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REGIONAL MAGAZINE FOR KLAMATH, LAKE, MODOC AND SISKIYOU COUNTIES

Klamath Life Fly Away Air time

Getting an elevated perspective of the Basin

Art & Science meet Klamath Basin flytiers study life along the river

It’s a ducks life

Meet Seven, the wood duck — ambassador, educator and muse

Lady of the Woods:

Mystery, history surround figure at Crater Lake National Park Herald and News

June/July 2013

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2 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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3 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away


4 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly away

Fly away Inside:

On the cover: Uwe Britsch, owner of Pelican Aviation, takes H&N reporter Devan Schwartz for a tour of Klamath Basin skies. Page 7.

Destinations ◗ Up in the air:

Klamath pilots provide elevated Basin views. Page 7 ◗ Basin fly tying: Where art and science meet. Page 11

Cover photo by H&N photographer Steven Silton

Views of the Basin & beyond This edition of Klamath Life, the only locally produced magazine in the Basin, takes flight in many different ways. The theme is Fly Away and topics range from flying lessons to fly fishing to birds of a feather. The Herald and News staff literally catches some air by stretching their wings. H&N reporter Devan Schwartz and photographer Steven Silton take an aerial tour of the Basin with flight instructor Uwe Britsch, owner of Pelican Aviation. No fear of flying here. Join them as they pass by the scenic and ancient volcanoes of McLoughlin , Thielsen, Shasta and Mazama. Another type of popular flying is fly tying in the Basin. Long-time fishermen Dick Winter and Robert West lend their expertise to what works on the prolific trout of the region. They are highly regarded as experts and have a few tips for new anglers. Airborne Taxidermy takes wing under a story by H&N reporter Nora Avery-Page. To taxidermist Charlie Thurston, an 8-year-old wood duck named Seven is both pet and muse. Charlie and his wife, Deana, take their live show on the road to local schools and public events to speak about the art of taxidermy and the importance of waterfowl. If flying is not your mode of travel, relax with some homemade, refreshing summertime drinks. By simply mixing water with fruit, herbs and mixers from around the house, one can concoct hydrating options that can satisfy without being pumped up with sugars. We have several recipes, thanks to intrepid H&N reporter Dave Martinez. We also have a sampling of alcohol-based drinks for the more adventurous. The Lady of the Woods — just who is she? She is a rock formation or sculpture at Crater Lake. Is it fact, fiction or myth? Regional editor Lee Juillerat explores the story in depth. And, as usual, our local magazine offers tips on gardening, cultural events and a list of what’s on tap for the summer. So we hope you enjoy this edition and take advantage of some of the offerings. If you have suggestions, feel free to email us at news@heraldandnews.com. Gerry O’Brien, H&N Editor

Culture

◗ Folk Society

Chronicling life’s journey through music. Page 17

◗ Lady of the Woods:

Mystery, history surround Crater Lake figure. Page 21

37 33

Country living ◗ Meet Seven:

He’s more than simply a wood duck. Page 25 ◗ A way of life: 4-H tradition is shared across generations. Page 29

Home & garden ◗ A body of work:

Historic architect’s work endures. Page 33 ◗ Community gardens: Growing healthy food and healthy bodies. Page 37

Cuisine ◗ Cheers!

Infuse flavor into cool summer drinks. Page 43

◗ Spirited cooking:

21

Liven up a recipe with a splash of alcohol. Page 46

Also inside: ◗ Flora & Fauna:

Page 50

◗ Basin views: Page 52

29

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◗ On the Calendar:

Community events. Page 53


5 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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❘ Destinations

❘ Up in the air ❘

Taking in an elevated perspective of the Basin The Klamath Basin spreads

before us like a sheet, and the unique geology and topography become clear. Flat farmlands give way to hills rising like islands from a forgotten sea. Through the airplane windows we glimpse the volcanoes of Mount McLoughlin and Thielsen and the flanks of Shasta blanketed by cumulous clouds. Upper Klamath Lake’s long, sinuous tarpaulin extends toward Crater Lake and the former majesty of Mount Mazama. See AIR, page 8

By DEVAN SCHWARTZ H&N Staff Reporter

Far horizon: A truly spectacular view can be seen from Pelican Aviation’s small, fourseater Cessna 172. Learning to fly: Uwe Britsch, owner of Pelican Aviation, explains how he teaches students as reporter Devan Schwartz takes in the view. H&N photos by Steven Silton


❘ Destinations

8 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

AIR, from page 7

Whether it’s for personal travel, business travel, or for a bucket list, Our plane has two sets of ped- Britsch sees pilots of all different als and two yokes, and my question stripes come through the doors of is this: Why is the pilot telling me to Pelican Aviation. help steer us around the Basin, the He’s flown his own planes as far slightest twist of the wrist yawing as Alaska and the East Coast, preus unsteadily this way and that? ferring the flexibility and quickness Our photographer’s protestations over commercial flights, skipping are muffled by his withheld breath. the security routine of shoe and I gladly pass the controls back belt removal and pouring coffee — because I could fill a book with into the garbage can. all I don’t know about piloting, The Cesna 172 catches the and because this way I can actually faintest trace of turbulence on a enjoy the view. mostly clear morning, foreshadow Uwe Britsch is a flight instructor ing rain and thunderstorms the and owner of Pelican Aviation. His afternoon will see. Our pilot comease in the air comes from years of pares our plane to a Chevrolet — experience, from military flights, nobody likes them, but everybody acrobatics and former corporate owns one. flying for Jeld-Wen. He tells his Cockpit controls and flight stories in a ho-hum voice about instruments seem simple, like the island hopping in the Bahamas and first speed boat you ever rode in. day trips to Colorado, the kind of When we started up the engine, range that feels commonplace to gas was primed manually into the someone as used to a cockpit as a cylinders. driver’s seat. Rather than some fully auto Britsch tells us he has five to 10 mated experience, Britsch says one students at any time, who probably learns to fly using all the senses. The jump through some additional seeming simplicity makes it easy to hoops before getting their hands temporarily forget the beauty still on the yoke. surrounding us. Flight schools differ based on The pilot says he once flew a the type of training and loans they National Geographic photograaccept. Pelican Aviation doesn’t pher doing a story on migrating take Veterans Affairs benefits, and snow geese, and the photographer its programs are more one-on-one, required the plane door to stay moving at each student’s individual open throughout the flight. pace. Some see it as a hobby. Oth Britsch says Crater Lake is the ers see a pilot’s license as a leg up No. 1 site guests like to see, along for becoming a military pilot. with Spring Creek and the Klamath Recently he’d taught his teenRiver dams. He adds locals enjoy age daughter to fly, and he said glimpsing their homes from the it took her “a hell of a lot longer sky. to learn to drive — there are less See AIR, page 9 things to hit in the air.”

First flight: Herald and News reporter Devan Schwartz takes control of the Cessna 172 for a few turns during a short tour of the Basin. Flight experience: Uwe Britsch flies over Oregon Institute of Technology while answering questions about his piloting experiences over the years. H&N photos by Steven Silton

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❘ Destinations

9 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

AIR, from page 8 “I’d hate to live in Kansas or Indiana,” our pilot says. “This is a great area to fly. It’s scenic, and the geography makes it easy to navigate, if you can remember which mountain is which.” And though flight conditions are typically good, mountains combined with clouds can cause problems. “You should never be dodging mountains and clouds at the same time,” Britsch says. As we bank toward the Klamath Falls Airport runway, F-15 fighter jets screech by like an entirely different species. “I can’t tell you how many people don’t want to fly here because there are jets around,” he says. Although I didn’t think the fourseater plane made me nervous, I feel relieved as we touch down on the tarmac, the landing as uneventful to our pilot as pulling into a parking space. See AIR, page 10

‘This is a great area to fly. It’s scenic and the geography makes it easy to navigate, if you can remember which mountain is which.’ — Uwe Britsch, Pelican Aviation

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❘ Destinations

10 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

AIR, from page 9 ❘ A piece of aviation history ❘ Behind huge hangar doors are more small planes and a 1943 Fairchild PT-19 with a wooden propeller. The owner is David Junker, a certified flight instructor and a master sergeant stationed at Kingsley Field. He points out the wooden wings and fabric body and says it’s one of 80 or so still flying. PT-19s were used originally in the U.S. Army Air Corps, the

predecessor to the modern Air Force. “She turns 70 this year and still runs like a clock,” Junker said, with disassembly and reassembly part of each year’s makeover. The plane is now used for sightseeing tours and is limited to 25 nautical miles surrounding the runway. Junker learned to fly in Southern Louisiana and says the Klamath Basin is his favorite place to fly. He says he especially likes the “mountains, flatlands, swamps and nice big runways.

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The sun is usually shining except for winter, when it snows and then shines again.” Junker says his passion is teaching kids to fly and he’s instructed students who learn piloting skills as senior high school projects. His daughter, Sarah Junker, a sophomore at Klamath Union High School, is learning to fly and will soon fly solo. On July 20, the Eagle Flyout event, which Junker is highly involved in, will provide free flights for area children. Besides helping get kids into the air, Junker helps visiting pilots see the Basin from above. He says this is a common thing: a traveling pilot calls up local pilots to scratch that itch of flying. “It gives you a different perspective on the Basin,” Junker says. ❘ Flight economy could soar ❘ Jim Chadderdon, executive director of tourism organization Discover Klamath, said the Klamath Basin has potential to attract more private pilots looking for beautiful places to visit.

“We’re the closest airport to Crater Lake and they could take the Crater Lake Trolley up there,” Chadderdon said. “Or they could do birding. We’ve got all these wildlife refuges and (Lava Beds National Monument). They could connect with ROE Outfitters to do rafting or go fishing on the Klamath River. They don’t have to bring any equipment or anything. We’ve got adventure, certainly.” Chadderdon has researched the economic benefits of affluent pilots visiting communities. He additionally brainstormed bundling packages with Ross Ragland Theater shows, or with local dining and lodging options. “The thing about Klamath is we’ve got an airport you can get in and out of without a lot of air traffic. We have fuel. We’ve got rental cars right at the airport. That’s a big plus, and all these activities to do. It’s an undeveloped little niche that we should be playing more aggressively.”

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❘ Destinations

11 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Klamath Basin fly tying: Where art & science meet Expert flytier Dick

Winter was once dubbed “King of the Klamath” by Fly Tyer Magazine, and for good reason.

Story by GERRY O’BRIEN: H&N Editor

Winter is a premier flytier in the Basin and has studied the Klamath, Williamson, Sprague and Wood rivers and their tributaries for nearly all his life. Fifty years of making hard-to-beat commercial flies for fishermen has not slowed him down. Now 81, Winter ties for the fun of it, and only for a few choice friends. Many other local flytiers give a nod to Winter as the best in the region. Winter and his wife, Madge, live in a small home in Klamath Falls, where he has his fly-tying materials neatly laid out, organized and labeled at a work bench. The walls sport numerous photos of fish caught, awards and magazine articles written about his skills. Winter is humble about most of it, but one award does stand out and that is the 2008 Oregon Council of Federation of Fly Fishers’ flytier of the year. That was voted on by his peers and he’s particularly proud of that recognition. Winter’s favorite flies are the ones he catches fish on, he likes to say, especially the ones tied by himself. See FLYTIERS, page 12

Testing the waters: Dick Winter is a well known local flytier. At 81 he’s held in high regard for developing flies that work under all sorts of conditions. H&N photo by Steven Silton


❘ Destinations

12 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Winter started this labor of love back in 1955. He was a ranch hand on his grandmother’s place along the Rogue River and got hooked there. The ranch he was on was next door to Ginger Rogers’ land, the famous dancer. FLYTIERS, from page 11 “There is no better feeling than catching a trout on a fly that you tied,” he said. “It’s a big thrill.” And he has some remarkable creations. One is the black drake mayfly spinner made for the Williamson River near its headwaters where the waters run clear and cold. That particular mayfly comes off the river the first of June. “I gave some to a doctor friend, who said, ‘Those flies are dead on, I want some more!’ ” It is probably the most-sold fly when Winter was commercially tying 50 dozen flies a year. The other favorite he developed is a big, yellow mayfly that comes off the Williamson in July. It’s known as a hexagenia limbata or “big yellow mayfly.” “It’s the world’s largest mayfly, and they are big. (The fly is a size 6). They hatch just at dark. It lasts for 20 minutes and it’s over. Fishing those 20 minutes is better than a whole week of fishing,” Winter said. The flies look like miniature sailboats on the water, their wings up in a triangular shape. Once they start popping up, one can see them all over the river. The trout that strike a fly that big are called “toilet flushers” and with good reason. Most are more than 20- to 24-inches in length. Winter started this labor of love back in 1955. He was a ranch hand on his grandmother’s place along the Rogue River and got hooked there. The ranch he was on was next door to Ginger Rogers’ land, the famous dancer. “Ranching doesn’t pay all that well and me and my wife were raising two children, so I tied flies to supplement our income,” he said. Born and raised in Klamath, Winter returned to the Basin to work as a service manager for a car dealership until it later folded. He was about 60 at the time and poured his time into making flies that work. “What I really like to do is study insects and come up with flies that mimic them,” he said. He often quotes the Latin genus and species names for the various insects found on the river. See FLYTIERS, page 13


❘ Destinations

13 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

FLYTIERS, from page 12 He credits others who went before him with teaching him the trade. “Bill Nelson, of Eugene, who passed away this year, was one of the men who founded the International Federation of Fly Fishers. He asked me to tie up steelhead flies he could show off at a conclave of fly-fishermen. “From there, ‘Polly’ Rossborough of Chiloquin, said he saw my flies and hired me. He was an irascible fellow, but I learned a lot from him. He was also quite famous at one time, but we called him ‘Polly’ because once he started talking, he wouldn’t stop.” Winter was hired by national retailer Orvis for a while, which asked for 2,500 dozen flies in one year. He later found out he could make more money tying his own and struck out from there. H&N photos by Steven Silton

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❘ Destinations

14 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

FLYTIERS, from page 13 He is part of the local Klamath Country Flycasters club that has done a boat-load of reclamation work up and down the rivers since its inception in 1971. “The most important thing nowadays is the habitat. If we don’t save or improve the habitat, you won’t have the trout runs you have

today. The club did a lot of that improvement over the years,” he said. He doesn’t get out to fish as much anymore, but one can be assured that many of his flies are on the water in the hands of up and coming fly fishermen. See FLYTIERS, page 15

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❘ Destinations

15 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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FLYTIERS, from page 14

West, a route driver for Pepsi-Cola, says spending time observing on the river is the best way to get to know it. Robert West: Tying a fly “Sometimes finding fish is like finding a needle in a haystack, so getting that just plain works to know the river and where the fish Robert West, 47, of Klamath Falls is are laying is important. It’s the same humble about his fly tying skills. While for lakes and streams.” he admits he hasn’t reached the artistic level of Dick Winter’s flies, he’s Unlike Winter, whose flies are produced a host of variables that just more artistic in nature, West likes to keep his tying simple and efficient. plain work. “Dick Winter is at a whole ’nother “I just like to tie some basic flies level. He’s a great teacher. He’s able to that work on all the rivers around here. They are nothing fancy, but break it all down for the uninitiated.” sometimes you stumble onto some- He favors the variety of stoneflies, thing as a variation and you find out it salmon flies and elk hair caddis. works.” He’s tied his own flies for nearly 35 He’s philosophical about tying flies years. Growing up in the Tulelake area, and fishing in general. “Sometimes, it’s like a chess match West has tested all the waters in the to get the right flies on the water, region. He started tying his own flies especially if it’s real clear,” he said. “But when he was 13. if you stick with it, like any pursuit, His favorites include: and stay observant, you can do pretty 1. Salmon Fly imitation for the well.” Klamath River West ties for himself, but also 2. Wooly bugger for the Williamoffers hand-tied flies and custom rods son and Rogue rivers 3. Bead-head prince nymph for the made to order. If interested, call 541892-3320. Williamson and other streams 4. Hair’s ear nymph gobrien@heraldandnews.com

H&N photos by Gerry O’Brien

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❘ Culture

17 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Klamath Basin’s Folk Music Society ❘

Chronicling life’s journey through music

M

easured strums of Bill Palmer’s hand push lilting chords from his acoustic guitar, tenderly filling The Leap of Taste coffee shop on Main Street.

The songs he plays are simple, tent-poled by three, maybe four chords. A verse, a chorus, then repeat. The guitar is not the focal point, only the framing apparatus, the background that bolsters the true purpose of Palmer’s songs — the words. Palmer is playing folk music, a style typified not by virtuosity of an instrument, but by the stories it tells. It’s music for long country and big skies, a medium to chronicle life from a bygone era — a time being slowly swallowed by the hectic pace of modern life. By ANDREW CREASEY: H&N Staff Reporter

Case in point; Palmer’s lyrics from his song “When I Looked Into Your Eyes,” released on his 2002 album “Water and Life:” “And I feel your heart beat And it takes me back to when we met Drinkin’ Coke from a 10-cent bottle And we’d sit outside that General Store Then we’d ride that John Deere at full throttle Into the August night” See FOLK, page 18

In the society of folk: The Folk Music Society’s next jam session is from 7 to 10 p.m. today, June 8 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars hall at 515 Klamath Ave. They will present Folk Music in the Park at Veterans Memorial Park on July 27. “We’re trying to grow, we’re looking for people who want a camaraderie with other musician and people that like to listen to others,” said member Bill Palmer. For more information, email Palmer at harleyjamesradio@charter.net.

Telling tales: Mike Campbell on violin accompanies Bill Palmer on guitar during a Folk Music Society session at Leap of Taste. H&N photo by Steven Silton


❘ Culture

18 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

FOLK, from page 17 The stories often carry a message or teach a lesson. Written after the water shortage of 2001, “Water and Life” is Palmer’s way of supporting the farmers whose livelihoods were threatened that year. From his song, “Water and Life:” “In the sun it looks like silver meandering like the river Yet it’s worth its weight in gold And Klamath Lake’s got all it can hold “So what’s it gonna take to get us off the hook What would it say to do in the good book From what I’ve read and I’ve heard said Maybe sharing the wealth is worth a second look” So what is folk music, then? Does it tell stories or send a message? Is it blues music? Country, rock or jazz? Ask 10 people for their definition of folk music, and you’ll likely get 10 different answers. It is with this in mind that Palmer and a group of local musicians formed the Folk Music Society last September — to educate the community about the tenets of folk music while finding others who share their passion along the way. See FOLK, page 19

Something I think what sets

this group apart is that they are mutually respectful to the performer, it’s a listening crowd because it’s a performing crowd. They’d rather play for free for people who listen than getting paid to play to the backs of heads.’ — Mike Campbell Folk Music Society

Shared passion: Playing for a quiet audience at the Leap of Taste on Main Street recently are Folk Music Society members Bonnie Campbell on drum and Joan Daley and Ted Schneringer on guitar. H&N photos by Steven Silton


❘ Culture

19 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

FOLK, from page 18 The group gathers at the VFW Post 1383 hall on Klamath Avenue on the first Saturday of each month — to serenade each others with songs, many of which are originals. “Something I think what sets this group apart is that they are mutually respectful to the performer, it’s a listening crowd because it’s a performing crowd,” said Mike Campbell, a fiddler and member of the Folk Music Society. “They’d rather play for free for people who listen than getting paid to play to the backs of heads.” The time is usually devoted to the members of the society — about 30 — but Palmer said they usually don’t turn down requests to play. If anything, the welcoming, attentive audience is an ideal setting for first-time performers, said percussionist Bonnie Campbell. The jam session also is a way for Folk Society members, many of whom are life-long musicians, to get their fix. “Some people get the feeling from dance, some people get the feeling from lifting weights. These people get that feeling from music,” Mike Campbell said. “They center themselves; it makes them whole in

a way that can’t get any other way.” Palmer, now retired after teaching for 30 years, calls music “the centerpiece of my life right now.” See FOLK, page 20

H&N photo by Steven Silton

A feeling for music: Mike Campbell, left, Bill Palmer, center, and Bonnie Campbell play “Wagon Wheel” at Leap of Taste. Monthly jam sessions at the VFW hall give Folk Society members an opportunity to get their musical fix.

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❘ Culture

20 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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Root of folk music: Folk Society member Bill Palmer sees folk music as a way to communicate life experience. H&N photo by Steven Silton

FOLK, from page 19

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Folk Society members cite artists such as Woody Guthrie, Johnny So, back to the question: What is Cash and U. Utah Phillips as influfolk music? ences. “It’s a roots music. It’s music And with their group estabthat’s part of our lives,” Palmer said. lished, folk society members are “It’s anything you grew up with, any- focused on spreading the music of thing you used in your life to write the folks throughout the Klamath music. Basin. “It’s the idea of telling about his- “Klamath can improve its culture tory. It’s communicating something a little bit. We’re part of the cultural from person to person not over the education of music,” Palmer said. airwaves or in print,” Palmer added. “It’s tough to find a place to play

here. That’s something we’re trying to get going. We’re hoping it will educate and bring in other musicians.” So far, it seems to be working. “We’re learning that there’s an underground of people that play and write and perform that you don’t even hear about,” Palmer said. “This is helping connect them with that.” acreasey@heraldandnews.com; @HN_ Creasey

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❘ Culture

21 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

❘ Lady of the Woods ❘

Mystery, history surround figure at Crater Lake By LEE JUILLERAT: H&N Regional Editor

S

he’s a sign of spring.

Much of the year, Crater Lake National Park’s mysterious woman remains cloaked and hidden in snow. As warming temperatures gradually melt the snow, the Lady of the Woods emerges. Most years the Lady isn’t viewable until June or July. But the park’s lower-than-average snowfall, combined with unusually warm spring days, revealed the Lady in early May, the unfinished sculpture of a naked woman carved into a boulder just a short walk from the Steel Information Center. For decades the Lady was the stuff of imagination and rumors. Some thought she was a petrified woman, possibly frozen in stone by the heat and ashes of Mount Mazama during its climactic explosions more than 7,700 years ago. Others wondered if it might be a pagan shrine or a monument to a lost love, or a clever hoax devised to draw attention to the park. Actually, it was none of the above. The Lady was carved in 1917 by Dr. Earl R. Bush, then a 31-year-old surgeon with the U.S. Health Bureau who was stationed in the park to provide medical care for crews from the U.S. Engineers who were building the first road around the lake. According to park historian Steve Mark, work had mostly ceased by October so Bush, using tools provided by a government blacksmith, spent about two weeks chiseling and hammering the form of a woman. See LADY, page 22 The Lady’s creator: Dr. Earl R. Bush, a surgeon with the U.S. Health Bureau who was stationed at Crater Lake in 1917, carved the figure of a woman into a boulder at the park. Submitted photo H&N photo by Lee Juillerat


❘ Culture

22 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

❘ Carving the Lady ❘

LADY, from page 21

‘None of the others knew just what I was

When he left the park on Oct. 20, the Lady stayed behind. It wasn’t until years later that Bush was revealed as the Lady’s creator. When he returned to the park in 1954, he explained his motivation. “This statute represents my offering to the forest, my interpretation of its awful stillness and repose, its beauty, fascination and unseen life,” Bush said. “A deep love of this virgin wilderness has fastened itself upon me and remains today. It seemed that I must leave something behind.” He also explained the lack of markings, saying, “If it arouses thought in those who see it, I shall be amply repaid. I shall be satisfied to leave my feeble attempt as sculptural expres-

doing all day for about a week. Curiosity got the better of them however ... .’ In 1953, from his home in Florida, Dr. Earl Bush described his experiences at Crater Lake in 1917 in a letter to park naturalist Richard Brown. Along with fascinating revelations about experiences traveling to the park with his wife and child, friendships with park staff, a night spent on Wizard Island and the death of a construction foreman, Bush provided details on carving the Lady of the Woods. “I was wholly unacquainted with the techniques of sculpturing and had no model,” Bush wrote. “I must have had some sort of inspiration … . None of the others knew just what I was doing all day for about a week. Curiosity got the better of them, however, and one day they trailed me by the tap-tap of my hammer. It

embarrassed me for I suddenly felt rather ridiculous. They reassured me by their praises, but nevertheless I pledged them to secrecy.” Bush said he later studied clay modeling and sculpturing. During that time, one of those who had seen Bush at work revealed the artist. “Perhaps the most interesting part has been the aftermath,” Bush wrote Brown, noting the attention even resulted in a San Francisco musician incorporating the Lady into a symphony, “Crater Lake Suite.” “I have quite a scrapbook of clippings, postcards, pictures and correspondence,” he wrote. “It has made me both happy and proud that I aroused so much interest.”

sion alone and unmarked, for those who happen to see it and who may find food for thought along the line (of what) it arouses in them individually. It would be sacrilege to assign a title and decorate it with a brass plate.” Fred Kiser, the photographer who did much to promote Crater Lake through his handcolored black-and-white images, suggested the Lady of the Woods title and, according to Mark, installed a sign leading to the Lady. In the 1930s, a park employee was the first to object to featuring the sculpture as a point of interest in a “natural” area. Over the decades, Park Services signs directing visitors to the Lady have appeared and disappeared. See LADY, page 23

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Inspiration: Crater Lake National Park historian Steve Mark considers the Lady a reminder of a different time that serves to instruct and inspire.

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❘ Culture

23 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

LADY, from page 22

❘ Crater Lake mystery makes state headlines ❘ The mystery of the Lady of the Woods deepened and increased when Anne Shannon Monroe, a writer for the Oregonian newspaper, wrote a front page story on Aug. 28, 1921. In the July 1925 Steel Points, an occasional publication by William Gladstone Steel, who is known as “the Father of Crater Lake” for his efforts to have Crater Lake designated as a national park, added his thoughts: “Unknowingly, this figure in stone has been given some of the grace of the Sleeping Ariadne, the sleeping beauty of the days of Casar (sic) Augustus. All who looking upon this tribute to the forest linger to admire and leave with thoughts of gratitude to the silent, ever present power that directs the human mind in mysterious ways.”

Meet the Lady: The Lady of the Lake is located about a quarter mile from park headquarters in Munson Valley. If the signs are not in place, ask for directions from the park information desk.

Mark, however, considers the Lady a reminder of a different time. “Whereas the function of most built features at park headquarters has been put in terms of visitor services (information, restrooms) or support facilities (employee housing, offices, equipment storage), the Lady of the Woods serves to instruct and inspire,” Mark wrote in the May 2002 issue of “Southern Oregon Heritage Today.” “The sculpture can speak to change, because eight decades ago the park headquarters looked considerably different than it does today. “When Bush made his carving in 1917, there were only three log buildings and a barn with no attempt at year-round occupancy of the site. Less than a decade later the National Park Service began building a headquarters on the site of the former camp road, then slowly expanded it over time to impinge on the sanctity of the mostly undisturbed forest that Bush once knew.”

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❘ Culture

24 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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❘ Country Living

25 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

MORE THAN A DUCK ambassador, educator, family member,

LIFE MODEL, muse, pet, son of Newt, wood duck, star of the show, CAMERA HAM, center of attention, endangered species list graduate, colorful

T

o Charlie Thurston, Seven, an 8-year-old wood duck, is both a pet and muse for his taxidermy work.

Model behavior: Seven is not only a pet to Charlie Thurston, but he helps him in his work as a taxidermist. Seven models for Thurston so he can see how a duck would place its feet on a branch or rock, for example. H&N photo by Nora Avery-Page

Thurston and his wife, Deana, have raised Seven since before he was hatched, talking to the egg so the bird would recognize their voices, and continuing the connection after he hatched so the duckling would imprint on them. Seven, along with his fellow ducks — Ari, a Chinese mandarin, and Rusty, a cinnamon teal — act as ambassadors to Charlie’s taxidermy company, Airborne Taxidermy, and help the couple teach people more about waterfowl both at bird festivals and in classrooms. Seven is usually the star of the show. “He’s had so many different pictures of him,” Charlie said. “It actually seems like he enjoys it a lot.” See SEVEN, page 26 By NORA AVERY-PAGE H&N Staff Reporter


❘ Country Living

26 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

When they go to schools,

Deana and Charlie let Rusty fly over the students, and Charlie said the children are amazed they can feel the breeze from the wings of the small duck.

‘We always hear, ‘do it again, do it again,’ ’ — Charlie Thurston

Ready for a lesson: Deana and Charlie Thurston hold two pet ducks they use for teaching young students about waterfowl. Deana holds Rusty, a cinnamon teal, while Charlie holds Seven, a wood duck. H&N photo by Nora Avery-Page

SEVEN, from page 25 “He likes being the center of attention,” Deana added. “Sometimes I swear he’s posing.” But Seven does get shy when he is molted out, Charlie said; the duck, who normally has a wide variety of color in his feathers — from green, to an iridescent purple with little streaks of orange — does not want to talk or be touched when he is molting, Charlie said. Seven and the other birds act as three-dimensional models for Charlie and other taxidermists to see how the fowl act, what their attitude is, and more.

The Thurstons give presentations at the annual Winter Wings Festival in Klamath Falls and the Tule Lake Migratory Bird Festival, as well as visit local classrooms to teach students about birds. “We tell people how birds’ wings and legs are similar to a person in construction,” Charlie said. They also explain how the birds’ eyes work, how the oil on their feathers protects them from water, and emphasize birds also have personalities, Charlie explained. “We just teach the children with simple language,” he said. When they go to schools, Deana

and Charlie let Rusty fly over the students, and Charlie said the children are amazed they can feel the breeze from the wings of the small duck. “We always hear, ‘do it again, do it again,’ ” Charlie said.

❘ About Seven ❘ Seven is the son of Newt, who came to the Thurstons years ago when another taxidermist from Cape Cod, Mass., was in Klamath Falls to give a presentation. The man’s daughter was raising the ducks, and he brought three with him. Newt, at 3 months old, walked right out into Charlie’s hand, he said.

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The Thurstons brought Newt to their education presentations for about four years, but the bird died a year ago at the age of 13. Seven has been part of the presentations since he was a duckling, Deana said. Charlie said in 1952, wood ducks were on the endangered species list, but have since begun to thrive. Wood ducks are now the secondmost common duck in the United States, behind mallards, Charlie said. They are also the most colorful duck in North America, he added. See SEVEN, page 27

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❘ Country Living

27 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

SEVEN, from page 26 “When the sun hits him just right, it’s like an oil spill across his back,” Charlie said of Seven’s coloring. His good looks have probably helped Seven with the ladies, too. The bird has had a cinnamon teal, Belle, as a girlfriend, and also has been close with two other female wood ducks, Charlie said. Charlie’s parents bought their Klamath Falls home in 1963, but their son and Deana have made several renovations to the property, including knocking out the original back wall to create a large living room with high ceilings and lots of windows. The new back windows look out into a bird sanctuary, complete with a small pond and many perches, where Seven, Ari and Rusty live. In another corner of the yard, the Thurstons have an additional duck enclosure where their nine breeding ducks, including cinnamon teals, wood ducks and hooded mergansers, live. Deana also raises rabbits, which occupy yet another corner of the yard. A chicken coop rounds out the space. “We’ve set up our yard like our own little oasis,” Charlie said. See SEVEN, page 28

H&N photo by Nora Avery-Page

Backyard sanctuary: Deana Thurston looks in on Seven, a wood duck, who lives in a bird sanctuary built at the back of her house.

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❘ Country Living

SEVEN, from page 27 ❘ Taxidermist at work ❘ As a model, Seven gives Charlie an idea of how a bird places its feet on a piece of wood or rock he uses as a base for his taxidermy, as well as how the wings would lay and how the neck is constructed. Because Seven is so used to being touched, Charlie can really get a hands-on idea of how his creations should look. After getting out of the Army, Charlie said he asked himself what he wanted to do. He had always enjoyed hunting and fishing, so he settled on taxidermy. When he was a young boy, Charlie said his father wanted him to have experience with a variety of wildlife. ”It’s been something I was involved in since I was a little kid,” he said. “It’s kind of been in his blood,”

28 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Deana added. After taking a taxidermy class in Iowa, Charlie worked on his own for a while, but later worked for another local taxidermist. With that job, he was able to work on a variety of exotic animals, but his passion is for birds, Charlie said. “I like all the American stuff,” Charlie said. “I like doing that. I think birds are really pretty in the colors they’ve been given.” Waterfowl are particularly interesting to Charlie, he said, because they have the ability to go anywhere, whether in water, on land, or in the air. Charlie’s relationship with the birds is almost cyclical — not only does he have them as pets, like Seven, but he also hunts and will eat the birds in addition to his taxidermy

work. “It softens your heart to have

them at home,” Charlie said. But because the wood ducks in particular are so plentiful in the country, he doesn’t worry about his own consumption. And Deana said many hunters prefer the taste of wood ducks because the birds’ diet includes many nuts. It takes Charlie about five hours to create a small bird taxidermy, not including an extra hour to attach it to a base, plus as long as a month to dry. He is currently working on a set for Nevada Fish and Game as a traveling exhibit for schools. On commission, when the birds are brought to him from a hunter, for example, Charlie charges $265 for a taxidermy duck. “It’s a lot of fun — it’s better than doing hard labor,” Charlie said.

Shot full: Over the years, Charlie Thurston has collected more than a shot glass full of small bullets and shot pellets from the birds he mounts for taxidermy. Move like a duck: The Thurstons visit schools and educational festivals, like the Winter Wings Festival, to teach children more about birds. Here, Charlie Thurston shows how a duck moves its neck. H&N photos by Nora Avery-Page

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❘ Country Living

29 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Generation by generation — 4-H is a way of life Jordon Doke, 21, has no problem showing her younger brother and step-sister how to wrestle a lamb, wash it and shear it. After participating in 4-H from fourth grade to her senior year in high school, she knows her stuff. Even though her 4-H participation days are behind her, she is happy to lend a hand to her younger siblings still in the program.

By SAMANTHA TIPLER: H&N Staff Reporter

Choice lamb: 4-H members of the Poe Valley Community Club choose lambs for this year’s projects. H&N photo by Samantha Tipler

“It was what I grew up knowing, and it was just something I always did,” Jordon said. “It’s cool to see them do well, knowing you helped them and teaching them different things. I did it even before fourth grade. I always had a little lamb.” Jordon and her siblings and cousins are the third generation in her family to participate in 4-H. Her mother, Margaret McCadden, and aunt, Leslie Garrett, are the leaders of the Poe Valley Community Club. McCadden and Garrett’s father, Joe Arant, ran the club when they were children. “I always showed sheep,” McCadden said. “I stuck with sheep all the way through fourth grade

until I was a senior in high school.” Her nieces, nephews and children have all done 4-H. Currently, her son, Avery Baker, 15, and stepdaughter, Chelsea McCadden, 14, show sheep. Avery also shows goats. McCadden said there was never any pressure or expectation for the children to start with 4-H. They wanted to do it. “They just always said, ‘When do I get to show sheep,’ ” McCadden said. “So it was never pushed or assumed, but they assumed it. The little kids couldn’t wait until they were in fourth grade.” See GENERATIONS, page 30


❘ Country Living

30 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

‘(4-H) teaches you to care about something besides yourself and know that you have to take care of something. It taught me a lot.’ — Jordon Doke

GENERATIONS, from page 29 “I always looked up to my older cousins and older members of the club, too,” Jordon said. “I remember being little and thinking how cool those kids were.” Perhaps the biggest community impact the 4-H program has on Klamath County is the impact it has on individuals. In addition to teaching children and teens about livestock, it teaches them about hard work, record keeping, responsibility and community service. There are nearly 500 4-H participants in Klamath County in 30 clubs, said Jedediah Smith, county 4-H agent with the Oregon State University Extension Service. There are also 140 volunteers leading clubs and helping out. “It’s not that I only believe in my club,” McCadden said. “I believe in the whole 4-H community. They’re just out and around. It just brings everyone together. They understand giving back to the community.” What 4-H teaches: Every Memorial Day, the Poe Valley Community 4-H Club goes to Mount Laki Cemetery to post American flags. Club members also clean the grounds of the cemetery and the Mount Laki Church, where monthly meetings are held. “We learn the history of our community when we’re out there,” McCadden said. Other lessons from 4-H include time management, interview skills and responsibility. “One of the biggest things they get out of this is a strong work ethic,” said Garrett, McCadden’s sister and fellow 4-H leader. “It teaches you to care about something besides yourself and know that you have to take care of something,” Jordon said. “It taught me a lot. How to work with other people. Having a commitment you have to stick to and follow through with.” “It teaches them responsibility,” Garrett said. “Older kids mentor the younger kids. It teaches perseverance. It gets frustrating.” Jordon said she had to be up and feeding her lambs at 6 a.m., then back each evening to exercise and feed them again. See GENERATIONS, page 31 Shearing time: Jordon Doke, 21, and her brother, Avery Baker, 15, shear a sheep to get it ready for 4-H participants to choose for their summer projects. H&N photos by Samantha Tipler


❘ Country Living

31 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

GENERATIONS, from page 30

H&N photo by Samantha Tipler

Watching and learning: Six-year-old Hagen Balsz watches his older cousin, Avery Baker, 15, wash a sheep and prep it for shearing.

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McCadden said when her children come to the breakfast table in the morning, the first thing she asks is if they fed their animals. The animals come first. Lots of 4-H options: Even though 4-H is most commonly associated with agriculture — lambs, beef, pigs and goats — it encompasses much more. “There are so many things all the kids do,” Garrett said. The programs include small animals, such as chickens and rabbits. Photography, sewing, cooking and archery are a few of the more unusual activities that reach a broad range of interests. Smith, the county 4-H agent, said shooting sports are a growing category in Klamath County. The goal is to have 5,000 youth in the program statewide by 2015. In Klamath County, there are more than 60 4-H participants working in archery, rifle, pistol, shotgun, muzzle loader and western action (like cowboy speed shooting). See GENERATIONS, page 32

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❘ Country Living

32 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Lending a hand: Jordon Doke, left, washes a sheep with her brother and step-sister, Avery Baker, 15, and Chelsea McCadden, 16. Chelsea and Avery are in 4-H now, Jordon is a graduate of the 4-H program but still lends a hand to help her siblings. H&N photo by Samantha Tipler

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GENERATIONS, from page 31 Jordon, along with her brother Avery and step-sister Chelsea, spent a mid-May Saturday washing and shearing sheep. That meant wrestling the unruly animals out of the barn for the wash and back in for the shearing. It took all of them, plus Garret, to get the job done. Standing on the sidelines holding a brush was 6-year-old Hagen Balsz, McCadden’s grandson. He seemed absolutely transfixed by watching his family work. McCadden said it won’t be long before the fourth generation

of her family is showing sheep with 4-H. She has a grand-nephew who will be in fourth grade next year, ready to start. McCadden said 4-H is a continuing part of her family and others, and so it is a part of the community. “If you look at Klamath County, we go deep with leaders that have been involved for many, many, many years,” McCadden said. “And same thing for the families that have done it for years.”

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❘ Home & Garden

33 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

A body of work

Photos courtesy of the Klamath County Museum

Klamath architect’s work endures; fills historic building registries Howard Perrin was a Klamath Falls architect whose body of work, from original designs to remodels, fills a 21-page long list at the Klamath County Museum — a building which he designed. To get a glimpse of the influence he had on how the city looks, five of the many buildings in the core of the city of Klamath Falls he designed are described. While the Klamath County Museum is the only building he designed which is on the National Register of Historic Places, many others are in the Oregon Inventory of Historic Properties. The followBy LEE BEACH: H&N Staff Reporter

ing descriptions of each are from State Historic Preservation Office listings or the Oregon inventory of historic properties historic resource surveys. ◗ Klamath County Museum — 1451 Main St.: It was originally built as the county’s National Guard armory in 1935. It is a two-story brick building which stands at the corner of Spring and Main streets. The building exhibits elements of the Art Deco style, especially in the decorative metal sections located between the first and second See HISTORIC, page 34

HOWARD PERRIN — KLAMATH’S GRAND ARCHITECT Howard Perrin was born in Pawtucket, R.I., March 10, 1891. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering at Brown University in 1914. He practiced as an engineer and architect in Boston from 1914 to 1921 in the firm Perrin, Harvey and Watkins and with Aberthaw Construction Co. In 1922, he moved to Klamath Falls, opened an office and worked from there for the next 47 years. The one exception, according to a letter from his son on file at the Klamath County Museum, was two years spent in Portland helping design the Vanport Housing Project, which was destroyed by flooding from the Columbia River on Memorial Day, 1948. When he came to Klamath Falls, it was to design the Pine Tree Theater project, which he later managed. He designed his own home — 825 Pacific Terrace — which was featured in a 1928 issue of the Evening Herald. Among his designs and remodels, he worked on the American Legion Veterans Memorial Building, Elks Temple, Klamath County Jail, Hillside Hospital, Dorris and Lakeview city halls, Oregon Technical Institute (now Oregon Institute of Technology), Kingsley Field and numerous schools from Butte Valley and Cedarville to Crescent and Lakeview with many more in between. He was a member of the American Institute of Architects and served on the Oregon Board of Architectural Examiners, 1940-54. He retired in 1969 and died Oct. 16, 1980.


❘ Home & Garden HILLSIDE HOSPITAL

34 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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Photos courtesy of the Klamath County Museum

HISTORIC, from page 33 stories. Mounted between the first and second stories near the entries are partial figures of soldiers in World War I period uniforms and helmets. ◗ Central Fire Station — 143 Broad St.: Built in 1931, the design offers little ornamentation beyond a pattern in the brickwork on the parapet and the suggestion of pilasters worked into the brick on the front corners. Over the garage-type double doors in front is another brick design, suggesting quoins, or exterior angles. ◗ Elk Hotel-Hirvi Building (now the Elk Apartments) — 1111 Main St.: The Hirvi Building was constructed in 1930 for Jacob and Elvira Hirvi, Finnish immigrants who opened a bakery in Klamath Falls that operated until 1940. After the White Pelican Hotel burned at the corner of Main Street and Esplanade Avenue in 1926, the Hirvis saw an opportunity to open another large hotel on the east edge of the commercial core area. The edifice took the name of the Hotel Elk. In 1961, the hotel was named The Winema and a major rehabilitation occurred. It was originally in the Art Deco style, with terra cotta decorative features. It now houses residential apartments. ◗ Golden Rule Building — 803 Main St.: This brick building was originally constructed with two stories in 1928-29 for Edgar Vannice’s expanding Golden Rule Store. Designed in the Art Deco style, of buff vertical brick with terra cotta decorative features, it is one of four significant buildings erected on the block from 1928 to 1930. In 1937, the store was sold to J.C. Penny Co. Perrin designed a third story that was erected just after World War II. More recently, it was home to South Valley Bank and Trust, which was acquired by Washington Federal in 2012. ◗ Willard Hotel — 203 Main St.: Constructed in 1926 at an initial cost of $150,000, the Willard Hotel demonstrates a period mission style. It has concrete quoins, inset spandrels — ornamented spaces — on the top story, with a concrete belt. At a height of six stories, it remains one of the tallest buildings in Klamath Falls. One hundred rooms were planned above the first floor; a lobby, coffee shop, barber shop and two store buildings were designed on the first floor. Perrin designed a banquet hall addition in 1928. To the east is the former Montgomery Ward building (also known as Jennings Furniture), designed by Perrin, which complements the Willard architecturally. See HISTORIC, page 36

PROTECTING THE STATE’S CULTURAL AND HISTORIC RESOURCES The Oregon State Historic Preservation education on cultural heritage issues. Office (SHPO) was established in 1967 to ◗ Main Street: work with communities manage and administer programs for the to develop revitalization strategies based on protection of the state’s historic and cultural a community’s unique assets, character and resources, as stated on its website. heritage. It was created out of the concern that ◗ National Register of Historic Places: when these resources disappear, communi- Assists property owners, governments and ties lose tangible and educational assets that interested citizens in listing Oregon’s most contribute directly to Oregon’s heritage, and historically important resources in the also opportunities for local economic devel- National Register of Historic Places. opment. SHPO assists city planners and ◗ National Register of Historic Places other officials, property owners and presPreserving Oregon Grant : Matching ervation groups to find forward-thinking grant for rehabilitation work that supports solutions to protect and preserve the past. the preservation of historic resources listed Some of the programs which operate in the National Register of Historic Places archaeological sites. Tax incentives and under the preservation department are: scholarships are provided. ◗ Archaeological Services: to protect Oregon’s archaeological sites and provide Source: tinyurl.com/aarp2rq NEARLY 30 KLAMATH COUNTY STRUCTURES ON NATIONAL REGISTRY Twenty-nine Klamath County struchistory. Other structures might qualify to be tures, located from Crater Lake National listed, but owners have not gone through Park to Klamath Falls’ Main Street to Bly, are the arduous process of meeting all neceslisted on the National Register of Historic sary requirements to qualify to be included. Places and can be found at tinyurl.com/ Many more structures are of historical interabl24gv. Many structures have been lost to est, but wouldn’t qualify for the registry.

WILLARD HOTEL — 203 MAIN ST.

H&N photo by Steven Silton


35 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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❘ Home & Garden

36 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

HISTORIC, from page 34

THE GOLDEN RULE — 803 MAIN ST.

PRESERVING DOWNTOWN HISTORY

Although city codes don’t contain concrete requirements for preserving buildings, according to Erik Nobel, city planning manager, he said, “Visually we would like to see owners do their best to keep with the historical theme of downtown. We are not as strict as some cities with regard to materials.” Three buildings on Main Street that were in disrepair after different owners were unable to maintain them were featured in an article in the Herald and News in April 2012. They were purchased by the city rather than leave them to continue deteriorating. Here is an update on what has happened to them: ◗ Location of the former Antonio’s Restaurant, 1012-1014 Main St. was sold to Atone General Contracting, owned by Mike and Scott McKay. Mike McKay said construction is going well, and they are working with architects now to create retail and restaurant space and hope to have spaces ready for tenants in about six months. ◗ The building that formerly housed Leo’s Camera shop, 1022-1026 Main St., was torn down. It is still owned by the city, which is going to create parking on the site. ◗ The building at 1038 Main St. was purchased by veterinarian Rich Long with the Klamath Animal Clinic. Long said the structural repairs are done and plumbing and electrical work is being done now. It is zoned for office-retail and he hopes to have spaces available by mid-summer.

KLAMATH ARMORY — 1451 MAIN ST.

CENTRAL FIRE STATION — 143 BROAD ST.

H&N photos by Steven Silton

lbeach@heraldandnews.com

• • • •

The Golden Rule building was originally constructed with two stories in 1928-29 for Edgar Vannice’s expanding Golden Rule Store. In 1937, the store was sold to J.C. Penny Co. Architect Howard Perrin designed a third story that was erected just after World War II.

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❘ Home & Garden

37 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

❘ Community Gardens ❘

Growing healthy food and healthy bodies for Basin communities By LEE BEACH: H&N Staff Reporter

S

ome people are enjoying the satisfaction of gardening for the first time this year, thanks to the growing trend of community gardening in the Klamath Basin. Each educational, civic and public body which has encouraged community gardening has a philosophy similar to that expressed by Jennifer Scanlon, garden coordinator for the Klamath Falls Community Garden. “The idea behind the garden,” said Scanlon, “is to encourage healthier eating, a healthier lifestyle, gaining an appreciation and understanding of where food comes from and reducing costs for fresh produce.”

Photo courtesy of Sage Community School

Growing lessons: Sage Community School students show off some of their hard work at the school’s 2012 summer garden near Chiloquin.

Here is a growing list of community gardens in Klamath County: ◗ Klamath Falls Community Garden: The Klamath Falls Community Garden, 320 S. Sixth St. (at Oak Street) is open to all residents of Klamath Falls and is a cooperative effort between Rotary Club of Klamath County, which started the garden with a grant and helped build it, and the Klamath County Health Department. Preference is given to those residents who do not currently have access to garden space — seniors, families with children or low- income individuals — and live near the garden. See GARDENS, page 40

Library programs offering growth opportunities

Grow a row — or more — for the food bank

More gardens coming? Oregon State University Extension is coordinating with Klamath County Library reading programs in Merrill and Malin, from June to mid-August, to offer free educational classes about gardening, nutrition and cooking. “You Grow It, You Cook It” is for elementary-age youth. No registration is required — just drop in. It is hoped people will become interested in establishing community gardens in those communities next year. Call the Extension Office, 541-883-7131, for details. In Chiloquin, volunteers hope to start a community garden this summer under the umbrella of Chiloquin CARES food bank. Land and water are committed. Call Peter Rollenhagen at 541-827-8570 for information.

When that garden begins to flourish, there is a way to share the bounty with those families who are having a hard time making ends meet. “If you’d like to grow a row for the food bank, our produce wish list includes corn, cherry or grape tomatoes, peppers — from bell to jalapeno — and yellow crookneck squash. We’ll take whatever garden produce you have. We can always find a good home for it,” said Niki Sampson, director of the Klamath-Lake Counties Food Bank, in the food bank’s April newsletter. Drop off produce donations 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at 3231 Maywood Drive. For more information, call 541-882-1223.


38 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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39 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

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❘ Home & Garden

40 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

GARDENS, from page 37

nity center with a licensed kitchen by Keno volunteers. The KCG (in concert with the greenhouse),” All 32 beds are assigned this year, allows local entrepreneurs to prosaid Angela Reid, a Master Garduce fresh herbs, heirloom vegeta30 percent to first-time gardeners. dener who started the greenhouse. bles, and a variety of plants for the Gardeners maintain a 4- by 20-foot Reid also teaches gardening skills to Keno Farmers Market. Seeds can raised garden bed. Cost is a $25 children and adults at the Extension be started on a community seeding donation for a full bed for the seafer on the John Deere 3032E Model: 32 hp, “For nearly 50 years we have been committed growing Community ydrostratic Transmission, Power Steering, Office and attoKlamath start table with recycled everyday Wheel Drive. Model 305son, Loaderwhich included! pays for liability insurthe finest qualitykits” strawberry plants in the world.” fer onwith the optional John Deere 3032E Model: 32 hp, hown Wood Chipper. College. For more information, products for “seed starting at “For nearly 50 years we have been committed to growing ydrostratic Transmission, Power Steering, ance and water. Call Terry ZimmerWheel Drive. Model 305 Loader included! contact Reidworld.” at kenoherbs@gmail. no cost. Extra seedlings are shared, the finest quality strawberry plants in the hown with optional Wood Chipper. For more information about man, 541-882-8846, at the Klamath % for % for MOS. MOS. com, kenocommunitygreenhouse. and the Keno food pantry givesHay Orders, Offer onCounty the John Deere 3032E Model: 32 hp, contact: Ray Chatham Health Dept., 403 Pine St.,SPECIAL! “For nearly 50 years we haveFor been committed to growing Transmission, Power Steering, more information about on 3032E & 3038e TRACTORS % for Hydrostratic % $ 00 org or 541-882-1620. SPECIAL! coupons for seedlings to encourage 4-Wheel Drive. Model 305 Loader included! 530-921-1058 MOS. MOS. Offer on the John Deere 3032E Model:for 32 hp, for information or applications. the finest quality strawberry plants in the world.” Shown with optional Wood Chipper. Hay Chatham “For nearly 50 years we Orders, have beencontact: committedRay to growing Transmission, Power32Steering, OfferHydrostratic on the John Deere 3032E Model: hp, $ 00 plus $1,000 IMPLEMENT BONUS! Drive. Model 305 Loader included! SPECIAL! families00 to grow“For their own fresh nearly 50 years weother have been committed to world.” growing Hydrostratic Transmission, Power Steering, &4-Wheel 3038e TRACTORS All questions Lee Allen the finest quality strawberry plants incontact: the Shown withModel optional Wood Chipper. 4-Wheel Drive. 305 Loader included! $ SPECIAL! on 3032E ◗ Keno Community 530-921-1058 ◗committed Thumbs Up ComOffer onoptional the JohnWood DeereChipper. 3032E Model: 32Greenhp, the finest quality strawberry plants inGreen the world.” For more information about Shown with % % $ produce. “For nearly 50 years we have been to growing Hydrostratic Transmission, Power Steering, Offer onMOS. the John OR Deere 3032E Model: 32 hp, 530-223-1075 for for MOS. $ 00 plus 1,000 IMPLEMENT BONUS! 4-Wheel Drive. Model 305 Loader included! “For nearly 50 years we have been committed to Chatham growing Transmission, Power Steering, For more information about Hay Orders, contact: Ray % % The KCG is a nonprofit house:Hydrostratic All other questions contact: Lee Allen munity Garden: This is a project of $ 00 the finest quality strawberry plants in the world.” Shown with optional Wood Chipper. 4-Wheel Drive. Model Loader MOS. included! For more information about 0%with3032E for&305 60 OR 1.9% SPECIAL! for 72 MOS. and for placing orders for on 3038e TRACTORS the finest quality strawberry plants in the world.” Hay Orders, contact: Ray Chatham Shown optional Wood Chipper. 0 for 60 MOS. OR 1.9 SPECIAL! for 72 MOS. 530-921-1058 530-223-1075 on 3032E & 3038e TRACTORS “My dream is to build a commucommercial greenhouse restored Klamath Sustainable Communities, Hay Orders, contact: Ray Chatham $ “For nearly 50 years we have been committed to growing 530-921-1058 Forcommitted more information about Strawberries, Blackberries, % forIMPLEMENT % for 72 MOS. on 3032E & 3038e TRACTORS plus 1,000 BONUS! 50 years weother have been to growing $1,000 All questions Lee Allen 530-921-1058 For more information about 60 MOS. OR 1.9 $ $%OR 0000 “Forthenearly the finest quality strawberry plants incontact: the world.” for placing orders plus IMPLEMENT BONUS! Hay Orders, contact: Ray Chatham 541-798-5660 • 21600 HWY 39 •3032E MERRILL, $1,000 Alland other questions contact: Leefor Allen 00%plus for 60 MOS. OR 1.9 for 72 MOS. finest quality strawberry plants inRaspberries the world.” and IMPLEMENT BONUS! on & 3038e TRACTORS Orders, contact: Ray Chatham 530-223-1075 AllHay other questions contact: Lee Allen 530-921-1058 Strawberries, Blackberries, 3032E & 3038e TRACTORS For more 530-223-1075 information about % % Fixed-Rate Financing 60 Months offer on new John Deere 3E on Series Compact Utility Tractors available % $ 530-921-1058 530-223-1075 For more information about 0 for 60 MOS. OR 1.9 for 72 MOS. % % and for placing orders for plus 1,000 IMPLEMENT BONUS! bruary 1, 2012 through July 31, 2012 is subject to HWY approved credit on John Deere Financial Installment 541-798-5660 • and 21600 39 • MERRILL, OR Hay Orders, contact: Ray Chatham $ and for placing orders for All other questions contact: Lee for 60 MOS. OR 1.9 for 72 MOS. and Raspberries Allen plus0 1,000 IMPLEMENT BONUS!

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& 3038e TRACTORS an. Some restriction apply; other special rates and terms may be available, so see on your3032E dealer for details and on 3032E & on 3038e TRACTORS herFixed-Rate financing options. can be combined withJohn dollars off promotions. Save USD a new John $$1000 % FinancingOffer 60 Months offer on new Deere 3E Series Compact Utility Tractors available ere 3E 1, Series Utility when with two or moreonJohn Frontier implements $ Deere bruary 2012Compact through July 31,Tractor 2012 and is purchased subject to approved credit John DeereorFinancial Installment er available Februaryapply; 1, 2012 through 31,and 2012. Available participating dealers in the United States. an. Some restriction other specialJuly rates terms may beatavailable, sooffer see your dealer for3Edetails and Utility Tractors available 0% Fixed-Rate Financing 60 Months on U.S. newCompact John Deere Series Compact cesfinancing and models vary by dealer. Offers available on newonoff equipment and Save in only. 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Special agencies, Discount Program, businesses that in John Deere’s Rental Business Program areStates. not offer availableand February 1, 2012 July 31, 2012. Available at participating dealers in theDeere’s United government company direct sales or through otherparticipate businesses/agencies that participate in John company direct sales green oronother businesses/agencies in John Prices and varydollars. bythat dealer. Offers available new equipment and inscheme, thethat U.S.participate only.leaping Sales to eligible. Prices and government savings in agencies, U.S. . John Deere’s and yellow color the deerDeere’s Special Discount Program, andmodels businesses participate in John Deere’s Rental Program are notmade Special Discount Program, businesses in JohnBusiness Deere’s Business Program are not government agencies, company direct sales or that otherparticipate that Rental participate in John Deere’s symbol andand JOHN DEERE are trademarks of and Deere & Company. eligible. Prices savings in U.S. dollars. .and John green andbusinesses/agencies yellow color scheme, the leaping deer eligible. Prices and savings in Deere’s U.S. dollars. . John Deere’s green and yellow scheme, the leaping Special Discount Program, businesses that participate in John Deere’s Rental color Business Program are not deer symbol and JOHN DEERE are trademarks of Deere Company. symbol andand JOHN DEERE are &trademarks of Deere & Company. eligible. Prices savings in U.S. dollars. . John Deere’s green and yellow color scheme, the leaping deer symbol and JOHN DEERE are trademarks of Deere & Company.

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STATELINE PARTS SUPPLY INC. STATELINEPARTS PARTSSUPPLY SUPPLYINC. INC. STATELINE Stateline SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA STATELINE PARTS SUPPLY INC. STATELINE PARTS SUPPLY INC. SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA STATELINE PARTS SUPPLY INC. SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA STATELINE PARTSSUPPLY SUPPLY INC. STATELINE PARTS SUPPLY INC. STATELINE PARTS INC. Stateline Stateline & KLAMATH BASIN & KLAMATH BASIN Parts Supply Inc. SERVING CALIFORNIA SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA &NORTHERN KLAMATH BASIN SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA &KLAMATH KLAMATH BASIN & BASIN Parts Supply Inc. &KLAMATH KLAMATH BASIN &&&KLAMATH KLAMATH BASIN Parts Supply BASIN BASIN Inc.

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eligible. Prices and savingsoffer in U.S. dollars. .other John Deere’s green and yellow colorwithat scheme, leaping available February 1,financing 2012 through July 31, Available participating dealersSave indeer the United options. Offer can2012. be combined dollars offthe promotions. $1000 USDStates. on a new John symbol and models JOHNagencies, aredealer. trademarks ofavailable Deere &oron Company. available February 1, 2012 through July 31, 2012. Available atthat participating dealers in the United States. government direct sales other participate John Deere’s Deereoffer Series Compact Utility Tractor when purchased with twoinorthe more John DeereSales or in Frontier implements Prices and vary by3E Offers new businesses/agencies equipment and U.S. only. made to symbol and JOHN DEERE are trademarks ofDEERE Deere &company Company. Prices and models vary by dealer. Offers available on new equipment and in the U.S. only. Sales made to

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AUTO·TRUCK·HYDRAULIC HOSES tulelake: 530-667-3358 merrill: 541-798-5015 (OREGON & CALIFORNIA STATELINE) TULELAKE: 530-667-3358 541-798-5015 • MERRILL: 21875 Stateline Road Merrill, OR 97633 OR (OREGON CALIFORNIA (oregon &STATELINE california TULELAKE: 530-667-3358 MERRILL: 541-798-5015 TRACTOR FILTERS·BATTERIES 530-667-2220 541-798-5214 21875 Stateline Road 22301 RD.STATELINE) &&stateline) HWY 3939 22301 stateline rd. hwy 22301 STATELINE RD. & HWY 39 Merrill, OR 97633 AUTO·TRUCK·HYDRAULIC (OREGON & CALIFORNIA STATELINE)HOSES TRACTOR FILTERS·BATTERIES 541-798-5214 Merrill, OR 97633 OR (OREGON & CALIFORNIA STATELINE) california stateline) TULELAKE:(oregon 530-667-3358 MERRILL: 541-798-5015 21875 Stateline Road MARTIN’S BusinCardAd_AAC_2.25x2.5_4c.indd 1 2/5/2013 11:51:27 AM 22301 STATELINE RD. & HWY 39 TRACTOR FILTERS·BATTERIES 541-798-5214 TULELAKE: 530-667-3358 MERRILL: 541-798-5015 21875 Stateline Road Merrill, OR 97633

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klamathsustainablecommunities. org . The garden is located at 1917 Orchard Ave., at Richmond Street in Mills Addition. Space is available at a cost of $15 for a 4- by 10-foot bed and $30 for a 4- by 20-foot bed, which covers water and liability insurance. A stocked tool shed is available on site. Participants are responsible for all aspects of planting, growing, cultivating and harvesting their bed, as well as weeding the area See GARDENS, page 41

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❘ Home & Garden

41 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

GARDENS, from page 40 around it. For information or to reserve a bed, contact Leslie Lowe at 541-882-6509 or inharmony46@ charter.net. ◗ Sage Community School Garden: Students tend a 40-footsquare garden plot at the school at 43580 Highway 62 in Chiloquin. In the spring, students and their families prepare the soil, plan planting schemes and sow seeds in the greenhouse. In summer, they regularly plant, water, weed and harvest. A

neighboring ranch donates manure to enrich the soil. At the beginning of the school year, the harvest is used for integrated classroom studies and includes a meal using the produce they have grown, according to coordinator Sandra Klepadlo-Girdner. For more information about the garden, contact Klepadlo-Girdner at sgirdner@ sagecommunityschool.org, or call 541-783-2533. ❘

Extension Service ❘

◗ Fairview Friends Community

Garden Camp: This free summer garden camp is put on by OSU Extension Office at a community garden next to and sponsored by Friends Church, 1918 Oregon Ave. Produce is shared with the community and the food bank. The “I Can Grow It,” summer camp, July 22 to Aug. 1, teaches youth how to grow and cook food from the garden. Open to children entering grades two through six. Space limited to 25. The camp is offered free of charge. Register by July 12 at OSU Extension

Service, 3328 Vandenberg Road. For more information, call 541-883-7131 or go to oregonstate.edu/dept/kbrec. Bonanza Kids’ Garden Camp, at the Bonanza Community Center in July, is for youth grades two through six. The camp is offered free of charge. For more information, call the extension service at 541-8837131. Junior Master Gardeners will gain in-depth knowledge of gardening while growing produce for See GARDENS, page 42

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❘ Home & Garden

42 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

GARDENS, from page 41 the Klamath-Lake Food Bank from June 24 to 28. For grades two through six, at the OSU Extension Auditorium, 3328 Vandenberg Road. Cost is $50 and registration required. Register by June 14 at the OSU Extension Service, 3328 Vandenberg Road. For more information, call 541-883-7131 or download an application at oregonstate.edu/ dept/kbrec.

Lesson served: Sage Community School students’ lessons include a meal using produce they have grown in the school’s garden over the summer.

Photo courtesy of Sage Community School

lbeach@heraldandnews.com

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❘ Cuisine

43 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

❘ Cool summer drinks ❘

Infusing water with fruit, herbs and mixers from around the house offers a hydrating option that isn’t pumped with fructose.

Cheers! When the sun is hot, the days are long and it seems like there is no relief from summer’s oppressive heat, a cool drink can be an oasis. Avoid the supermarket staples and get creative with your refreshments. Infusing water with fruit, herbs and mixers from around the house offers a hydrating option that isn’t pumped with fructose. Many of these drinks are served “dirty,” that is, with herbs and spices in the drink. If you prefer cleaner drinks, allow the mixture to sit in the refrigerator for a few hours to absorb the flavors, then strain before serving. These recipes are based with water but don’t be afraid to mix it up with soda, juice or your favorite alcohol. Adult suggestions are included with the recipes. After trying a few of these, create your own drinks and share them on our Facebook page. See DRINKS, page 44 Story and photos by DAVE MARTINEZ: H&N Staff Reporter


❘ Cuisine

44 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

BASIL AND MINT MOJITO

DRINKS, from page 43

GINGER SWEET AND SOUR Ingredients: sugar, orange, lemon and ginger root Cut a wedge of lemon and wet the rim of the glass. Put down a layer of sugar and rotate the glass so sugar sticks to the rim. Give the glass a couple soft taps over the sink to discard excess sugar. Squeeze the juice of two oranges and the rest of the lemon into a mixing bowl. Cut a few pieces of ginger root and mince. Then throw into the mixing bowl and stir the mixture. Put ice in the glass, then the liquid, being careful not to hit the rim. Put a lemon wedge on the drink and enjoy. To make it an adult drink: add a bit of lager beer.

GINGER SWEET AND SOUR

H&N photos by Dave Martinez

BASIL AND MINT MOJITO

2012 REALTOR® OF THE YEAR!

Ingredients: basil, mint, sugar and lime Cut a wedge of lime and use it to wet the rim of the glass. Rotate the rim of the glass in a layer of sugar, then give the glass a few taps over the sink. Squeeze the juice of a lime or two into a mixing bowl. Mince basil and mint in equal proportions and throw into the mixing bowl. Add water and stir. Throw some ice cubes into the glass, then the liquid, being careful not to damage the sugared rim. Garnish with a lime wedge. To make it an adult drink: add white rum or tequila. www.Century21-Showcase.com

See DRINKS, page 45


❘ Cuisine

45 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

DRINKS, from page 44

KICKING CUCUMBER

KICKING CUCUMBER

Ingredients: minced cucumber, lime and jalapeno Mince cucumber and throw into a glass. Mash the cucumber in the glass with a muddler or wooden utensil. Throw in ice and squeeze the juice of a lime into the mixture. Throw in a couple thin slices of jalapeno and fill with water. To make it an adult drink: use vodka and a little bit of sparkling soda water.

H&N photos by Dave Martinez

FROZEN GRAPES Frozen grapes aren’t just a snack. They can flavor and keep a drink cool without diluting its contents. Making them is as simple as it sounds. Wash a bag of fresh, green, seedless grapes. Once they’re mostly dry, stick them in the freezer and leave for at least six hours. Once they’re frozen, drop them into some water or pop them into your mouth for a refreshing treat. Mash a few in a glass before adding water for a sweet treat. To make it an adult drink: add the frozen grapes to a glass of white wine.

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❘ Cuisine

46 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Spirited Cooking Adding alcohol to food has long been a dinner and dessert classic — think a splash of red wine in Italian or French sauces, or bananas foster set aflame tableside at restaurants. Adding alcohol to your meals at home doesn't have to be intimidating. While you might want to look over the recipe before serving such dishes to children or pregnant women, overall alcohol can add a delicious — and somewhat unexpected — flavor to food. If recipes call for the alcohol in the middle stages of cooking, much of the alcohol content will be cooked off. Other recipes, however, like the one for the Jack & Coke cupcakes, call for alcohol to simply be mixed in with the other ingredients. With these Jack & Coke cupcakes, consider making a whiskey-free frosting and ganache for the kids’ table. The whiskey burgers, which I added extra bacon and sweeter onions to as a modification to the original recipe, might also be more adult fare, particularly because the spicy flavor might not appeal to children. The process makes it simple enough to cook plain hamburgers for them. The burgers, which are small sliders in the original recipe, offer an explosion of flavor. Leftover barbecue sauce from the recipe could be used to marinate chicken or to top ribs as well. For another adults-only dessert, add a sweet white wine to homemade popsicles, perfect for summer. The process for popsicles is simple: blend fresh or frozen fruit with enough fruit juice and wine to make the mixture thin. Then freeze in a popsicle mold or in small paper cups, at least overnight, and enjoy. See SPIRITED, page 47 H&N photo by Dave Martinez

By NORA AVERY-PAGE: H&N Staff Reporter


❘ Cuisine

47 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

STRAWBERRY MOSCATO POPSICLES

SPIRITED, from page 46

SWEET AND SPICY WHISKEY BURGERS

Blend 1 cup frozen strawberries with 1 cup apple juice, and desired amount of a sweet, white wine, like moscato, about 1/2 cup. For creamy popsicles, mix in 1/2 cup Greek yogurt as well. Mixture should be thin. This recipe should make enough mixture to fill six small popsicle molds. Freeze overnight.

Adapted from Conni Smith, TheFoodieArmyWife.com

2 lbs. ground beef 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground black pepper 1 Tbsp. steak seasoning 2 Tbsps. Worcestershire sauce 4-5 strips crispy bacon, crumbled 2 Tbsps. butter 1 medium onion, diced 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1/2 cup whiskey 1 cup barbecue sauce Jalapeno slices or chipotle peppers, chopped Whole wheat hamburger buns Sharp cheddar cheese, sliced (optional) Preheat your grill, or oven to 400 degrees. Combine the meat with the salt, pepper, steak seasoning, Worcestershire sauce and crumbled bacon. Form into six patties, with a slight indentation in the center. Grill for about 20 minutes, until desired doneness or bake 20-25 minutes. While burgers are cooking, sauté the onions in the butter until golden and tender. Stir in the whiskey (with stove off) and then stir in the brown sugar and barbecue sauce. Turn the stove back on and toss in peppers and simmer for about 5 minutes. When burgers are cooked through, nestle the cooked beef patties into the sauce, turning them over to coat. Allow them to simmer in sauce for about five minutes. Serve burgers on toasted buns, with extra sauce, peppers and cheese slices. Makes six burgers.

See SPIRITED, page 48

H&N photo by Dave Martinez

JACK & COKE CUPCAKES adapted from Baking for Neighbors and lesliehaash.com

Cupcakes: 1/2 cup Coke (not diet soda) 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 cup flour 1 cup sugar 3/4 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1 large egg (room temperature) 1/3 cup sour cream (room temperature)

Directions for cupcakes: Preheat oven to 350 degrees, and line 12 cupcake cups with liners. Bring Coke and ½ cup butter to a simmer in medium saucepan over medium heat. Add cocoa powder and whisk until mixture is smooth. Allow to cool for 15 minutes. Whisk together flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl. Set aside. Using electric mixer, whisk together eggs and sour cream in a large bowl to blend. Add in sugar and whisk to combine. Pour in the Coke-chocolate mixture and beat until just combined. Add flour mixture and beat briefly on slow speed. If needed, use a spatula to fold batter until

Ganache filling: 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 1/3 cup heavy cream 1 Tbsp. butter (room temperature) 1 tsp. Jack Daniels whiskey Frosting: 3 cups confectioners sugar 6 Tbsps. unsalted butter (room temperature) 3 Tbsp. whiskey

thoroughly combined. Pour batter into cupcake liners, filling them 3/4 of the way. Make sure not to overfill them as the batter will rise while cooking and you don’t want it to spill over. Bake for about 17 minutes, until a toothpick stuck in the center comes out clean. Let them cool completely. Directions for ganache: Place the chocolate chips in a small, heatproof bowl. In a small saucepan, heat the cream until it is simmering. Pour it over the chocolate in the heatproof bowl. Let it sit for one minute and then stir until smooth. Add the butter and whiskey and stir until combined. Let the ganache cool enough to be placed in piping bag with a wide tip. You also can use a plastic freezer bag with the corner

cut off. Cut the centers out of the cooled cupcakes using a small paring knife. Fill the holes in the cupcakes with ganache. Directions for frosting: Whisk the butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer for several minutes until light and fluffy. Slowly add the powdered sugar, a few tablespoons at a time. When about half of the powdered sugar is mixed, add in some of the whiskey and continue mixing in powdered sugar. Add the rest of the whiskey to thin out the mixture, and mix in the rest of the powdered sugar. Pipe the frosting onto the cupcakes with a frosting bag. Makes 12 cupcakes.


❘ Cuisine

48 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Mocha. Munchies. Megabytes. (FREE Wi-Fi)

SPIRITED, from page 47

GARLICKY BEER SHRIMP Adapted from “Keys to the Kitchen” by Aida Mollenkamp and foodgal.com

2 Tbsps. unsalted butter 1 lb. shrimp, peeled and deveined 10 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper 3/4 cup lager 2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tsp. honey 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsps. finely chopped fresh Italian parsley

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Return the pan to the stove, add the 1 Tbsp. of remaining butter, chopped garlic and cayenne pepper. Cook until fragrant then stir in the beer. Worcestershire sauce, honey, mustard and lemon juice and simmer until sauce thinly coats the back of a spoon, about 10 minutes. Return the shrimp to the sauce and simmer until shrimp are just cooked through, two to three minutes. Season as desired, stir in parsley and serve. Serves two to four.

BACON AND BEER CARBONARA Adapted from babble.com

1 large sweet onion, chopped 8 oz. smoked bacon, chopped 3 eggs, plus 2 egg yolks Melt 1 Tbsp. of the butter in 2 cups sweet grape tomatoes a large frying pan over medium(optional) high heat. When it foams, add the 1 cup stout or other dark beer shrimp and cook until pink on both sides, 2 to 3 minutes. Using a slotted 1 cup Parmesan cheese spoon, transfer the shrimp to a large 1 lb. spaghetti salt and pepper to taste bowl.

Los Potrillos DAILY LOUNGE SPECIALS

Add chopped bacon to a large skillet. Cook for about 10 minutes over medium-low heat, and then add chopped onions. Continue to cook until the fat is rendered from the bacon and it is crisp. While bacon is cooking, cook pasta according to package directions. After bacon is done, add beer and tomatoes to skillet with bacon, the bacon fat and the onions. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer until tomatoes pop. Add eggs to a large bowl and whisk. Temper the eggs by adding a little of the hot beer mixture at a time to the eggs, whisking constantly until you’ve added all the beer and bacon mixture. Combine the egg mixture with the pasta and Parmesan. Toss well to coat. The heat from the pasta will cook the eggs and melt the cheese.

naverypage@heraldandnews.com

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Family. Community. Education.

49 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Complete Physical Exams | Well Child Exams | Immunizations Women’s Health | Family Planning, Prenatal, OB & Newborn Care Sports Medicine | Orthopedic Clinic Mental Health & Social Services | Lab, X-Ray, and EKGs Office Procedures (including biopsy, circumcision & vasectomy) Same Day Visits for Acute Illness | Se Habla Español

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50 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

❘ Flora & Fauna of the Klamath Basin ❘ ◗ Pacific chorus frogs ❘

If you walk out your door at night and hear the gentle croaking of frogs, you’re most likely hearing chorus frogs. The Pacific chorus frog, formerly the Pacific treefrog, is the most abundant frog in Oregon, according to an Oregon State University fact-sheet. Pacific chorus frogs are found anywhere from southern British Columbia, in Canada, to Baja California, in Mexico, and live in all of Oregon. They live in wooded areas, meadows, pastures and populated areas. They are usually close to the ground in grass and shrubs. When it is time to lay eggs, they move near water, and in the winter they hibernate. Pacific chorus frogs can be as large as two inches long. Their colors range from bright green to brown to reddish, to gray. Dark marks run from their nostrils to their shoulders and look like a mask, the OSU fact-sheet said, and they can change color to match their background. Instead of webbed feet, Pacific chorus frogs have sticky pads on the tips of their toes, allowing them to climb plants. The frogs eat spiders and insects, including beetles and ants, the OSU fact-sheet said. The spring croaking comes from male frogs that go to pools and ponds to call females. Find it online: “Common Plants of the Upper Klamath Basin: — rabeconsulting.com/ pdf/plantbook.pdf

Blue-Green Algae Photo from “Common Plants of the Upper Klamath Basin” ◗

Pacific Chorus Frogs

Photo courtesy of Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Pacific Chorus Frogs

Blue-green algae

◗ Two inches long ◗ Markings from the nostrils to shoulders that look like a mask ◗ Can range in color: green, brown, reddish, gray ◗ Sticky toes instead of webbed feet ◗ Springtime croaking is males calling to females

◗ Blue-green algae is also known as cyanobacteria ◗ Extensive blue-green algae production has happened in Upper Klamath Lake since the 1930s ◗ Over the last century, the nutrients in the lake has increased, causing more blooms ◗ Companies harvest and market Upper Klamath Lake blue-green algae as a supplement and superfood

By SAMANTHA TIPLER: H&N Staff Reporter

Bl ue-gr een al gae ❘

Blue-green algae is also known as cyanobacteria, a type of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton. Upper Klamath Lake is 30 miles long and eight miles wide, but only about six to eight feet deep. It’s a eutrophic lake, which means it is nutrient rich, especially in phosphorous and nitrogen. The lake has always had high phosphorous, said Eric Janney, field station leader with the U.S. Geological Survey Klamath Field Station, but changes in land practices over the past century has caused more phosphorus, making the lake go from eutrophic to hypereutrophic. In other words, even more phosphorus. Also, the lake might have hosted several types of algae before, but not any more. “Over the last 80 years it’s switched to this monoculture,” Janney said. “This one species dominates because the blooms are so intense and so heavy.” When the bloom starts to die, it causes water quality problems — low dissolved oxygen, higher pH, high ammonia — that leads to tough conditions for fish in the summer.


51 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Quintessentials By STEVEN SILTON H&N Staff Photographer

Meet Kacie Flagor

H&N photo by Steven Silton

About Quintessentials: This Klamath Life series takes a close-up look at one of the personalities from the region who helps shape and make the Basin a great place to live.

The Ross Ragland Theater’s spire pokes over the downtown skyline as a beacon for arts in this community. Whether it’s a country concert, a play performance, dance recital, pageant contest or food festival; the Ross Ragland has something for everyone. Getting the word out to the community and drumming up interest in everything the Ragland offers is the job of Kacie Flagor, the director of marketing and fund development. Originally from Sacramento, Flagor moved to Bonanza in 1989 when her daughters were ages 3 and 1. Two years later, Flagor had a son as well. After teaching preschool and working in a daycare for years Flagor went back to school. “I needed something else in my life. I graduated from OIT (Oregon Institute of Technology) within one week of my oldest daughter graduating from high school.” A few years later she started part time in the Ross Ragland’s box office before the board created a position to bring her on full time. Flagor is the Ragland’s first patron and donor services manager. “The first thing was getting box office policies and procedures into something predictable and consistent. It used to be that when show day came we all got nervous because we weren’t sure what was going to happen, but now we know what’s going to happen. ” Although her responsibilities have changed and grown since then, Flagor still loves her job. “I never seem to be off work and I don’t mind it. I could be in the grocery store and someone will say ‘I need to call you and buy tickets!’ or ask me ‘What’s coming up at the Ragland?’ ” Never one for the spotlight, Flagor fell in love with live performances in high school where she attended her first play. She finally gave in and took center stage a few weeks ago when she was a contestant for the Ragland’s “Dancing With Your Stars” competition. “Mark (McCrary) made me do that. I had a good time, but I am not a stage person. Give me a room full of people I know and I’ll entertain you all night, but don’t put me in the spotlight,” she said with a laugh. Far away from the spotlight, she feels lucky to live so close to Crater Lake, one of her favorite places on Earth. Flagor also goes to Lake of the Woods with her family on camping trips, but doesn’t consider herself to be an outdoors person. “My idea of a vacation is sitting on a dock with a book. If I can read three books I’m good.” With the 24th season of the Ross Ragland coming to a close soon, Flagor is sure to be the driving force behind the box office glass pulling patrons in to another wonderful experience at the Ross Ragland Theater for years to come.

ssilton@heraldandnews.com


52 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Views of life in the Klamath Basin f jl ;sa — Wanda Padg et t Willie Nel son xxx & Cr— ystsdalklGayle

Share Your Best Shot: Share your views of the Klamath Basin by posting your favorite scenic photo on our Diversions Facebook page at Facebook. com/HandNDiversions. We will print a selection of reader photos in our August/September edition of Klamath Life.

Owl s — Char l ot t e Mot schenbacher

Poppies — Mich ael P ar ks

Yel lo wheaded bl ackbir d — Linda Jones-Mot t

On t he 10-7 Ranch Mal in — Lana Mocker Ro wl ey

Peli can at R ocky Point — r ebecca Hunt


53 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

On the calendar in the Basin On the calendar in the Klamath Falls area through July: TODAY ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market, featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. ◗ Carla’s The Dancers’ Studio presents “Now is the Time,” 7:30 p.m. at the Ross Ragland Theater. General admission tickets $18, $16 for students and children 12 and under. SUNDAY, JUNE 9 ◗ Old-Time Fiddlers will host a jam and dance from 1 to 4 p.m. in Shasta View Community Hall at Madison Street and Shasta Way. THURSDAY, JUNE 13 ◗ Rachel’s School of Dance presents Cinderella, A Ballet, 6 p.m. at the Ross Ragland Theater. General admission tickets are $15, $10 for children under 12 and seniors. SATURDAY, JUNE 15 ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. ◗ Klamath County Library Foundation will host an island party fundraiser at 6 p.m. in the Klamath Yacht Club. Tickets are $20 per person and can be purchased at the county library or the existing South Suburban library, any foundation member or at the door the day on the event. Funds raised will be used to renovate the property for a new South Suburban Library.

TUESDAY, JUNE 18 ◗ Ross Ragland Theater launch party for its 25th anniversary season. The silver anniversary season will include 25 shows with some old favorites and new experiences. Details to be announced at a later date in the Herald and News. THURSDAY, JUNE 20 ◗ Third Thursday in downtown Klamath Falls from 6 to 9 p.m. Includes music, food and businesses remaining open past usual closing times. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, JUNE 22 AND JUNE 23 ◗ Chiloquilters Eighth Annual Quilt Show, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Chiloquin Community Center, 140 First Ave. in Chiloquin. SATURDAY, JUNE 22 ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. SUNDAY, JUNE 23 ◗ Downton Tea, a tea served in the style of the popular Masterpiece Theater miniseries, 1 p.m. and again at 3 p.m. at the Baldwin Hotel Museum. Tickets are $20. FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, JUNE 28-30 ◗ Klamath Kinetic Challenge, watch homemade, humanpowered kinetic sculptures as they attempt to travel over land, sand, muck, rocks and water around Klamath Falls. ◗ Kruise of Klamath events will include a Cops & Robbers event, a block party at the Ross Ragland Theater, a Show ‘N Shine, a downtown cruise and a Poker Run. SATURDAY, JUNE 29 ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street

between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. ◗ Bluegrass Musical Jam at Collier State Park Logging Museum, 1 to 4 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 6 ◗ Klamath Falls Yacht Club Firecracker Regatta on Upper Klamath Lake. ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. SATURDAY, JULY 13 ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. SUNDAY, JULY 14 ◗ Old-Time Fiddlers will host a jam and dance from 1 to 4 p.m. in Shasta View Community Hall at Madison Street and Shasta Way. THURSDAY, JULY 18 ◗ Third Thursday in downtown Klamath Falls from 6 to 9 p.m. Includes music, food, and businesses remaining open past usual closing times. FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, JULY 19, 20 AND 21 ◗ Rip City Riders Summer Fun Run at the Klamath County Fair-

grounds. Events will include live bands, a poker run, tattoo contests, vendors, a bike and car show and raffle prizes. SATURDAY, JULY 20 ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. JULY 21 ◗ Baldwin Hotel Museum Ice Cream Social, 1 to 3 p.m., featuring music from barbershop quartet “Tone Deaf.” Limited tickets will be sold in advance. SATURDAY, JULY 27 ◗ CASA’s 10th Annual Ride for the Child Cycling Event. Cycling events kick off at 7:30 a.m. at Mazama High School. ◗ Klamath Falls Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ninth Street between Main Street and Klamath Avenue. An open air market featuring products from local growers, producers and artisans. ◗ Rides on the Klamath and Western Railroad, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 36951 S. Chiloquin Road, Chiloquin. Refreshments and picnic area available at the model railroad park. Bluegrass Musical Jam at Collier State Park Logging Museum, 1 to 4 p.m.

On the calendar: Does your group or organization have a special community event coming up? Let us know and we’ll put it in the community calendar in the August/September edition of Klamath Life. Send event information to clerk@heraldandnews.com, or call 541-885-4412.


54 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away

Advertiser’s Index

A Country Home Floral............................... 41 Accounting Offices of Edwin R. Gilman................................. 38,40 AETNA Carpet Cleaning............................ 19 American AgCredit...................................... 40 Anderson Engineering & Surveying, Inc... 41 Balin’s Tower Drug....................................... 36 Basin Fertilizer & Chemical Co.................. 40 Basin Immediate Care................................. 36 Black Bear Diner.......................................... 42 California Pines Lodge................................. 38 CAL-ORE...................................................... 55 Cascades East............................................... 49 Century 21 Showcase Realtors / Rosemary Whitaker............................... 44 Coldwell Banker-Holman Premier............. 56 Courtesy RV Center....................................... 5 Crowwroads Guitar & Mercantile.............. 38 Davenport’s Funeral Chapel....................... 23 Desert Rose Funeral Chapel........................ 41 Diamond Lake Resort.................................. 13 Diamond S Meat Co..................................... 26 Edward Jones............................................... 42 Elmer’s........................................................... 54 Emmett’s Auto Repair Center..................... 31 Express Employment Professionals............ 42

Fisher Nicholson Realtors, LLC.................... 3 Fisher Nicholson Realtors, LLC /Diana Kellstrom....................................... 20 Floyd A Boyd Co.......................................... 14 Four Seasons Supply Center....................... 39 Frank and Diane’s Carpets.......................... 45 Gun Cave, The.............................................. 38 Hanscam’s Bowling Center............................ 8 Harbor Links................................................... 6 Heartfelt Obstestrics & Gynecology...... 19,32 High Desert Hospice...................................... 8 Hotel Niles..................................................... 13 House of Shoes.............................................. 31 Howard’s Bodyshop..................................... 42 Howard’s Drugs............................................ 41 Howard’s Meat Center, LLC........................ 48 Hunter’s Hot Springs.................................... 14 Klamath Audiology...................................... 22 Klamath Eye Center.................................... 35 Klamath Hospice.......................................... 26 Klamath Hopsice Treasures Thift Store........ 23 Klamath Metals............................................ 28 KPEFCU....................................................... 14 Lanids Produce & Nursery.......................... 38 Los Potrillos.................................................. 48

Macy’s Flying Service................................... 40 Martin’s Diesel Shop.................................... 39 Martin’s Food Center................................... 40 Matteo’s Coffee House................................. 48 Mile Hi Tire & Exhaust............................... 41 Modoc Steel & Supply................................. 38 Monica Derner, CPA.................................... 38 Napa Auto Parts........................................... 39 OIT................................................................ 15 Oregon Community Foundation................. 16 Pelican Pointe................................................. 9 Pinehurst Inn................................................ 10 Ross Ragland Theater.................................. 24 Seab’s Electronics/Radio Shack.................. 39 Seab’s True Value Hardware....................... 39 Seasons Change............................................ 28 ServiceMaster Clean..................................... 45 Sky Lakes Medical Center............................. 2 Smith Self Storage........................................ 22 St. Therese Chapel....................................... 32 Stateline Parts Supply, Inc........................... 40 Tobiko............................................................ 20 Waffle Hut & Eatery.................................... 10 Wagon Wheel Motel & Restaurant............. 38 Waldo’s Bar & Grill..................................... 27

friday, saturday & sunday rock-salt roasted prime rib

$

(flavor shown is smaller than actual size)

12

99

available after 4pm

3030 South 6th Street Klamath Falls 541.882.1881 www.eatatelmers.com Limited time only. Cannot be combined with other offers.

our rock-sale roasted prime rib is served with your choice of Ivan’s Famous Clam Chowder, our seasonal soup, or a Yellow Bowl Dinner Salad.


55 ❘ Klamath Life ❘ Fly Away


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Bill Haskins Principal Broker/President

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Coldwell Banker Holman Premier Realty 3815 South 6th Street, Suite 110. Klamath Falls, Oregon 97603 (541) 884-1343 office • (541) 883-7475 fax • (800) 347-1343 toll-free www.CBHolmanPremier.com • blog.cbkfalls.com *Based on MLS statistics of total residential sales volume from 01/01/1999 to 12/31/2012. Equal housing opportunity. Each office independently owned and operated. Bill Haskins, Principal Broker / President.

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Klamath Life - June/July 2013  

REGIONAL MAGAZINE FOR KLAMATH, LAKE, MODOC AND SISKIYOU COUNTIES