JJC - 20 Under 40 - December 23, 2022

Page 1

2040 under

Honoring those whose commitment to the community is helping set the pace for the years ahead 2022
Special supplement of the

TRAVIS J. LITTIG

Illinois Air National Guard recruiting flight chief. My wife Alyssa and I have been married for nine years now. We have a 25-year-old son Landen Gound, who is my stepson. He is married to Holly Gound and they have a brand new baby girl named Ivy. They live in Roodhouse. My wife and I also have a 6-year-old son named Gatlin Nash Littig who was named after us getting married in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. He enjoys playing soccer, basketball and baseball, so this keeps us very busy, as I have been coaching both his baseball and basketball teams.

I have been a member of the 183d Wing in Springfield for closing in on 17 years now. I started out as a water and fuels troop and then moved over to recruiting in 2018. I quickly found a home in recruiting and because of some turnaround ended up becoming the flight chief in the office. My roles consist of managing the recruiters and also assisting with officer recruiting for our base. I also create and manage the recruiting marketing/advertising plans and strategic plans for each

fiscal year. By using the benefits that the Illinois Air National Guard provided me, I was able to get a bachelors in business management at no cost to me. I like to think that those classes I took have helped me be successful in my current position.

The most rewarding part of my job is when you see a young adult who you recruited come back from basic training and seeing how much they have matured. I always encourage them to go to school and use the 100% college tuition while they are young. It’s amazing to see what some of them end up doing with those degrees. I’ve recruited members that have ended up becoming police officers, firefighters, nurses and even a few who are in medical school to become doctors.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Professionally, my experiences from the Illinois Air National Guard and its benefits drives me to help those in need to take advantage of those benefits. Some people think

they sounds to good to be true, and I was the same way until I experienced it myself. Personally, trying to better the community for my son and his friends drives me to help out where I can. Jacksonville and the surrounding areas have some amazing communities compared to things you see in the news.

I want Gatlin and his friends to grow up healthy, happy and possess that will to help those in need to make this community better.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My wife, Alyssa, has always influenced me in my career. She was my rock during three deployments and just always pushes me to achieve my goals. She balances work and family so that I can continue to be successful in my career. The rest of my family, who have always volunteered to help out the local area whether it be coaching, keeping scorebook at high school basketball games, being members of the Elks Lodge and helping young kids, or being the

mayor of the village of Bluffs (my father) when I was growing up.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Welcoming. I think that what’s makes me successful in my career now is that I listen, and care about others so people feel comfortable about talking to me. My wife and I both probably worry too much at times about others, but we enjoy lending a hand.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I would like to see our community continue to grow. There have been some amazing things done with the square in Jacksonville and even the square in Winchester which is where I lived before Jacksonville. We need to encourage our kids to go work for a living and instill that work ethic in them when they are younger. It not only helps them become more successful and

teaches them life lessons, it helps our area by keeping businesses open by giving them the help they need.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Right now, I think it’s inflation. It’s hard for families to balance work and still being able to afford activities that keep our kids happy and help them grow. For example, taxes continue to rise along with gas prices, trash in our area sky rocketed not long ago and we lost the opportunity to choose from multiple companies. Things have just become so expensive that as parents we have to work a lot more hours to provide for the family. That time away, takes time away from us taking kids to tumbling, a basketball practice or even just to a park to play. So we need to find ways to help those families that are working their tales off to give their kids a better life.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

I think COVID was a very

challenging time for everyone. We moved during this time and having Gatlin being the only kid in the house, it was hard to tell him he couldn’t go out and play with kids or go somewhere fun. I learned to not take life for granted and enjoy time with your family and friends because we don’t know when it could change.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I have always thought being a high school basketball coach would be fun. I grew up an athlete and just enjoy teaching kids the value of team ethics. Even coaching my sons younger teams, I enjoy seeing how much better they get by the end of the season.

What are your goals for yourself?

My goals are to make it to Senior Master Sergeant (E-8), if not Chief Master Sergeant (E-9), before I retire from the military.

2 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
“My wife, Alyssa, has always influenced me in my career. She was my rock during three deployments and just always pushes me to achieve my goals. She balances work and family so that I can continue to be successful in my career.”
Ben Singson | Journal-Courier

BRITTANY N. HENRY

was raised in Oakford, a very small rural town in Menard County. My family moved to the area when my dad took an opportunity to manage a small hog farm. Once I graduated from Porta High School, I attended Illinois College, where I met my husband of 16 years, Brett Henry. We have one son, Parker, who is 12 years old.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Ever since I moved here to attend Illinois College, I have felt very proud of our community. Finding a community at such a young age where my husband and I felt we could be centrally located to each other’s families, careers and even potentially raise our future family in made our involvement in the community more important to us personally before we became more involved professionally.

Now, I have made it my entire career to assist in helping Jacksonville by bringing people to our area to experience what we have while marketing our historic yet vibrant community.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

I have so many that have influenced me. I would have to say my parents. My mother is someone who will never pass up any opportunity to help someone in need, and sometimes even when

they don’t need it. She has taught me to always think of others first, and I try to strive for that as well and my father who taught us that it is OK to work hard.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Energetic, cheery, talkative. I’ve heard “bubbly” before. Hard worker. I enjoy people so it’s hard not to be all of those things when you are around good people.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I really feel like we are seeing the beginnings of Jacksonville becoming more of a destination. You can see it downtown and throughout the Jacksonville area, with several new businesses opening up offering shopping, entertainment, and services of all sorts. There are so many wheels that keep Jacksonville moving and everyone is doing a great job at connecting all of those pieces. Sports tourism is rising, along with education, healthcare and general services. In years past, I would hear of so many not being able to do all of their local business in Jacksonville which is not the case anymore. We have so many wonderful opportunities that are avaialbe for not only residents but our visitors.

I would like to see in 10 years

Jacksonville become a place that families, friends, and couples come to spend time together. I think we are on the right track and have come so far. The more job opportunities, affordable housing and added amenities our community continues to expand will help these continued efforts in attracting those mentioned above.

So much can be brought to fruition by participating in your local community. Every town relies on their members to help continue making their communities a better place. Find what you are passionate about and work or volunteer to make things happen. Teamwork and communication will continue to build on placemaking for Jacksonville.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

The biggest challenge that I can see is that big changes or new ideas can sometimes be met with resistance. Change is hard - trust me. I believe we have all been there a time or two, but it takes stepping outside of your comfort zone to have the experience of a new thing or even starting a conversation (which can also be scary). Most of the time you will find that you enjoy it and hopefully tell all of your friends.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

I can’t say one without saying many. It truly takes a village to do the work we are intended to do. Professionally, I owe

So many have been influential in helping me through learning more about my role, and later adapting new changes and challenges as they come along. I am a part of the Illinois Council of Convention and Visitors Bureaus and it’s wonderful knowing that I have a great network of people I can turn to at any time when needed.

What are you most proud of?

Our numbers are measured directly by the number of hotel rooms sold in the Jacksonville Area and almost every year (except 2020) we have been able to see a growth in those numbers. Not only does having those numbers grown help our organization out, but it helps the community as well as these visitors are here bringing outside dollars into our community, spending money on food, gas, and shopping!

I am so proud of the work that our community does to aid in our efforts. Without a community full of thriving events, businesses and culture it would be nearly impossible to do the work we are charged to do each day.

What is something you’re passionate about?

I’m passionate about my family, my job and the community that I live in. Work-life balance is hard to come by,

3 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Executive director, Jacksonville Convention & Visitors Bureau.I a lot of my success to my peers across the state of Illinois, the Illinois Office of Tourism and my fellow members of the Illinois Council of Convention & Visitors Bureau, my board of directors, industry peers and friends and family.
Congratulations To All The 20 Under 40 Winners!
See HENRY, Page 8
“I really feel like we are seeing the beginnings of Jacksonville becoming more of a destination. You can see it downtown and throughout the Jacksonville area, with several new businesses opening up offering shopping, entertainment, and services of all sorts. There are so many wheels that keep Jacksonville moving and everyone is doing a great job at connecting all of those pieces.”
Angela Bauer | Journal-Courier

EVAN K. DAVIDSON

Registered Nurse. I live in South Jacksonville. My wife, Megan Davidson, is a CPA at Zumbahlen, Eyth, Surratt, Foote and Flynn Ltd. Our son, Owen, was born in August. I graduated from Quincy University and Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing and Health Sciences in 2017 with my bachelor of science degree in nursing. I have worked as a Registered Nurse in critical care and ICU since graduating. I volunteer as a firefighter and pre-hospital RN for the South Jacksonville Fire Department. I also recently joined the Jacksonville Morgan County Dive Team.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

My profession involves helping others on what may be their worst day. I like to know that I can make a positive impact for that person and their family.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I would like to see that the community has better access to specialized care within the area. Additionally, a larger availability of EMS services in the Jacksonville and surrounding areas.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think the act of volunteering is not as prominent in the community in the younger generation. I hope to see younger individuals volunteer their time to better the community.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

My wife, Megan, is always encouraging me to do my best whether it be at work or the fire department. She has also volunteered her own time to help with different activities for the

department.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I would most likely work in carpentry.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Spending time with my wife and son. I enjoy riding my motorcycle and kayaking.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Don’t dwell on the little things. Things could always be worse.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

I get to work and volunteer with colleagues that share the same passion of providing for the public whether it be in the hospital or within the community.

4 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
20 UNDER 40 RECIPIENTS!
“My profession involves helping others on what may be their worst day. I like to know that I can make a positive impact for that person and their family.”
CONGRATULATIONS

JACQUELINE J. SCHUTZ

Owner of Greene Elite Athletics and business teacher at North Greene High School. I am married to Brock Schutz. Together, we will live on a farm with our children, Taylor, Tess and Bo.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Being from Jerseyville, and not raised in the North Greene community, I have no familial ties or fond younger memories of the community traditions.

Over the years, I have fallen in love with the stories our friends and family have shared. I want my children to have the same feeling of home and pride when they think of their childhood and the community that helped shape them.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

Wendy Turner owned and operated Turner’s Tumbling’s in

Jerseyville and I had the honor of working for her as a young adult. Through her mentorship, Wendy modeled for me the importance of building relationships with youth, no matter the content you’re teaching to them. She laid the groundwork for me to understand how to have a successful business, through treating people with respect and having a sense of humor. Wendy’s guidance has given me the courage to start my own gymnastics studio and, therefore, pass on my knowledge to future business leaders.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

“Wow, she’s a lot!” My husband and I have joked about this sentiment several times, but I truly have a love for people and developing relationships through good conversations and connection. When I get to know you, I’m excited about your story and can usually relate on so many levels.

What changes would you like to

see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

With technological advances, this next generation no longer has to relocate to urban areas to have successful, fulfilling careers. Rural areas, such as White Hall and Roodhouse, are wonderful places to raise families. People care about each other here, and that is a beautiful thing. I would like to see others in the community proactivily encouraging youth to remain in the area and, perhaps, start their own businesses.

There is endless potential here.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

We need to hop off our devices and get out there. Participate in our community events. Show our kids you believe in them by attending sporting and academics events, participating in fundraisers, and just be there for them at home.

Who has had the greatest influ-

ence on you, and how?

My parents have had the biggest influence on me. Whether it is my mom’s grit or my dad’s heart, I truly believe I inherited the best of them both.

They created such a solid foundation for me through love and support, that I can stand firm when obstacles are thrown my way. When life does get the best of me, as it does with everyone, they are right there in my corner ready to see me through.

What are you most proud of?

I am most proud of my husband and the life we created together.

What is something you’re passionate about?

I seriously love the youth in the North Greene community. Whether I am teaching them how to do a cartwheel or how to fill out their taxes, I want to see everyone grow and prosper. I believe I found my lot in life with the privilege of being a part of my students’ lives.

What’s one of the most chal-

lenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

I believe I saw it on a social media meme: As soon as you say “My child will never,” here they come nevering like they never nevered before.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

My husband and I are very optimistic people. We love to get involved in community traditions. With him as a member of the White Hall Lions, myself on North Green PTO council, and us both serving on our church council board, we always hear of opportunities to serve our community.

What’s something about you few people know?

I am double-jointed in my left thumb.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

As a child, I wanted to train Shamu at Sea World. Now, that

sounds a little too dangerous and I’m pretty content in the life I’ve created.

What are your goals for yourself? Raise good humans.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

I enjoy spending time with family and friends. My favorite way to do that is with dinner and a movie.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

It all falls back to the Golden Rule: Treat others how you would like to be treated. We echo that throughout our house and I’m sure our kids are sick of hearing it by now.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

The absolute best is when I see my students (past or present) and I’m greeted with excitement. It always encourages me to keep planting those mustard seeds.

5 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
“Over the years, I have fallen in love with the stories our friends and family have shared. I want my children to have the same feeling of home and pride when they think of their childhood and the community that helped shape them.”
Samantha McDaniel-Ogletree | Journal-Courier

JOHN & RACHEL ROHN

Owners Fitness World Health Club, Ks Creek/Kitchen 63, and The Plaza. Married 14 years and have two girls, Kaylin, 11, and Kendal Jo, 6.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

We have always wanted to do our part to drive positive growth in this community that we love so much and has made us feel at home, since graduating from Illinois College in 2007. We have loved taking old businesses in this town and breathing new life into them, and watching so many people’s lives changed for the better as a result of it.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

Our college track coach, Mike

Brooks, has had a profound influence on us both personally and professionally. His example of coaching kids in this community going all the way back to a Routt State Championship has caused us to want to take Fitness World to places it had never gone before and then K’s Creek as well. We are proud to have thousands of kids each year come through the doors of both places, having an opportunity to work on whatever they are passionate about in a caring, friendly environment. Coach Brooks’ work ethic is always something we have tried to emulate professionally, as there was never any job too big or too small for him to take on, and whether stressed to the max, or otherwise, he always performed his duties with care and compassion and with service for those around him always the priority.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Depending on where we are at and what we are doing, we are both kind of chameleons. Rachel is positive and upbeat when showing people one of our businesses for the first time and John’s 15 years as a loan officer usually show through in his customer-service-first demeanor.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

We think so many positive changes have occurred since we started at IC nearly 20 years ago, we can honestly say we just hope the positive train keeps rolling. Whether it be new businesses bringing new job opportunities, new entrepreneurs stepping out on the edge to start

their own businesses, or existing businesses continuing to expand in Jacksonville, we hope that the great momentum in Jacksonville right now just continues to accelerate. And we hope more people just like us want to come to town to be a part of it.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Jacksonville is a great sized town but is somewhat caught in the middle between small town USA and the Springfields, Champaigns, and Bloomingtons of the world. We hope that the collective efforts of many in this town will cause us to grow to be more of the ladder than the former over the next 20 years.

What are you most proud of?

We are really proud of taking Fitness World and K’s Creek from something really pret -

ty broken down or closed up altogether, and taking them and making them into something the whole community could be proud of. And how we get there still to this day, are the people behind them all: Richie Frederick and Derek James at K’s Creek/Kitchen 63, Ryne Turke at Fitness World, and now Brian Davenport at The Plaza/ The Vault Axe Throwing. We are proud of the success of our businesses because these people make it happen. We are most proud of them and the work they contribute day in and day out to make this community a better place.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

We love spending time with our girls either at home snuggling on the couch or, when we get a chance, going out on the water. We are foodies at heart

so the four of us really like to spend our free time trying new places to eat or just endlessly patronizing our favorites.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Like we said when we took on The Plaza project recently, we firmly believe that the rising tide lifts all boats. We want to spend our time and efforts at this stage of life creating a more positive environment for our family, our friends, and our community. We have always had the mindset that if what we are doing is good for everyone around us, then we can never go wrong. This little bit of scripture reaffirms it all: “Seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the Lord for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper.”: Jeremiah 29:7

6 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Dave Dawson | Journal-Courier
“We have always wanted to do our part to drive positive growth in this community that we love so much and has made us feel at home, since graduating from Illinois College in 2007. We have loved taking old businesses in this town and breathing new life into them, and watching so many people’s lives changed for the better as a result of it.”

Owner, Soap Company Coffee House. Like my family, I am a Jacksonville native who is hard-working and kind. Serving our thriving community is what keeps me going.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Bringing people joy by serving them comforting drinks and food brings me joy in return. I’ve formed close relationships with so many of our customers by serving them daily.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My mom, Kat Parker, raised me to do my best at whatever I choose to do. I dropped out of college to work full-time at a coffee house that I now own. It was a questionable decision at the time, but her encouraging words gave me hope for my future and got me where I am today.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Friendly, ambitious, and shy.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

Continual growth and support toward the homeless shelter and women’s crisis center are essential, fundraising and donations go such a long way. I think we’ve made great strides in the last few years with events like the Central Park Market and Downtown Concert Series, too. I’d love to see more events like them and even more involvement with our small businesses.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

As a small business owner, reaching out and finding those who have never heard of us or don’t make their way downtown much is a big challenge. Spreading the word to those people about our town’s other local businesses and getting them to frequent a different area of town.

What’s one of the most chal-

lenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

I’m a very understanding and accepting person by nature, but I’ve learned that just because you can withstand something doesn’t mean that you should stand for it. Learning when to let go of something or someone is always a challenge.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

The previous owner of Soap Co, Nicole Riley, gave me a job as a barista and taught me a lot of what I know. She helped lay the foundation of my work ethic and ambition.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

Making people happy by serving them small and affordable luxuries brings me such fulfillment. Running a business where the employees are excited to come to work and do a fantastic job also brings me fulfillment. I’m so grateful to have chosen a career that is so positive and brings everyone involved joy.

7 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Cong ratulat ions 20 U nder 40 W inners! You help make our community “go round ” . ABIGAIL SUZANNE KAFER
Angela
“Bringing people joy by serving them comforting drinks and food brings me joy in return. I’ve formed close relationships with so many of our customers by serving them daily.”

TABITHA R. SCHWEER

Assistant director of curriculum, instruction, and assessment for Jacksonville District 117 schools.

Even though I was born and lived in Texas for the first seven years of my life, I moved to Illinois and grew up in Clarendon Hills, a Chicago suburb, and am a graduate of Hinsdale Central High School. I completed my undergrad studies at Eastern Illinois University, my first master’s degree as a reading specialist from Olivet Nazarene University, and my

second master’s degree, educational leadership with a principal endorsement, from North Central College in Naperville.

I am in my 16th year of education and am lucky enough to have found a career that I truly enjoy. Growing up, school was extremely difficult for me and I struggled year after year.

Facing and overcoming adversity, teaching myself strategies to learn, and finally becoming a successful learner was when I realized I wanted

to be the teacher that advocated for all students while maintaining high expectations for them. Over the years, I have transitioned to working with my peers as we collaborate to continuously improve student learning through best practices.

Jacksonville School District has been an amazing place to continue my passion and love for learning.

My wonderful husband, Steve Schweer, is head men’s basketball coach and associate athletic director

at Illinois College, and I moved to Jacksonville in 2018. We also share our home with our full-of-smiles daughter, Samantha Blair. When we aren’t chasing after Sam, we love eating at all the restaurants in town, spending time with family and friends, and cheering on the BlueBoys.

Jacksonville has been very good to us and we are happy to call it our home.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

My daughter Sam drives my involvement and dedication to the community for sure. We all want the best for our loved ones, so any part I can have in strengthening what is already great will get my time and attention.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and

why.

The women in my family have been very influential in shaping me into the woman I am today. Their fierce determination to their family, strength as mothers, and knowledge in their fields served as models for who I wanted to become. Their continued love and support helps drive my passion and I hope to pass it on to Samantha.

HENRY

but I make sure that I can always get all that I need done and still make my son’s sports events.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

There are always challenges on this winding road - but I take each day with small strides. I was taught several years ago by a dear friend and past board member that those that we are closest to will let us down and even some we are not will still do the same, people will challenge us and hurt us whether they mean to or not. What is more important is how we as individuals react in certain situations and overcome

those challenges that we face.

It may seem like something we should all know but it’s a great reminder to keep climbing. One hill presents itself with another, but every climb will get you closer to the top and ready for the next.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

I was able to get an internship with the Jacksonville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau during my time at Illinois College. Once there, I grew to love the job and kept in contact, volunteering in the community and by keeping the relationships I had built led me to getting a call a few years later from

the director saying that she needed someone to step in and help out during a maternity leave. The rest is history, as I’ve been there ever since.

What’s something about you few people know?

I really love Dolly! I own several T-shirts and other memorabilia with her face on it. Dolly Parton is genuinely a humble person who made so much of herself and career with her hard work.

I love that she never forgets her roots and you can hear so much of it in the lyrics of her music, much like one of my favorites, “Coat of Many Colors.”

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or

dead, who would they be and why?

Well, Dolly of course. I’d be so excited to see her I don’t know if I’d even need a second famous person to have dinner with.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I would like to be a small-business owner of my own. It’s been something I’ve had my eyes set on for some time, but I’ve just never been able to pull the trigger on it. I even have mood boards saved of my dream business.

What are your goals for yourself?

Never leave anything out and get the most out of every single day. I do this by surrounding myself with

good people that support what I am passionate about. Once you find your passion, use it for the common good. Whatever it maybe it should contribute to your happiness and wellbeing of your friends and family.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

I like to catch up with friends and family and spend as much time with my husband which lately has been following our son around and enjoying all the simple things that bring him the most joy. I also love to cook. In the summer, we keep a small vegetable and an herb garden. I enjoy taking pictures or videos of recipes and posting them in my social media. It’s fun, therapeutic

and nothing brings me more joy than talking around the dinner table with my friends and family.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

As my favorite gal Dolly would say, “Don’t get so busy living where you forget to make a life.”

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

Choosing Jacksonville as our home. Having a sense of community with great friends, family and a career are three of the best things in life that we have always wanted when looking where to settle down.

8 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
See SCHWEER, Page 11
Continued from Page 2
“There will always be challenges, circumstances, and situations that test us, but in the end, we can do hard things. We must continuously challenge and push ourselves. In trying hard things, we learn. Without it we stay the same. When things get tough, remind yourself, you can do hard things.”
Samantha McDaniel-Ogletree | Journal-Courier

President, Hamilton’s Catering.

I grew up in Franklin, the product of a family business of catering that has been operational for going on 109 years and running. My sister, Leevia, and I watched our parents make tough decisions and sacrifices to both equal out the business world and our family life. This gave my sister and I the work ethic that we have today and will try to bestow upon my kids whether they are involved with the family business or not.

I graduated Franklin High School in 2004 and then MacMurray College in 2008. Upon graduating college, I jumped into the family business, managing our banquet hall in Jacksonville Hamilton’s at 110 N. East St. In my time there, I met and built good relationships with a lot of great people in the community of Jacksonville.

In 2014, I decided to break apart from catering and to try a law enforcement career. This is what I had always been interested in. I was lucky enough to get a job working for the Jacksonville Police Department. I worked with some amazing and professional people there and they taught me lessons that I continue to apply to life, but after a while I realized I missed my family business. So, I made the tough decision to move forward as a caterer.

In 2018, I married my wife, Ashley. She is an event planner for the business and an accountant on the side. We had our first son, Pauly, in July.

With my wife and I spending our entire adulthood and a big portion

of our childhood in the hospitality business, we have seen how important community support is in and around the Jacksonville area. When I say community support, I don’t just mean accepting the support. I am talking about giving community support. Whether it is the rejuvenation of downtown Jacksonville or benefits to support the improvement of an area of our community, it is each and every person’s support that makes Jacksonville and the surrounding area stick out.

Although the catering lifestyle is kind of stressful and hectic, I lean on my family in a lot of ways and I am very lucky to have them in my life.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Personally, I have grown up here. My father has grown up in this community. My mother moved to this community at a young age. My grandfather and great-grandfather and their families were a major part of this community. I feel as though it is part of my family tree. It is something that is a part of my life wherever I go. I love hearing stories from people throughout the community about my grandfather and grandmother. I never got to meet them so it makes it special when I hear these things.

Professionally, this community has done a very good job of reaching out to me and letting me know what I can do to support it. I think the way I show support usually varies. It mainly consists of what is needed, whether equipment is

needed to be lent or a meeting space is needed.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My whole family has really influenced the way I think and handle myself, especially my father, mother and sister. My grandfather, who lives in Chicago, has been a major influence on my life as well. I am really lucky to have such great people that have raised me.

However, recently my wife and son have really influenced the way I look at life and the way I make decisions. My way of thinking has changed from wanting to better myself and achieve my goals, to making sure they have the type of life they deserve. They are such amazing people and their influence on me I feel makes me ready to adapt to the obstacles that life throws at me.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I like to think they would find me polite and accommodating. I grew up knowing how important first impressions are to people. I treat people the way I would like them to treat me. This goes back to the way I was raised. I witnessed the people around me treating others with respect and supporting them.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

Instead of changes, I am going

to use the word “improvements.”

This is because I have watched so many people over the over the past 15 years or so work so hard and passionately to improve our community. It takes a real passion for your community and the people around you to work through all of the obstacles and challenges that

they have overcame. At the age I was starting my adult working career, it was really a motivation to watch this. I had never heard of or seen anything like it.

My role in the community up to this point has been more of a support role. This is compared to a true community leader who identifies

the changes needed. I feel my role has been to listen to these issues and to help with the changing process. In other words, at this point I do not feel like I am the one who could be suggesting the changes.

I have listened to so many bright, intelligent and motivated people who make so much sense. I feel right now I need to listen and help as needed.

To be clear and answer the question, I would like the next 10 years of this community to continue on the path of improvement. I would like to see our community leaders keep the passion they have for their community and I would like to be involved in the improvements wherever I am needed.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think from my perspective it has been the ever-changing way of life the past few years have thrown on us with COVID. There are too many aspects that are challenging right now to discuss. I feel as though these are affecting most parts of the community. It is becoming difficult for each part of the community to fulfil their jobs or expectations which I think is really the backbone of a good community

9 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
JOSEPH HAMILTON
Page 18
KYLE
See HAMILTON,
Dave Dawson | Journal-Courier
“We have seen how important community support is in and around the Jacksonville area. When I say community support, I don’t just mean accepting the support. I am talking about giving community support. Whether it is the rejuvenation of downtown Jacksonville or benefits to support the improvement of an area of our community, it is each and every person’s support that makes Jacksonville and the surrounding area stick out.”

Nurse practitioner. I live in Jacksonville, where I was born and raised with my husband and daughter. I graduated from MacMurray College with my bachelor’s in nursing. After graduating with my bachelor’s degree, I worked in an emergency department where I gained crucial experience and skills. I then graduated Bradley University in Peoria with my master’s in nursing and became a nurse practitioner. I now work full-time for Springfield Clinic as a hospitalist.

In July 2022, I started my own business, called Cloud Nine Aesthetics. Here, I offer Botox, Dysport, dermal fillers, IV hydration, B12 injections, biotin injections, VI Peels and microneedling with PRP. My long-term goal and dream is to be able to continue to grow Cloud Nine where I can offer more services, hire nurses and work there full-time.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

My passion is to serve the community. To be able to see

how I can directly impact women and make them feel good from the inside out is what fuels my passion. It is truly an honor to have a patient choose me and sit in my chair. Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

What influences me the most is watching successful women entrepreneurs.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I would hope to be seen as kind, caring and compassionate.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I hope to continue to see growth in small businesses. I love watching the progression and changes to the square. The best way to see this continue, is to see everyone think small when making their purchases.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I feel like the biggest chal -

lenge is having people change their old ways. I would love to see people look more into preventative care and medicine.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I would love to sell luxury beach real estate or be a world traveling photographer.

What are your goals for yourself?

My goal is to be able to work at Cloud Nine Aesthetics full time.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Hang out with my family and dogs.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

You have to assemble your life yourself, action by action.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

I’ve been able to make lifelong connections and friendships.

10 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
HOLLY D. HARP 307 East Court St. Jacksonville, IL - 217-243-2547 Cong ratulations Cloud Nine Aesthetics-Holly Har p! From: Your On The Cli p Side Family #ontheclipside
passion is to serve the community. To be able to see how I can directly impact women and make them feel good from the inside out
my
“My
is what fuels
passion.”
Dave Dawson | Journal-Courier

City of Jacksonville parks superintendent. I am a 2004 graduate of Winchester High School. After high school, I served three years in the Army. While serving, I was deployed to Iraq in 2005-2006 and was awarded two Army Commendation Medals. After my service, I enrolled in Western Illinois University, where I studied recreation, parks and tourism administration. I then moved to Jacksonville in 2013 when I started an internship with the Parks and Lakes Department under Bruce Surratt. I met my wonderful wife, Rebecca, and we have two sometimes-great rescue dogs,

Sonny, 9, and Boone, 3.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

As a member of the community I want to try to give a voice to the people that think they don’t have a voice that matters, and as the parks superintendent, I want to listen. I want to give the child that thinks there is nothing to do, a park to play in.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

I spent a lot of time with all of my grandparents and they made sure to make us earn our keep. But if I had to pick one person, it would be my friend Devin, because he works his tail off every day and is a great example of what a great person should be.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I would like to think I’m pretty laid back and like to talk about my dogs, nature and traveling.

What changes would you like to

see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I would love to see more outdoor recreational opportunities available for people of all ages because keeping people active and involved is what keeps communities going and striving forward. We can work together as a community to make these goals achievable because bringing recreation to our community is going to take help from everybody to make sure we can include everyone.

What do you consider the biggest

challenge about your community?

The availability of resources. We are a smaller but mighty community and making parks and other recreational areas accessible for everyone is a goal but also a challenge.

What are you most proud of? My military service.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Trying to learn more about wildflowers and pollinator habitats.

What’s something about you few people know?

SCHWEER

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I would hope that someone meeting me for the first time would describe me as an active listener, full of energy, trustworthy, resourceful, and somebody worth building a relationship with.

What changes would you like to

see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

Even though I’m new to the community, over the last five years, I’ve witnessed a great deal of growth and development here. I hope in the next 10 years that Jacksonville continues to challenge themselves to be the best they can be for all people living in our community.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think our community faces many challenges that all other communities face. All in all, I think working together is something we can continue to improve.

What is something you’re passionate about?

I love my career and if you know me, you know I’m passionate about it. But it’s probably my number two

in life. Most importantly, I’m most passionate about being a loving wife, mom, daughter, and friend. Family is important to me and comes first above all else.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

Dr. Rita Pierson: She was an anti-poverty advocate that spoke on teachers building strong relation-

ships with children. I would have loved to pick her brain and take part in her wisdom.

Dr. Anthony Muhammad: He is an educator who spends his time fighting for all students “who have ever been doubted.” He helps educators change the culture of their buildings to work together for all students. Everytime I hear him speak or read one of his books, I have more questions and more drive to keep grinding.

Want to learn the art of Bonsai. I have tried and not been successful ... yet.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Love traveling with my wife and our dogs, visiting places off the beaten path.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

I know all the young people say it, but “you only live once.” Do whatever you can whenever you can do it because this is your life, let’s live it.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

We can do hard things.

There will always be challenges, circumstances, and situations that test us, but in the end, we can do hard things. We must continuously challenge and push ourselves. In trying hard things we learn. Without it we stay the same. When things get tough, remind yourself, you can do hard things.

11 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
C.
ADAM
FLETCHER
Continued from Page 8
“I want to try to give a voice to the people that think they don’t have a voice that matters, and as the parks superintendent, I want to listen. I want to give the child that thinks there is nothing to do a park to play in.”
Dave Dawson | Journal-Courier

JILL D. MOSS

Chief operating officer, Farmers State Bank Pittsfield. I was raised in Winchester. My parents are Steve and Debbie Bigelow, and I have three siblings, Lisa, Clint and

Luke. After high school, I graduated magna cum laude from Benedictine University with a bachelor’s degree in Communications. I later married Stan Moss from Pittsfield, and we

reside there with our two boys, Hudson and Griffin.

I am an active member of First Christian Church of Pittsfield and Old Orchard Country Club. Over

the past several years, I have had the honor of mentoring students for the Pike, Scott and Morgan County CEO programs. I coach youth soccer and basketball, and I serve

as a school board member for Pike County Christian Academy and volunteer on its PTO committee.

Previously, I served on the Chamber of Commerce board of

directors and co-chaired the Young Professionals Network of Pike County.

12 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
See MOSS, Page 18
“I think small businesses are the heartbeat of our community and the challenges small business owners currently face between government regulations and trying to compete with big business conglomerates is a major challenge.”
Ben Singson | Journal-Courier

Registered Nurse at Jacksonville Memorial Hospital in the Intensive Care Unit. I have been at this hospital for nine years and work 12-hour shifts. I started as a nurses’ aide in 2013 while attending MacMurray College for my degree in nursing.

Once I graduated, I started working as an RN in 2015 on the medical/ surgical unit. Over the last several years, I have worked in various departments in this hospital. I have worked in med/surg, behavioral health inpatient, behavioral health outpatient, transitional care, and the ICU.

I very much enjoy my career and helping others. I have had the privilege of caring for many patients and their families in our area. I have always wanted to be a nurse ever since I was a little girl. On my days off, I work with my father, Wes Knox, doing construction work. I have worked alongside him since September 2020. In January 2019, my father suffered a massive heart attack. He went back to work solo — or so he thought —  in September 2020. I was worried about him and his health. He started his first roof since his heart attack on Sept. 17, 2020. I had already worked several nightshifts in a row and got off at 7:45 that morning. I went home, packed a lunch, and showed up at the job site. My dad was so excited and so was I. I work with him for about 7.5 hours that day then went home and crashed. I fell in love with roofing and carpentry. There is nothing better than getting to

work with your dad on your days off from your full-time job as a nurse. It was a nice contrast from my nursing career especially during the COVID pandemic. We have completed many projects over the last two years from roofing to building a house together, setting trusses, sheathing houses, etc. It was so awesome and addicting to see the progress and difference we made in other people’s lives as carpenters.

I am very hard-working and always give 150% in whatever I may be doing, whether that is being a nurse or a carpenter with my father. People say sometimes that I shouldn’t work my life away, but if you love what you do, it’s not really work, it’s a passion. I absolutely love spending time with my family any chance I get. They are the driving force that keeps me going every day. I grew up in a very loving and supportive home that thought me at a young age that with discipline and hard work you can make your dreams come true, and it has. I owe everything I have accomplished to my parents, Wes and Lisa Knox, because without them I would not be half the person I am today. I live here in Jacksonville in a house my grandparents used to live in, with my long-time boyfriend, Josh Rooney, and our two handsome Siberian huskies, Ghost and Storm.

Being a fur baby mama, the fall/ winter seasons, coffee, Christmas, my family, cooking, singing Celine Dion, attending rock concerts with my dad, impromptu dance sessions

in the kitchen, and watching the Dallas Cowboys football with Josh are just a few of my favorite things.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

I am driven both personally and professionally by the joy that helping others brings me. I know that may sound like a cliche, but it is the God’s honest truth. When you have made someone’s day better or made them smile, it is totally worth it. You never know what someone is going through in his or her own life, so it is just better to be kind to all no matter the circumstance.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My father has been my biggest influence on who I am as a person, because no matter what life has thrown at him, he never gives up. He always goes to work with a smile and a positive attitude. He works in every type of terrain and weather, but you would never hear him complain about it. He is the hardest working person I have ever known. He does everything he can for his family. We are and always have been his number one priority. I learned from him at a young age that life is what you make it. Life isn’t always fair, but with determination and hard work, you can help make a better life for yourself and your family.

ing you for the first time would describe you?

I think someone would describe me as outgoing, hardworking, and energetic. I don’t really know many

strangers and I absolutely love to meet new people.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next

10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I think we need more mental

13 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
How do you think someone meet-
See KNOX, Page 14
“I am driven both personally and professionally by the joy that helping others brings me. I know that may sound like a cliche, but it is the God’s honest truth.
When you have made someone’s day better or made them smile, it is totally worth it.”
Samantha McDaniel-Ogletree | Journal-Courier

LOGAN MICHAEL GRIFFIN

Firefighter/EMT Jacksonville Fire Department. I was born and raised in Jacksonville. I attended North Elementary, Turner Junior High, and graduated from Jacksonville High School, Class of 2012. I continued my education at Lincoln Land Community College, where I graduated with an associate’s degree in criminal justice and obtained my EMT certification. I always knew from the time I was young that I wanted to serve the community and help people. I tested multiple fire departments in the state before landing my dream job at the Jacksonville Fire Department five years ago, in August 2017.

I have known, my wife, Ashley Kate Griffin, since high school. She is my best friend and biggest

KNOX

Continued from Page 13

health awareness and access to mental health help for people in our community. It is very prevalent, and the resources have been scarce over the last few years. No matter who you talk to, someone has been touched by mental health, either directly or indirectly. We have so many people suffering from addiction, mental health disorders, and homelessness who need more help and positivity in their lives. I think

supporter for all of my endeavors in life. Ashley is a Registered Nurse currently staying at home with our children. Like many things, we share the same ambition to help and serve the community we live in. We married on June 8, 2019. We have two children, Pierce, 2, and just recently welcomed our daughter, Vivianne. Spending time with my family is truly my biggest hobby, and getting to be a husband and father to them is my biggest accomplishment in life. Aside from the fire department, I own and operate a home inspection company, Safe-Sight Home Inspections. When I’m not doing that, I help my family farm. Farming allows me to spend additional time with my family, especially my son. He enjoys going

“workin’”, is a true lover of being around the farm and helping with day-to-day tasks.

I have great ambition to help the Jacksonville community. I want it to continue to be a great place to raise a family, as it was for me growing up.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

To give back to the community that helped shape me into the person I am today.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My uncle is a firefighter and I thought it was the coolest job

in the world when I was a kid. It truly sparked my interest into the profession, driving me to become the firefighter I am today.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I would say funny, and someone you could ask for a hand if needed.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I would love to see business grow and provide more jobs in the community. With big companies that have left town in the past, I would hate to see any more leave town and leave more families without jobs to

stay here.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

The drug and mental health problem in our community has become something of attention in my book. Seeing some of the situations the families we go on calls for breaks my heart. Proper rehabilitation and help for these individuals is a must-have.

What are you most proud of?

My children. They make me a better person and couldn’t imagine life without them.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Treat other people as you want

to be treated. And always treat our patients if they were a member of our own family to provide the best possible care.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

The best thing to happen to me with my career is getting to work along side of some of the best guys I know. Jacksonville Fire Department has some of the best firefighters and paramedics the community could ask for. All of them have truly became a second family to me, and have guided me in my career.

bringing back a day program that helps individuals learn positive coping skills and other basic life skills would be so beneficial and helpful to so many people.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Resources for those in need. I know we have great programs, such as Healthy Jacksonville, but not everyone has access to a newspaper, or flyer or a social media post to obtain important information they may need.

What’s something about you few people know?

Before nursing school, I was interested in being a diesel mechanic or doing underwater welding. In high school, I welded the top of my class out of a class of guys. I took many carpentry courses, welding and metalworking in high school.

I also drove a pickup truck and worked on it with my dad. I would change my own oil and everything.

So before being a nurse was 100% what I knew I wanted to do for the

rest of my life, I was considering being a tradesman, or tradeswoman if you will.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

I would hands down want to have dinner with Celine Dion and Princess Diana. I absolutely love Celine Dion’s voice and have listened to her music since I was a child. Her voice literally gives me goosebumps every time I play her music. I would also

love to have dinner with Princess Diana because I have been obsessed with her since I was very young. I used to check out every single book about her in elementary school and read them cover to cover. I always admired how she carried herself and all of the volunteer work she used to do. She was an amazing woman. They both are.

If you could be or do anything else — what would it be?

Honestly, I would not change what I do as a nurse or carpenter

for anything. However, coming in at a very close second would be living in a house in the country with many acres and all the huskies in the world to tend to. I would be a stay-at-home fur mama. I would love to rescue dogs, puppies, or even sick fur babies that needed a loving home for a short amount of time they had left on this Earth. There is no greater love than the love a dog has for you. They are so loyal and love you for the entirety of their little lives.

14 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
“I have great ambition to help the Jacksonville community. I want it to continue to be a great place to raise a family, as it was for me growing up.”
Ben Singson | Journal-Courier

DANNY J. POWELL

Funeral director and Greene County coroner. I am married to my wife Miranda and we have three children, Bailee, 8, Brynlee, 5, and Braydee, 1.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

I have become involved with

our community in a variety of ways: I work here, I live here, and I volunteer here. I can remember being a little boy and attending so many of the same events we

still have, and thinking about how wonderful those moments were, so I’d like to continue those

15 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
See
Page 21
POWELL,
“I work here, I live here, and I volunteer here. I can remember being a little boy and attending so many of the same events we still have, and thinking about how wonderful those moments were, so I’d like to continue those traditions to create similar memories for my children.”
Samantha McDaniel-Ogletree | Journal-Courier

Project manager and operations officer at Turner Painting & Construction. I was born in Jacksonville, but grew up in South Carolina. After graduating from the University of South Carolina, I relocated back to Jacksonville about 7 1/2 years ago. My parents, Mark and Ellen Kleinlein, live in South Carolina still, but I am surrounded by many wonderful relatives in the Jacksonville area.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Jacksonville has always felt like home. It is the “sweet spot” with a small town feel where you run into friends at the coffee shop mixed with enough to do for all types of people. With community involvement in the area, it is easy to get to know those you are helping and those who are helping you. This feeling of community makes it hard to not want to be involved.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

It is difficult to choose one person but I have always admired my mother, Ellen Kleinlein, and her ability to balance being a success-

ful woman and a compassionate one, too. I see many women in the Jacksonville community with these characteristics as well and I often look to them with admiration and for inspiration.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I would hope they could consider me positive, welcoming, and kind.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I would like to see more of Jacksonville’s population involved in local activities, ranging from social events to causes that help one another. There are some under-served areas of our community and it would be wonderful to see that improved. I think step one is simply reaching out to someone you may not know and inviting them along.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Being someone who did not grow up in this community, I can recognize how it can be difficult for those moving to the area to feel welcomed at times. It is a very tight

knit community in some aspects, which is a positive, but it can be hard to find a way in. However, we are lucky to have some amazing leaders and friends in our community actively working on outreach to make those not from here feel welcomed.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

When I am not working or volunteering I enjoy being out in nature or in the kitchen. Hiking, bike riding, kayaking, or even just taking a walk out in the country with the dogs are favorite past times.

In my other free time, I love to cook and bake, and eat.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Leave the world a little better than how you found it.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

Through volunteering in our community, I have met the most wonderful people, many of which I would now consider lifelong friends.

16 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
We wouldn't be where we are today without you! We are so proud of you, love you and look forward to many more years of success with you by our side! May God continue to bless you as He uses you in service to others.
Much Love & R espectRyan, Casandra, Gerald & Karla Turner
Congratulations, Erin!!
“With community involvement in the area, it is easy to get to know those you are helping and those who are helping you. This feeling of community makes it hard to not want to be involved.”

JESSICA E. GALE

Owner/operator at Our Town Books. I grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, in a town a little smaller than Jacksonville, in the middle of the woods. As a child I enjoyed escaping into the woods, reading fantasy fiction, and seeking out adventure. As a young adult, I went to school and worked in several cities on the East Coast, then in 2014 my family relocated to Jacksonville for work.

After being a stay-at-home mom for several years, I decided I wanted to get back into the working world, ideally running my own business.

Around the same time, the bookstore went up for sale, and I jumped on the opportunity.

I’ve always loved hanging out in bookstores, especially with a good cup of coffee.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

To me, books give access to people and worlds that we might otherwise not have access to.

Through this, books build empathy in the people that read them (there’s a quote somewhere out there that says this more succinctly).

I look at my work in the bookstore as helping people in my community have access to a place where they can reach better understanding for themselves and others.

Understanding breeds tolerance and kindness.

This is the work I wish to participate in in my community, if even on a very small level.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

One book I always return to, is Bell Hooks’ “All About Love.” She delves into the history and sociology of the idea of love, and among many other things, says we must

expand our idea of love to include community and non-romantic love, in order to have healthy relationships and so a healthier more lovefilled world.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Friendly, open, kind, maybe a little quirky.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I think Jacksonville in particular is currently experiencing a little revitalization of its downtown and business district. It’s great to see more buildings filled with shops, and more people coming downtown to explore and just meet in person. I would love to see this momentum continue in the next 10 years in Jacksonville.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Maybe it’s remoteness and distance from larger city centers, and so larger and more diverse customer bases for businesses; However, that challenge could also be considered a strength, especially in this day and age when folks are wanting to get away from busy and congested cities, and live in communities where they know more people and have a slower pace of life.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

That is hard to say. Maybe indirectly, my son (who is 7 years old). I think I try to act in the world and make decisions always with him in mind.

What are you most proud of?

My son, and probably my work at the bookstore.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Storytelling in all its forms, art, music my friendships.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

Persistence gets you a lot farther than most things.

What’s something about you few people know?

I like binge-watching select reality TV shows, and enjoy pop culture.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

Virginia Woolf. I just love her writing and her ideas.

Carole King; her album “Tapestry” is one of my favorites.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be? Maybe a cook or a dancer.

What are your goals for yourself? To continue to grow, listen to myself, and make good connections in the world.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Hang out with my son, cook, rest and relax when possible.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Live authentically, and treat everyone with kindness.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

I’ve gotten to know so many more people in the community through the bookstore, and have made some important friendships.

17 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
“I look at my work in the bookstore as helping people in my community have access to a place where they can reach better understanding for themselves and others. Understanding breeds tolerance and kindness.”
Angela Bauer | Journal-Courier

HAMILTON

Continued from Page 9

structure.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

It would have to me my parents. I think in a lot of ways the way I have acted and the decisions I continue to make have been from what I have observed growing up. I believe, especially in my career, I have been influenced greatly growing up in my families business. I have seen so many different situations that my parents have had to handle I find ways each day that I think back about how I have been influenced.

What are you most proud of?

I am proud most of my wife and son. I could not be any luckier to have my wife, and when my son was born, it was the most beautiful thing to me.

MOSS

Continued from Page 12

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

At this point in my life, my children drive my involvement in the community. I want to ensure they have opportunities and grow up in a place of which they are proud. Anytime someone asks for my involvement, I think “If not me then who?” and sometimes that thought alone scares me into jumping in to assist.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My parent’s story. They have been married for 43 years, and I’m sure they will attest it hasn’t always been the easiest ride. Despite any circumstance thrown at them, my parents always provided a loving home for my siblings and me. They taught us the importance of hard work and what it means to persevere, and I would not be who I am today without them.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I’ve been told I’m passionate, outgoing and confident.

What changes would you like to

What is something you’re passionate about?

Weddings. Although I am passionate about every event we do, it is special to me helping a bride and groom on the most important day of their life.

It makes hard work worth it when you see the smile on a brides face and they tell you how great everything was.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

Be over-prepared; it helps you deal with the unexpected.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

I think for the most part I got involved with my career and volunteer work through my family business. They have kind of gone

hand and hand. I realize it is a unique thing to be around the hospitality industry, especially catering, when growing up. But this is pretty much what opened up the paths I am heading down currently.

What’s something about you few people know?

If I did not live in this community, I would want to live in Key West.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

The first person would be Michael Jordan. I grew up idolizing him. I had posters all over my wall. I would try to imitate him. I drove my parents crazy until I finally had his shoes and his jersey. I still even drive my wife crazy now, talking about him. He led to a passion for basketball. However, as I got older, I realized his passion for his

career can be carried over to other careers. His goals and accomplishments were because of how hard he worked and how focused he was.

The second person would be Leslie Nielsen. The main reason for this is I enjoy quoting him, and I wonder if it would get on his nerves.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

Scuba diving instructor in Key West.

What

My other goals include to designate more time for my family and enjoy life with them. I would like to include traveling with them and seeing the world.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Currently, most of my life involves hanging out with my son. Since he is only 4 months old, this mostly involves rolling around on the floor, eating, and bouncing around in his play seat. Anything that makes him smile.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

There has been so many things that have happened to my family because of this community and community service, it is very hard to say. Every person I have worked with or for has left a mark on me. I will have to be a little selfish though and say the best thing that has happened to me because of my community is the relationships I have built.

are your goals for yourself?

I would like to build and push the business I am in to a stable condition which will support my wife and son as well as benefit the community. The past few years have been very challenging, as it has been for everyone. I think it will only help me to look forward and try to adapt, compared to focusing on how things use to be.

I also like to hike with my dogs and be around nature.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

Be faithful to what you believe in. If you are inspired or pressured to change your ideals, you are not showing the world who you truly are.

I went from being a young kid, watching different people in my community through my work, to getting to know these people. It has been very rewarding to me and made me proud to be a part of this community. It has given me an understanding on what motivates different people in different positions.

see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

Over the past several years, our community has done an incredible job improving our downtown area and creating new ways of bringing families together. We have so many churches and organizations providing outreach, I think it would be amazing to find a way to bring everyone together to collaborate, share resources and possibly make a bigger impact by working together.

When doing this, I would love to focus on having people of all generations at the table. I’m not sure if it’s my age, but more than ever, I see the importance of gaining wisdom from those with grayer hair than me and thinking outside the box with those who have new ideas. Imagine if those two worlds collided on a consistent basis.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think small businesses are the heartbeat of our community and the challenges small business owners currently face between government regulations and trying to compete with big business conglomerates is a major challenge.

In addition, I think our community, like all communities across Illinois and America, are experiencing an increase in the presence of

drugs, specifically meth and heroin. I believe a soft-on-crime approach, especially for drug offenses, has not proved to be effective and could have a very negative impact on our community.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

Wow, this is a tough one. I have had so many wonderful mentors in my life, but at the end of the day, I have to say my husband has had the greatest influence on me. He is everything I’m not, and his influence on me has made me a better human being.

Stan has been through a lot of tragedy in his life and because of that, he has a different perspective on life than most. When things get busy or I am unsure of a decision, he’s my true north, the one I can count on to point me in the direction of what really matters in life–our faith and our family.

What are you most proud of?

Professionally, I’m most proud of our company for being named a Best Places to Work in Illinois and a Top Community Bank in America this year.

Personally, I am most proud of the life I’ve built and the family I have despite many hardships and obstacles thrown my way. In the end, I’m proud of being an

overcomer.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Communication and turning ideas into action.

I feel most all conflicts in our world are because of individual interpretations of the facts and an inability to communicate effectively. I’m passionate about improving my own skills in this area and training others on how to have safe and productive conversations about differing opinions.

I’m also passionate about turning thoughts and ideas into action.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

The importance of grace and forgiveness. The most challenging part of that lesson has been understanding I don’t deserve grace and forgiveness, yet Jesus gives it to me freely, so who am I to withhold it from someone else? Also, through that lesson, I have experienced firsthand that forgiveness heals you more than the one who hurt you.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

My story has not been one of me finding a specific industry, job or career path. Every opportu-

nity I have had in my career and volunteer work has been due to my ability to incorporate my skillsets and strengths into whatever the situation or position may be. For the most part, I am where I am now because of others reaching out to me with new opportunity ideas. I am so thankful to those individuals because I absolutely love what I do, both in my career and my volunteer work

What’s something about you few people know?

I tried enlisting in the military three different times. An irreparable hole in my eardrum disqualified me each time.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

Jesus, because duh, and Louis Zamperini, because wow.

If you could be or do anything else - what would it be?

I would love to write a book or help anyone who feels unseen or insignificant find hope, specifically those who are homeless, going through abuse, or veterans struggling with PTSD. I would also love to study the brain. I find the brain incredibly fascinating

What are your goals for yourself?

Right now, I have a goal of running a half-marathon. Prior to having children, I ran them all the time. It is a part of me I miss and a part of me I want my boys to know. I want them to see the dedication and the pride that goes into training and finishing a race like that.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

Anything athletic and competitive. I love to play rec volleyball, soccer, softball, anything that can feed my competitive drive and need to be on a team. I also love hiking, reading, exercising, and of course spending time with my family.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

“So that happened.”

What I’ve learned in my life so far is most things do not turn out how you expect. Instead of looking at those unexpected events as problems, I tend to say, “OK, so that happened” and then I work to seek solutions and pivot when needed instead of sulking or complaining.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

Hands down, the best thing has been the people I’ve met and the relationships I’ve built.

18 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier

Veterinarian. I was born and raised in Jacksonville.  I graduated from Jacksonville High School and Illinois College before heading to University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. I graduated in 2011 and began working as a veterinarian at Lincoln Land Animal Clinic, where I am presently. I am also the consulting veterinarian for Turner Scientific in Jacksonville.

My husband, Shawn Artis, and I met through Young Professionals Network and were married in October 2016. We have two boys, Camden 2½ years, and Jace, newborn. We have one cat, Morgan, 13 years. My mom and dad both reside just outside of Jacksonville and Shawn’s mom and dad reside in Rushville.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

I began my involvement with the community during different service days through Illinois College and I helped new students at the college when I was a connection (orientation) leader.  During my time in YPN, I really learned that giving

back is very important to me. I enjoyed the various community services we helped with and the connections that I made.  I am also a “Rotary wife,” which has influenced my community involvement and has improved my understanding of global issues.

As a veterinarian, I give back to the community by helping animals.  Happy animals equals happy owners. I also go back to Illinois College to discuss various topics in vet med and have interns come to our clinic to help them gain experience and assist them in pursuing their future endeavors.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

Honestly, it’s hard to pick a person.  There have been so many individuals who have helped me pursue my dream of being a veterinarian.  From my parents having faith in my dream and   guiding me along the way.  To professors and other veterinarians who were willing to give their time and take me under their wings.  Their knowledge was contagious and helped me to want to become better

both professionally and personally.  My husband has helped me keep the faith in a demanding career as well as enjoying community involvement.  And finally my two boys who helped me gain more patience and learn to see the world differently.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

At first I am very quiet and reserved, but once they get to know me, I would hope they would say welcoming and friendly as well as compassionate.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I really love seeing the local businesses prosper and downtown regaining its spark. By continuing to shop local and support area businesses, we can keep the momentum going.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

The current financial situa-

19 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
JENNIFER M. ARTIS See ARTIS, Page 21
Angela Bauer | Journal-Courier
“I am very passionate about trying to get down to the bottom of why a pet is sick. We become detectives because they are unable to tell us what is wrong. I want to be able to give the owner a reason why.”

District director at AmerisourceBergen. Married to Rachel Hackett for nine years. We have two children, Landon, 8, and Emmerson, 3, who keep us very busy. I

am a graduate of Illinois College (2010) and can say that I went to kindergarten through college in my hometown.

I am president of the Jacksonville

Soccer Association and have been part of the organization for roughly 15 years. I also coach two Jacksonville United traveling soccer teams and I am an assistant coach for the

Jacksonville Lumberjacks U8 baseball team. I also sit on the board of Jacksonville Area Baseball and have

Cong ratulation s D aniel Hacke tt!

20 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Wa lton’s APPLIANCES • ELECTRONICS • FURNITURE
Coach Daniel Hackett for his dedication to the Jacksonville community on & off on the soccer fields. We are proud of you!
Congratulations
Page 21
DANIEL
See HACKETT,
Angela
“The people I have been able to meet personally and professionally is absolutely the best thing that has happened to me because of my community and career service.”

coached in the organization for four years.

I co-chaired the Jacksonville Art Association’s Beaux Arts Ball in 2022 with my sister, Katie Hackett, and am a life-member of the Art Association of Jacksonville.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

Jacksonville has given me so much and quite honestly has shaped me into the person I am today. I have always been a part of different organizations throughout the community as a child and those memories still live with me today. I want to be a part of someone’s memories when they look back and remember the positive experiences they had as a child. Jacksonville has so much to offer, we just need volunteers to

maximize the potential which is something I strive to do.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

Family. I have been fortunate enough to be around both sides of my family growing up here in Jacksonville. I have deep family roots in the community and have learned both personally and professionally from them. Watching each of them and their own involvement within the community pushed me to do be the best version of myself possible.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Personable. I strive to be wellliked, respected, and sociable. This is yet another attribute passed down to me by my family. I think the quote, “There are no strangers here; only friends you haven’t met

yet” by William Butler Yeats sums it up.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

Jacksonville has definitely seen its ups and downs over the years, but things seem to be moving in the right direction. I would like to see more hands being raised throughout the community. We have so many diverse individuals within the community with great ideas, but yet many of our volunteer organizations are struggling to increase participation. I understand we all have busy lives, but by making just a little time to give back we can significantly impact those around us and the community as a whole.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think tourism is one of the biggest challenges we face currently in our community. Jacksonville has such a rich history, but we need to continue to build upon this. By bringing new businesses, growth opportunities, and recreation into the community we will be able to entice an economic increase to Jacksonville. For example, Illinois College is a prestigious school but many of those students graduate and then move on to other destinations. If we make the necessary changes, we will be able to retain much of this talent in our community and the surrounding area.

What is something you’re passionate about?

I am extremely passionate about coaching youth in the community, specifically soccer. Soccer is something that has always been a part of my family growing up. I have coached all ages, from pre-K to

eighth grade and have even helped out at MacMurray College from time to time. There is nothing better than watching a team put in significant time and effort in training and then showcasing it all on the field. What is even better is watching the friendships that are made not only with the kids playing, but their parents as everyone comes together for a common goal (no pun intended).

What are your goals for yourself?

I have a handful of goals, but one key is to be a lifelong learner. I am about to graduate with my MBA from the Jack Welch Management Institute, which is exciting, but it helped me recognize the importance and joy of growth and personal development and the need to continuously seek out ways to improve upon myself. Pushing to go outside of my comfort zone and to be constantly curious is a key focus of mine. Now that I have

ARTIS POWELL

Continued from Page 19

tion our state is in, decreased population growth and the cost of housing can all affect a rural community like ours.

Who has had the greatest influence on you, and how?

I would say from a young age, my dad.  He is a Vietnam veteran, former funeral director and auditor of funeral homes/cemeteries.  His sense of purpose, drive and knowledge in the medical fields helped to guide and push me to follow my dreams.  He would help quiz me on medical terms and where certain vessels were. He was always willing to talk about his experiences and share the things he had seen/gone through. This helped me build more compassion for what people go through as well as wanting to help others.

What are you most proud of?

My family and career

What is something you’re passionate about?

I am very passionate about trying to get down to the bottom of why a pet is sick.  We become detectives because they are

unable to tell us what is wrong.  I want to be able to give the owner a reason why, but sometimes it is out of our hands.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

That you can’t do it all. Just do the best you can.

How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

I’ve always had the dream of becoming a veterinarian.  My years of schooling to working in the veterinary field before going to vet school, have all played a role in where I am today.

What’s something about you few people know?

When I was younger, my family and friends would put on a pretty awesome haunted house in my parents’ Morton building.

If you could have dinner with two famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

Sir Paul McCartney. Do I really need a reason? Ha! Dolly Parton. She seems like such a sweet and witty person.  She also gives back so much to her

community and to children with her reading program. I would love to pick her brain and hear her stories about life. I think she could teach us a lot.

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I would probably still do something with animals. Whether that’s working at a zoo or in a different position in the veterinary medical field.

What are your goals for yourself?

To keep pursuing and gaining knowledge in life and my career.

What do you do when you aren’t working or volunteering?

I love spending time and making memories with my family.

What’s your personal philosophy on life?

“Treat others how you want to be treated”—The Golden Rule

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

I met my husband through the Young Professionals Network and now we have two beautiful children :)

Continued from Page 15

traditions to create similar memories for my children.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

I’d have to say the most influential people in my world is a two-part question; first and foremost I’d have to say my parents have been an exceptional influence on my life. They have a work ethic that never quits, they’re always encouraging me to do the next thing on my mind, and they are always offering to help when I need it.

Beyond them, I’m lucky that my greatest influence in my work world is still part of my everyday life, and that is Joe Coultas. He has been tremendously instrumental in teaching me, helping me, guiding me and supporting me in my career.

I’m fortunate to have him not only as a mentor at work, but to have become one of my greatest friends through that process.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

I think the first thing they

would say is that I’m motivated. I hope they would say that I am a hard-working person, with a great outlook on life and our community, but most of all I hope they would say that I was considerate, caring and kind.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I am on the White Hall Park Board, and the number one thing I’d like to see would be having our Rez used to a greater capacity. We’ve got some really great ideas in the works, and I’d love to see that supported by our community to be fully implemented.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

I think our biggest challenge is recognizing the positivity in change. Change is progress, and sometimes that is scary to people because there’s a certain element of unknown (even with full planning, full disclosure and full transparency)… so I’d love to see our community embrace change a little more openly.

started, I am finding it difficult to slow down.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

The people I have been able to meet personally and professionally is absolutely the best thing that has happened to me because of my community and career service. My day to day consists of leading a team of individuals that are there to support independent pharmacies across the Midwest. I have met so many small business owners that are doing everything in their power to improve the health and wellness in their communities even when they are against big box competitors. Their drive and consistency to provide exceptional care to their patients is humbling to watch and to be a part of their success is extremely rewarding.

What are you most proud of?

My family. They are the ones that truly support me and it pushes me to be a better person every day. I have an awesome wife who works hard, our kids are healthy, my parents are always behind me, my siblings help however they can, and I’m able to contribute so much more to this community and my work because of all of them supporting me.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Creating a town that my children and their children will be proud of. This happens in a lot of different ways, but I figure that if I can contribute to anything, if I can leave my mark anywhere, my goal is to have a positive impact on this community.

What’s the best thing to happen to you because of your community or career service?

Meeting some of the best people in this world. Being involved in many community events, a business that serves our community and the ones surrounding us has given me a great gift in meeting a lot of different people.

21 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Continued from Page 20
HACKETT

Owner of Nothing Fancy Supply & Gillham House. I recently moved to Jacksonville from our family farm with my husband, Tim, and three children, Cashin, Robyn and Leo. Tim works for Farmers Bank along with owner of Haberdash (mens store on the square). Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

I love connecting and bringing people together. The evolution of downtown Jacksonville is inspiring and something I wanted my business, Nothing Fancy Supply, to be apart of.

Historically, town squares have been the heart of a community. Seeing the the centralization of shops, restaurants and entertainment really brings people together and creates a sense of community.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My parents have been the biggest influence in my life. My dad is a farmer and my mom a homemaker. They are both great examples of community connectors. Thanksgiving and family get-togethers are open doors to anyone. We’ve had many neighbors, travelers and peo-

ple without family become a part of ours. That openness to inclusion has molded the way I live and run my businesses.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Probably depends on where we meet. I hope that I make people feel comfortable to be themselves around me. I am a pretty genuine and honest person.

What changes would you like to see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I’m excited to see the snowball of downtown economic development continue to grow. The more we have to offer, the more people will see how special Jacksonville is and want to be apart of it. Whether being a part of this community is visiting for a day or overnight or even become a permanent resident.

I think they key to bringing that vision to Jacksonville is to be encouraging and supportive of new and existing businesses. We have something really special brewing in our downtown community.

What do you consider the biggest

challenge about your community?

The biggest challenge is cracking the shell of “what has always been” and opening up to new opportunities. There have been a core group of people working hard for decades to revitalize downtown. The square is beautiful and a welcoming place to be because of them. I hope that long-term Jacksonville and surrounding area residents see the downtown efforts and how much there is to offer. We currently have so many makers, artists, and boutique owners that offer unique and quality experiences. I believe it’s on the brink of becoming a Midwest destination for makers and entrepreneurs along with the visiting shoppers and travelers near and far.

What are you most proud of?

I’m most proud of creating a sustainable product in a way that I can stand behind. All our ingredients in our beeswax food wraps are sourced from small farms in the U.S. Our packaging is made from recycled materials in Iowa. I use local designers as much as possible. Along with giving my employees a flexible work schedule where

22 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Congratulations Colleen Flinn & All 20 Under 40 Recipients! 200 West State St. 1718 West Morton Ave. Jacksonville, IL 62650 www.fsbtco.com Phone 217-479-4000 COLLEEN FLINN See FLINN, Page 23
“I’m excited to see the snowball of downtown economic development continue to grow. The more we have to offer, the more people will see how special Jacksonville is and want to be apart of it.”

ELIAS “BUBBA” TRACE

Emergency physician, assistant medical director of Jacksonville Memorial Hospital Emergency Department. I’m a Jacksonville native and life-long resident. I live with my wife, Sherie, and our three young boys, Edison, 8, Henry, 6, and Max, 6. I spend my free time playing sports with my kids, listening to music and playing guitar, spending time outdoors, hunting, cooking and grilling, cycling, or diving into home improvement projects and woodworking. There’s a good chance if I’m not working in the ER

that you can find me wandering the aisles of Home Depot or Farm & Home here in town.

Describe what drives your involvement in the community, either personally or professionally.

As a proud native of Jacksonville, I am committed to making the Jacksonville Memorial Hospital Emergency Department a highly respected and trusted place for patients to seek emergency medical care.

Tell us about someone or something that has influenced you, and why.

My father, Peter, was my biggest influence. He was a tough, dedicated father and physician who demonstrated unwavering duty to his family and his patients.

How do you think someone meeting you for the first time would describe you?

Friendly, easy-going, humorous.

What changes would you like to

see in your community in the next 10 years, and how can they be brought to fruition?

I’d love to see continued re-investment in our school district and education system. We’ve made a lot of progress over the last decade, thanks to the vision of our school leadership and board. I’d love to see the community rally behind a major, innovative, district-wide physical improvement project that renews community pride in our schools, leads to economic growth and makes us a regional leader in

public education.

What do you consider the biggest challenge about your community?

Labor shortages, consolidation and reappropriation of resources and an aging population have placed unprecedented challenges to our healthcare system. Overcoming these challenges to prevent deterioration of health outcomes and standard of living is our biggest local and regional challenge.

If you could have dinner with two

famous people from history, living or dead, who would they be and why?

Teddy Roosevelt. I feel like we’d have a lot in common, especially our respect for the outdoors and rugged individualism.

Benjamin Franklin. My favorite founding father. I’d love to talk to him about his experience shaping our country

If you could be or do anything else, what would it be?

I’d be a farmer.

they can pursue their own goals. We are a woman-owned and -run company. All of us have families, businesses or other areas in life that are as important as bringing in an

income.

What is something you’re passionate about?

I’m an idea person. I’m passionate about pursuing opportunities that will enhance the community around me. A good conversation

based around ideas with other “doers” fills my soul.

What’s one of the most challenging lessons you’ve learned in your life?

The most challenging lesson is balancing work life, home life and

being a mom. I’m very driven and love to pursue opportunities but need to pump the breaks sometimes to enjoy life. How did you get involved with what you do now, whether career or volunteer work?

As a stay-at-home mom, I be-

came very conscience of the amount of waste our family was producing. I began to explore different ways to cut that back. One was beeswax food wraps instead of disposable plastic food storage. After starting at a farmers market, it took off very quickly. Nothing Fancy has afforded

me the opportunity to bring an old building, like the Gillham-Buchanan funeral home, back to life. Gillham House is an extension of the values I built Nothing Fancy Supply on.

23 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier
Continued from Page 22
FLINN
Samantha McDaniel-Ogletree | Journal-Courier
“As a proud native of Jacksonville, I am committed to making the Jacksonville Memorial Hospital Emergency Department a highly respected and trusted place for patients to seek emergency medical care.”

Congratulations Dr. Trace!

Dr. Elias (Bubba) Trace is a physician in the Emergency Departments at both Jacksonville Memorial Hospital and Springfield Memorial Hospital. He started with Mid-America Emergency Physicians in July of 2021 after graduating from SIU School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine program.

Dr. Trace currently serves as the Assistant Medical Director in the Emergency Department at Jacksonville Memorial Hospital. Dr. Trace is Board Certified in Emergency Medicine and is part of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

Dr. Trace was Chief Resident for his class and received Resident

Teacher of the Year awards in both 2019 and 2021.

Dr. Trace was born in Jacksonville, the son of Konnie Trace and the late Dr. Peter Trace. He and his wife Sherie currently live in Jacksonville with their three sons, Edison (8), Henry (6) and Max (6).

Congratulations Bubba, we are proud to have you on our team!

24 Friday, December 23, 2022 Jacksonville Journal-Courier