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HS INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2014-2018


HS Design is a justice to society, not just a professional practice. Architects and designers have a social responsibility to design for the well being of a society and the people within it. Architecture has the ability to change lives and I aspire to be a designer with an impact.

HEATHER SHINE Interior Architecture www.heathershine.com hshine@vols.utk.edu 678.654.1781


CONTENTS


INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

0 1 VERTICAL INTEGRATION 0 2 INVERTED LANDSCAPES 0 3 ON DISPLAY 0 4 INTERNAL COLONIES

pg. 6 pg. 20 pg. 36 pg. 50

MIXED MEDIA

0 5 FURNITURE DESIGN 0 6 PHOTOGRAPHY

pg. 62 pg. 68


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VERTICAL INTEGRATION The goal behind this project was to design a space that would bring people together and strengthen the community in Knoxville. This would be achieved through introducing a market for new and uprising artists and craftsmen. A market structured with intersecting spacial zones and dynamic circulation would create a social atmosphere that enriches community. One focus for this project was to design flexible and customizable spaces to adapt to the changing needs of the artists using them. This was implemented in the individual retail spaces through a range of floor plans and a series of layout options. The variety of options would allow each person to find the choice best for their needs. This project spanned beyond creating an outlet for artists, it’s overall focus was to enhance community relations. The location of this project was at a major crossroad in Knoxville. The surrounding neighborhoods were divided by infrastructure and differing demographics. The introduction of a local market would enhance community interactions and pride.

Fall 2017 Professor: Lisa Mullikin L&N Station 401 Henley Street, Knoxville, TN


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THE MAKER CIT Y - KNOXVILLE, TN “ The Maker City is the network of the Greater Knoxville area community of makers, artists, creatives, and small scale manufacturers and supporting entities. Led by the Mayor ’s Maker Council, we create collaborative partnerships, programming, and opportunities in support of Knoxville’s maker community.” The planning and organizational approach for this project was to ask ourselves a thesis question and propose an answer. With my passion of designing spaces for strong community benefits in mind, my thesis question was, “How can one reconnect a city, enrich the community, and restore the aspect of gathering spaces?” My proposal in response to the thesis question was that the introduction of a crafts market would bring together local artisans and strengthen not only the artist community, but the entire Knoxville community. The Maker City is an initiative in Knoxville, TN whose goal is to bring together a community of crafters, local artisans and small-scale manufacturers to help cultivate the region’s maker community. This initiative served as the backbone and purpose for this project.

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PARTI DIAGRAMS

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SPACE WITHIN A SPACE The concept for this project was to design an innovative approach on how to reinvent the interior of a historic building without changing the exterior shell. Implementing new framework to create a space within a space allowed the introduction of new life to the building while preserving the history of the site.

INTERSECTING SPACES The organization of the design focused on creating a range of spaces that would benefit and sustain a local craft market. The goal was to overlap and intersect the different spaces to create a sense of discovery while traveling through the market, as well as a sense of inclusion and integration between the visitors and vendors.

DYNAMIC CONNECTIONS The means of circulation throughout the building were designed to further expand the sense of creativity and discovery in the space. With a dynamic circulation strategy, the connection between the spaces, as well as the connection between the people, would strengthen the participation of the market and strengthen the community.

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1ST FLOOR PLAN

MEZZANINE FLOOR PLAN

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

Reception Restaurant/Cafe Lounge

Circulation Storage

Market Stairs Fire Stairs Elevators

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Bridges


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07 02

PROGRAM LABEL

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01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

06 02

Reception Open Market Restaurant Administration Offices Outdoor Patio Retail Pods Lounge Cafe

2ND FLOOR PLAN

Attic 925’ - 9” [+14’ - 8”] 2nd Floor 912’ [+10’] 1st Floor Mezzanine 902’ [+10’] 1st Floor 892’

STRUCTURE DIAGRAM Columns Load Bearing Walls Joists

Beams Framing

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POD DESIGN OPTIMIZATION The focus for this project was to provide local vendors with customizable work and market spaces to best fit their needs to maximize the potential for success. The program of the building included open market areas as well as closed market pods to ensure each vendor was best suited for their product and business capacity. The open market consisted of table booths for vendors, while the pods offered more diversity in options. The pods came in 3 different size options, and each option had 3 different applicable furniture layouts. The range in possibilities allows each pod to be accessible to a wider range of vendors while being more customizable to best fit the vendors. The options for the layout were: all tables, all shelving, or a combination of the two. The idea behind this was to offer an option that focused on the display of merchandise, an option that had a lot of storage capabilities, and an option that had a mixture of the two. The building consisted of 2 main levels and a mezzanine. The entry level, or the first floor, was all open markets in order to keep an open layout to compensate for the heavier traffic. The mezzanine and second floor incorporates the closed pods with the open market to create the sense of a community zone.

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INVERTED LANDSCAPES The purpose of this project was to create a center for at risk youths while focusing on a certain performative criteria. The demographic of youth focused on was overweight and obese children and the performative criteria was sound. The program of the space consists of a dance studio, music room, classroom, and offices. This space is to serve as an after school and weekend program for overweight and obese children of the community to come together, dance, learn musical skills, and build confidence. The music room and dance space share a wall with openings so that the music can travel between the two spaces. The classroom has two different settings. There is a traditional classroom near the offices, and there are special pods for more private studying. This project was split into two phases, design and construction. My project consisted of a custom wall assembly and several custom millwork pieces. The music room was framed out by a functional wall assembly to serve as a sound reflecting and sound transmitting unit. The overall goal for this project was to create a space that would not only serve a large portion of our community, but to also help improve their livelihood and life styles.

Spring 2017 Professor: Rana Abudayyeh EVOLVE Building 2010 Cumberland Avenue, Knoxville, TN


SOUND STUDIES Sound is an environmental factor that impacts our day to day lives as well as the spaces we inhabit. Investigating the different sources of sound and their patterns throughout our communities deepens the knowledge designers have on the people they are designing for.

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20 dB

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11 AM


CONVERSATION VARIANCE

CONSTRUCTION VARIANCE

MUSIC VARIANCE

TRAFFIC VARIANCE

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INTERACTING WITH SOUND The common experience people have with sound is just hearing it. Through the design of a tiled wall, I intended to transform our interaction with sound from an audible to tactile experience. The wall was designed to outline a space that would be a louder area, whether it be due to conversation, music, or general environmental sounds. The wall is composed of a plastered tile application for sound reflection, a variety of sound insulating foam panels for sound absorption, and a series of openings for sound transmission. The topography of the insulating panels is modeled after a series of sound waves. This variety of shapes allows people to experience sound through hearing it, seeing it, and feeling it.

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B

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01 A

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LEVEL 1 FLOOR PLAN

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B

09 A

Confidence at the Front

MEZZANINE FLOOR PLAN

Internal Sound System

PROGRAM LABEL Reception 01 02 Dance Studio 03 Personal Pods 04 Music/Multipurpose Room Classroom 05 06 Administrative Offices 07 LAN/Mechanical Closet Storage 08 09 Observation Lounge

Zones for Introspection

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SECTION A

1/2” Plywood with Oak Veneer 2” x 4” Wood Blocking

RECEPTION DESK

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CUSTOM MILLWORK DETAILS The design of this space featured a continuous built structure that folded the interior of the building to create different programmatic zones. The structure served as the main walls, ceiling, and usable surfaces within the project to create a sense of unity. The construction of the structure and the surrounding elements consisted of 4 custom millwork details and 1 custom wall detail. Creating custom design elements allowed for this project to better serve the community that would be using it. Each piece was designed with a specific user group in mind to serve a specific functional purpose.

1/2” Plywood with Oak Veneer 2” x 4” Wood Blocking

DANCE STUDIO BENCH

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SECTION B

1/2” Plywood with Oak Veneer 1/2” Molded Plywood with Oak Veneer 1” x 4” Wood Blocking Metal Stud Framing and Bracing

POD BENCH DETAIL

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1/2” Plywood with Oak Veneer 1” x 4” Wood Blocking

SHELVING DETAIL

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Top of Wall 12’ - 0”

Level 1 0’ - 0”

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3 5/8” Metal Studs 16” O.C. 5/8” Gypsum Board 2” x 4” x .25” Crossville “Glass Blox” Tile Foam Inserts Foam Inserts Beyond Plaster 1/4” Metal Lath Acoustic Batting Insulation 5/8” Gypsum Board 3 5/8” Metal Studs 16” O.C. Metal Runner Existing Concrete Slab

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ON DISPLAY The purpose of the project was to obtain experience working with a client and designing for their needs. The client I worked with was a glass blower who prefers clean lines and simplicity. Upon meeting, he outlined specific things that would benefit his work. He asked for a lot of open storage where he could showcase his work. To fulfill the needs of the client, I designed a 3 story storage system that encloses the vertical circulation of the space and provides adequate storage on each floor of the space. The main area of the first floor is completely public and consists of a gallery and workspace for the client to work and display his products for customers and guests. The back side of the first floor has a separate living suite for guests of the client or even one of the other workers. The second floor is a mixture between public and private that has a conference room, the client’s private office, and open circulation space that could be utilized for events. The third floor is entirely private as it is the residential apartment. The apartment has 3 bedrooms, including a nursery and 2 bathrooms.

Spring 2016 Professor: Lisa Mullikin The Jackson 114 West Jackson Avenue, Knoxville, TN


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CLIENT: MATTHEW CUMMINGS Matthew Cummings is the owner of Pretentious Beer Glass Company and Pretentious Beer Company, both located in Downtown Knoxville. His passion for glassblowing began by taking an elective in college, which influenced him to switch majors immediately. His art consists of glass sculptures and unique beer glasses. The goal for this project was to work with Matthew and use our site to improve his current glassblowing studio.

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KIT OF PARTS STORAGE After multiple client meetings, Matthew emphasized the want and need for extra storage and display space. The design behind this 3 story storage system developed from ideas of customizable and multi functioning items. Designed as a “kit of parts,� this storage unit consists of varied pieces that allow the owner to customize and adapt the structure to their needs. This is beneficial to Matthew, so that his storage can be dynamic to fit all of his artwork. The structure unit is multi functional in the sense that it encloses the stairwell as well as serves as storage.

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04

ESTCODE ESTCODE

UP

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ESTCODE

ESTCODE

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ESTCODE

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1ST FLOOR PLAN

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2ND FLOOR PLAN

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3RD FLOOR PLAN


DN

PROGRAM LABEL 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

MEZZANINE FLOOR PLAN

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Art Gallery and Reception Glass Blowing Studio Viewing Area Guest Apartment Conference Room Event Space Resident Apartment


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INTERNAL COLONIES The aim for this project was renovate the 7th and 8th floor of the Whitney Museum in New York to create a herbarium and an office space. In addition to the herbarium, the space includes a reception area, library, research and collaboration zone, and office spaces. The first floor consists of programming for public usage, such as the herbarium, library, and collaboration area. The second floor is designed to be strictly private, hence, it is dedicated to the office spaces. The goal of this studio was to introduce an innovative lighting strategy to strengthen the relationship between the people and the plants. The system I designed in this space is a double height structure that consists of three strategies to benefit the space: light, irrigation, and furniture. The light travels from skylights through fiber optic cables to illuminate the space while also providing natural light to the living plants. Irrigation and furniture is also incorporated into the structure. The structure within the space inhibits a symbiotic relationship between the people in the space and the plants.

Fall 2016 Professor: Rana Abudayyeh The Whitney Museum 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY


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ATOLLA WYVILLEI PRECEDENT STUDY The study of lighting strategies for this project began with researching bioluminescent organisms to learn how various types of light occur in nature. The Atolla Jellyfish, also known as the Alarm Jellyfish, lives in a deep zone of the ocean without sunlight and relies on its bioluminescence for survival. The anatomy of the jellyfish features 8 cells that light up when the organism is trying to draw the attention of its prey and also when it is in danger. The light from the cells is diffused through the skin structure that results in scattered light. From the precedent study, the aspect of drawing attention through diffused light was a strong feature in the project’s lighting strategy.

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04 05

01 02 03

7TH FLOOR PLAN

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8TH FLOOR PLAN

PROGRAM LABEL 01 02 03 04 05 06

Reception Greenhouse Research Library Team Workspaces Exhibition Offices

Interior spaces experience a range of usage through the day in response to program and functionality. Usage can be measured by studying average foot traffic or average duration of stay in a space. Both are taken into consideration to predict the flow of programmatic usage and to determine materiality and furnishings.

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7 AM 10 PM

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Reception

Library

Greenhouse

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Workspace

Exhibition

Offices


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SECTION A

SECTION B

INTRODUCTION OF LIGHTING SYSTEM The sectionalism of this space was important to establish hierarchy. The space is divided by a vertical core which consists of structure and the elevators. The glass system is implied on both sides of the core to create a balanced interior. The system that embodies the greenhouse, on the left, extends to the roof plane to create a connection to the skylights. This allows for fiber optic cables to draw in natural light for illumination. The system also regulates the opening in the 8th floor which allows the greenhouse to serve as an atrium space. The lighting that in embedded through the paneling of the structure mimics the strategy of the jellyfish by creating a focal point in the space through the diffusion of light.

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DESIGNED STRUCTURE VARIATIONS The structure is functional in 3 aspects: irrigation, lighting, and furniture. The diagrams on the right show the irrigation system and an example of the furniture paneling. The irrigation is important to the plant life within the greenhouse. It is introduced through copper piping within the panels. It is regulated throughout the greenhouse via horizontal extensions of the pipes. There are 2 types of extensions, one varies in height above the floor and the other sits within the flooring. The raised pipes mimic a sprinkler system to water the plants while the below ground pipes are to absorb and recycle the water. The system consists of furniture pieces to extend the functionality from plant life to human use. The built in furniture is utilized in each space. There are benches in the lobby, a reception desk, work surfaces in the workspace, book shelves in the library, and desk tops in the office.

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FURNITURE DESIGN The design of this furniture piece originated from the idea that furniture of the future is furniture that can be mass produced using 3D printing and furniture that can have multiple purposes. The concept for this table was to design a dual functioning entryway table. The piece would function as a coat rack as well as a table so that one’s entry sequence into their home is simplified in terms of space and process. The table consists of a plexiglass top that is 18” wide by 30” high. The legs of the table and the neck for the coat rack are 1” round wooden dowels. The joinery of all of the different components of this table were tessellated 3D prints. The 3D prints were designed to create a smooth connection to unify the table. The tessellation of the 3D prints resembled a rigid, orthogonal pattern to contradict the flow of connection and to also complement the angular motif of the table itself.

Fall 2017 Professor: Ryann Aoukar In collaboration with Lauren Higdon


Top Joint + Coat Rack

Tabletop Joint

Center Joint for Table Legs

Front Elevation

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Plan

FURNITURE OF THE FUTURE The goal for this project was to design a functional furniture piece that could not only serve dual purposes, but also to have the potential for mass production. Designing a furniture piece with the restraints of only using 1 tabletop, wooden dowels, and a maximum of 4 3D prints, allows anyone with access to a 3D printer to be able to make one for themselves. With the technology and capabilities of 3D printing, many different industries are noticing the potential for innovation, including furniture design. Through using 3D printed furniture joints, the labor and production costs and implications would decrease, resulting in a smarter and more efficient furniture design industry.

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PHOTOGRAPHY Photography is a way to travel in time, to explore memories and moments, and to tell stories. A photograph has the power to change our perspectives without the image itself actually changing. Through the lens of a camera you are removed from the outside world and placed within this new reality that is the subject of your pictures. Every photo has its subject, and every subject has its personality and story, whether it is a person or an inanimate object. The art of the design and the art of photography go hand in hand, in the sense that when designing a space you are creating an experience and when taking a photo, you are capturing that same experience. Photography and travel have opened my eyes on the impacts that design and experiences can have on one’s life.

Paris, France Seattle, Washington Skagway, Alaska


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THANK YOU


2018 Interior Architecture Portfolio  

Heather Shine | Interior Architecture | University of Tennessee

2018 Interior Architecture Portfolio  

Heather Shine | Interior Architecture | University of Tennessee

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