Page 1

Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund Update NOVEMBER 2018 

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION    OAHU  827 FORT STREET MALL HONOLULU, HI 96813, (808) 537‐6333     KAUAI  4268 RICE ST # K, LIHUE, HI 96766, (808) 245‐4585


Executive Summary    In mid‐April 2018, massive rainstorms hit Kaua‘i with  devastating impact.  The National Weather Service  recorded over 50 inches of rain in Hanalei within a  24‐hour period and bad weather continued to  devastate the island for days following the initial  storm, complicating already difficult recovery efforts.  The North Shore and South Shore of Kaua‘i were  particularly hard hit.    Thanks to the generosity of Pierre and Pam Omidyar  and two anonymous donors, Hawai‘i Community  Foundation (HCF) quickly established the Kaua‘i Relief  and Recovery Fund (KRRF) and began distributing  grants within 24 hours of the creation of the fund to  serve the critical needs of the community.  HCF  decided it would waive all service fees associated  with the fund for 90 days to ensure that donations  were being immediately delivered to those who  needed them most.     In the four months since the creation of the Kaua‘i  Relief and Recovery Fund, nearly $1.9 million has  been raised through the immense generosity of over  200 private foundations and individual  donors.  Approximately $1.3 million has already been  distributed and committed to more than 30 grantees.     HCF determined that the focus of the Kaua‘i Relief  and Recovery Fund would address three main areas:  1) Community Stabilization; 2) Short‐Term Recovery;  and 3) Long‐Term Rebuilding.      COMMUNITY STABILIZATION  In addition to immediate concerns regarding the  distribution of emergency supplies and the  assessment of the health and safety of island  residents, the community quickly identified childcare  as a critical need. To that end, HCF created an  educational partnership that placed preschoolers in  safe childcare settings, enabling their parents to  focus on stabilizing their households.    At the same time, HCF worked with officials and  representatives across the education spectrum to  provide satellite classrooms and lunch service,  HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

replace damaged furniture and supplies, and assist  students—from preschool to post‐secondary—with  tuition.     A key strategy HCF employed was to distribute funds  to small nonprofit organizations on Kaua‘i so they  could expand their reach, organize volunteers, and  serve more island residents.  Additional support from  HCF was directed to the American Red Cross, Hawai‘i  Foodbank, Kaua‘i North Shore Food Pantry, and the  Kaua‘i Independent Food Bank. HCF’s development  of a financial assistance mini‐grant program enabled  funds to be distributed to farmers and islanders  whose primary residences were affected by the  floods.      In isolated ahupua‘a (land divisions), there was also  the challenge of utilizing existing heavy equipment to  clear debris on impassible roads. HCF partnered with  the National Tropical Botanical Garden and other  community nonprofits to secure ATVs, hire local  workers, and support ongoing clean‐up efforts and  flood relief.  In specific areas of the island, such as in  Po‘ipū, HCF stepped up to support community‐based  efforts initiated by community members and  businesses.       SHORT‐TERM RECOVERY  After stabilizing access to emergency food and  supplies and tackling childcare challenges and access  to continued education, families looked for safe  places to stay for a few months while they focused on  rebuilding or remediating damage to their existing  homes.  Through Catholic Charities, HCF offered  short‐term rental assistance.     HCF’s support of Kaua‘i’s Child & Family Services  (CFS) was in response to a noticeable shift in the  need for access to mental, emotional, and social  services to help residents navigate the complex relief  aid and insurance processes and cope with the stress  and trauma associated with the flooding.   

1


HCF funds also helped Hale Hālāwai create and  administer a community survey that functioned as a  connector between individuals and the services they  were looking for.  A separate grant to Hale Hālāwai  allowed residents (many of whom had become  unemployed overnight) to be hired to clear major  streams and waterways.     In response to scammers who were targeting flood  victims, HCF worked with the Hawai‘i State Bar  Association to warn and assist everyone who could  be a target of fraudulent activities.       LONG‐TERM REBUILDING  As Kaua‘i residents get back to their new normal,  systematic challenges such as housing and  transportation remain the focus of the long‐term  recovery effort. Many of the impacted homeowners  did not have flood insurance and existing  infrastructure repairs will take more than a year to  complete.     Because regaining a sense of normalcy is a key  component to achieving recovery, HCF is supporting  organizations that attract youth back into their after‐ school and summer activities.  Funds from the KRRF will help the North Shore  community create and implement a regional  development plan. And HCF is supporting a large  effort by Catholic Charities of Hawai‘i to provide  financial assistance to up to 60 families affected by  the floods.    In terms of environmental and biological resilience,  HCF is helping to support UH graduate students to  study the fish populations on Kaua‘i’s North Shore  and enable monitoring   in the Community‐Based Sustainable Fisheries Area in  Hanalei Bay and Haena once the roads reopen.             

LESSONS LEARNED  Nimble and flexible internal policies helped HCF to be  as responsive as possible, enabling grants to be  proposed, approved, and dispersed within 24 hours.  By leveraging its existing infrastructure of  communications, network of donors and  philanthropic partners, and long‐standing community  relationships, HCF was able to respond to the  immediate needs of the community.    While funds were deployed, HCF sought to maintain  communication with donors and the general public to  provide transparency and amplify the call for support  to the outside world. We knew it was important to  make grant reporting simple and easy to track for  grantees at a time like this, and we recognized the  benefit of unrestricted grants and donations for  nonprofits to adapt to changing needs.    The experience clarified three realities: 1) Nonprofit  organizations and community leaders are the first  line of defense for their communities in times of  disaster; 2) Community leaders emerge and organize  independently; and 3) Disaster relief requires  nonprofit organizations to operate differently. Those  that are well governed and positioned to be flexible  and quick to action are the community’s best assets  in times of disaster.       KEY CONCLUSIONS  A wide gap exists between the reality of a disaster  situation and the community’s expectation of what  government’s’ role should or can be in terms of  recovery. It’s clear that the role of philanthropy was  pivotal to creating and sustaining momentum for  Kaua‘i’s recovery. HCF’s ability to quickly coalesce  and create the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund  proved be a beacon of hope for what a community  can do when it works together to accomplish a  greater goal for the betterment of all.  To learn more  about HCF’s commitment to Kaua‘i, visit  www.HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/KauaiRelief.     

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

2


Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund Update    November, 2018  In mid‐April 2018, massive rainstorms hit Kaua‘i with devastating impact.  The National  Weather Service recorded over 50 inches of rain in Hanalei within a 24‐hour period and bad  weather continued to devastate the island for days following the initial storm, complicating  already difficult recovery efforts.   The subsequent flooding caused a multitude of problems ranging from dozens of landslides,  washed‐out roads, overflowing drainage ditches, and countless homes destroyed by water  damage.  Although rainfall was felt throughout the island, the North Shore and South Shore of  Kaua‘i were particularly hard hit. It became immediately apparent that, due to the multi‐layered emergency assessment process  required for county, state and federal aid, the community would need to work together.  Kaua‘i  displayed impressive resilience and the Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF) galvanized all  parties into immediate action to address the needs in the community.  Thanks to the generosity of Pierre and Pam Omidyar and two anonymous donors, Hawai‘i  Community Foundation quickly established the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund (KRRF) and was  able to begin distributing grants within 24 hours of the creation of the fund to serve the critical  needs of the community.  HCF decided it would waive all service fees associated with the fund  for 90 days to ensure that donations were being immediately delivered to those who needed  them most. HCF’s Kaua‘i staff focused on convening community partners and overcoming the  recovery effort’s logistical barriers.  In the four months since the creation of the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund, nearly $1.9 million  has been raised through the immense generosity of over 200 private foundations and individual  donors.  Approximately $1.3 million has  already been distributed and committed  to more than 30 grantees.  Upon the fund’s creation, HCF determined  that the focus of the Kaua‘i Relief and  Recovery Fund would address three main  areas: 1) Community Stabilization; 2)  Short‐Term Recovery; and  3) Long‐Term  Rebuilding.

    HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

3


COMMUNITY STABILIZATION   In addition to immediate concerns regarding the distribution of emergency supplies and the  assessment of the  health and safety  of island residents,  the community  quickly identified  childcare as a  critical  need.  Parents  needed the ability  to normalize their  situations so they  could focus on  stabilizing their  households.  In April, with the  Community members load supplies into a helicopter for delivery to stranded Kaua‘i residents end of the school  year fast  approaching, it was also evident that the lives of students along the entire educational  continuum ‐ from preschool to post‐secondary ‐ were going to be significantly disrupted and  destabilized by the storm.  Aloha Preschool and Hanalei Elementary School were badly  damaged and considered unsafe for students. Students who attended Kapa‘a Middle School,  Kapa‘a High School, and Kaua‘i Community College were not going to be able to attend classes  in person with the main road deemed impassable.   As the Department of Education worked through budgeting and procurement challenges, HCF  worked tirelessly with officials and representatives across the education spectrum to ensure  that students were equipped to finish out their school year with minimal interruption.   Grants were provided to secure space at Hanalei Colony Resort to create three satellite  classrooms with lunch service to serve 50 students through the end of the school year.  Hanalei  School’s PTSA and Aloha Preschool were provided with funding to replace damaged furniture  and supplies so that students would be able to have a safe place to learn when they returned. In order to ensure that keiki had safe places to learn and play, HCF create partnerships between  Kaua‘i Christian Academy, Aloha Preschool, Kaua‘i Babysitting Company, Waipa Foundation,  and Tūtū & Me.  As a result of these partnerships, 36 preschoolers were placed in safe childcare  and 12‐14 families were supported through HCF’s efforts. Kaua‘i Community College was also  provided resources with which to assist students with tuition as well as access to additional  services and programs to minimize disruptions and keep them in school.

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

4


As state and county officials worked to coordinate recovery efforts, HCF distributed funds to  strengthen the capacity of organizations such as Waipa Foundation, Malama Kaua‘i, and Hale  Hālāwai, which allowed them to expand their reach, organize volunteer teams, and serve more  island residents.  All three offered financial, logistical, and social services.  Additional support  was provided by HCF to the American Red Cross, Hawaii Foodbank, Kaua‘i North Shore Food  Pantry, and the Kaua‘i Independent Food Bank to assist the community with much needed  resources.  The increased capacity allowed Kaua‘i nonprofit organizations to coordinate, manage, and more  efficiently distribute over $100,000 of purchased supplies and over $500,000 in in‐kind  donations to over 400 households.  It also allowed for the coordination of a complex volunteer  transportation network by working with over 100 volunteers utilizing a variety of boats, jet skis,  all‐terrain vehicles (ATVs), and large machines. Development of a financial assistance mini‐grant  program enabled $160,000 to be distributed to farmers and islanders whose primary residences  were affected by the floods. In the initial month following the flood, food and supplies were provided to 150‐200 people  daily through Opakapaka Grill for breakfast, and through YMCA Camp Naue for lunch and  dinner.  To date, over 140,000 pounds of food and supplies have been provided to individuals,  families, and relief workers in the area; partnerships via mobile food pantries have served 165‐ 200 people from mid‐June  to August.     In isolated ahupua‘a (land  divisions), there was also  the challenge of utilizing  existing heavy equipment  to assist with clearing  debris.  With roads being  impassable, HCF partnered  with National Tropical  Botanical Garden, Hui  Maka‘ainana o Makana,  and ‘Āina Ho‘okupu o  Kilauea to provide funds  for ATVs and to support  Students in Hanalei, unable to reach their usual campuses due to flood damage, ongoing clean‐up efforts  circle up to start the day at a temporary satellite school. and flood relief.  The direct  impact resulted in  individuals continuing to earn wages at a time when they would have otherwise gone without,  and positively impacted over 22‐32 households and 60‐80 individuals.

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

5


With so much attention being given to the  heavily impacted North Shore of Kaua‘i, HCF  was also very cognizant of the struggles  being felt in the Kona moku in the ahupua‘a  of  Kōloa.  Dedicated community members  moved swiftly to conduct damage  assessments and canvassed homes to  determine priority needs. Nearby businesses  pulled together to donate appliances,  housewares, and offer volunteers to families  in need.   HCF recognized the need to  Food and supplies ready for those in need support this community‐based effort and  partnered with Poipu Beach Foundation to  ensure that resources were available for impacted families. In addition to ongoing efforts, 30  homes were canvassed, and 45 families were supported through this effort.  

SHORT‐TERM RECOVERY   Roughly a month after the initial storm and subsequent flooding, the immediate needs of  Kaua‘i’s communities had stabilized to a degree and residents began looking to address larger  challenges.  After stabilizing access to emergency food and supplies and tackling childcare  challenges and access to continued education, families looked for safe places to stay for a few  months while they focused on rebuilding or remediating damage to their existing homes.   A shortage of affordable housing is an ever‐present problem on Kaua‘i and the county decided  to place a ban on the operation of Transient Vacation Rental (TVR) properties in the Wainiha‐ Haena area through July 23 .  This was followed by an appeal to owners of impacted properties  to utilize their properties to assist impacted Kaua‘i families. HCF offered to provide temporary  rental assistance‐‐up to $1,800/month‐‐to help families bridge the temporary housing gap.  These grants were disbursed through Catholic Charities. rd

There was also a noticeable shift to providing much‐needed access to mental, emotional, and  social services.  The devastating effects of the storm will likely pose lingering challenges over  time. HCF’s support to quickly bolster Kaua‘i’s Child & Family Services (CFS) existing outreach allowed  150 families the opportunity to get assistance on a range of services.  CFS helped by providing  case management support, counseling, and mental health assessments, assistance in navigating  the complex relief aid and insurance processes, and offered coping strategies to counter stress  and trauma.   As different government agencies began trying to address the complex situation in the impact  areas, the need for accurate and timely baseline information also needed to be worked  HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

6


through.  Hale Hālāwai created and administered a community survey that became the central  administrative focal point in the area to help connect individuals and families with critical  services and provide data collection and management. Approximately 500 households,  impacting 1,500 individuals from Haena to Kapaa were reviewed, triaged, and given outreach  assistance.   The community leaders in the area gathered in support of creating jobs for local residents,  many of whom had become unemployed overnight, to assist with ongoing environmental  clean‐up activities. Hale Hālāwai was awarded a grant of over $200,000 to employ residents to  clear major streams and waterways. In a period of just one month, over 640 cubic yards of  waste and debris were removed.  Eighteen clean‐up workers contributed over 950 work hours  directly towards the Haena and Wainiha debris removal efforts and 12 new hires contributed  over 1,600 hours to support 500 families by providing case management and support. This  important work continues as the rain and flooding continues to impact the North Shore of  Kauai. While the recovery  efforts following a natural  disaster can be a  wonderful example of the  best of human nature  and generosity, the  negative side of human  nature arises as well,  unfortunately.  As  scammers and others  targeted flood victims, it  became important to  educate, inform, and  protect residents within  the impacted  communities. As such,  HCF worked with the  Hawai‘i State Bar  Association to conduct  Limahuli Garden staff and equipment assisted in post-storm clean-up workshops and staff a hotline  message warning everyone to be on the lookout for fraudulent ads promoting appraisal and  other services.  Those who experienced loss due to flooding will receive help with preparing  insurance claims and documents. 

  HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

7


LONG‐TERM REBUILDING    As Kaua‘i continues to look forward, the  strain and stress wrought by the emotional  roller coaster of the past four months  continues to weigh heavily on affected  communities.  Continued access to mental  and social health services will be critical to  assisting families as they adjust to new  beginnings. HCF will support a large effort by Catholic  Charities of Hawai‘i to provide financial  Recovery workers review their plans for the day assistance to up to 60 families affected by  the mid‐April floods.  While the maximum time of support will not exceed six months, each  family’s needs will be assessed and assistance will be tailored accordingly. HCF also plans to focus its long‐term rebuilding efforts to shift the negative impacts of April’s  natural disaster from a liability to an opportunity.  With regard to the North Shore of Kaua‘i,  HCF has an opportunity to help the community shape its future by creating and implementing a  regional development plan that will address the community’s desire to preserve its unique  identity while prioritizing the region’s natural resource management, Hawaiian culture, and  sense of place. Regaining a sense of normalcy is a key component to achieving recovery. HCF has committed  support to organizations that help get youth back into their after‐school and summer activities  by supporting organizations such as AYSO 941, Namolokama Canoe Club, and Hanalei Hawaiian  Civic Club.  By supporting AYSO 941, roughly 75‐100 youth, ages 3 to 13 years old, from Wailua  to Haena, will be sponsored with soccer registration to help focus on safe and healthy exercise  and sportsmanship.  Just as the flora and fauna are starting to regrow and take root, it is also evident that the ocean  is restocking its offerings. The University of Hawai‘i’s Hui ‘Āina Momona project allowed  graduate students and local residents to take part in a study of the fish populations on Kaua‘I’s  North Shore.  The team has completed 35 surveys of fish and benthos and was able to conduct  video surveys of fish behavior at 14 of these sites. Samples for chlorophyll analysis were  collected at 18 sites and sediment was collected at 22 sites. Early data collections indicate that  fish have re‐inhabited areas that they had long since abandoned since beaches are now less  inhabited.     

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

8


Environmental and biological monitoring will be continued in the Community‐Based Sustainable  Fisheries Area in Hanalei Bay and Haena once the roads reopen.  Signs of growth and resilience  are giving hope that the community can rebuild and recover better than ever before. 

LESSONS LEARNED  Hawai‘i Community Foundation found  itself playing a new and vital role in  disaster response. HCF leadership  worked quickly to organize an internal  reporting and peer review process so  that grants could be proposed,  approved, and dispersed within 24‐ hours. A key component of HCF’s ability  to administer funds in the face of  disaster is its Board of Governor’s  policy that delegates grantmaking  authority to key staff for grants up to  $100,000. Nimble and flexible internal  policies helped HCF to be as responsive  and responsible as possible.

U.S. Senator Brian Schatz and Community Organizer Mehana Vaughn walk toward Hanalei Pier and discuss the recovery effort

While a flexible policy facilitated the process, the primary reason for HCF’s effectiveness in the  wake of the disaster was the organization’s long‐standing and deep relationships within the  community.  HCF’s credibility with the responding nonprofit organizations, donors, government  and business representatives, uniquely positioned HCF to be able to quickly build bridges across  relationships to meet the diverse needs of the community.   The April flooding was a unique challenge as most of the areas affected were in rural and  isolated communities. Therefore, the nonprofit organizations supporting those communities  were by most standards very small, with limited capacity. HCF decided to take the perspective  of staying in proximity to the disaster and working with the small nonprofits to help expand  their capacity.  HCF made grants and provided guidance that took into consideration the  organization’s ability to absorb their new funding and leadership position. Many grants were  purposely made on a monthly basis so the organizations could continually assess their  immediate needs and match them with their capacity.  The state legislature responded with a $100 million appropriation to address flood damage.  State and county agencies worked quickly to address life‐saving evacuations and assess road  and infrastructure damage. It quickly became apparent that a wide gap exists between the  reality of the situation and the community’s expectation of what government’s role in disaster  response should be. Thanks to the hundreds of generous donations from around the world, the  Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund was able to address the needs of Kaua‘i’s communities quickly  with critical philanthropic dollars.  HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

9


Three lessons were learned regarding the ability of the community to address its immediate  needs:     1) Nonprofit organizations and community leaders are the first line of defense for their  communities in times of disaster;     2) Community leaders emerge and organize independently; and     3) Disaster relief requires nonprofit organizations to operate differently. Those that are well‐ governed and positioned to be flexible and quick to action are the community’s best assets in  times of disaster.  HCF also experienced organizational growth, as it is not typical for HCF to receive such a high  volume of donations in such a condensed period of time. HCF’s entire staff of 70 employees  pulled together to work beyond their daily responsibilities to help Kaua‘i’s flood victims. It was  important to help donors give directly to the disaster, so HCF waived its administrative fee on  all donations. It was endearing to read the hundreds of comments of how people around the  world felt intimately connected with Kaua‘i, particularly Kaua‘i’s North Shore. We also learned it  was difficult to manage restrictions on grants and donations for the reason that HCF had to  react to needs as the disaster evolved. In cases of disaster, it is clear that unrestricted funds  help to facilitate aid quickly.    While HCF was committed  to facilitate aid quickly, the  team also understood the  importance of tracking  impact, both for donors as  well as for community  accountability.  HCF  quickly recognized that in  times of disaster, many of  the most critical  organizations on the  forefront of positive  impact are busy working in  the trenches of disaster  relief and it’s difficult to  Aloha Preschool is repaired and has welcomed students back to school expect lengthy outcome  reports.  It was important to  make grant reporting simple and easy to track and HCF was able to customize and simplify its  final report forms in order to accommodate the needs of KRRF grantees. 

HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

10


KEY CONCLUSIONS   Kaua‘i’s innate ability to pull together in times of need is an intangible strength that bolstered  the communities of impacted areas when they needed it most.  Early on and still today,  community leaders have stepped up to help families and residents in need; the outpouring of  love and concern was heartfelt and, at times, overwhelming.  Having HCF quickly coalesce and  create the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund provided donors with a trusted philanthropic  resource with a reliable and long‐standing track record which proved to be critical to creating  and sustaining momentum for the island’s recovery.  First KRRF grants were deployed to quickly and strategically bolster the organizational capacity  of several existing nonprofit organizations; this was a critical turning point in the recovery  effort.  Empowering trusted and familiar community members and providing opportunities for  them to interface within their areas of knowledge greatly improved the ability of communities  to stabilize themselves.   By leveraging its existing infrastructure of communications, network of donors and  philanthropic partners, and long‐standing community relationships, HCF was able to respond to  the immediate needs of the community. As funds were deployed, it was imperative to maintain  communication with donors and the general public to offer transparency into HCF’s work as  well as amplify the call for support to the outside world. When possible, HCF photographed the  nonprofit work, interviewed and aired podcasts from the field, and maintained web and email  updates so that the impact of the generous donations to the Kaua‘i Recovery and Relief Fund  could be shared in real time. These communications will continue as the work supported by the  Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund addresses Kaua‘i’s long‐term recovery and rebuilding needs.  On Kaua‘i there is now a new “normal” as residents get back into the rhythm of life.  However,  systematic challenges have arisen.  Housing and transportation will remain the focus of the  long‐term recovery effort and strategies to address ongoing challenges with flood‐inundation  zones, permitted structures, multiple ingress and egress points, and shuttle systems also will  need to be addressed. The mid‐April 2018 storms meant a difficult and lengthy recovery for many of the families and  communities located within the impact zones of portions of the North and South Shores.  For a  multitude of reasons, many of the impacted homeowners did not have flood insurance and  existing infrastructure repairs will take more than a year to complete. 

HCF remains committed to expanding upon existing partnerships while creating new  opportunities to serve the important needs of Kaua‘i residents.   While the mid‐April floods  were indeed devastating, funds made available by KRRF’s generous donors proved be a beacon  of hope for what a community can do when it works together to accomplish a greater goal for  the betterment of all.  To learn more about HCF’s commitment to Kaua‘i, visit  www.HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/KauaiRelief.   HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY FOUNDATION KAUA‘I RELIEF AND RECOVERY FUND UPDATE 11/2018

11

Kauai Relief and Recovery Fund Update  

NOVEMBER 2018

Kauai Relief and Recovery Fund Update  

NOVEMBER 2018