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School Improvement Plan Title I - Schoolwide Single Building District

School Year: 2012 - 2013 ISD/RESA: Wayne RESA School Name: Bridge Academy Grades Served: PK,K,1,2,3,4,5 Mr. Naji Abduljabbar Building Code: 09464

District Approval of Plan: Authorized Official Signature and Date Board of Education Approval of Plan: Authorized Official Signature and Date


Bridge Academy

School Improvement Plan Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vision, Mission and Beliefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goal 1: English Language Arts Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goal 2: Mathematics Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goal 3: Science Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goal 4: Social Studies Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resource Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assurances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stakeholders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Statement of Non-Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supporting Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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3 4 5 6 6 18 20 23 29 30 42 50 51 52

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Bridge Academy

Introduction The SIP is a planning tool designed to address student achievement and system needs identified through the school's comprehensive needs assessment (CNA). Additionally, the SIP provides a method for schools to address the school improvement planning requirements of Public Act 25 of the Revised School Code and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as applicable.The SIP is a planning tool designed to address student achievement and system needs identified through the school's comprehensive needs assessment (CNA). Additionally, the SIP provides a method for schools to address the school improvement planning requirements of Public Act 25 of the Revised School Code and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as applicable.

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Bridge Academy

School Information School:

Bridge Academy

District:

Bridge Academy

Public/Non-Public:

Public

Grades:

PK,K,1,2,3,4,5

School Code Number:

09464

City:

Hamtramck

State/Province:

Michigan

Country:

United States

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Bridge Academy

Vision, Mission and Beliefs Vision Statement Bridge Academy seeks to create a challenging learning environment that encourages high expectations for success through development appropriate instruction that allows for individual differences and learning styles. Our school promotes a safe, orderly, caring, and supportive enviornment. Each student's self-esteem is fostered by positive relationships with students and staff. We strive to have our parents, teachers, and community members actively involved on our students' learning.

Mission Statement To Promote Lifelong Learning By Nurturing Academic Excellence, Positive Character, and Appreciation of Cultures.

Beliefs Statement 1. We believe that all students are entitled to reach their highest potential through a meaningful educational experience that takes into ccount their diverse learning styles. 2. We believe that parents are partners in the learning process and educational success is most often achieved when schools provide opportunities for parental involvement and support. 3.We believe that well-defined goals and objectives are essential to a quality educational program.

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Bridge Academy

Goals Name

Development Status

Progress Status

English Language Arts Achievement

Complete

Open

Mathematics Achievement

Complete

Open

Science Achievement

Complete

Open

Social Studies Achievement

Complete

Open

Goal 1: English Language Arts Achievement Content Area: English Language Arts Development Status: Complete Student Goal Statement: All Bridge Academy students will be proficient in English Language Arts. Gap Statement: Based on a review of the 2011 MEAP results for grades 3-5, on average 64% of our studnets were proficient on the MEAP Reading assessment. Cause for Gap: English Language Learners performed about 53% lower on MEAP assessments. Multiple measures/sources of data you used to identify this gap in student achievement: 2011 English Language Arts MEAP, Ed Performance assessment, and local assessments. What are the criteria for success and what data or multiple measures of assessment will be used to monitor progress and success of this goal? Our criteria for success will be based on increased MEAP scores and minimize the gap between ELL students and non-ELL students on the English Language Arts portion of the MEAP. Grades will increase by 5%. Contact Name: Angela Beleski

List of Objectives: Name Objective Reading Fluency and Overall ELL students in grades 3-8 will show a 10% improvement in reading as measured Comprehension by the MEAP and Ed Performance; overall students in grades 1-5 will show equivalent of a grade level improvement using the Developmental Reading Assessment and other local assessments by June 2011. Writing All Bridge Academy students in grades 1-8 will increase achievement in writing by 10% as Achievement measured by the MEAP, schoolwide writing rubrics and other local assessments.

1.1. Objective: Reading Fluency and Comprehension SIP

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Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: Overall ELL students in grades 3-8 will show a 10% improvement in reading as measured by the MEAP and Ed Performance; overall students in grades 1-5 will show equivalent of a grade level improvement using the Developmental Reading Assessment and other local assessments by June 2011.

List of Strategies: Name Strategy ESL Instruction ;SIOP Staff will be provided for English Language Learners to help support their Content and Differentiated needs. Staff will implement SIOP strategies and use differentiated instruction in the Instruction teaching of reading and in all content areas. Integration of Teaching staff will integrate technology in teaching and learning in all content areas. Technology Parental Involvement Bridge Academy's Principal,Academic Coordinators, Parent Coordinators, Teachers and staff will implement parent involvement and parent education activities focused on increasing student achievement in English Language Arts and in all content areas. Reading Programs & Teachers, reading specialists, and paraprofessionals will implement school-wide Activities reading programs and activities including guided reading groups, reading buddies, independent reading time, and reading response activities(graphic organizers, illustrations,etc.)to increase reading comprehension and fluency in all content areas. Response to Staff will implement school wide Response to Intervention for reading, writing, and Intervention math.

1.1.1. Strategy: ESL Instruction ;SIOP and Differentiated Instruction Strategy Statement: Staff will be provided for English Language Learners to help support their Content needs. Staff will implement SIOP strategies and use differentiated instruction in the teaching of reading and in all content areas. Selected Target Areas 1.3 Identifies goals to advance the vision 1.4 Develops and continuously maintains a profile of the school, its students, and the community 2.9 Responds to community expectations and stakeholder satisfaction 3.1 Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly defined expectations for student learning 3.4 Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice 1.5 Ensures that the system's vision and purpose guide the teaching and learning process and the strategic direction of schools, departments, and services 3.7 Maintains articulation among and between all levels of schooling to monitor student performance and ensure readiness for future schooling or employment 3.8 Supports the implementation of interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning

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Bridge Academy What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Tomlinson, Carol Ann. How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development. (2009) Valenti, J. & Tracey, D.Full-Day, Half-Day, and No Preschool: Effects on Urban Children's First Year Reading Achievement. Education and Urban Society, Vol. 41, No. 6, 695-711 (2009)

Robin, K., Frede, E. & Barnett, W. Is More Better? The Effects of Full-Day vs Half-Day Preschool on Early School Achievement.(2006). Rutgers University

ECHEVARRIA , VOGT & SHORT. Making Content Comprehensible for English learners (3rd ed ) SIOP The Influence of Mentor Reading Buddies in Oral Reading Fluency for ESL and Non ESL Students. Erin M. Gregory

From Silence to a Whisper to Active Presentation: Using Literature Circles with ELL students. Catherine Carrison and Gisela Ernst-Slavit, Washington State University

List of Activities: Activity ESL/Bilingual Instruction/SIOP Preschool

Begin Date 201109-01 201109-01

End Staff Responsible Date 2012- Paraprofessionals, teachers, and ESL staff. Reading Specialists and 06-30 ESL teacher will be trained in a supplemental phonics program such as Fast Learning. 2012- Principal, Academic Coordinator, ESL teacher, Preschool teachers 06-30 and staff.

1.1.1.1. Activity: ESL/Bilingual Instruction/SIOP Activity Type: Professional Development Activity Description: Staff will be trained in SIOP, readers workshop, phonics and DI. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Paraprofessionals, teachers, and ESL staff. Reading Specialists and ESL teacher will be trained in a supplemental phonics program such as Fast Learning. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Academic Coordinator, GEE and teachers.

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Bridge Academy Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Bilingual staff, paraprofessionals ESL teacher to work with studnets not meeting standards Resources for professional learning communites training Summer school and after school instruction Summer SIOP training, stipends for staff and DI training

Funding Source Title I Schoolwide Title I School Improvement (ISI)

Planned Actual Amount Amount 80,000.00 0.00 1,000.00

Title II Part A

1,000.00

Title III

20,000.00

Title II Part A

10,000.00

1.1.1.2. Activity: Preschool Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Bridge Academy will provide a preschool program for students who are identified as at risk. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Principal, Academic Coordinator, ESL teacher, Preschool teachers and staff. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: GEE, staff Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Funding Source Preschool Program

Section 32 e

Planned Amount 0.00

Actual Amount 0.00

1.1.2. Strategy: Integration of Technology Strategy Statement: Teaching staff will integrate technology in teaching and learning in all content areas.

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Bridge Academy Selected Target Areas 1.3 Identifies goals to advance the vision 3.1 Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly defined expectations for student learning 3.2 Promotes active involvement of students in the learning process, including opportunities for them to explore application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.3 Gathers, analyzes, and uses data and research in making curricular and instructional choices 3.4 Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice 3.5 Offers a curriculum that challenges each student to excel, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity 3.8 Implements interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning 3.11 Ensures that all students and staff members have regular and ready access to instructional technology and a comprehensive materials collection that supports the curricular and instructional program 3.4 Supports instruction that is research-based and reflective of best practice 5.10 Provides technology infrastructure and equipment that is up-to-date and sufficient to accomplish the system's goals

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Klopfer, E., Osterweil,S., Groff, J. & Haas, J.(2009). The Education Arcade:Using the Technology of Today,in the Classroom Today. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Poole, B., Sky-Mellvain, E., Jackson, L. & Singer, Y. (2006). Computers, Education, and Society. Teaching In The Computerized Classroom (6th ed. pp. 344-365). Schacter, J. The Impact of Educational Technology on Student Achievement: What the Most Current Research Has to Say. Santa Monica, CA: Milken Exchange on Education Technology, 2001. Stratham, D. S., & Torell, C. R. (1996). Computers in the classroom: The impact of technology on student learning. Boise, ID: Army Research Institute. Strudler, N. B. (1995-96). The role of school-based technology coordinators as change agents in elementary school programs: A follow-up study. Journal of Research on Computing in Education. 28(2), 234-257. Waxman, H.C., Len, M., & Michko, G. M. (2003). A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of teaching and learning with technology on student outcomes. North Central Regional Education Laboratory.

List of Activities: Activity Computers, software, smartboards, doucment cameras, and training

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Begin End Date Staff Responsible Date 2011-09- 2012-06- Classroom teachers and 01 20 paraprofessionals.

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1.1.2.1. Activity: Computers, software, smartboards, doucment cameras, and training Activity Type: Technology Activity Description: Teachers will integrate the use of computers, software, and related technology in the classroom and the computer lab that support teaching and learning for all subjects. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Classroom teachers and paraprofessionals. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Academic Coordinator Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-20 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Source

Software and computers Technology specialist, Resource Teachers, and para pro

Title I Schoolwide Title I Schoolwide

Planned Actual Amount Amount 16,000.00 0.00 9,000.00

1.1.3. Strategy: Parental Involvement Strategy Statement: Bridge Academy's Principal,Academic Coordinators, Parent Coordinators, Teachers and staff will implement parent involvement and parent education activities focused on increasing student achievement in English Language Arts and in all content areas. Selected Target Areas 1.1 Establishes a vision for the school in collaboration with its stakeholders 1.2 Communicates the vision and purpose to build stakeholder understanding and support 1.3 Identifies goals to advance the vision 1.4 Develops and continuously maintains a profile of the school, its students, and the community 1.5 Ensures that the school's vision and purpose guide the teaching and learning process 3.8 Implements interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning 4.3 Uses student assessment data for making decisions for continuous improvement of teaching and learning processes 4.5 Communicates the results of student performance and school effectiveness to all stakeholders 6.1 Fosters collaboration with community stakeholders to support student learning 6.4 Communicates the expectations for student learning and goals for improvement to all stakeholders 2.9 Creates and supports collaborative networks of stakeholders to support system programs 2.10 Provides direction, assistance, and resources to align, support, and enhance all parts of the system in meeting organizational and student performance goals 2.11 Provides internal and external stakeholders meaningful roles in the decision-making process that promote a culture of participation, responsibility, and ownership SIP

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Bridge Academy 2.12 Assesses and addresses community expectations and stakeholder satisfaction 3.9 Maintains a system-wide climate that supports student learning 5.12 Provides student support services coordinated with the school, home, and community

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? -Epstein, Joyce,L. Parent Involvement: What Research Says to Administrators. -Tableman, Betty . CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN POVERTY AREAS. Characteristics of Relationships:Relationship of School with Parents, p.2. University Outreach & Engagement, Board of Trustees of Michigan State University,(2004). -Hoover-Dempsey, K. & Sandler, H. Parental Involvement in Children's Education: Why Does It Make a Difference? Vanderbilt University

List of Activities: Activity Parent Involvement & Education

Begin Date End Date Staff Responsible 2011-09-01 2012-06-30 Principal,Parent Coordinator, Teachers

1.1.3.1. Activity: Parent Involvement & Education Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Bridge Academy will provide parental involvement activities and parent education programs. This will strengthen the relationship between parents and the school, in order to improve student achievement. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Principal,Parent Coordinator, Teachers Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Principal, Parent Coordinator, Teachers Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Source Planned Actual Amount Amount

Academic Coor. to work with parents to implement skills to help at Title I Part A risk students Merit pay for parental involvement Title II Part A SIP

18,500.00 0.00 6,000.00 0.00 Page 12 of 52


Bridge Academy Parent coordinator Parent Involvement and Parent Education Student services Coor. to work with parents on school attendance and hw

Title I Schoolwide Title I Schoolwide Title I Schoolwide

5,000.00 5,000.00 23,000.00 0.00

1.1.4. Strategy: Reading Programs & Activities Strategy Statement: Teachers, reading specialists, and paraprofessionals will implement school-wide reading programs and activities including guided reading groups, reading buddies, independent reading time, and reading response activities(graphic organizers, illustrations,etc.)to increase reading comprehension and fluency in all content areas. Selected Target Areas 3.5 Offers a curriculum that challenges each student to excel, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity 3.8 Implements interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning 3.3 Ensures that system-wide curricular and instructional decisions are based on data and research at all levels 3.4 Supports instruction that is research-based and reflective of best practice 3.8 Supports the implementation of interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning 3.11 Coordinates and ensures ready access to instructional technology, information and media services, and materials needed for effective instruction

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Drop Everything And Read-But How? Jan Hansbruck The Influence of Mentor Reading Buddies in Oral Reading Fluency for ESL and Non ESL Students. Erin M. Gregory

155 Research Studies Support the Effectiveness of Accelerated Reader. Renaissance Learning and What Works Clearinghouse Guiding Readers and Writers (Grades 3-6), Fountas and Pinnell

From Silence to a Whisper to Active Presentation: Using Literature Circles with ELL students. Catherine Carrison and Gisela Ernst-Slavit, Washington State University Helping Students Learn. Deborah Davis and Rhonda Barton

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Bridge Academy A survey of Teachers' Read-Aloud Practices in Middle School, Mary Ariail, Georgia State Univeristy and Lettie K. Albiright, Texas Woman's University

List of Activities: Activity

Begin Date Guided Reading 2011-0701 Phonemic Awareness and training for 2011-09new programs 01

End Date Staff Responsible 2012-0630 2012-0630

Teachers, reading specialist, ESL teachers and paraprofessionals. Teachers, paraprofessionals ESL teachers and Reading Specialists.

1.1.4.1. Activity: Guided Reading Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Teachers, reading specialists, ESL teachers and paraprofessionals will implement guided reading to increase reading comprehension and fluency. High interest books for lower reading levels. Read aloud books for Math Connects. Science and Social Studies leveled readers based on standards. Leveled books for AR tests. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, reading specialist, ESL teachers and paraprofessionals. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, reading specialist, ESL teachers and paraprofessionals. Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-07-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Source Planned Actual Amount Amount Academic Coor. to work with staff to implement strategies to help at Title I 10,000.00 0.00 risk students meet the standard Schoolwide Title I ESL Teachers 10,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I Leveled books and resources 0.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I Paraprofessionals 20,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I Reading Specialist Teachers 15,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide

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Resource Librarian Sitton Spelling materials Study Island K-8

Title I Schoolwide Title I Schoolwide Title I Schoolwide

9,000.00 0.00 1,500.00 0.00 5,000.00 0.00

1.1.4.2. Activity: Phonemic Awareness and training for new programs Activity Type: Professional Development Activity Description: Teachers will use a phonics program to increase phonemic awareness and fluency. Reading Specialists and ESL teacher will be trained in a supplemental phonics program such as Fast Learning. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, paraprofessionals ESL teachers and Reading Specialists. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, paraprofessionals ESL teachers and Reading Specialists. Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Academic Coordinator to work with staff implement strategies to help students who are not meeting st Phonics Program materials Resource Librarian Staff; Reading Specialist, paraprofessionals, ESL teacher

Funding Source Planned Actual Amount Amount Title I 15,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Section 31 a 8,000.00 0.00 Title I 9,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I 60,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide

1.1.5. Strategy: Response to Intervention Strategy Statement: Staff will implement school wide Response to Intervention for reading, writing, and math.

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Bridge Academy Selected Target Areas

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Cortiella, C. July 2006. Response-to-Intervention - An Emerging Method for LD Identification. Great Schools. Responsive Teaching - The 'response to intervention' framework in Iowa is helping teachers better understand and address students' learning needs. Article from the Teacher Professional Development Sourcebook (Fall 2008).

List of Activities: Activity Implementing and training for RTI

Begin End Date Staff Responsible Date 2011-05- 2012-06- Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education 26 15 Teacher

1.1.5.1. Activity: Implementing and training for RTI Activity Type: Professional Development Activity Description: Materials to implement RTI, intervention programs, and RTI training Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education Teacher Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education Teacher Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-05-26, End Date - 2012-06-15 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Funding Source intervention programs

Title I Schoolwide

Planned Amount 5,000.00

Actual Amount

1.2. Objective: Writing Achievement SIP

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Bridge Academy

Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: All Bridge Academy students in grades 1-8 will increase achievement in writing by 10% as measured by the MEAP, schoolwide writing rubrics and other local assessments.

List of Strategies: Name Writing workshop

Strategy Training on writing workshop

1.2.1. Strategy: Writing workshop Strategy Statement: Training on writing workshop Selected Target Areas

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Lucy Caulkins

List of Activities: Activity Begin Date End Date Staff Responsible Writing workshop 2012-03-19 2013-06-14 Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education Teacher

1.2.1.1. Activity: Writing workshop Activity Type: Professional Development Activity Description: Training for all teachers. Grade specific training.(K-2, 3-5) Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education Teacher Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Special Education Teacher Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2012-03-19, End Date - 2013-06-14 SIP

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Bridge Academy Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Funding Source

Planned Amount

Actual Amount

Goal 2: Mathematics Achievement Content Area: Math Development Status: Complete Student Goal Statement: All Bridge Academy students will be proficient in mathematics. Gap Statement: Based on a review of the 2011 MEAP results for grades 3-5, on avaerage 37% of our students were proficent on the MEAP math assessemnt Cause for Gap: English Language Learners performed about 39% lower on MEAP Assessments. Multiple measures/sources of data you used to identify this gap in student achievement: 2011 Mathematics MEAP, Ed Performance,Study Island, and common assessments. What are the criteria for success and what data or multiple measures of assessment will be used to monitor progress and success of this goal? Our criterion for success is to minimize the gap between ELL students and non-ELL students on the 2012 Math portion of the MEAP. Grades will make an increase of 5%Success will be monitored using local common assessments linked to Grade Level Content Expectations, EdPerformance tests and the MEAP. Contact Name: Stacey Mayberry

List of Objectives: Name Objective Measurement, Problem The achievement gap between ELL students and non-ELL students will close with a 10% Solving & Numbers increase for ELL student in skills needed to apply measurement, use real life applications and Operations to problem solve and manipulate numbers and perform mathematical operations as measured by the MEAP, Ed Performance, Achievement Series and other local assessments (pretests, unit tests, post tests, etc.) by 2012.

2.1. Objective: Measurement, Problem Solving & Numbers and Operations SIP

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Bridge Academy Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: The achievement gap between ELL students and nonELL students will close with a 10% increase for ELL student in skills needed to apply measurement, use real life applications to problem solve and manipulate numbers and perform mathematical operations as measured by the MEAP, Ed Performance, Achievement Series and other local assessments (pretests, unit tests, post tests, etc.) by 2012.

List of Strategies: Name Strategy Authentic and Hands Teachers, Paraprofessionals, and Resource Teachers will use hands on, authentic On Activities activities, and the use of manipulative materials in the classroom during math instruction.

2.1.1. Strategy: Authentic and Hands On Activities Strategy Statement: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, and Resource Teachers will use hands on, authentic activities, and the use of manipulative materials in the classroom during math instruction. Selected Target Areas 2.5 Fosters a learning community 3.2 Promotes active involvement of students in the learning process, including opportunities for them to explore application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.3 Gathers, analyzes, and uses data and research in making curricular and instructional choices 3.4 Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice 3.2 Establishes expectations and supports student engagement in the learning process, including opportunities for students to explore application of higher order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.4 Supports instruction that is research-based and reflective of best practice 3.5 Supports a curriculum that challenges and meets the needs of each student, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity 3.6 Allocates and protects instructional time to support student learning 3.10 Ensures that curriculum is reviewed and revised at regular intervals

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Zemelman, Steven., Daniels, Harvey., Hyde, Arthur. Best Practices

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List of Activities: Activity Student -Centered Activities

Begin Date 2011-09-01

End Date 2012-10-30

Staff Responsible Teachers and paraprofessionals

2.1.1.1. Activity: Student -Centered Activities Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Teachers will use manipulatives and measurement tools to explore real world scenarios and discover solutions with mini-lessons and math centers. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers and paraprofessionals Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Homeroom Teachers, Paraprofessionals, ESL staff, Special Education Staff Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-10-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Academic Coor. to work with staff to increase at risk student achievement in Math Math materials and manipulatives Staff,ESL and paraprofessionals Training at maspa and MDE for Math Activies

Funding Source Planned Actual Amount Amount Title I 15,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I 1,500.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title I 30,000.00 0.00 Schoolwide Title II Part A 300.00 0.00

Goal 3: Science Achievement Content Area: Science Development Status: Complete Student Goal Statement: All Bridge Academy students will be proficient in Science. Gap Statement: Based on a review of the 2011 Science MEAP for grades 5 on average, 17% were proficient on the MEAP science assessment.

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Bridge Academy Cause for Gap: The possible causes for this gap may be attributed to: 32% of the 5th grade students and are English Language Learners. Multiple measures/sources of data you used to identify this gap in student achievement: 2011 Science MEAP, Ed Performance and local assessments. What are the criteria for success and what data or multiple measures of assessment will be used to monitor progress and success of this goal? Our criteria for success; Overall MEAP scores will increase by 7% for 5th grade students by 2012.

Progress will be monitored with the use of Achievement Series, common local assessments, and Pre-tests/Posttests that are linked to the state benchmarks and standards. Contact Name: Kerry Bitar

List of Objectives: Name Overall Achievement in Science and Inquiry Process

Objective Overall Bridge Academy students will increase achievement in Science by 10% as measured by local assessments(Pretests and Post Tests)and Ed Performance. Overall 5th and 8th grade MEAP scores will increase by 10% by the end of the 2011/2012 school year.

3.1. Objective: Overall Achievement in Science and Inquiry Process Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: Overall Bridge Academy students will increase achievement in Science by 10% as measured by local assessments(Pretests and Post Tests)and Ed Performance. Overall 5th and 8th grade MEAP scores will increase by 10% by the end of the 2011/2012 school year.

List of Strategies: Name Strategy Hands-Ons and Authentic Teachers will use hands-on, authentic activities, and the use of manipulative Activities materials to increase overall achievement in science.

3.1.1. Strategy: Hands-Ons and Authentic Activities Strategy Statement: Teachers will use hands-on, authentic activities, and the use of manipulative materials to increase overall achievement in science. SIP

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Selected Target Areas 3.2 Promotes active involvement of students in the learning process, including opportunities for them to explore application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.4 Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice 3.11 Ensures that all students and staff members have regular and ready access to instructional technology and a comprehensive materials collection that supports the curricular and instructional program 3.2 Establishes expectations and supports student engagement in the learning process, including opportunities for students to explore application of higher order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.3 Ensures that system-wide curricular and instructional decisions are based on data and research at all levels 3.4 Supports instruction that is research-based and reflective of best practice 3.5 Supports a curriculum that challenges and meets the needs of each student, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Zemelman,Daniels, and Hyde. Best Practices.

List of Activities: Activity guided reading Promoting Inquiry

Begin Date 2012-09-03 2011-09-06

End Date 2013-06-14 2012-06-20

Staff Responsible Teachers Teachers, paraprofessionals.

3.1.1.1. Activity: guided reading Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Teachers will use nonfiction leveled readers in guided reading groups. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Support Staff, Special Education Staff Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2012-09-03, End Date - 2013-06-14 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

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Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Source

Leveld science readers

Title I Part A

Planned Amount

Actual Amount

3.1.1.2. Activity: Promoting Inquiry Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Teachers will use active scientific inquiry-based investigations and explorations using the appropriate equipment to promote hands-on learning. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, paraprofessionals. Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Support Staff, and Special Education Teacher Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-06, End Date - 2012-06-20 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Planned Actual Source Amount Amount Lab equipment and materials, FOSS Full Options Science System Kits General Funds 5,000.00 0.00

Goal 4: Social Studies Achievement Content Area: Social Studies Development Status: Complete Student Goal Statement: All Bridge Academy students will learn appropriate grade level skills and content in Social Studies and demonstrate an increase in academic achievement. Gap Statement: Based on a review of the 2011 MEAP results for grades 6 on average 28% were proficient on the Social Studies MEAP. Cause for Gap: Possible causes for the Gap are as follows: Most of our students are considered "At-Risk," and research has shown that "At-Risk" students tend under perform, on standardized test, than students that are not considered "At-Risk." Multiple measures/sources of data you used to identify this gap in student achievement: 2011 Social Studies MEAP SIP

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Bridge Academy What are the criteria for success and what data or multiple measures of assessment will be used to monitor progress and success of this goal? The criteria for success is that students will increase 5% on achievement in Social Studies on the MEAP, Achievement Series and other local assessments (pretest, end-of unit tests, post tests,etc). Contact Name: Allison Thomas

List of Objectives: Name Foreign Language

Objective All Bridge Academy students will show a 5% increase in Arabic fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary Overall Achievement in Bridge Academy students will show at least a 10% increase in Social Studies, as Social Studies measured by the MEAP and local assessments( pretests, unit tests, post tests,etc.) by 2011/2012 school year.

4.1. Objective: Foreign Language Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: All Bridge Academy students will show a 5% increase in Arabic fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary

List of Strategies: Name Strategy Foreign Language All Bridge Academy foreign language teachers will completely immerse students in Arabic Immersion language, the entire instructional time, to increase achievement in reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills.

4.1.1. Strategy: Foreign Language Immersion Strategy Statement: All Bridge Academy foreign language teachers will completely immerse students in Arabic language, the entire instructional time, to increase achievement in reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills. Selected Target Areas 1.3 Identifies goals to advance the vision 3.1 Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly defined expectations for student learning 3.2 Promotes active involvement of students in the learning process, including opportunities for them to explore application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning SIP

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Bridge Academy 3.9 Monitors school climate and takes appropriate steps to ensure that it is conducive to student learning 3.9 Maintains a system-wide climate that supports student learning

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? The Standards for Foreign Language Learning for the 21st Century-" 5 C's" (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons and Communities), published in 1996 by the National Standards Collaborative

List of Activities: Activity Foreign Language Immersion

Begin Date 2010-09-01

End Date 2011-06-30

Staff Responsible Foreign Language Teachers

4.1.1.1. Activity: Foreign Language Immersion Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Teachers will immerse students in the Arabic language by various methods such as: poetry readings, plays, spelling bees, reading competitions, real-life scenarios, and the use of technology. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Foreign Language Teachers Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Arabic Staff Members Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2010-09-01, End Date - 2011-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Funding Source

Planned Amount

Actual Amount

4.2. Objective: Overall Achievement in Social Studies Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: Bridge Academy students will show at least a 10% increase in Social Studies, as measured by the MEAP and local assessments( pretests, unit tests, post tests,etc.) by 2011/2012 school year.

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Bridge Academy

List of Strategies: Name Strategy Authentic Social Studies Teachers will consistently teach students according to the Social Studies GLCES resources using resources to supplement their lessons.

4.2.1. Strategy: Authentic Social Studies resources Strategy Statement: Teachers will consistently teach students according to the Social Studies GLCES using resources to supplement their lessons. Selected Target Areas 3.1 Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly defined expectations for student learning 3.4 Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice 3.8 Implements interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning 3.1 Develops, articulates, and coordinates curriculum based on clearly- defined expectations for student learning, including essential knowledge and skills 3.2 Establishes expectations and supports student engagement in the learning process, including opportunities for students to explore application of higher order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning 3.4 Supports instruction that is research-based and reflective of best practice 3.5 Supports a curriculum that challenges and meets the needs of each student, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity 3.11 Coordinates and ensures ready access to instructional technology, information and media services, and materials needed for effective instruction

What research did you review to support the use of this strategy and action plan? Biggs, J.B. (2003). Teaching for quality learning at university. Buckingham: The Open University Press.

Houghton, W. (2002) Using QAA subject benchmarking information: an academic teachers perspective. Quality Assurance in Education, 10 (3), 172-186

Ramsden, P. (1984). The context of leaning. In F. Marton, D. Hounsell, and N. Entwistle, N. (eds),The experience of Learning. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press.

Taylor, C. (1994). Assessment for measurement or standards: The peril and promise of large scale assessment reform. American Educational Research Journal, 31, 231-262.

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Bridge Academy Tyler, R.W. (1949). Basic principles of curriculum and instruction. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

List of Activities: Activity Citizenship guided reading

Begin Date 2011-09-01 2011-09-01

End Date 2012-06-30 2012-06-30

Staff Responsible Classroom Teachers Classroom Teachers

4.2.1.1. Activity: Citizenship Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Staff will use and implement strategies to teach student about their responsibility to participate and function in society. Teachers will implement character traits into their teaching. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Classroom Teachers Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: classroom teachers Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource Funding Source

Planned Amount

Actual Amount

4.2.1.2. Activity: guided reading Activity Type: Other Activity Description: Staff will use and implement strategies to teach students how to read nonfiction books based on Social studies objectives. Planned staff responsible for implementing activity: Classroom Teachers Actual staff responsible for implementing activity: Classroom teachers, Paraprofessionals, Support Staff Planned Timeline: Begin Date - 2011-09-01, End Date - 2012-06-30 Actual Timeline: Begin Date - N/A, End Date - N/A SIP

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SIP

Fiscal Resources Needed for Activity: Resource

Funding Source

Social Studies leveled text based on standards

Title I Part A

Planned Amount 0.00

Actual Amount

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Resource Profile

SIP

Funding Source

Planned Amount

Actual Amount

General Funds

$5,000.00

$0.00

Title I Part A

$18,500.00

$0.00

Section 31 a

$8,000.00

$0.00

Section 32 e

$0.00

$0.00

Title I School Improvement (ISI)

$1,000.00

$0.00

Title III

$20,000.00

$0.00

Title II Part A

$17,300.00

$0.00

Title I Schoolwide

$344,000.00

$0.00

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Additional Requirements Comprehensive Needs Assessment The comprehensive needs assessment (CNA) requirement is met by completing a School Data Profile/Analysis (SDP/A), School Process Profile, and Summary Report. The comprehensive needs assessment must be completed prior to creating a new plan or annually updating an existing school improvement plan. Use the results of the comprehensive needs assessment to develop a Schoolwide Reform Model, Goals/Objectives/Strategies and Activities. Ensure that the Gap Statements and Causes for Gaps included in the Goals information address all four measures of data: student achievement data, school programs/process data, perceptions data (must include teachers and parents; student data is encouraged), and demographic data. 1. How was the comprehensive needs assessment conducted? Stakeholders were surveyed regarding their role within the learning community. Committees were formed to analyze the various data from all areas of the school. The committees reported back to the entire staff regarding the data. Their input was also requested. The final report and analysis was presented and utilized for fiduciary and curricular decisions. School based decisions are made in conjunction with the varied stake holders. 2. Summarize the results obtained from the comprehensive needs assessment and general conclusions drawn from those results. Include information from all four measures of data: student achievement, school programs/process, perception and demographic. More specific information will be included in your Goals/Objectives/Strategies and Activities. The area of greatest for improvement is reading with a special emphasis in comprehension and vocabulary. The greatest achievement gap is between our ethnically white and Asian students, with Asian students scoring approximately thirty percent higher than our white population. There is no noticeable gap between genders. There is also a gap between the ELL students and non ELL students with non ELL scoring forty percent higher. Over ninety five percent of students are considered economically disadvantage according to the free and reduce lunch.

Schoolwide Reform Model 1. Describe the overarching, comprehensive, research-based concept/program that the school improvement team is implementing in order to close achievement gaps of at-risk students and increase the academic achievement of all students. Teachers implement the SIOP model for teaching content to ELL Learners. Staff members receive professional development in the use of this model. To provide extended learning opportunities for students, after school tutoring and 21st century is provided. Additional reading materials were purchased to address the reading needs of students. We use Rosetta Stone is used as a part of a language immersion program. Study Island also reinforces the reading at home and at school. 6+1 traits is used to provide a logical method to teach writing. Reading a-z and Raz Kids are used to provide reading materials for students to use SIP

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Bridge Academy in school and at home. Sitton Spelling is the work study program used to increase student vocabulary acquisition. Staff are instructed in differentiated techniques to address the academic challenges with in the learning environment. Smart Boards, computers in classroom, and laboratory are used to provide a visual learning environment to engage all students and provide linguistic support. 2. Describe how stakeholders were involved in the process of developing/selecting the reform model. Stakeholders reviewed various programs that evidenced success with English Language Learners. The program that demonstrated the greatest benefit and paralleled the research of Marzano was selected: SIOP (Sheltered Instruction). In addition, stakeholders found evidence to support the use f technology to engage the visual learner.

Curriculum Alignment that Corresponds to the Goals 1. Describe how the curriculum is aligned with State standards and how this alignment will help the school meet the academic Goals. Describe the process for review and revision of the curriculum; evidence could include a timeline for curriculum review or a description of the review process. Curriculum is aligned with State standards through the curriculum team that works on Atlas in creating lesson plans and activities utilizing our curriculum resources to target all Grade Level Content Expectations. Assessments created to ensure that GLECS are being taught and comprehending by students. 2. Describe how decisions about curriculum, instruction and assessment are made at this school, and how all stakeholders are involved in the process. The academy staff will use curriculum maps developed by the curriculum task force which will have all units aligned to the benchmarks and standards. Units consist of Big Ideas, Enduring Understandings, Essential Questions, What Students Will Know and Be Able to Do. Staff will attach lesson plans to curriculum units in the curriculum maps. These lesson plans will be evaluated by the administrator to ensure that the curriculum is being implemented in the classroom. Activities, resources, and assessments will be added and updated as school leaders and staff reviews the implementation of the curriculum. To ensure that the curriculum is being fully implemented in the classroom, the following steps are being taken: 1. All teachers will have access to curriculum maps. 2. Lesson plans are turned in and evaluated by the administrator to verify that the benchmarks and standards are being addressed. 3. Teachscape is utilized to ascertain the instructional practices and strategies that are implemented in the classroom. Data is displayed for analysis. 4. Academic coordinator facilitates the implementation of the curriculum and provides coaching as needed.

Instruction by Highly Qualified Professional Staff 1. Provide an assurance statement that all teachers and instructional paraprofessionals are highly qualified OR SIP

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Bridge Academy a state-approved plan is in place for staff that does not meet requirements. It is the policy of the academy that all teachers and paraprofessionals must meet Title I requirements. The hiring practice requires all new and existing teachers to meet the "highly qualified" requirements as outlined by No Child Left Behind federal legislation. The academy's management company (Global Educational Excellence) tracks teacher qualification status and ensures that teachers achieve and maintain the correct qualifications. The Human Resources department is currently only hiring teachers who possess the certification that qualifies teachers as highly qualified. Procedures are in place to document and record certifications. Teachers currently employed are assigned to positions that reflect certification of the teachers. Procedures are in place that place laid off and surplus teachers in only positions for which they would be considered highly qualified.

Strategies to Attract High-Quality, Highly Qualified Teachers to High Needs Schools 1. Identify the experience level of key teaching and learning personnel. 1. Shannon Jenks-Kindergarten Elementary K- 5, All Subjects(K -8 Self CC), ZA Endorsement,MAT- 7 years experience 2.Diana Zwolak-Kindergarten, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects,(K -8 Self CC), ZA Endorsement MAT 8 years 3. Janan Chami-Kindergarten-Elementary K- 5,All Subjects, Math Endorsement,BS- 4 years experience 4. Tom Talmadge-First Grade-Elementary K- 5, All Subjects, K -8 Self CC, BS; 5 years experience 5.Darlene Ordiz First Grade Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, (K -8 Self CC), English 6-8 Bachelor of Science, 7 years experience 6.Wafa Elhady,First Grade Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, 2 year experience 7.Stacey Mayberry,Second Grade, Elementary K-8 CC, Math 6-8, BS,6 years of experience 8.Natalie Trupiano ,Second Grade, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, (K -8 Self CC), Language Arts 6-8 BS,4 years experience

9.Kimberly Charland,Third Grade, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, (K -8 Self CC), BS, 2 year of experience 10. Carla Olando, Third Grade, Elementary K-5 All subjects, BS, 5 year of experience 11.Doha Aman, Third Grade, Elmentary k-5 all subjects, BS, 1 year of experience, Math (6-8), ESL (K-8) 12. Rita Peter,Fourth Grade, Elementary K-8 CC BS, 3 years of experience 13. Randi Cummins, Fourth Grade, Elementary K-8 CC, Math 6-8, BS,3 year of experience SIP

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Bridge Academy 14. Kimberly Cubr ,Fourth Grade, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, (K -8 Self CC), SS (CX) 6-8, Language Arts (BX) 6-8 BA in education, 3 years of experience 15. Debra Marval, Third Grade, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, Science 6-8, Mathematics 6-8 Masters in arts of Teaching, 8 years of experience

16. Michele Miller,Fifth/ sixth Grade, Elementary K- 5 All Subjects, 6-8 Language Arts and K-8 ESL, BS, 1 year of experience 17. Jeanne Olear,Elementary Education K-8 & and Special Education K-12 with a Cognitively Impaired (CI) endorsement,BS, 6 years of experience 18. Luljeta Seidarsi, ESL Teacher,Secondary ESL K-12,Bilingual other (YL) 6-12, Masters in Bilingual and Bi cultural Education, 5 years of experience 19. Angela Beleski,Reading Specialist, Elementary K-5 All subject K-8 self cc ,ZA endorsement, Reading 6-8,BS, 4 years of experience 20. Marcella Gelardi, Reading Speicialist, Elementary K-5 All subject K-8 self cc, Masters in reading, 12 years of experience

2. List the specific initiatives implemented at the district and school level for attracting/keeping high-quality, highly qualified teachers to/in high needs schools. The academy is a one-building public school academy that utilizes a variety of strategies to attract high quality teachers. These strategies include: - Offering a competitive salary and benefits package - Extra compensation for degrees earned - Providing a Merit Pay Program for exemplary teachers who have shown success in working with low achieving students - Providing a comprehensive orientation that facilitates a successful transition into teaching - Providing opportunities for teachers to improve their instructional skills through a comprehensive professional development program - Including teachers in the continuous improvement planning process, and other school initiatives and activities - On-line job recruitment and application - Attendance at University job fairs and advertisement in local newspapers 3. Describe the rate of teacher turnover for the school. In 2011-2012 we only had three new teachers. 4. If the school has identified a high teacher-turnover rate list the specific initiatives implemented to try and lower the rate. If the school does not have a high teacher turnover rate, enter "Not applicable" in the text box. SIP

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Bridge Academy Merit pay system will be implemented.

High-Quality and Ongoing Professional Development Use the results of the comprehensive needs assessment to create a written professional development plan that identifies ongoing, sustained professional development that is aligned to the Goals, Objectives, Strategies and Schoolwide Reform Model. The specific professional development activities must be included as Activities under the Goals section. District professional development activities that align to the school's comprehensive needs assessment and Schoolwide Reform Model should also be included in the school-level Activities section. Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement 1. It is critical that the school improvement team refers to the legislation included in the schoolwide school rubric as guidance while completing this section. Describe, in detail, the Section 1118 (e)(1-5) and (14) and (f) strategies employed by the school to increase parental involvement. To have increased parent and community involvement and overcome some of the barriers to such involvement: -Surveys will be done once a year to evaluate the success of the parent involvement plan, perceptions about parental involvement, and to find out about the interests and concerns of the community. -Alternate days and times for meetings to help increase participation. -Provide childcare during meetings, or welcome children as participants -Invite people from the community such as business owners, to attend meetings. -Adult Education classes; Technology Software Workshops and Internet Access Workshops -Adult ESL Classes using Rosetta Stone Staff training will be provided in the following areas; -Cultural awareness -How to engage parents effectively to increase student achievement - Parenting education 2. Describe the role of parents in the following schoolwide school plan/program areas:

2a. Design Research indicates that the leading predictor of student success is parental involvement. As such, the academy includes parents in every aspect of the education program. The school governance structure relies on significant parental input and cultivates a close working partnership between staff and parents. The Parental Involvement Program includes the following types of parental involvement; 1. Communication: Effective forms of communication will include school-to-home and home-to-school communication. 2. Volunteering: There will be many opportunities for volunteering and the members of the PTC, under the direction of the Parent Coordinator will organize and recruit parent help. SIP

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Bridge Academy 3. Parenting and Learning at Home: Parents will be encouraged to participate in parent education programs that are focused on learning at home and parenting skills that will help establish a home environment that supports children as students. 4. Decision-Making: All parents and family members are encouraged to become involved and the staff will actively work with parents to improve student learning and school environment. 5. Collaborating with the Community: Parent Coordinator and administration will assist in facilitating and organizing efforts of parents who are encouraged to be actively involved in creating relationships with the business community and helping to identify community activities and community resources that would link to learning skills, strengthen school programs and provide recreational and social support. 2b. Implementation The Parent Coordinator of the academy will take the lead in the implementation of Parental Involvement and all staff will participate in involving parents. There is an established Parent Teacher Committee that will have a significant role in the implementation of the Parental Involvement Plan. In cooperation with the Parent Teacher Involvement Committee (PTIC), the school desires to promote parental participation in the education of their children, promote school safety, and develop effective parent involvement strategies. Since Bridge Academy's mission is to promote life-long learning by nurturing academic excellence, positive character, and an appreciation of cultures, the Parent Teacher Committee supports our school mission and school improvement in many ways and serves as the vehicle for promoting and helping to organize many of the parent involvement and education activities. 2c. Evaluation Parent, staff and student surveys will be done once a year to evaluate the success of the parent involvement plan, perceptions about parental involvement, and to find out about the interests and concerns of the community. Evaluations of parent education meetings/events will be done to assess effectiveness and make improvements. 3. Describe how the school provides individual student academic assessments results, including interpretation of those results, in a language the parents can understand. - Annual open house and/or orientation will provide parents with the opportunity to see the school facilities, learn about the curriculum and programs offered at the school, and meet the faculty. - Parent - Teacher conferences are conducted in such a way that will insure two-way communication between home and school - There will be meetings of staff members and parents of those students with special abilities, difficulties, disabilities, needs, or problems. - Newsletters will be written and available on the school website. Translations will be available in all appropriate languages. - Notices of parental rights and information about student eligibility for additional programs and services will be sent in written form and will be posted on the school website, as appropriate. This information will also be translated as needed. - Required notices related to Title I and Title III - Teachers will communicate with parents and families both formally and informally. This happens through progress reports, report cards, weekly letters, phone calls and notes home. Parents are notified of events and activities, academic progress and behaviors. SIP

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Bridge Academy - Translators are available at school meetings, conferences, and programs. - The online student information system at the academy will provide access to up-to-date information for parents on student academic progress, assignments, and discipline. In addition, student resources and homework help will be available in this online system. - To support those families who do not have access to technology, the academy will provide parent information kiosks with computers. Parent coordinators and staff will provide assistance in the use of the technology. - The Parental Involvement Plan will be made available at public events and will also be available on the school website, and upon request at the school, ensuring that it is available to all stakeholders. - The Parental Involvement Plan will be made available to the School Board at the annual organizational meeting and at the time of the annual review of the plan. - Adult Education programs are made available to the families of the school through postings on the community board and newsletters home. 4. All Title I schools must have a School-Parent Compact. Describe the role of parents in the development of the School-Parent Compact, including the most recent review and revision of content. Elementary schools must also provide an assurance statement that the compact is discussed at least annually at parent-teacher conferences. The academy staff will discuss the compact with parents at the initial parent teacher conference each year. Parent teacher conference attendance records will be available in addition to the compacts that are signed by those participating in the discussion. 5. Describe how the parent involvement components of the schoolwide plan will be evaluated. parent and community surveys 6. Summarize the results of the evaluation and how those results will be used to improve the schoolwide program. As a staff we would like our parents to be more involved in their children academics. One way we do this is by having family math night, science night, after school adult language education, and health clinic. We utilize board members active in the community to promote school activities. One thing we need to work on is find other ways to advertise these activities to the parents. At present we only translate to one population. We need to also translate for other populations that may need language assistance. 7. Attach the School-Parent Involvement Plan (that addresses Section 1118 activities) that is aligned to the District's Board Policy in the Supporting Documentation section. Attach the School-Parent Compact in the Supporting Documentation section.

Preschool Transition Strategies 1. Describe preschool transition strategies (more than once a year visitation) and the training that is provided to SIP

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Bridge Academy preschool parents and/or teachers related to Kindergarten readiness skills. Describe other school level transitions that occur, if appropriate. If the school serves only middle school or high school grades, the school may put a statement in the box that indicates this section is "Not applicable due to grade levels served". 1)The Preschool Parent Advisory Committee and Parent Coordinator will participate in the planning and implementation of the preschool transition activities. 2)Preschool program will provide transition activities for students in the preschool program at the academy a)'A Day in the life of a Kindergarten student' for all Preschool students. b)Visits from the Kindergarten teachers into the preschool classroom to read and interact with the preschool students 3)During the March Parent-Teacher conference parents will be provided with information about activities to assist in transitioning to Kindergarten. 4)End of the year home visits, preschool families will receive information to help them prepare for the start of Kindergarten to include; a)Establishing routines for bedtime, waking up, and eating breakfast to ease the transition. b)Calendar of Activities to do over the summer in preparation for Kindergarten. c)Summer family events, field trips, or group gatherings 5)Preschool and Kindergarten teachers will meet annually to align expectations, programs, and goals for student achievement. a)Assessment information from preschool will be provided to Kindergarten staff as needed. b)Kindergarten teachers will provide follow-up feed back to preschool staff about incoming students including assessment information. 6)Kindergarten teachers and preschool teachers will collaborate on Kindergarten Round-Up Program held at the end of the school year for incoming Kindergarten students and their parents. a)Parents and children will tour the school, meet the staff, and experience part of the daily routine in Kindergarten. b)Parents will receive information about Kindergarten curriculum and have the opportunity to have questions answered 7)Kindergarten teachers will make home visits prior to the start of the school year to facilitate the transition. a)Teachers will receive training in Home Visiting including the purpose, techniques, and value of conducting the visits.

Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions 1. Describe how teachers participate in making assessment decisions (Ex. selection, development, frequency). Teachers participate in developing local assessments through individual and grade level collaboration based on state guided standards, benchmarks and GLCEs. In addition, assessments are modified according to need based recommendations and collaboration with all student support staff including ESL coordinator, Special Education teacher, parent, and Reading Specialist. 2. Describe how teachers are involved in student achievement data analysis to improve the academic achievement of all students. SIP

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Bridge Academy

Teachers participate in data analysis as whole staff, grade-level, subject-level and individually on a variety of assessments including MEAP, ELPA, NWEA, DRA, and Ed Performance. Teachers use this information to improve and adjust their planning and curriculum delivery.

Alternative Measures of Assessment 1. Describe the process for developing, or the alternative measures of assessment used, that will provide authentic assessment of pupils' achievements, skills, and competencies. Alternate measures of assessment include Interim writing assessments and student work portfolios. In addition, members of the staff participate in the Formative Assessment Initiative through MDE and Measured Progress. NWEA provides interim reading and math skills assessments.

Timely and Additional Assistance 1. Provide a summary of the effective, timely, additional assistance activities provided to students that are not mastering the State's academic achievement standards. These must also be included in greater specificity as Activities under the Goals section. Timely, additional assistance should include differentiation of instruction to meet students' individual needs within the classroom. Response to Intervention Model (RTI) has been implemented to work with students who are not mastering the standards. Students are involved in intervention programs for a period of time and then re-evaluated. Continuous progress monitoring is done throughout the intervention. Students receive supplemental services from a reading specialist, ESL Department, tutoring after school with other core teachers and help from the paraprofessionals. Struggling students in grades 1 through 4 receive additional support from certified teachers in a small group setting. 2. Describe the identification process for students that are not mastering the State's academic achievement standards. Stakeholders convene to evaluate the assessment scores and determine the level each student has achieved in each sub-category. Based on the analysis, a list is generated identifying students that might need additional support and instructional adjustments are made. We use the Response to Intervention model. The team includes classroom teacher(s), Academic Coordinator, RTI Facilitator, Reading Specialist, and other relevant support staff. that will help assess each student's individual needs and identify interventions for those students who are having difficulty mastering the standards. We offer: - Individualized placement for newcomers to the school, based on English Language Proficiency levels or other special needs. - Differentiation of instruction and flexible grouping.

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Bridge Academy Coordination and Integration of Federal, State and Local Programs and Resources 1. Include a list of State educational agency and local educational agency programs and other Federal programs that will be coordinated in the Schoolwide program. Title I, Title II, Title III, 31-A At Risk, IDEA 2. Describe how federal, state and local programs and resources are coordinated to support the schoolwide program and initiatives in your plan. We coordinate all the different funds/resources the school receives to fulfill the implementation needs of the School-wide Improvement Plan. - Contracted Services for Special Ed. Students - Positive Behavior Support - Summer School Program - After school programming, Reading Intervention Programs, - Extended day Kindergarten, - Character Education Program, - Paraprofessionals - Professional Development - Computer Software Programs for Differentiated Instruction - Computer Software for assessment data and Differentiated Instruction - Technology to enhance visual learning and student engagement 3. Describe how the school will use resources under Title I, Part A and from other sources to implement the required ten schoolwide components. 1. After school programs and tutoring 2. Summer school programs 3. Parent Involvement Coordinator and programs 4. Supplemental Reading Program 5. Reading Specialist 6. Character Education Programs 7, English as a Second Language Programs 8. Use of Paraprofessional 4. Describe the coordination and integration of Federal, State and local programs and services in a manner applicable to the grade level, including: violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Great Start Readiness Program, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training. 1. Contracted Services for Special Ed. Students 2. Positive Behavior Support 3. Summer School Program 4. After school programming, Reading Intervention Programs, 5. Full day Kindergarten, SIP

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Bridge Academy 6. Preschool Program, 7. Character Education Program, 8. Paraprofessionals 9. Professional Development 10. Computer Software Programs for Differentiated Instruction 11. Computer Software for assessment data and Differentiated Instruction 12. Technology used to enhance instruction for visual learners and students engagement

Effective Use of Technology 1. Describe the methods for effective use of technology as a way of improving learning and delivery of services and for integration of involving technology in the curriculum. Bridge Academy's Educational Technology Plan has technology goals that are aligned with the national and state technology standards and benchmarks and is on file with the state of Michigan. The standards have been utilized as the basis for integrating technology into curricula and instruction to improve student academic achievement.

Evaluation of the School Improvement Plan 1. Describe how the school annually evaluates the implementation of, and results achieved by, the SIP, using data from the State's annual assessments and other indicators of academic achievement. To evaluate the implementation of school programs and the SIP, we conduct monthly SIP committee meetings. All staff members are assigned a content area and are responsible for evaluating the programs associated with that content area. They report back to the entire staff on progress towards goals. Surveys are also conducted with the staff, students, and parents. A data wall is maintained indicating academic achievement as measured through various programs and/or assessments. New strategies and activities are updated as needed; demonstrated through data. 2. Describe how the school improvement team determines whether the schoolwide program has been effective in increasing the achievement of students who had been furthest from achieving the standards. A gap analysis is conducted on both the cohort and non-cohort groups. Data from MEAP, NWEA, Scantron, and DRA are analyzed with regards to change in proficiency. Data is color coded and disseminated to teachers who then modify instruction to reflect the analysis. 3. Describe how the school improvement team revises the plan, as necessary, based on the results of the evaluation, to ensure continuous improvement of students in the schoolwide program. To evaluate the implementation of school programs and the SIP, we conduct monthly SIP committee meetings. All staff members are assigned a content area and are responsible for evaluating the programs associated with that content area. They report back to the entire staff on progress towards goals. Surveys are also conducted with the staff, students, and parents. A data wall is maintained indicating academic achievement as measured through various programs and/or assessments. SIP

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Bridge Academy New strategies and activities are updated as needed; demonstrated through data. 4. Describe how school and student information and progress will be shared with all stakeholders in a language that they can understand. Bridge Academy shares information with stakeholders through newsletters, report cards, progress reports, and the on-line program Next K12 . Information sent out to the community is sent in English as well as other languages. Interpreters are available in the school to facilitate home-school communication.

Building Level Decision-Making 1. Describe how school stakeholders are engaged in the decision-making process, including, but not limited to the development of the Goals, Objectives, Strategies and Activities included in the school improvement plan. School board members, school building administrators, teachers and other school employees, pupils, parents of pupils attending that school, parents of pupils receiving Title I, Part A services and other residents of the school district shall be invited and allowed to voluntarily participate in the development, review and evaluation of the district's school improvement plans. The staff and administration primarily do the monitoring of the plan. These functions are primarily done at grade level meetings and at the School Improvement Meetings. Our School improvement Committee includes representatives from all stakeholder groups to ensure that their interests are included at the organization level as well as in the review of documents. In addition to representation, parents are invited to school events and meetings via the school newsletter and other written communication. Teacher will maintain open routes of communication with parents in writing, by phone and by conferences to get ongoing parental input. Parents can also participate in grade level meetings to provide input. Parental input is solicited for school improvement initiatives. Parent meetings are held to inform stakeholders as to the Title i services provided by the school.

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Bridge Academy

Assurances EdYES! 1. Literacy and math are tested annually in grades 1-5 (MCL 380.1280b) Response: Yes Comments: We administer NWEA in grades kindergarten through second twice per year. Ed performance is administered twice a year second through eighth. Both assessment include math and literacy. MEAP is administered grades third through eighth. 2. Our school published a fully compliant annual report. (The Annual Education Report (AER) satisfies this). If yes, please provide a link to the report on your website in the comments field (if applicable). Response: Yes Comments:

Educational Development Plan (EDP) 1. Our school has the 8th grade parent approved Educational Development Plans (EDPs) on file. Response: Yes Comments: We use Career Cruising to develop EDP. 2. Our school reviews and annually updates the EDPs to ensure academic course work alignment. Response: Yes Comments:

Health and Safety (HSAT) The following assurances come directly from the Healthy School Action Tool (HSAT) Assessment (http://www.mihealthtools.org/hsat), an online tool for school buildings to assess their school health environments. If your school completed the HSAT in the past year, you may refer back to your report to answer the following assurances. Responses to these assurances are necessary - whether you've completed the HSAT or not. These assurances are designed to help school improvement teams think about conditions for learning in their school, specifically related to student health and safety, and develop strategies in their school improvement plan to address any identified needs. 1. Our School has a written policy on school safety that supports proactive, preventative approaches to ensure a safe school environment. SIP

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Bridge Academy Response: Written Policy, but not fully implemented Comments: Need for crisis management team and training. 2. All teachers in our school have received professional development in management techniques to create calm, orderly classrooms. Response: No Comments: Classroom management and crisis management training has yet to be provided. 3. Our school communicates all of our health and safety policies to students, staff, substitute teachers, parents and visitors through the parent handbook or newsletter at least once a year. Response: Yes Comments: 4. Our school has used data from a student health/safety assessment at least once in the past two years to assist in planning actions that will improve our school's environment and/or to determine the impact of changes that we have made on student attitudes and behaviors. Response: No Comments: 5. Our school has taken action on the Michigan State Board of Education Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education. Response: No action taken Comments: 6. All teachers who provide health education instruction received annual professional development/continuing education specifically related to health education. Response: No Comments: 7. The health education curriculum used in our school is the Michigan Model for Health速 Curriculum. Response: No, do not use a health education curriculum Comments: 8. The health education curriculum used in our school involves student interaction with their families and their community. Response: No SIP

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Bridge Academy Comments: 9. Our school has taken action on the Michigan State Board of Education Policy on Quality Physical Education. Response: No action taken Comments: 10. At our school, physical education teachers annually participate in professional development specific to physical education. Response: Yes Comments: 11. The physical education curriculum used in our school is: Response: No curriculum Comments: 12. At least three times during the past 12 months, our school offered programs, activities or events for families about physical activity. Response: No Comments: 13. Our school offers the following amount of total weekly minutes of physical education throughout the year. Response: 60-90 minutes at elementary level, 106-135 minutes at middle/high level Comments: 14. Our school has taken action on the Michigan State Board of Education Policy on Nutrition Standards. Response: Adopted policy, but not fully implemented Comments: 15. The food service director/manager participated in professional development related to food or nutrition during the past 12 months. Response: Yes Comments: 16. The food service director/manager supports/reinforces in the cafeteria what is taught in health education. SIP

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Response: Yes Comments: 17. During the past 12 months, our school collected information from parents to help evaluate/improve school meals or foods offered a la carte, in concessions, school stores, vending machines, or as a part of classroom celebrations/parties or at school events. Response: No Comments: 18. Our school makes a good faith effort to ensure that federally reimbursable school nutrition programs are the main source of nutrition at school rather than vending or a la carte. Response: Yes Comments: 19. Our school has a health services provider or school nurse accessible to students. Response: No Comments: 20. Our school has a written policy on school safety that involves parents, and broader community, in collaborative efforts to help ensure a safe school environment. Response: Written Policy, but not fully implemented Comments: 21. Our school has a system in place for collecting relevant student medical information. Response: Yes Comments: 22. Our school has taken action on the Michigan State Board of Education Positive Behavior Support Policy. Response: Adopted policy, but not fully implemented Comments: 23. During the past 12 months, the school counseling staff has provided professional development to school health staff about identification and referral of students related to violence and suicide prevention. Response: No Comments: SIP

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Bridge Academy

24. During the past 12 months, the school counselor/psychologist/social worker offered information to students (presentations, materials, individual or group counseling activities, events) about bullying, harassment and other peer to peer aggression. Response: Yes Comments: 25. During the past 12 months, the school counselor/psychologist/social worker has collaborated with appropriate school staff or community agencies to implement programs or activities related to bullying, harassment and other peer to peer aggression. Response: No Comments: 26. During the past 12 months, the school counseling staff identified students who are at risk of being victims or perpetrators of violence. Response: Yes Comments: 27. Our school's mission statement includes the support of employee health and safety. Response: No Comments: 28. During the past year, our school supported staff participation in health promotion programs by having a budget for staff health promotion. Response: No Comments: 29. During the past year, our school supported staff in healthy eating by providing healthy food choices at staff meetings. Response: No Comments: 30. Our school has a written family involvement policy that advocates for strong connections between the home, school and the community as a means of reducing barriers to student achievement. Response: Written Policy, but not fully implemented Comments: SIP

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Bridge Academy

31. Our school has a parent education program. Response: Yes Comments: 32. During the past 12 months, our school collected information from parents to help evaluate/improve school health education in our school. Response: No Comments: 33. During non school hours the community has access to indoor facilities for physical activity (such as gym, weight room, hallway for walking, pool, basketball court). Response: Access to all indoor facilities Comments:

Special Education 1. The District School Improvement Team reviews the CIMS data. Response: Yes Comments: 2. CIMS data is used to prepare the District Improvement Plan. Response: Yes Comments:

Technology 1. The District Technology Protection Measure blocks or filters adult and student internet access to inappropriate materials (visual depictions that are obscene, child pornography, or harmful to minors). Response: Yes Comments: Students filters are in place. 2. The district has a process to monitor adult and student use of the internet. Response: Yes SIP

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Bridge Academy Comments: 3. The district has an Internet Safety Policy in place. Response: Yes Comments: 4. The Internet Safety Policy meets the requirements as outlined in the state Technology Planning and CIPA requirements. Response: Yes Comments: 5. The district has a process to provide public notice and hearings about the Internet Safety Policy. Response: Yes Comments: 6. The district uses school-wide assessments to determine the telecommunication services and hardware support that are needed to support teaching and learning in all schools. Response: No Comments: 7. The district uses the school-wide assessment data to identify the needs of the schools in the following areas: infrastructure (wiring, internet connections T1, etc.) in all classrooms, in all labs, in all media centers, in the main office, in counseling offices, in support staff offices; hardware; software; professional development. If "yes", specify the needs in the comments section. Response: Yes Comments: We need 3 mobile lap top carts containing 26 lap tops each. In addition, we need to update the wireless connections within the building in order to be able to connect to the server. We need to provide mobile learning devices (IPads) to the special education and ELL departments. We need to replace current hardware with hardware that enables text to speech to facilitate our large ELL population. This would require us to update the classroom computers, media center, and computer lab. Teachers will require professional development in the use of the new hardware and software programs. 8. The district has identified specific actions that promote curriculum and teaching strategies to effectively integrate technology. If "yes", specify the actions in the comments section. Response: Yes Comments: We use Smart Board technology to provide an interactive experience for students. Additionally, we plan to incorporate hardware and software applications to best utilize text to speech SIP

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Bridge Academy technology. To create real-life experiences, students will be able to interact with technological devices to access and present new knowledge. An executive briefing has been held to highlight specific technology to solve out technological issues and make curriculum more relevant to students. 9. The district adjusts its curriculum to include technology literacy for all students. Response: Yes Comments: 10. The district adjusts its instructional program to promote technology literacy. If "yes", specify the adjustments in the comments section. Response: Yes Comments: Students are encouraged to access learning via computers and Smart Board technology. Software applications and web site literacy are taught as part of computer education.

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Stakeholders List of names, positions and e-mail addresses of the stakeholders (staff, parents, community/business members and, as appropriate, students) who were involved in the planning, design, monitoring, and evaluation of this plan.

SIP

Title Dr.

First Name Naji

Last Name Abduljaber

Ms.

Stacey

Mayberry

Mr.

Ghassan

Shihab

Position Principal SIP Committee Chair Board Member

Mrs.

Jamila

Malahi

Parent Member

Mrs.

Renyolds

Debbie

Mrs.

Carla

Olando

Mrs.

Luljeta

Sejdarasi

Mrs.

Angela

Beleski

Mr.

Tom

Talmadge

Mrs.

Shannon

Jenks

E-mail abduljabern@gee-edu.com mayberrys@gee-edu.com gshihab@aegistream.us Malahij@bridgeacademy.org

Title 1 renyoldsd@gee-edu.com Consultant SIP Memberolandoc@gee-edu.com Science SIP Member-ESL Sejdarasil@gee-edu.com SIP Membereggelstona@gee-edu.com Reading SP. SIP Membertalmadget@gee-edu.com Math SIP Memeberjenkss@gee-edu.com writing

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Statement of Non-Discrimination Federal Office for Civil Rights The institution complies with all federal laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and with all requirements and regulations of the U.S. Department of Education. It is the policy of this school that no person on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, gender, height, weight, marital status or disability shall be subjected to discrimination in any program, service or activity for which the district/school is responsible, or for which it receives financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education.

Contact Information Schools/Districts are required to designate an employee to coordinate efforts to comply with and carry out nondiscrimination responsibilities. Name/Position:

Dr. Naji Abdul-Jaber, Principal

Address:

9600 Buffalo, Hamtramck

Telephone Number:

313-887-8100

References Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Elliott-Larsen prohibits discrimination against religion

SIP

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Bridge Academy

Supporting Documentation The following documentation was attached. These are appended to this PDF and will display in the following pages:

District Board Policy on Parent Involvement School-Parent Involvement Plan School-Parent Compact

SIP

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*STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT RELATIONS WITH PARENTS The Board of Directors believes that the education of children is a joint responsibility, one it shares with the parents of the Academy. To ensure that the best interests of the child are served in this process, a strong program of communication between home and the Academy must be maintained. The parents have the right to participate in the education of their children as well as the ultimate responsibility for their children’s in-school behavior, including the behavior of students who have reached the age of majority, but are still, for all practical purposes, under parental authority. In accordance with Board policies and administrative guidelines 2240 (Opt-Out), 2413/14 (Health/Sex Education), and 9150 (Academy Visitors), the Academy shall provide the opportunity for parents to review curriculum and instructional materials and to visit the Academy to observe the instructional process. With regard to student behavior, during school hours, the Board, through the Educational Service Provider/School Leader, acts in loco parentis or in place of the parents. The Board recommends that the following activities be implemented to encourage parent-Academy cooperation: o parent-teacher conferences to permit two-way communication between home and school: o meetings of staff members and parents of those students having special abilities, disabilities, needs, or problems; and o open houses to provide parents with the opportunity to see the Academy facilities, meet the faculty, and sample the program on a first hand basis. For the benefit of children, the Board believes that parents have a responsibility to encourage their child’s career in school by: o supporting the Academy in requiring that the children observe all Academy rules and regulations and by accepting their own responsibility for children’s willful in-behavior;


o sending children to school with proper attention to their health, personal cleanliness, and dress; o maintaining an active interest in the student’s daily work and making it possible for the student to complete assigned homework by providing a quiet place and suitable conditions for study; o reading all communications from the Academy, signing, and returning them promptly when required; and o cooperating with the Academy in attending conferences set up for the exchange of information of the child’s progress in school

PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT PLAN Research indicates that the leading predictor of student success is parental involvement. As such, the academy includes parents in every aspect of the education program. The school governance structure relies on significant parental input and cultivates a close working partnership between staff and parents. In cooperation with the Parent Teacher Committee (PTC), the school desires to promote parental participation in the education of their children, promote school safety, and develop effective parent involvement strategies. Since the Academy's mission is to promote life-long learning by nurturing academic excellence, positive character, and an appreciation of cultures, the Parent Teacher Committee supports our school mission and school improvement in many ways and serves as the vehicle for promoting and helping to organize many of the parent involvement and education activities. Communicating Effective forms of communication will include school-to-home and home-to-school communication. This will include a wide range of information with a variety of opportunities and means of communication. Whenever it is possible, information will be translated or translators will be provided. 

Annual open house and/or orientation will provide parents with the opportunity to see the school facilities, learn about the curriculum and programs offered at the school, and meet the faculty.

Parent – Teacher conferences are conducted in such a way that will insure 3 way communication between the student, home and school

There will be meetings of staff members and parents of those students with special abilities, difficulties, disabilities, needs, or problems.

Newsletters will be written and available on the school website. Translations will be available in all appropriate languages.

Notices of parental rights and information about student eligibility for additional programs and services will be made available in written form and will be posted on the school website, as appropriate. This information will also be translated as needed.


o Required notices related to Title I and Title III 

Teachers will communicate with parents and families both formally and informally. This happens through progress reports, report cards, weekly letters, phone calls and notes home. Parents are notified of events and activities, academic progress and behaviors.

The online student information system at the academy will provide access to upto-date information for parents on student academic progress, assignments, and discipline. In addition, student resources and homework help will be available in this online system.

To support those families who do not have access to technology, the academy will provide parent information kiosks with computers. Parent coordinators and staff will provide assistance in the use of the technology.

The Parental Involvement Plan will be made available at public events and will also be available on the school website, and upon request at the school, ensuring that it is available to all stakeholders.

The Parental Involvement Plan will be made available to the School Board at the annual organizational meeting and at the time of the annual review of the plan.

Adult Education programs are made available to the families of the school through postings on the community board and newsletters home.

Volunteering There are many opportunities for volunteering and the members of the PTC, under the direction of the Parent Coordinator will organize and recruit parent help for:  Fundraising  Becoming a room parent  Classroom help  Library volunteers  Tutoring  Organizing and providing support for Parent meetings and other events  Coaching athletics  Assisting with field trips Parenting and Learning at Home In addition to these opportunities for involvement, parents are encouraged to participate in parent education programs that are focused on learning at home and parenting skills that will help establish a home environment that supports children as students. These programs will include;  Annual Title I and Title III meeting  Cultural Awareness  Study Skills  Internet safety  Bullying  Health/Nutrition


       

Community services Effective discipline Understanding the MEAP/MME/ACT and other assessments Financial Aid for college bound students Reading your child’s report card Multicultural Night Reading Events Understanding how to help your child in the content areas: o Math o Science o Social Studies o Literacy

Decision-Making All parents and family members are encouraged to become involved and the staff will actively work with parents to improve student learning and school environment. Some options for involvement in decision-making that are available are:  Participation on the school improvement team  Being an active member of the PTC  Participating with strategic planning. Collaborating with the Community Collaborating with the community is another important way to be involved and the Parent Coordinator will assist in facilitating and organizing efforts of parents who are encouraged to:  Be actively involved in creating relationships with the business community  Help identify community activities and community resources that would link to learning skills, strengthen school programs and provide recreational and social support.

OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO PARENTAL INVOVLEMENT To have increased parent and community involvement, include parents in the school improvement planning process, and overcome some of the barriers to such involvement the academy will; 

   

Survey parents at least once a year to evaluate the success of the parent involvement plan, perceptions about parental involvement, and to find out about the interests and concerns of the community. Alternate days and times for meetings to help increase participation. Make transportation arrangements whenever needed and whenever possible Provide childcare during meetings, or welcome children as participants Invite people from the community such as business owners, to attend meetings.


 

Offer Adult Education classes; Technology Software Workshops and Internet Access Workshops Offer Adult ESL Classes

Staff training will be provided in the following areas;   

Cultural awareness How to engage parents effectively to increase student achievement How to conduct effective parent education PARENT/STUDENT/TEACHER/PRINCIPAL COMPACT

To accomplish our vision, students, parents, teachers, and the principal need to work together. We ask that all parents, students and teachers complete and sign their part of a compact which outlines the responsibilities of all parties. This agreement was developed with the cooperation of all stakeholders and is reviewed annually by the School Improvement Team. The compact is discussed annually with all parents and students at the initial parent-teacher conferences and open house events. To view the entire compact, see Appendix A.


Bridge Academy East SIP Plan  

School Improvement Plan