals in Japan, scant attention emotional responses to death and their social and based on extensive ethnographic fieldwork in a ways in which grief is experienced and perceived by cally how it is expressed and controlled and under their emotional condition, grieving demeanour, ender roles and pollution. I found that the emolated to social relationships between the bereaved e proximity of bonds between the living and the seeks to elucidate why the Japanese notion of grief e understood, first and foremost, in terms of these

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Emotion; Grief; Pollution; Japan

ultural roots in Confucianism in which weeping or ormally accepted or even encouraged as it has an

Background

Patients with metastatic non–small-cell lung cancer have a substantial symptom burden and may receive aggressive care at the end of life. We examined the effect of introducing palliative care early after diagnosis on patient-reported outcomes and end-of-life care among ambulatory patients with newly diagnosed disease. Methods

We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed metastatic non–small-cell lung cancer to receive either early palliative care integrated with standard oncologic care or standard oncologic care alone. Quality of life and mood were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks with the use of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Lung (FACT-L) scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, respectively. The primary outcome was the change in the quality of life at 12 weeks. Data on end-of-life care were collected from electronic medical records.

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Results

Of the 151 patients who underwent randomization, 27 died by 12 weeks and 107 (86% of the remaining patients) completed assessments. Patients assigned to early palliative care had a better quality of life than did patients assigned to standard

From Massachusetts Gene Boston (J.S.T., J.A.G., A.M., C.M.D., J.J., W.F.P., J.A.B.); t versity of New York, Buffalo Palliative Medicine, Departm thesiology, Columbia Unive Center, New York (C.D.B.); a versity, New Haven, CT (T.J reprint requests to Dr. Tem chusetts General Hospital, Yawkey 7B, Boston, MA jtemel@partners.org. N Engl J Med 2010;363:733-

Copyright © 2010 Massachusetts M


CCEPTANCE THROUGH RITUAL NANCY C. REEVES

ational Psychology, University of Victoria, and Island inic, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Individual Project

7 Months

zes the author’s original research, which sought to discover y for using death-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic people who experience their grief as ‘‘stuck,’’ ‘‘unending,’’ so on. A death-related ritual is defined as a ceremony, least 1 person and the symbols of the loss, and usually ctly involving others. Suggestions for counselors and iscussed.

ars I have explored the use of ritual as a psyegy for maladaptive grief. This article describes eed to be in a ritual for it to be perceived as issues for the practitioner will be outlined. will be on using a ritual when mourners experistuck’’ or maladaptive, usually some months or ess. I also use the information when assisting er their loss, to create more meaningful s, such as wakes, funerals, scattering ashes, orials. henomenological research, which I conducted (Reeves, 1989), included five corespondents ne man), who had developed rituals that were g them out of a seemingly chronic experience wo corespondents were grieving sudden, unexothers; one woman, a successful artist, grieved reative block,’’ which had brought her to the man grieved his former self, ‘‘killed’’ by an

er 2009; accepted 17 December 2010. nce to Nancy C. Reeves, 1514 Shorncliffe Road, Victoria, BC nancy@islandnet.com

of the

Typology: Crematorium

milies

eral Hospital, E.R.G., V.A.J., the State Unio (S.A.); Adult ment of Anesersity Medical and Yale UniJ.L.). Address mel at Massa, 55 Fruit St., 02114, or at 42.

Medical Society.

TOM WILKINSON, 2016

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Product-Service Design

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Individual Project

7 Months

Through the Eyes of Death Workers In most modern cities, death practices are handled by Funeral Directors. I worked as a part-time funeral assistant to get a more nuanced understanding of death and the surrounding practices through my own senses.

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Product-Service Design

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Individual Project

7 Months

Partaking in Rituals Coping with death is an extremely emotional process. Being physically present with the bereaved as they mourned allowed me understand death practices in a visceral manner beyond what books and documentaries can offer. I felt the shivers as silence washed over the entire mourning group at the chime of the Buddhist bell. I felt my heart quiver as I witnessed a grandma, too frail to stand by herself, gently and methodically arrange incense over her husband's body in a Taoist ritual. I felt my heart fill with warmth from the bittersweet laughter that filled the room as a large family exchanged banters while they took turns to transfer their grandmother's remains into an urn.

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Why Do Death Practices Matter? On an individual and communal level, they fulfill “critical psychological and social needs following a death”. On a societal level, they "serve as platforms for re-enactment and reaffirmation of societal values1. “ While directed at the dead, death practices serve the living. And although they are shaped by our society, how we practice them shape our society in return.

1 Hoy, W. G. (2013). Do funerals matter?: The purposes and practices of death rituals in global perspective. New York, NY: Routledge. Last Cradle

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Individual Project

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shape

Psychological & Social Needs

fulfill

D E AT H RITUALS

Societal Values

shape

225

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

What Are Our Needs Following a Death? Death rituals can be seen as mechanisms that cultures have developed to help the living cope with the disruptive effects of death. Studying these responses to death can hence shed light on the needs that people have when confronted with a death. By comparing across various cultures and their practices, I extracted 6 common threads in dealing with death.

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Individual Project

7 Months

Responses to death

Underlying needs in dealing with death

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Product-Service Design

Green burials give meaning to death with the idea that one can “return to the earth� and become part of the world in another way

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Individual Project

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1

The Need to Facilitate Making Sense of Death The impulse to make sense of death is almost always activated when one is confronted with a death, and the difficulty of such a task often demands assistance from symbols, metaphors, and ritual.

229

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

A family huddling together to give each other support as they express their grief

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Individual Project

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2

The Need to Strengthen Communal Ties Death often breaks communal ties. For example, losing your wife often means losing contact with your wife’s friends too. Funerals seem to counteract this by gathering the decreased’s social network. They also encourage strengthening of relationships through opportunities for acts of mutual support. Perhaps then the universality of strong communal components in funerals is not a coincidence. Perhaps funerals evolved to be commual to address a universal need in the face of a member's death—the need to strengthen communal ties where a gash has been dealt.

231

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

The practice of placing flowers on the coffin is often described as comforting in the sense of being able to “do something� for the deceased

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Individual Project

7 Months

3

The Need for Expression of Thoughts and Feelings Many rituals provide opportunities for expression of thoughts and feelings, whether through prayers, verbal outcries, or symbolic physical actions such as the throwing of flowers into the grave. Mourners often describe these rituals as comforting because they allow the mourners to express their last regards for the dead or “do one last thing� for the dead, facilitating closure.

233

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

A mourner pours holy water into a bowl as part of a bathing ceremony for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at the Grand Palace. Rituals often involve similar simple but symbolic tasks.

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Individual Project

7 Months

4

The Need to Channel Grief Emotions Many cultures respond to death by prescribing a flurry of tasks for the bereaved to carry out. The tasks are typically simple and low impact in nature, potentially providing a means for channeling of grief emotions. Funerals also naturally create a supportive and acceptable space for public statements of grief to play out.

235

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

A Japanese bone picking ceremony where the relatives pick the bones from the ashes and transfer them to the urn. This intimate interaction with the remains allow mourners to tangibly affirm the death and corresponding transformation of the deceased

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Individual Project

7 Months

5

The Need to Embrace Transformation In many cultures, the transformation of the body is perceived as the climax of the whole funeral process, whether it is transformed into ashes or whether it “becomes� part of the earth. The importance placed on these rituals point to the need for some kind of tangible affirmation of the death, possibly to help the bereaved embrace the reality of the death and the resultant transformation to their lives.

237

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Product-Service Design

A traditional chinese funeral in Singapore follows an elaborate and precise order of rituals

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Individual Project

7 Months

6

The Need to Regain Feelings of Control Funerary rituals often follow a precise order of events, helping mourners exercise and experience control in the midst of the chaos and upheaval associated with grief.

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Learning from Existing Death Processes 4 main principles for addressing the needs of the living were extracted from existing postdeath processes. These provide the guidelines or starting points in designing post-death processes.

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Individual Project

7 Months

1. USE OF SCRIPTED BEHAVIOR Funerals create space and time where public expression of grief becomes acceptable and is supported

2. USE OF SYMBOLS AND METAPHORS Release of doves provides an imagery that symbolizes the release of the deceased’s spirit and letting go

3. LEVERAGE ON SENSORY EXPERIENCES Flowers are often used to create a comforting image through both sight and smell

4. USE OF HANDS ON ACTIVITIES Folding of paper money fill up idle time in Taoist funerals, keeping mourners occupied and providing opportunities for expression

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Individual Project

7 Months

The Transfer Process What is the transfer process? The “transfer process” refers to the collection of the deceased person by the funeral service for transportation to the funeral center (where the deceased’s body will be prepared for the wake). The collection point can be either the deceased’s home, hospice, nursing home, or hospital morgue, depending on where the deceased passed away.

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Funeral Center Ready for Collection Death WA K E

FUNERAL

MEMORIAL

TRANSFER Wake Place Funeral Procession

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Burial or Cremation

246


Individual Project

Home / Hospice / Hospital / Nursing Home

247

7 Months

Move deceased from bed/ gurney into van*

Preperation of body for the wake

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248


Individual Project

7 Months

“Sometimes people get angry at you. You’re taking their loved one away. They are very stoic, they are

very together, and as soon as you start to move that body, they fall apart.”

Curtis Johnson ‘Body transporter’ for Serenity Transportation based in California

249

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

“The way they do it is horrible! As if the the deceased was not a person� Dover Park Hospice Nurse

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Individual Project

7 Months

Why Design for the Transfer Process? The current process is carried out with a clinical and utilitarian attitude, inappropriate for a profound and sacred life event such as death. 2

Insensitive to the sociopsycho needs of the bereaved

2

Opportunity to chart a more humanistic approach to handling death

3

A largely overlooked area by designers

251

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Example of a Hospital Case Hospital Mortuary

Cleaning

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252


Individual Project

7 Months

CURRENT TRANSFER PROCESS

PRAGMATIC NEEDS

SOCIO-PSYCHO NEEDS

253

DESIRABLE ATTITUDE

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Death is not just another biological event that we need to quickly get over and be done with

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255

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Death is a deeply profound and transformative life event

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257

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Design Brief

PROJECT GOALS 1. To better address the needs of the bereaved 2. To re-integrate death into our consciousness 3. To shape society’s values through death 4. To raise the profile of the death profession

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Individual Project

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ISSUES WITH CURRENT PROCESS 1. Poor attention to semantics 2. Low sensitivity to socio-psycho needs of bereaved 3. Too clinical and anaesthetic given the profoundness of the event

NEEDS OF BEREAVED 1. Facilitate making sense of death 2. Strengthen communal ties 3. Expression of thoughts and feelings 4. Channel grief emotions 5. Embrace transformation

PRINCIPLES FOR ADDRESSING NEEDS 1. Use of scripted behavior 2. Use of symbols and metaphors 3. Leverage on sensory experiences 4. Use of hands-on rituals

6. Regain feelings of control

259

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Design Brief Taking into account the goals of this project, the shortfalls of the current transfer process, and the principles in addressing the needs of the bereaved, a design brief was formed. This brief gives focus to the project and guides the idea generation process.

To humanise the transfer proc transforming it from a detache into a process that is more dig

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Individual Project

7 Months

cess, ed, clinical procedure gnified, intimate, and aesthetic

261

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Brief Breakdown

O

Gen tler and more carin g gestures Warmer aesthetics

Wrapping and securing

Dign i fi

d

e

Current gestures and aesthetics of wrapping and securing the body feel rough and undignified

Easier and gentler carrying

Funeral staff hide the process because it is difficult to carry the body gently

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Individual Project

OPP

7 Months

ORTUNITIES

KEYW

ORDS

A e s th eti c More family in volvement

at

e

H u m a n i s i n g t he t ra nsfe r pro ce ss

i t n I

m

Create opportunities for family to be involved

Openness a n d transpa ren cy of process­ t o berea v ed

263

Families are currently detached from the process Last Cradle


Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Last Cradle Through affording for gentler and more caring gestures, Last Cradle transforms the now clinical procedure of transferring a deceased person into a warm and aesthetic ritual that is more meaningful for both the bereaved and the funeral staff. C L I C K TO P L AY V I D E O

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Individual Project

265

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Part 1: Carrier Facilitates easier and gentler lifting. Decreases the likelihood of the process being hidden.

EASY TO DEPLOY

EMBRACE AS YOU CARRY

Completely flexible, allowing the carrier to be rolled under the body like any flexible stretcher. Stores away easily.

As the handles are pulled upwards, the carrier embraces the body like a cradle, shrouding the head and legs.

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Individual Project

7 Months

CURRENT PROCEDURE Body sags, making carrying strenuous, rough, and ugly. The process is hence often hidden.

LIFT WITHOUT SAGGING With the head and legs pulled towards the center, the body can be carried nearer to the center without the head and legs flopping, even with only two carriers.

,

267

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Part 2: Mortuary Cot Cover A mortuary cot attachment that transforms the covering process into a ceremonial ritual

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Individual Project

269

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

AT TA C H

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Individual Project

7 Months

UNZIP AND FLIP OPEN

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Retrofits Existing Cots Fits most standard cots, allowing Last Cradle to be affordable and easy to acquire

VELCRO STRAPS

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Individual Project

273

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Product-Service Design

274


Individual Project

7 Months

Warmer Securing Instead of black belts brutally strapped across the body, a pair of wings hugs the deceased snuggly in place.

CURRENT PROCEDURE 2 utilitarian black belts are tightened around the deceased

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Product-Service Design

276


Individual Project

7 Months

Graceful Closure Two halves come together, enveloping the deceased into a cocoon.

CURRENT PROCEDURE The cloth is haphazardly tied at the face and feet

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Product-Service Design

278


Individual Project

7 Months

A Ceremonial Last Step A separate last step is dedicated to covering the face­—punctuating the most emotionally intense part of the process. Such a personal yet simple gesture could be left for the family to complete.

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Product-Service Design

280


Individual Project

7 Months

A Vessel Fit for People The cocoon's double curvature structure keeps the shape crisp, preventing the material from flopping onto the deceased's face, and lending it a sense of portectiveness.

C U R R E N T A LT E R N A T I V E S Existing cot covers are designed as simply clinical bags for bodies

281

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Product-Service Design

282


Individual Project

7 Months

Gestures That Honour The zippers are always the furthest from the body, allowing the zipping to feel more respectful than in conventional body bags.

283

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Materials The materials used in this prototype are chosen for prototyping purposes only. The final materials need to be easily cleanable, or have an easily cleanable coating.

S TA I N - R E S I S TA N T,

SEMI-STIFF TEXTILE

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Individual Project

7 Months

S TA I N - P R O O F CANVAS

VELCRO

S TA I N - P R O O F P U C O AT I N G INSIDE

285

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

"It has the effect on not onl the loved one, but also the

From the point of view of a gives you a sense of identit feel better when you are do you are doing something m the loved one, rather than j "ok lets go!" And then that Mr. Bernard Chen Project Executive, Ang Chin Moh Foundation

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Individual Project

7 Months

ly the family of e staff itself.

a funeral staff, it ty, it makes you oing this, that meaningful to just *wrap* and t's it."

287

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Conduct precedent studies

Ideation & probe generation

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Evaluation based on qualitative feedback, analysis of quotes

288


Individual Project

7 Months

Design Strategy Leading up to the final outcome, many "research­—prototype—evaluate" cycles were conducted. Evaluation focused on analysis of qualitative feedback which is better suited for understanding latent attitudes and uncovering unexpected insights.

289

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Prescedent Studies Very few works deal with funerary transfers. Hence, the prescedent studies focused largely on tangentially related works. From utility-driven stretchers to ceremonial shrouds to infant swaddles, I aimed to cover as wide a range as possible to learn and draw inspiration from existing approaches.

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7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Ideation & Probe Generation Sketches and prototypes were generated throughout the process to concretise ideas. By studying how people interact with them, the sketches and prototypes act as probes, helping to uncover unique insights.

stiffer hem

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7 Months

Scanne

d by Cam

Scanne

r

Scanned by CamScanner

Individual Project

translucent fabric opaque fabric

translucent fabric opaque fabric

293

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S


Undergraduate Thesis Project

Product-Service Design

Structured Studies

HIDE FORM BODY

More systematic precedent studies were carried out in later phases to sharpen sensitivity for the chosen parameters.

SPOOKY

DRAPING/STRETCHING FEELS SPOOKY Thinner materials that drape or stretch over the form of the body tend to create feelings of spookiness Last Cradle

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Individual Project

7 Months

OF

"indoors still ok, but when outdoors i’d rather something not so vulnerable looking”

STRUCTURED FORM FEELS MORE PROTECTIVE This becomes most relevant when deceased leaves family and/ or is outdoors (during transfer, handing over to undertakers)

NOT SPOOKY

SOFTENED FORM OF BODY FEELS WARM Softened silhouettes of body are acceptable. In some cases, they also feel protective. SHOW FORM OF BODY 295

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297

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

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Individual Project

299

7 Months

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Undergraduate Thesis Project

PROJECT TYPE

Undergraduate Thesis Project

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Students self-initiate a topic to research on based on their area of interests. They are then expected to design an innovative artifact that fulfills human needs and improves quality of life.

DURATION

7 Months

DELIVERABLES

Proof of Concept Research and Documentation

TEAM

YEAR

Product-Service Design

Nil 2017

In collaboratation with Ang Chin Moh Funeral Directors

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Individual Project

301

7 Months

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Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

302


Team Project

7 Months

08.

Greater Care: Design for Care Workers #SocialDesign # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #ServiceDesign #DesignSprint

BACK TO CONTENTS 303

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

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Team Project

7 Months

The Future of Caring for the Elderly Dementia and elderly day care centers rely heavily on front-line care workers to ensure quality care. However, quality care workers are difficult to attract, nurture, and retain. How might we support this profession to grow and improve?

Client

Kaohsiung City Government Senior Citizen's Service Center

Type

Design for Social Impact

Duration

4 days

Team Size

5

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Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

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KNOWN CHALLENGES

1. Worker shortage despite easy entry 2. Tough job requiring mental stamina and support 3. High turnover rate, poor quality of care

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Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

Day-Care Case Study We had the opportunity to visit Kaoshiung City Government Senior Citizen’s Service Center to learn about the issues their care workers face. The timeline was extremely tight, so we quickly got to work and tried to gather as many insights as possible through observation and interviews.

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Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

Quick Ideation and Validation The daycare center was kind enough to let us work in one of their rooms, allowing us to quickly clarify hunches and validate ideas on the spot.

Greater Care

310


Team Project

311

7 Months

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

INSIGHT 1

Holistic care requires tailored attention and rich experience • Every elderly person is different • Ability to handle difficult situations comes with exposure to many situations

Greater Care

312


Team Project

313

7 Months

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

INSIGHT 2

Sharing knowledge and experience between stakeholders is messy • No time for organised sharing • Small observations are sometimes forgotten and not shared • Sharing happens only by chance or among close friends Greater Care

314


Team Project

315

7 Months

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

“My m not to poop j

INSIGHT 3

Poor social image • •

Nobody aspires to be a care worker No support by the society and even family

Greater Care

316


Team Project

7 Months

other-in-law told me d o t h i s h e l p - e l d e r ly ob�

C a re Wo r k e r

317

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

WHAT KEEPS A CARE WORKER GOING?

Greater Care

CARE WORKER'S FUEL

LOVE RETURNED BY ELDERLY

OBSTACLE

INACCESSIBLE UNL EXPERIENCED

318


Team Project

LESS

319

7 Months

SUPPORT FROM OTHERS (TEAM, FAMILY, SOCIETY)

MONETARY

LITTLE SUPPORT FROM FAMILY AND SOCIETY

DEPENDENT ON SOCIAL IMAGE

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

320


Team Project

7 Months

H OW M I G H T W E

Support (new) care workers in a way that not only assists their day-to-day jobs, but also helps them feel more pride in their profession?

321

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

GREATER CARE A Tool that the Care Profession Wears With Pride C L I C K TO P L AY V I D E O

Greater Care

322


Team Project

7 Months

FA M I LY T I PS

OR

W

OBLEM

A I C

L

SO

323

KER

HIS TO R Y

N E EDS

ER CA R E WO R K

PR

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

FA M I LY T I PS

W

OBLEM

A

L

S

Greater Care

KER

OR

EDS

HIS TO R Y

NE

ER CA R E WO R K

PR

I OC

324


Team Project

7 Months

APP A platform that facilitates connection between stakeholders around the elderly

325

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

SMART BADGE Smart, Connected Tool that Care Workers are Proud to Wear • Microphone Equipped • AI Voice Assistant • Connected to Greater Care App • Grants priviliges at participating retailers

Greater Care

326


Team Project

327

7 Months

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

CONCEPT OVERVIEW APP Platform for stakeholders to share knowledge and experience

FA M I LY T I PS

OR

Married

W

OBLEM

A

L

S

Greater Care

KER

HIS TO R Y

N E EDS

ER CA R E WO R K

PR

Emotional

I C O

328


Team Project

7 Months

APP + BADGE

BADGE Need to wear diapers

Smart tool that care workers wear with pride

Give juice before meals Play Beatles to calm down

V O I C E A C T I VAT E D A S S I TA N T AT W O R K

R E C O R D E D T I P S A R E A U TO M AT I C A L LY C AT E G O R I S E D A N D U P LO A D E D TO A P P

• Record helpful tips as they are discovered • Help set reminders during work

l History Day care center

War

Dementia

329

BADGE OF COLLECTIVE PRIDE

FREE COFFEE AT O U R C A F E !

RECOGNITION AND A P P R E C I AT I O N B Y COMMUNITY

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Design for Social Impact

A CARE WORKER'S STETHOSCOPE Like a stethoscope, the Greater Care Badge aims to become a meaningful emblem of the care profession. More than a professional tool, the badge is a symbol of collective pride and a first step towards greater public recognition for the profession.

Greater Care

330


Team Project

331

7 Months

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

332


Team Project

7 Months

POSSIBLE EXTENSIONS Color coded badges that makes visible the care workers' years of experience, acknowledging the value of experience accumulated in an experience-driven profession.

333

Greater Care


Multi-Disciplinary Workshop

PROJECT TYPE

Multi-disciplinary Workshop

PROJECT BACKGROUND

A international workshop where students from different countries and disciplines come together to study aging related issues. Students are then expected to brainstorm innovative solutions from a global perspective and present them at the end of the workshop.

DURATION

4 Days

DELIVERABLES

Concept Presentation

TEAM

Jie-Chun Chen Yi-Tzu Li Takashi Maruya Julia Beer

YEAR

2017

Greater Care

Design for Social Impact

334


Team Project

335

7 Months

Greater Care


Self-initiated Projects

Leathercraft

Product Design & Craft

336


Individual Project

Duration Varies

09.

Leathercraft # Pro d u c t D e s i g n #Craft

BACK TO CONTENTS 337

Leathercraft


Self-initiated Projects

Leathercraft

Product Design & Craft

338


Individual Project

339

Duration Varies

Leathercraft


Self-initiated Projects

Leathercraft

Product Design & Craft

340


Individual Project

341

Duration Varies

Leathercraft


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