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SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

SAMAR FAY /wheat HI-LINEharvest FARM & RANCH On a hot August morning, a combine makes sweeps up and down an endless field of grain on Whatley Road southeast of Glasgow. As of the last week of August, the winter was 92 Onpercent a hot August morning, a combine makescrop sweeps and down an endless field of grain on Whatley Road southeast of Glasgow. As of the last week of August, the winter wheat harvest was 92 complete, and the spring wheat was up 38 percent cut. percent complete, and the spring wheat crop was 38 percent cut. If the country doesn’t produce commodicontract with them. On the other hand, there economy. Ifties, the country produce commodiwith them. the other hand, there economy. they aredoesn’t very concerned. Some of these contract is Columbia Grain,On owned by Marubeni, “The return we see from the products we ties, they areare very concerned. of these iswhich Columbia owned by Marubeni,Ten of “The return we see from themore products we countries buying land in Some other countries; has aGrain, big presence in Montana. sell is realized economically signifiCONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 countries are buying land facilities; in other countries; which has a big presence inare Montana. Ten of sell is realized economically moreeconomic signifisome are buying export some are its 20 Montana elevators on the Hi-Line. cantly than other products. The CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 some are buying export facilities; some are itsMarubeni 20 Montana elevators areGavilon, on the Hi-Line. than other products. The economic farmers,” Raska said. “We’re concerned if investing in research. recently bought owner of cantly impact is tremendous of wheat and barley farmers,” concerned research.in Montana are owned Marubeni recently Gavilon, owner of a impact is tremendous of wheat barley there areRaska strikessaid. and “We’re blockages. We seeifthe ef- investing Mostinelevators three elevators in bought Montana. EGT negotiated sold out of state. Money fromand other counthere strikes andmove. blockages. We seeit’s thekind efelevators in have Montana are owned elevators of state. Money from other fect are if trains can’t Otherwise, byMost companies that an interest in Japan, three union contractinaMontana. couple of EGT yearsnegotiated ago. Co- a sold triesout rolls into Montana. Think howcounmany fect trains can’t move. Otherwise, it’s kind byFalcon companies union contract of years Cotries rolls intodollars Montana. of if arm’s distance.” said. that have an interest in Japan, lumbia Grainaiscouple operating with ago. replacement times those turnThink over, how frommany the of arm’s said. lumbia Grain is operating with replacement times those turnthe over, from The the buildFooddistance.” security is very significant for Japan Falcon The new EGT elevator in Kintyre Flats workers. farmer, thedollars elevator, railroad. Food is very significant Japan Theofnew EGTiselevator farmer, railroad. and forsecurity other Asian countries withfor growing east Nashua owned in byKintyre a pair ofFlats Japanese workers. Falcon emphasized the importance of ing of the the elevator, economythe from wheat The and buildbarley and for other and Asian countries with growing Nashua is owned of Japanese Falcon emphasized the importance of the ing the economy from wheat and barley population growing demand, Falcon said. east andofinternational firms,by anda pair the ILWU has a Montana’s export products for building is of huge.” population and growing demand, Falcon said. and international firms, and the ILWU has a Montana’s export products for building the is huge.”

GrainExports ExportsAt AtIssue Issue Grain

Grainy Grainy OutlookIn In Outlook Contract Contract Dispute Dispute

HII-L -LINE INE H FORD ORD F

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SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

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YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA. YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA.

nion disputes with managenion disputes with management over contracts are ment over contracts are in not usually a big factor notfarmer’s usually profit a big factor in a Montana at harvest a time, Montana farmer’s profit at harvest but that could change this year. time,As butthethat couldriver change this year. golden of grain moves As the golden river of grain moves from fields to combines to elevators from to combines to elevators and fields westbound trains, longshoremen and westbound trains, longshoremen are in a bitter dispute with export terare in a owners bitter dispute with minal that thy sayexport could terslow minal owners that thy say could slow export shipments and depress prices. export depress prices. At shipments left, trucksand laden with local grain At left, trucks laden with local grain line up at Farmers Elevator in Glasgow line up attheir Farmers Elevator in Glasgow to drop burden and head back to tothe drop their burden and head back to field for more. the field forFay more. Samar reports on Page 2. Samar Fay reports on Page 2.


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Dispute Could Affect Grain Prices Dispute Could Affect Grain Prices

BUTBUT ITS ITS TOLL IS NOT SINEVITABLE, IS INEVITABLE, TOLL IS NOT SAMAR FAY /SAMAR HI-LINEFAY FARM & RANCH / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

GRAINY OUTLOOK ININ CONTRACT DISPUTE GRAINY OUTLOOK CONTRACT DISPUTE Will Distant LaborLabor Disputes AffectAffect Montana GrainGrain Prices? Will Distant Disputes Montana Prices?

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“because “because of what’s of going on going on theon coast.� It coast.� It what’s on the CONTINUEDCONTINUED FROM PAGEFROM 2 PAGE 2 their respect. their respect. wasn’t created the union, heunion, said. he said. wasn’tbycreated by the “Montana“Montana has a whole hasdifferent a whole atmosphere different atmosphere Grain industry Montana aren’t aren’t Grainofficials industryinofficials in Montana than on the coast,� said Richsaid Austin ofAustin ILWU of ILWU than on the coast,� Rich seeing lower prices, however. seeing lower prices, however. Local 19 Local in Seattle, HeWash. is co-chair 19 inWash. Seattle, He isof co-chair of “We haven’t concerns from elevators “Weheard haven’t heard concerns from elevators the ILWUthe grain negotiating committee. ILWU grain negotiating committee. that they’re with exports,� said thatplugged they’reup plugged up with exports,� said “There is “There misinformation out there out thatthere that is misinformation Kim Falcon, director ofdirector the MonKimexecutive Falcon, executive of the Monportrays us as being adversely portrays uson as strike being and on strike and adversely tana Wheat and Barley Committee. “They are“They are tana Wheat and Barley Committee. affecting affecting farmers,�farmers,� said Scottsaid Mason ofMason Taco- of TacoScott full because harvest.� fullofbecause of harvest.� ma, Wash., president of ILWU of Local 23.Local “The 23. “The ma, Wash., president ILWU She said grain prices have beenhave down She said grain prices been down union is not on strike. Westrike. were We locked out.� union is not on were locked out.� for quite afor while. go down a bigwith a big quiteThey a while. They with go down Mason’s local is still at work, theunder the Mason’s local is stillunder at work, harvest, but will rise there harvest, butifwill riseisifconcern there isabout concern about Temco contract, other but locals arelocals picketing Temco but contract, other are picketing protein and quality. protein and quality. their former workplaces. their former workplaces. “Our markets heavily by “Ourare markets areinfluenced heavily influenced by “We hate “We to seehate disruption negativelynegatively world demand to see disruption supply,� said. worldand demand andFalcon supply,� Falcon said. impact theimpact farmer,� Austin, ILWU the said farmer,� saidwhose Austin, whose ILWU “From a grower we haven’t “From aperspective, grower perspective, we haven’t local has local no contract Louis Dreyfus, has nowith contract with Louis aDreyfus,seen a any slowdown in the transportation of seen any slowdown in the transportation of Dutch- and French-owned firm. “ForeignDutchand French-owned firm. “Foreigngrain in Montana,� said Lola said Raska, executive grain in Montana,� Lola Raska, executive owned companies are now dictating Ameri-to Ameriowned companies are now to dictating vice president of the Montana Graingrowers vice president of the Montana Graingrowers can workers wages andwages hours.� cantheir workers their and hours.� Association. “We haven’t any effect on effect on Association. “Weseen haven’t seen any “We’re here now here because is a critical “We’re nowthis because this is a critical prices.� prices.� juncture,�juncture,� Mason said. “Thesaid. product hitting is hitting Mason “Theisproduct If the unions came to Montana to picket or If the unions came to Montana to picket or the market.� the market.� stop trains, thattrains, wouldthat be would a problem farm-and farmstop be a and problem Todd Walker, third member the of theers wouldn’t Toddthe Walker, the thirdof member like that, she couldn’t ers wouldn’t like said. that, She she said. She couldn’t group, is on Local 4’s Local labor relations group, is on 4’s labor comrelations comrecall union activity that happening in recall unionlike activity like that happening in mittee. They haveThey beenhave locked outlocked at Mitsuimittee. been out at MitsuiMontana.Montana. owned United Grain in Vancouver since owned United Grain in Vancouver since “Our farmers directly grainwith grain “Ourdeal farmers dealwith directly February,February, because ofbecause what heofsaid a phony whatis he said is a phony companies. That’s who they who sell their to. grain to. companies. That’s they grain sell their charge ofcharge sabotage the union. Heunion. said He saidI’m not sure of by sabotage by the will find sympathy with I’munions not sure unions will find sympathy with the grain the companies may offermay low offer priceslow prices grain companies CONTINUEDCONTINUED ON PAGE 12ON PAGE 12

ir self-esteem • Reduced•activity pleasure usual in ingness with the community oals, so their self-esteem Reducedand activity andinpleasure usual to initiate ingnesscontact to initiate contact with the community After theanything combine passes over the too grain field, aresource tractor pulls a baler over the windrows of straw, putting upputting round bales for winter feed. After the combine passes over the (“How grain field, a tractor pulls a baler over the help windrows of straw, up round bales for winter feed. because the activities: isanything just too resource do you feel about seeking help important because the “Doing activities: “Doing ismuch just much (“How do you feel about seeking ore you likely of anyou effort.â€? from this person/agency?â€?) nce,likely the more of an effort.â€? from this person/agency?â€?) ffectively. don’t want anyone to anyone 6. Where the person the or family esources effectively.• People problems: • People “I problems: “I don’t want to 6. Where personisorunwilling family is unwilling AGERS feelme,â€? so lonely.â€? to take thetoinitiative where ther is some TRESS MANAGERS see me,â€? “Isee “I feel so lonely.â€? take the or initiative or where ther is some stress manag• Physical •problems: Sleeping problems, danger if action taken, shouldyou takeshould take uccessful stress managPhysical problems: Sleeping problems, dangeris ifnot action is you not taken, decreased sexual interest, headaches. decreased sexual interest, headaches. the initiative: the initiative: our strengths, • Guilt and• low all my“It’s allCall andagency ask toand speak Know your strengths, Guiltself andesteem: low self“It’s esteem: my the agency Call the asktotothe speak to the what is imporintake worker (if worker there is (if one). es. Know what isfault,â€? impor-“I should fault,â€?be “I punished.â€? should be punished.â€? intake there is one). are going. Set going.Signs of suicidal intent include: Identify yourself your with where you are Set BY Signs FAY of suicidal intent include: longshoremen Identify and yourwith relationship with are inand ayourself bitter ex- with 1934, unions have donehave mostdone of most of One grainOne handler, AmericanSAMAR longshoremen are relationship indispute a bitter dispute ex- longshore 1934, longshore unions grainTemco, handler,anTemco, an AmericanBY SAMAR FAY off more Anxiety or depression: the person orowners family. Never bitethan off more •than • Anxiety or depression: Severe, intense the person or family. owned Cargillby and CHS and withCHS with port terminal that thy say slow the receiving and loading the docks, butdocks, the but HI-LINE FARM & RANCH ownedbyventure Cargill port terminal owners thatcould thy say could slow the receiving andatloading at the the venture HI-LINE FARM &Severe, RANCH intense emands feelings anxiety of or anxiety depression. State whatState you think fam- or famwn on themade demands made offeelings or depression. what the youperson’s think theorperson’s nion disputes with management export shipments and depress the global grain market chang- is changfacilities in Tacomainand Kalama, andWash., and nion disputes with management export shipments andprices. depress prices. structure of structure of the global grainis market facilities Tacoma andWash., Kalama, • Withdrawal or isolation: Withdrawn, ily’s needsily’s are (needs immediate protection protection in control. • Withdrawal or isolation: Withdrawn, needs are (needs immediate over contracts areand usually Eighty percent ofneeds Montana wheat is for sent ing. To guarantee their future food security, Portland, Ore,, reached agreement with the with the contracts areand notasupports. usually afrom Eighty percent ofneeds Montana wheat is for sent ing. To guarantee their future food security, Portland, Ore,,anreached an agreement pend timeSpend on time alone, ofover friends supports. suicidal acts, an appointment ke walks. onlack alone, lack ofnot friends from suicidal acts, an appointment big afactor Montana farmer’s of theout country, most ofor itďŹ nancial leaving countries countries are encouraging their companies union, which thewhich union the would likewould the others to others to in Sense ahopeless: Montana farmer’s of theďŹ nancial country, most ofor itPacific leaving Pacific are encouraging their companies union, union like the naps. Praynaps. or Pray • Helpless and hopeless: of complete counseling, needs legal advice). ers. Take orfactorbig •inHelpless and Sense ofout complete counseling, needs legal advice). Experienced cattle workers, farm Experienced cattlesheepherders, workers, sheepherders, farm Northwest ports forthink Asian markets Japan, to take steps to control food pipeline, template. The three The otherthree companies profit at harvest but that could change ports for Asian to take steps tothe control the food pipeline,adopt as aadopt as a template. other companies profit harvest time, but that could change e deeply anddeeply powerlessness, a hopeless State Northwest what you the person’s ormarkets fam- in un. Breathe andattime, powerlessness, afeeling. hopeless feeling. State what you think thein person’s or Japan, famequipmentequipment operators operators and general hands seekandranch general ranch hands seek• Alcohol abuse: There isofoften a is link be- Taiwan, ily’s beneeds are (needs immediate protection in the Pacific Northwest Grain Handlers this year. this Just as theJust golden river grain the Philippines and South Korea. beginningbeginning in producing countries.countries. Japanese Japanese • Alcohol abuse: There isofoften a is link ily’s needs are (needs immediate protection in the Pacific Northwest Grain AsHandlers Asyear. as the golden river grain Taiwan, the Philippines and South Korea. in producing ing up to 9ing months Housing Housing up to seasonal 9 months employment. seasonal employment. ral sources of sources tween alcoholism and suicide. fromissuicidal acts, needs animporter appointment for of U.S. aw on trickling several of tween alcoholism andflooding suicide. from acts, needs anof appointment for from fields to combines and Japan the single largest U.S. companies have established themselves in sociation say that idea a nonstarter. trickling from fields to combines and flooding Japan issuicidal the single largest importer companies have established themselves in sociation sayisthat idea is a nonstarter. must be provided, Contact Contact must be camper provided,acceptable. camper acceptable. mily, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, needs ďŹ nancial or legal advice). suchhobbies, as family, hobbies, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, needs ďŹ nancial or legal advice). into elevators and long westbound trains, trains,wheat, accounting for 10 percent it. Since Montana,Montana, building big shuttlebig train elevators, Three members of the ILWU took to the into elevators and long westbound wheat, accounting for 10ofpercent of it. Since building shuttle train elevators, Three members of the ILWU took to the or 406-579-7529. or 406-579-7529. previous attempts low to high lethality. Provide theProvide agencythe with background inpreviousofattempts of low to high lethality. agency with background inL A LB AO BR Odiane@peakseasonlabor.com R diane@peakseasonlabor.com and in theand Pacific Northwest, where they own theyroad to month talk upto their of theside of the in the Pacific Northwest, where ownthis month road this talkside up their Make things • Suicidal• plan: Frequent or constant formation (name, address andaddress phone;and agephone; and age and productive. Make things Suicidal plan: Frequent or constant formation (name, major grain export terminals. story in farm visited with farm-with farmmajor grain export terminals. storycountry. in farmThey country. They visited ement during thoughts a speciďŹ c in mind. of current orproblem crisis; any ess management during with thoughts withplan a speciďŹ c plan in mind.gender; nature gender; natureproblem of current or crisis; any After a long stalemate on a new contract ers, media and fellow unionists in places likeplaces like After a long stalemate on a new contract ers, media and fellow unionists in exercise, Making a will, giving posses historypast you’re aware of; further Eat right,and exercise,Cries and for help: Cries for help: Making a will, givingpast posses history you’re aware informaof; further informato replace the one that expired at the end of Lewiston, Idaho, Missoula, Miles City, MiLewiston, Idaho, Missoula, Miles City, Mito replace the one that expired at the end of • sions away, making statements such as “I’m as called • sions away, making statements such tion as “I’m tionfor). as called for). September last year, last longshore workers inworkersnot, and Glasgow, then headed not, Plentywood and Glasgow, then headed September year, longshore in Plentywood velop friendmy“Maybe family my would Ask the agency what follow-up theyaction they upport. Develop calling friend-it quits,â€? callingorit“Maybe quits,â€? or family would Ask the agency what action follow-up the International Longshore and Warehouse for the Golden Greatand Falls. They ng periods of periods be better me.â€? will take: will take: the International Longshore and Warehouse for theTriangle Golden and Triangle Great Falls. They omfort during of off bewithout better off without me.â€? Linda & Mark Nielsen, Linda & Mark Nielsen, HOW TO REFER A PERSON FOR HELP FOR HELP • When will• When they act onthey the referral? HOW TO REFER A PERSON will act on the referral? Union have SERVING ASREA ERVING AREA âœŻ beenhave locked outlocked of grain said that before visiting Glasgow Courier Courier Union been outtermiof grain termisaid that beforeThe visiting The Glasgow Owners Owners âœŻ .the Talk to each Be aware1.of agencies resources • Who will•be the will person for you to contact family. Talk to 1. each Bethe aware of theand agencies and resources Who be the person for you to contact Iva Murch, Manager nals in Vancouver and Portland, and replaced they met with somewith railroad unionists Iva Murch, Manager nals in Vancouver and Portland, and replaced they met sometrade railroad trade unionists RODUCERSPRODUCERS LIVESTOCKLPIVESTOCK available inavailable your community - what services later if necessary? n.appreciation Express appreciation in your community - what services later if necessary? 263-7529 263-7529 by contract managersmanagers and inand the Oasis overOasis a cupover of coffee, just to show byworkers, contract company workers, company in the a cup of coffee, just to show they offer and limitations are. be thewill costbe of the the cost service (atservice (at theywhat offertheir and what their limitations are.• What will• What of the OR 67 Y EARS F FOR !67 YEARS! Dean Barnes, YardBarnes, Manager Dean Yard Manager security guards hired by the companies. security guards hired by the companies. CONTINUEDCONTINUED ON PAGE 11ON PAGE 11 an overriding 2. Listen 2. forListen signs and symptoms that fee/sliding scale)? scale)? Encourage an overriding for signs and symptoms that fee/sliding 263-1175 263-1175 theout best, thebest, personthe or person family needs helpneeds whichhelp youwhich •you Do you need do need anything to coml for work for the or family • Dotoyou to doelse anything else to com1946 - 20131946 - 2013 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer Ed Hinton, Auctioneer w thatKnow eventsthatcan’t provide, ďŹ nancial, or personal plete the referral? pens. events can’ti.e., provide, i.e.,legal ďŹ nancial, legal or personal plete the referral? 783-7285 783-7285 ple’s counseling.counseling. 7. Make sure person refer- and refer--it isreactions people’s reactions 7. the Make sure or thefamily personand or family ms. 3. Assess what agency or agency community re- ral agency andconnect get together. one Make one he problems. 3. Assess what or community re- connect ral agency and getMake together. September – 2013 September – 2013 DAL INTENT source would be most appropriate to address to or more follow-up with the agency if agency if ON OR SUICIDAL INTENT source would be most appropriate address or more contacts follow-up contacts with the Peerless Peerless gns orof sympperson’s family’s) the situation. umber signs orthe sympthe(orperson’s (orproblems. family’s) problems. called for by called for by the situation. Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday experiencing, 4. Discuss 4.theDiscuss referralthe with the person or person family is experiencing, referral with the or Roubie Younkin, an MSU an Extension Roubie Younkin, MSU Extension 893-4398 893-4398 The Big Fall Classic Classic TheYearling Big Fall Yearling The One and Only Sheep The One and Only Sheep be. addition, family (“Itfamily sounds/looks like you are feeling ernIn should be. In addition, (“It sounds/looks like you areagent feelingin Valley this re- this reagent County, in Valleycompiled County, compiled featuring over 2000 outstanding NE featuring over 2000 outstanding NE Auction Auction of 2012 of 2012 t Grain Feed Seed tportBuying and t_____ Grain Feed Buying and She ng the follow-the _____. I think could help could youSeed deal with re exhibiting follow_____. I think _____ help you deal with fromt Extension sources. can be port from Extension sources. She can be Richland Richland Montana yearling steers & spayed Montana yearling steers & spayed & All Class Auction & Cattle All Class Cattle Auction dal intent, it is intent, youritsituation.â€?) on or suicidal ist your situation.â€?) reached atreached (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ Fertilizer Merchandising Grain t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain 724-3353 724-3353 and tested open heifers and tested open heifers m with profes5. Explore the individual’s or family’sor willonnect them with profes5. Explore the individual’s family’s will- valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS EARLY CONSIGNMENTS cries for asAll possible. All criest forAg Chemicals t Ag Chemicals t Agronomist t Agronomist Opheim Opheim All Class Cattle Auction All Class Cattle Auction seriously. ** 570 Steers ** 570 Steers t Petroleum Services t Petroleum Services e:ion include: 762-3231762-3231 875 - 925# green flesh, 76% 875 - 925# green flesh, 76% 440 Highway 2 West 2• Glasgow • Across• from thefrom Fairgrounds 440 Highway West • Glasgow Across the Fairgrounds wd movements, face, slow movements, 24% Red/RWF/Char. Cross Black/BWF, 24% Red/RWF/Char. Cross PleasePlease call in consignments call in consignments Black/BWF,

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so buyers can becan notiďŹ ed. so buyers be notiďŹ ed. 406-228-9306 406-228-9306 P.O. Box 129 P.O. Box 129 Glasgow, MT 59230 MT 59230 Glasgow, gsi@nemont.net gsi@nemont.net www.glasgowstockyards.com www.glasgowstockyards.com

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BNSF Talks Bakken, Oil With Farmers

at Courier Printing in Glasgow We offer a full line of Ag Printing Services! t Bull Sale Catalogs t Auction Posters t Letterhead & Envelopes t Livestock Record Sheets t Business Cards t Spreadsheets You Can Actually Write On t Even Labels For Your Pickle Jars! Really!

LOWEST PRICES IN VALLEY COUNTY Call Stan The Man at 406-228-9301

FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Montana Farm Bureau Vice President Bruce Wright recently attended the annual BNSF barbeque and listening session in Fort Benton. BNSF established the event five years ago to talk directly with farmer customers about the general economy, agricultural markets and rail transportation. Kevin Kaufman, BNSF vice president for Agricultural Commodities, led the discussion with a presentation outlining rail industry trends. “It was interesting to hear Kevin Kaufman talk to the group about the railroad’s challenges and opportunities in 2013,� noted Wright. “He explained that while overall carloads remain level and well below the 2006 peak, BNSF is experiencing new traffic patterns with the growing need for shipping crude oil and soft agricultural and coal traffic due to drought conditions and low natural gas prices.� “Growth in crude shipments from the booming Bakken devel-

opment is driving much of the investment on the BNSF’s northern corridor (including major work east of Glasgow). This is good for ag shippers who share rail lines to the Pacific Northwest,� noted Don Karls, BNSF ag ombudsman for Montana. “But like highway construction, it impacts traffic. We expect short-term challenges that come with track improvements so we ask our customers to prepare.� Wright, a Bozeman farmer who ships most of his grain by rail from an elevator in Belgrade, said Kaufmann explained that although the BNSF stays busy with the crude oil development and shipping coal, they recognize the major changes ongoing in the agriculture industry. “They feel they have the capacity to handle current grain production. There are now 21 grain shuttle stations in Montana, up from 13 just a few years ago, which is good news for our grain producers,� Wright said. Wright feels farmer concerns

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Angus Tour Sept. 17-19

Stop by and visit $ ��� ������������ ��� ������������ 40 off per ton with us about in September and October ������������������� ��������������������� – Herbicides �������������������� �������������������� Beat the rising cost of – Fungacides ���� ������������ ���� ������������ your winter feed needs. – Pesticides Order now and take ��������������� ��������������� We carry all of your is now on in early delivery. Agronomy Needs. ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� Get your Fall Soil Smart-lic Supplement Tubs while supplies last. Sampling done early ���� ����� to keep your herd in top condition! ���������� to avoid the rush!

SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5

The Glasgow Courier

about increased coal shipments displacing grain may be misplaced since it’s simply not in the best interest of the railroad to sacrifice one part of its business for another. They’re both important." In addition to investments at grain origins, Northwest exporters continue to make major investments at destination facilities, adding to the global advantage of U.S. grain transportation capability. “Apparently low natural gas prices, coupled with new natural gas development, are creating opportunities for commercial fertilizer production. For farmers, an increase in the supply of one of their primary inputs could be very positive,� Wright said. “It’s good to hear that the railroad is planning to make significant investments for growth in the northern corridor. They acknowledge the growth will come with challenges, but the investments made will continue to build on the supply chain advantage for U.S. grain producers.�

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Storage Solutions Available

Call or e-mail us TODAY for more information!

Jay Anderson – (406) 674-7000 HogelandProAg@mtintouch.net


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Harvest looking good for yield, quality Illinois launches sustainable farming effort Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com With harvest wrapping up in the end of August, farmers who were able to avoid the bad weather seem to have taken advantage of the good. Chris Herring, manager of ADM-CHS in Havre, said the grain coming into the elevator here was good for quality and yield. “This is one of the better years I have seen for a while,” he said, adding that it looks like the grain crop did better overall than 2012, and that was a good year, also. Hill County Extension Agent Nicole Gray said the producers to whom she has spoken also seem to have done fairly well. “It sounds like people had a really good year,” she said. That was if their crops were missed by the hailstorms that came through, she added. Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Farmers harvest wheat south of Havre near Laredo off of U.S. Highway 87. Local producers were wrapping up most of the grain harvesting in northcentral Montana by the end of August, with many seeing fairly good yields in a year that looked to be dry before rain started falling in May.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois agriculture officials announced Aug. 27 a three-year pilot project aimed at encouraging farmers to plant environmentally friendly cover crops as part of an effort to boost sustainable farming around the state. The project is slated to begin later t h i s ye a r w h e n 1 4 c o r n a n d s oy b e a n fields around the state will be seeded w i t h c ove r c r o p s. Ac c o r d i n g t o t h e Illinois Department of Agriculture, the

fields were selected because they are visible along interstates or state highways. The idea is that cover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient runoff from farm fields, which in turn improves water and soil quality. State officials said there also is evidence that cover crops may improve production. They cite a federal study that surveyed Midwest farmers last year, showing 10 percent higher yields for corn and 12 percent

for fields where cover crops had been planted. "The time is right for this initiative," Steve Chard, the head of land and water re s o u rc e s a t t h e a g r i c u l t u re d e p a r t ment, said in a statement. "New plant varieties and new production techniques h ave b e e n d i s c ove re d t h a t e l i m i n a t e

many of the problems that farmers who planted cover crops in the 1980s and 90s experienced." The cover crops state officials will plant include types of grasses and legumes. Each plot will be accompanied by a sign directing people to a state website with more details.


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Aquifer: Pumping more water than is naturally recharging ■ Continued from page A1 Irrigators are pumping more water than is naturally recharging. The aquifer's natural recharge accounts for just 15 percent of the amount of water now being pumped out of it. Once the water in the aquifer is gone, the study projects it will take between 500 and 1,300 years to refill. But it also outlined several scenarios whereby irrigators could cut back on pumping and possibly extend its usable life to 2110. David R. Steward, a Kansas State University professor of civil engineering and co-author of the study, said researchers put forth those scenarios not to advocate any particular policy but to give people an understanding of what the implications could be for the present and the future of corn and cattle production in the region. "The motivation for the study —what we really wrote the paper for — was the family farmer who wants to be able to pass his or her land on to their grandchildren and have their grandchildren have the same capacity, the same abilities for successful agriculture that they do," Steward said. West-central Kansas has had the biggest depletions to date, but larger water s to re s i n s o u t h we s t a n d n o r t h we s t Kansas are forecast to have pumping c a p a c i t y l i m i ta t i o n s w i t h i n 2 0 ye a rs, g i v e n c u r r e n t t r e n d s, r e s e a r c h e r s wrote. Jim Butler, chief of the geohydrology section of the Kansas Geological Survey, said he had not seen the four-year study, which was funded by the National Science Fo u n d a t i o n , t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture and Kansas State University's Rural Transportation Institute. But Butler said the findings were consistent in a general sense with past work his agency has done. "Those clearly show business as usual is going to have a very significant impact on the aquifer," Butler said. Both Steward and Butler lauded a promising pilot program enacted earlier this year in northwest Kansas' Sheridan County aimed at prolonging the life of the aquifer. T h e N o r t h we s t Ka n s a s G ro u n d wa t e r Management District No. 4 instituted a mandatory water management program that limited pumping for the next five years. Irrigators who pump more face a

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Sept. 2013

The hail damage in Hill County has been spotty, with storms that wipe out much of the planted crops for some farmers missing their neighbors just a few miles away. Local producers have said when the hail hits, it is heartbreaking, destroying what could have been best-ever plantings of wheat. Other areas have been hit worse with hail, including in Blaine County, and with widespread damage caused by some storms in some regions. A major thunderstorm blasted from Cascade into Chouteau and Teton counties in July, wiping out huge amounts of cropland in a single storm. An Aug. 1 storm starting in southwestern Montana moved to the east as far as Billings, wiping out huge amounts of crops in Gallatin County. Crop damage estimates there were close to $50 million, leading to a disaster declaration for the storm damage. Other storms also have caused widespread damage in parts of the state. In Hill County, the hail damage was not as widespread, but where it hit, it hit hard. The combination of rain and hail has helped yields with crops not hailed out, but also created problems in harvesting, with some producers saying that instead of water trucks to put out fires, they had tractors in fields to pull out combines when they got stuck in mud.

■ Continued on page 6 AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, file A sprinkler sprays water Aug. 28, 2003, onto a hay field near Hoxie, Kan. Continued irrigation in western Kansas has led to declining water levels in the Ogallala Aquifer. suspension of their water use for two years and fines. Ray Luhman, the district's assistant manager in Colby, said the agency is now looking to begin the process this autumn in Sherman County, another high-priority area. "Everybody can say, 'Hey, we are running out of water, the aquifer is going dry,'" Butler said. "But it is another thing to actually try to do something about it." ——— Online: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America journal: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/ pnas.1220351110

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Grain blows in the breeze at the end of July. A much-wetter-than-normal year led to bountiful harvests for some north-central Montana producers, although other problems such as hail decimated crops in some fields.


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Harvest: Wet conditions slow producers ■ Continued from page A1 The wet conditions slowed down harvesting for many producers, but most had wrapped up or were expecting to wrap up t h e h a r ve s t by t h e l a s t we e ke n d i n August. How the yield would come out was anyone’s guess just a few months ago, but the northern tier of north-central Montana, from about Liberty County and east through the northern part of the state was doing better than most areas even in April. While much of the state was slipping into water deficits by then, this region, and farther east, had received much more moisture. Even in north-central Montana, however, by that time dry conditions in February and March were starting to reduce the moisture in streams and in the soil Then storms hit causing severe flooding, but also brought in incredible amounts of moisture. Starting in mid-May and through the first week of June, the recording station at the Havre City-County Airport had received more than a half a foot of rain, with other areas such as in the Bear Paw Mountains receiving much more than that. By the end of August, the Havre recording station had received more than 15 inches of precipitation for the year, some 4 inches

more than the amount normally received by the end of December. While that led to other problems, including fighting fungus and diseases not often seen in this part of the state, as well as slowing down harvesting and creating problems and extra expenses earlier in the season, the moisture seems to have helped produce a good crop. Herring said he estimates that the yields have been in the vicinity of 50- to 60-bushelsan-acre. Other parts of the state had not done as well for precipitation, including in Silver Bow County, which was declared a drought disaster in July. Fires also continued to rage due to the dry conditions in western, southwestern and south-central Montana, with firefighters hoping for cooler weather and precipitation to help with those disasters. And the weather differences extended throughout this region of the United States. By the end of August, dry weather was helping harvests in Minnesota and North Dakota and South Dakota, but hurting the quality.

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FARM & RANCH

Sept. 2013

Study: High Plains Aquifer mostly gone in 50 years

Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Farmers harvest wheat south of Havre near Laredo off of U.S. Highway 87.

AP Photo/Orlin Wagner, file The Arkansas River cuts through the irrigated fields Sept. 22, 1999, in western Kansas south of Garden City, Kan. Irrigation, above all other uses, places the biggest demand on the Ogallala aquifer in western Kansas. The river is about the only surface water in that part of the state. ROXANA HEGEMAN Associated Press WICHITA, Kan. — If Kansas farmers keep irrigating crops at present levels, an estimated 69 percent of the water in the High Plains Aquifer will be depleted within 50 years, according to a study released Monday. Although the High Plains Aquifer supplies 30 percent of the nation's irrigated groundwater and extends beneath parts of eight states in the Great Plains, this latest study focused on the Ogallala aquifer that lies underneath Kansas. The report by researchers at Kansas State University was published in the scientific journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of

Sciences of the United States of America," or PNAS. The report noted that only 3 percent of its water had been tapped in 1960 — before farmers began putting in huge irrigation systems in western Kansas. An estimated 30 percent of the aquifer had been depleted by 2010, the study said, forecasting an additional 39 percent of the aquifer's water will be gone by 2060. "Society has an opportunity now to make changes with tremendous implications for future sustainability and livability," the study concluded. "The time to act will soon be past."

■ Continued on page 8

www.havredailynews.com


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FARM & RANCH

Harvest: Wet conditions slow producers ■ Continued from page A1 The wet conditions slowed down harvesting for many producers, but most had wrapped up or were expecting to wrap up t h e h a r ve s t by t h e l a s t we e ke n d i n August. How the yield would come out was anyone’s guess just a few months ago, but the northern tier of north-central Montana, from about Liberty County and east through the northern part of the state was doing better than most areas even in April. While much of the state was slipping into water deficits by then, this region, and farther east, had received much more moisture. Even in north-central Montana, however, by that time dry conditions in February and March were starting to reduce the moisture in streams and in the soil Then storms hit causing severe flooding, but also brought in incredible amounts of moisture. Starting in mid-May and through the first week of June, the recording station at the Havre City-County Airport had received more than a half a foot of rain, with other areas such as in the Bear Paw Mountains receiving much more than that. By the end of August, the Havre recording station had received more than 15 inches of precipitation for the year, some 4 inches

more than the amount normally received by the end of December. While that led to other problems, including fighting fungus and diseases not often seen in this part of the state, as well as slowing down harvesting and creating problems and extra expenses earlier in the season, the moisture seems to have helped produce a good crop. Herring said he estimates that the yields have been in the vicinity of 50- to 60-bushelsan-acre. Other parts of the state had not done as well for precipitation, including in Silver Bow County, which was declared a drought disaster in July. Fires also continued to rage due to the dry conditions in western, southwestern and south-central Montana, with firefighters hoping for cooler weather and precipitation to help with those disasters. And the weather differences extended throughout this region of the United States. By the end of August, dry weather was helping harvests in Minnesota and North Dakota and South Dakota, but hurting the quality.

www.havredailynews.com

7

Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH

Sept. 2013

Study: High Plains Aquifer mostly gone in 50 years

Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Farmers harvest wheat south of Havre near Laredo off of U.S. Highway 87.

AP Photo/Orlin Wagner, file The Arkansas River cuts through the irrigated fields Sept. 22, 1999, in western Kansas south of Garden City, Kan. Irrigation, above all other uses, places the biggest demand on the Ogallala aquifer in western Kansas. The river is about the only surface water in that part of the state. ROXANA HEGEMAN Associated Press WICHITA, Kan. — If Kansas farmers keep irrigating crops at present levels, an estimated 69 percent of the water in the High Plains Aquifer will be depleted within 50 years, according to a study released Monday. Although the High Plains Aquifer supplies 30 percent of the nation's irrigated groundwater and extends beneath parts of eight states in the Great Plains, this latest study focused on the Ogallala aquifer that lies underneath Kansas. The report by researchers at Kansas State University was published in the scientific journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of

Sciences of the United States of America," or PNAS. The report noted that only 3 percent of its water had been tapped in 1960 — before farmers began putting in huge irrigation systems in western Kansas. An estimated 30 percent of the aquifer had been depleted by 2010, the study said, forecasting an additional 39 percent of the aquifer's water will be gone by 2060. "Society has an opportunity now to make changes with tremendous implications for future sustainability and livability," the study concluded. "The time to act will soon be past."

■ Continued on page 8

www.havredailynews.com


8

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Sept. 2013

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Aquifer: Pumping more water than is naturally recharging ■ Continued from page A1 Irrigators are pumping more water than is naturally recharging. The aquifer's natural recharge accounts for just 15 percent of the amount of water now being pumped out of it. Once the water in the aquifer is gone, the study projects it will take between 500 and 1,300 years to refill. But it also outlined several scenarios whereby irrigators could cut back on pumping and possibly extend its usable life to 2110. David R. Steward, a Kansas State University professor of civil engineering and co-author of the study, said researchers put forth those scenarios not to advocate any particular policy but to give people an understanding of what the implications could be for the present and the future of corn and cattle production in the region. "The motivation for the study —what we really wrote the paper for — was the family farmer who wants to be able to pass his or her land on to their grandchildren and have their grandchildren have the same capacity, the same abilities for successful agriculture that they do," Steward said. West-central Kansas has had the biggest depletions to date, but larger water s to re s i n s o u t h we s t a n d n o r t h we s t Kansas are forecast to have pumping c a p a c i t y l i m i ta t i o n s w i t h i n 2 0 ye a rs, g i v e n c u r r e n t t r e n d s, r e s e a r c h e r s wrote. Jim Butler, chief of the geohydrology section of the Kansas Geological Survey, said he had not seen the four-year study, which was funded by the National Science Fo u n d a t i o n , t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture and Kansas State University's Rural Transportation Institute. But Butler said the findings were consistent in a general sense with past work his agency has done. "Those clearly show business as usual is going to have a very significant impact on the aquifer," Butler said. Both Steward and Butler lauded a promising pilot program enacted earlier this year in northwest Kansas' Sheridan County aimed at prolonging the life of the aquifer. T h e N o r t h we s t Ka n s a s G ro u n d wa t e r Management District No. 4 instituted a mandatory water management program that limited pumping for the next five years. Irrigators who pump more face a

5

Hi-Line

Sept. 2013

The hail damage in Hill County has been spotty, with storms that wipe out much of the planted crops for some farmers missing their neighbors just a few miles away. Local producers have said when the hail hits, it is heartbreaking, destroying what could have been best-ever plantings of wheat. Other areas have been hit worse with hail, including in Blaine County, and with widespread damage caused by some storms in some regions. A major thunderstorm blasted from Cascade into Chouteau and Teton counties in July, wiping out huge amounts of cropland in a single storm. An Aug. 1 storm starting in southwestern Montana moved to the east as far as Billings, wiping out huge amounts of crops in Gallatin County. Crop damage estimates there were close to $50 million, leading to a disaster declaration for the storm damage. Other storms also have caused widespread damage in parts of the state. In Hill County, the hail damage was not as widespread, but where it hit, it hit hard. The combination of rain and hail has helped yields with crops not hailed out, but also created problems in harvesting, with some producers saying that instead of water trucks to put out fires, they had tractors in fields to pull out combines when they got stuck in mud.

■ Continued on page 6 AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, file A sprinkler sprays water Aug. 28, 2003, onto a hay field near Hoxie, Kan. Continued irrigation in western Kansas has led to declining water levels in the Ogallala Aquifer. suspension of their water use for two years and fines. Ray Luhman, the district's assistant manager in Colby, said the agency is now looking to begin the process this autumn in Sherman County, another high-priority area. "Everybody can say, 'Hey, we are running out of water, the aquifer is going dry,'" Butler said. "But it is another thing to actually try to do something about it." ——— Online: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America journal: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/ pnas.1220351110

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Grain blows in the breeze at the end of July. A much-wetter-than-normal year led to bountiful harvests for some north-central Montana producers, although other problems such as hail decimated crops in some fields.


4

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FARM & RANCH

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Harvest looking good for yield, quality Illinois launches sustainable farming effort Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com With harvest wrapping up in the end of August, farmers who were able to avoid the bad weather seem to have taken advantage of the good. Chris Herring, manager of ADM-CHS in Havre, said the grain coming into the elevator here was good for quality and yield. “This is one of the better years I have seen for a while,” he said, adding that it looks like the grain crop did better overall than 2012, and that was a good year, also. Hill County Extension Agent Nicole Gray said the producers to whom she has spoken also seem to have done fairly well. “It sounds like people had a really good year,” she said. That was if their crops were missed by the hailstorms that came through, she added. Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Farmers harvest wheat south of Havre near Laredo off of U.S. Highway 87. Local producers were wrapping up most of the grain harvesting in northcentral Montana by the end of August, with many seeing fairly good yields in a year that looked to be dry before rain started falling in May.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois agriculture officials announced Aug. 27 a three-year pilot project aimed at encouraging farmers to plant environmentally friendly cover crops as part of an effort to boost sustainable farming around the state. The project is slated to begin later t h i s ye a r w h e n 1 4 c o r n a n d s oy b e a n fields around the state will be seeded w i t h c ove r c r o p s. Ac c o r d i n g t o t h e Illinois Department of Agriculture, the

fields were selected because they are visible along interstates or state highways. The idea is that cover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient runoff from farm fields, which in turn improves water and soil quality. State officials said there also is evidence that cover crops may improve production. They cite a federal study that surveyed Midwest farmers last year, showing 10 percent higher yields for corn and 12 percent

for fields where cover crops had been planted. "The time is right for this initiative," Steve Chard, the head of land and water re s o u rc e s a t t h e a g r i c u l t u re d e p a r t ment, said in a statement. "New plant varieties and new production techniques h ave b e e n d i s c ove re d t h a t e l i m i n a t e

many of the problems that farmers who planted cover crops in the 1980s and 90s experienced." The cover crops state officials will plant include types of grasses and legumes. Each plot will be accompanied by a sign directing people to a state website with more details.


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

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Sept. 2013 September 2013

www.havredailynews.com www.havredailynews.

BNSF Talks Bakken, Oil With Farmers

at Courier Printing in Glasgow We offer a full line of Ag Printing Services! t Bull Sale Catalogs t Auction Posters t Letterhead & Envelopes t Livestock Record Sheets t Business Cards t Spreadsheets You Can Actually Write On t Even Labels For Your Pickle Jars! Really!

LOWEST PRICES IN VALLEY COUNTY Call Stan The Man at 406-228-9301

FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Montana Farm Bureau Vice President Bruce Wright recently attended the annual BNSF barbeque and listening session in Fort Benton. BNSF established the event five years ago to talk directly with farmer customers about the general economy, agricultural markets and rail transportation. Kevin Kaufman, BNSF vice president for Agricultural Commodities, led the discussion with a presentation outlining rail industry trends. “It was interesting to hear Kevin Kaufman talk to the group about the railroad’s challenges and opportunities in 2013,� noted Wright. “He explained that while overall carloads remain level and well below the 2006 peak, BNSF is experiencing new traffic patterns with the growing need for shipping crude oil and soft agricultural and coal traffic due to drought conditions and low natural gas prices.� “Growth in crude shipments from the booming Bakken devel-

opment is driving much of the investment on the BNSF’s northern corridor (including major work east of Glasgow). This is good for ag shippers who share rail lines to the Pacific Northwest,� noted Don Karls, BNSF ag ombudsman for Montana. “But like highway construction, it impacts traffic. We expect short-term challenges that come with track improvements so we ask our customers to prepare.� Wright, a Bozeman farmer who ships most of his grain by rail from an elevator in Belgrade, said Kaufmann explained that although the BNSF stays busy with the crude oil development and shipping coal, they recognize the major changes ongoing in the agriculture industry. “They feel they have the capacity to handle current grain production. There are now 21 grain shuttle stations in Montana, up from 13 just a few years ago, which is good news for our grain producers,� Wright said. Wright feels farmer concerns

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The North Montana Angus Association will host the 2013 Montana Angus Tour Sept. 17-19. The event will be headquartered in Great Falls and showcase Angus breeders and operators throughout North Central Montana. The tour will kick off Tues day, Sept. 17, with a golf tournament and a social to follow at Holiday Inn of Great Falls. On Wednesday, tour participants will travel to the Sweetgrass Hills, Valier area, and finish their day with dinner in Choteau. Thursday’s agenda includes tour stops along the Highwood Mountains, Augusta area and dinner in Wolf Creek. There is a fee to register for the tour. For more information, contact North Montana Association president Jeff Flesch at 406-337-3402.

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Stop by and visit $ ��� ������������ ��� ������������ 40 off per ton with us about in September and October ������������������� ��������������������� – Herbicides �������������������� �������������������� Beat the rising cost of – Fungacides ���� ������������ ���� ������������ your winter feed needs. – Pesticides Order now and take ��������������� ��������������� We carry all of your is now on in early delivery. Agronomy Needs. ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� Get your Fall Soil Smart-lic Supplement Tubs while supplies last. Sampling done early ���� ����� to keep your herd in top condition! ���������� to avoid the rush!

SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5

The Glasgow Courier

about increased coal shipments displacing grain may be misplaced since it’s simply not in the best interest of the railroad to sacrifice one part of its business for another. They’re both important." In addition to investments at grain origins, Northwest exporters continue to make major investments at destination facilities, adding to the global advantage of U.S. grain transportation capability. “Apparently low natural gas prices, coupled with new natural gas development, are creating opportunities for commercial fertilizer production. For farmers, an increase in the supply of one of their primary inputs could be very positive,� Wright said. “It’s good to hear that the railroad is planning to make significant investments for growth in the northern corridor. They acknowledge the growth will come with challenges, but the investments made will continue to build on the supply chain advantage for U.S. grain producers.�

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Dispute Could Affect Grain Prices Dispute Could Affect Grain Prices

BUTBUT ITS ITS TOLL IS NOT SINEVITABLE, IS INEVITABLE, TOLL IS NOT SAMAR FAY /SAMAR HI-LINEFAY FARM & RANCH / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

GRAINY OUTLOOK ININ CONTRACT DISPUTE GRAINY OUTLOOK CONTRACT DISPUTE Will Distant LaborLabor Disputes AffectAffect Montana GrainGrain Prices? Will Distant Disputes Montana Prices?

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“because “because of what’s of going on going on theon coast.� It coast.� It what’s on the CONTINUEDCONTINUED FROM PAGEFROM 2 PAGE 2 their respect. their respect. wasn’t created the union, heunion, said. he said. wasn’tbycreated by the “Montana“Montana has a whole hasdifferent a whole atmosphere different atmosphere Grain industry Montana aren’t aren’t Grainofficials industryinofficials in Montana than on the coast,� said Richsaid Austin ofAustin ILWU of ILWU than on the coast,� Rich seeing lower prices, however. seeing lower prices, however. Local 19 Local in Seattle, HeWash. is co-chair 19 inWash. Seattle, He isof co-chair of “We haven’t concerns from elevators “Weheard haven’t heard concerns from elevators the ILWUthe grain negotiating committee. ILWU grain negotiating committee. that they’re with exports,� said thatplugged they’reup plugged up with exports,� said “There is “There misinformation out there out thatthere that is misinformation Kim Falcon, director ofdirector the MonKimexecutive Falcon, executive of the Monportrays us as being adversely portrays uson as strike being and on strike and adversely tana Wheat and Barley Committee. “They are“They are tana Wheat and Barley Committee. affecting affecting farmers,�farmers,� said Scottsaid Mason ofMason Taco- of TacoScott full because harvest.� fullofbecause of harvest.� ma, Wash., president of ILWU of Local 23.Local “The 23. “The ma, Wash., president ILWU She said grain prices have beenhave down She said grain prices been down union is not on strike. Westrike. were We locked out.� union is not on were locked out.� for quite afor while. go down a bigwith a big quiteThey a while. They with go down Mason’s local is still at work, theunder the Mason’s local is stillunder at work, harvest, but will rise there harvest, butifwill riseisifconcern there isabout concern about Temco contract, other but locals arelocals picketing Temco but contract, other are picketing protein and quality. protein and quality. their former workplaces. their former workplaces. “Our markets heavily by “Ourare markets areinfluenced heavily influenced by “We hate “We to seehate disruption negativelynegatively world demand to see disruption supply,� said. worldand demand andFalcon supply,� Falcon said. impact theimpact farmer,� Austin, ILWU the said farmer,� saidwhose Austin, whose ILWU “From a grower we haven’t “From aperspective, grower perspective, we haven’t local has local no contract Louis Dreyfus, has nowith contract with Louis aDreyfus,seen a any slowdown in the transportation of seen any slowdown in the transportation of Dutch- and French-owned firm. “ForeignDutchand French-owned firm. “Foreigngrain in Montana,� said Lola said Raska, executive grain in Montana,� Lola Raska, executive owned companies are now dictating Ameri-to Ameriowned companies are now to dictating vice president of the Montana Graingrowers vice president of the Montana Graingrowers can workers wages andwages hours.� cantheir workers their and hours.� Association. “We haven’t any effect on effect on Association. “Weseen haven’t seen any “We’re here now here because is a critical “We’re nowthis because this is a critical prices.� prices.� juncture,�juncture,� Mason said. “Thesaid. product hitting is hitting Mason “Theisproduct If the unions came to Montana to picket or If the unions came to Montana to picket or the market.� the market.� stop trains, thattrains, wouldthat be would a problem farm-and farmstop be a and problem Todd Walker, third member the of theers wouldn’t Toddthe Walker, the thirdof member like that, she couldn’t ers wouldn’t like said. that, She she said. She couldn’t group, is on Local 4’s Local labor relations group, is on 4’s labor comrelations comrecall union activity that happening in recall unionlike activity like that happening in mittee. They haveThey beenhave locked outlocked at Mitsuimittee. been out at MitsuiMontana.Montana. owned United Grain in Vancouver since owned United Grain in Vancouver since “Our farmers directly grainwith grain “Ourdeal farmers dealwith directly February,February, because ofbecause what heofsaid a phony whatis he said is a phony companies. That’s who they who sell their to. grain to. companies. That’s they grain sell their charge ofcharge sabotage the union. Heunion. said He saidI’m not sure of by sabotage by the will find sympathy with I’munions not sure unions will find sympathy with the grain the companies may offermay low offer priceslow prices grain companies CONTINUEDCONTINUED ON PAGE 12ON PAGE 12

ir self-esteem • Reduced•activity pleasure usual in ingness with the community oals, so their self-esteem Reducedand activity andinpleasure usual to initiate ingnesscontact to initiate contact with the community After theanything combine passes over the too grain field, aresource tractor pulls a baler over the windrows of straw, putting upputting round bales for winter feed. After the combine passes over the (“How grain field, a tractor pulls a baler over the help windrows of straw, up round bales for winter feed. because the activities: isanything just too resource do you feel about seeking help important because the “Doing activities: “Doing ismuch just much (“How do you feel about seeking ore you likely of anyou effort.â€? from this person/agency?â€?) nce,likely the more of an effort.â€? from this person/agency?â€?) ffectively. don’t want anyone to anyone 6. Where the person the or family esources effectively.• People problems: • People “I problems: “I don’t want to 6. Where personisorunwilling family is unwilling AGERS feelme,â€? so lonely.â€? to take thetoinitiative where ther is some TRESS MANAGERS see me,â€? “Isee “I feel so lonely.â€? take the or initiative or where ther is some stress manag• Physical •problems: Sleeping problems, danger if action taken, shouldyou takeshould take uccessful stress managPhysical problems: Sleeping problems, dangeris ifnot action is you not taken, decreased sexual interest, headaches. decreased sexual interest, headaches. the initiative: the initiative: our strengths, • Guilt and• low all my“It’s allCall andagency ask toand speak Know your strengths, Guiltself andesteem: low self“It’s esteem: my the agency Call the asktotothe speak to the what is imporintake worker (if worker there is (if one). es. Know what isfault,â€? impor-“I should fault,â€?be “I punished.â€? should be punished.â€? intake there is one). are going. Set going.Signs of suicidal intent include: Identify yourself your with where you are Set BY Signs FAY of suicidal intent include: longshoremen Identify and yourwith relationship with are inand ayourself bitter ex- with 1934, unions have donehave mostdone of most of One grainOne handler, AmericanSAMAR longshoremen are relationship indispute a bitter dispute ex- longshore 1934, longshore unions grainTemco, handler,anTemco, an AmericanBY SAMAR FAY off more Anxiety or depression: the person orowners family. Never bitethan off more •than • Anxiety or depression: Severe, intense the person or family. owned Cargillby and CHS and withCHS with port terminal that thy say slow the receiving and loading the docks, butdocks, the but HI-LINE FARM & RANCH ownedbyventure Cargill port terminal owners thatcould thy say could slow the receiving andatloading at the the venture HI-LINE FARM &Severe, RANCH intense emands feelings anxiety of or anxiety depression. State whatState you think fam- or famwn on themade demands made offeelings or depression. what the youperson’s think theorperson’s nion disputes with management export shipments and depress the global grain market chang- is changfacilities in Tacomainand Kalama, andWash., and nion disputes with management export shipments andprices. depress prices. structure of structure of the global grainis market facilities Tacoma andWash., Kalama, • Withdrawal or isolation: Withdrawn, ily’s needsily’s are (needs immediate protection protection in control. • Withdrawal or isolation: Withdrawn, needs are (needs immediate over contracts areand usually Eighty percent ofneeds Montana wheat is for sent ing. To guarantee their future food security, Portland, Ore,, reached agreement with the with the contracts areand notasupports. usually afrom Eighty percent ofneeds Montana wheat is for sent ing. To guarantee their future food security, Portland, Ore,,anreached an agreement pend timeSpend on time alone, ofover friends supports. suicidal acts, an appointment ke walks. onlack alone, lack ofnot friends from suicidal acts, an appointment big afactor Montana farmer’s of theout country, most ofor itďŹ nancial leaving countries countries are encouraging their companies union, which thewhich union the would likewould the others to others to in Sense ahopeless: Montana farmer’s of theďŹ nancial country, most ofor itPacific leaving Pacific are encouraging their companies union, union like the naps. Praynaps. or Pray • Helpless and hopeless: of complete counseling, needs legal advice). ers. Take orfactorbig •inHelpless and Sense ofout complete counseling, needs legal advice). Experienced cattle workers, farm Experienced cattlesheepherders, workers, sheepherders, farm Northwest ports forthink Asian markets Japan, to take steps to control food pipeline, template. The three The otherthree companies profit at harvest but that could change ports for Asian to take steps tothe control the food pipeline,adopt as aadopt as a template. other companies profit harvest time, but that could change e deeply anddeeply powerlessness, a hopeless State Northwest what you the person’s ormarkets fam- in un. Breathe andattime, powerlessness, afeeling. hopeless feeling. State what you think thein person’s or Japan, famequipmentequipment operators operators and general hands seekandranch general ranch hands seek• Alcohol abuse: There isofoften a is link be- Taiwan, ily’s beneeds are (needs immediate protection in the Pacific Northwest Grain Handlers this year. this Just as theJust golden river grain the Philippines and South Korea. beginningbeginning in producing countries.countries. Japanese Japanese • Alcohol abuse: There isofoften a is link ily’s needs are (needs immediate protection in the Pacific Northwest Grain AsHandlers Asyear. as the golden river grain Taiwan, the Philippines and South Korea. in producing ing up to 9ing months Housing Housing up to seasonal 9 months employment. seasonal employment. ral sources of sources tween alcoholism and suicide. fromissuicidal acts, needs animporter appointment for of U.S. aw on trickling several of tween alcoholism andflooding suicide. from acts, needs anof appointment for from fields to combines and Japan the single largest U.S. companies have established themselves in sociation say that idea a nonstarter. trickling from fields to combines and flooding Japan issuicidal the single largest importer companies have established themselves in sociation sayisthat idea is a nonstarter. must be provided, Contact Contact must be camper provided,acceptable. camper acceptable. mily, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, needs ďŹ nancial or legal advice). suchhobbies, as family, hobbies, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, needs ďŹ nancial or legal advice). into elevators and long westbound trains, trains,wheat, accounting for 10 percent it. Since Montana,Montana, building big shuttlebig train elevators, Three members of the ILWU took to the into elevators and long westbound wheat, accounting for 10ofpercent of it. Since building shuttle train elevators, Three members of the ILWU took to the or 406-579-7529. or 406-579-7529. previous attempts low to high lethality. Provide theProvide agencythe with background inpreviousofattempts of low to high lethality. agency with background inL A LB AO BR Odiane@peakseasonlabor.com R diane@peakseasonlabor.com and in theand Pacific Northwest, where they own theyroad to month talk upto their of theside of the in the Pacific Northwest, where ownthis month road this talkside up their Make things • Suicidal• plan: Frequent or constant formation (name, address andaddress phone;and agephone; and age and productive. Make things Suicidal plan: Frequent or constant formation (name, major grain export terminals. story in farm visited with farm-with farmmajor grain export terminals. storycountry. in farmThey country. They visited ement during thoughts a speciďŹ c in mind. of current orproblem crisis; any ess management during with thoughts withplan a speciďŹ c plan in mind.gender; nature gender; natureproblem of current or crisis; any After a long stalemate on a new contract ers, media and fellow unionists in places likeplaces like After a long stalemate on a new contract ers, media and fellow unionists in exercise, Making a will, giving posses historypast you’re aware of; further Eat right,and exercise,Cries and for help: Cries for help: Making a will, givingpast posses history you’re aware informaof; further informato replace the one that expired at the end of Lewiston, Idaho, Missoula, Miles City, MiLewiston, Idaho, Missoula, Miles City, Mito replace the one that expired at the end of • sions away, making statements such as “I’m as called • sions away, making statements such tion as “I’m tionfor). as called for). September last year, last longshore workers inworkersnot, and Glasgow, then headed not, Plentywood and Glasgow, then headed September year, longshore in Plentywood velop friendmy“Maybe family my would Ask the agency what follow-up theyaction they upport. Develop calling friend-it quits,â€? callingorit“Maybe quits,â€? or family would Ask the agency what action follow-up the International Longshore and Warehouse for the Golden Greatand Falls. They ng periods of periods be better me.â€? will take: will take: the International Longshore and Warehouse for theTriangle Golden and Triangle Great Falls. They omfort during of off bewithout better off without me.â€? Linda & Mark Nielsen, Linda & Mark Nielsen, HOW TO REFER A PERSON FOR HELP FOR HELP • When will• When they act onthey the referral? HOW TO REFER A PERSON will act on the referral? Union have SERVING ASREA ERVING AREA âœŻ beenhave locked outlocked of grain said that before visiting Glasgow Courier Courier Union been outtermiof grain termisaid that beforeThe visiting The Glasgow Owners Owners âœŻ .the Talk to each Be aware1.of agencies resources • Who will•be the will person for you to contact family. Talk to 1. each Bethe aware of theand agencies and resources Who be the person for you to contact Iva Murch, Manager nals in Vancouver and Portland, and replaced they met with somewith railroad unionists Iva Murch, Manager nals in Vancouver and Portland, and replaced they met sometrade railroad trade unionists RODUCERSPRODUCERS LIVESTOCKLPIVESTOCK available inavailable your community - what services later if necessary? n.appreciation Express appreciation in your community - what services later if necessary? 263-7529 263-7529 by contract managersmanagers and inand the Oasis overOasis a cupover of coffee, just to show byworkers, contract company workers, company in the a cup of coffee, just to show they offer and limitations are. be thewill costbe of the the cost service (atservice (at theywhat offertheir and what their limitations are.• What will• What of the OR 67 Y EARS F FOR !67 YEARS! Dean Barnes, YardBarnes, Manager Dean Yard Manager security guards hired by the companies. security guards hired by the companies. CONTINUEDCONTINUED ON PAGE 11ON PAGE 11 an overriding 2. Listen 2. forListen signs and symptoms that fee/sliding scale)? scale)? Encourage an overriding for signs and symptoms that fee/sliding 263-1175 263-1175 theout best, thebest, personthe or person family needs helpneeds whichhelp youwhich •you Do you need do need anything to coml for work for the or family • Dotoyou to doelse anything else to com1946 - 20131946 - 2013 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer Ed Hinton, Auctioneer w thatKnow eventsthatcan’t provide, ďŹ nancial, or personal plete the referral? pens. events can’ti.e., provide, i.e.,legal ďŹ nancial, legal or personal plete the referral? 783-7285 783-7285 ple’s counseling.counseling. 7. Make sure person refer- and refer--it isreactions people’s reactions 7. the Make sure or thefamily personand or family ms. 3. Assess what agency or agency community re- ral agency andconnect get together. one Make one he problems. 3. Assess what or community re- connect ral agency and getMake together. September – 2013 September – 2013 DAL INTENT source would be most appropriate to address to or more follow-up with the agency if agency if ON OR SUICIDAL INTENT source would be most appropriate address or more contacts follow-up contacts with the Peerless Peerless gns orof sympperson’s family’s) the situation. umber signs orthe sympthe(orperson’s (orproblems. family’s) problems. called for by called for by the situation. Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday experiencing, 4. Discuss 4.theDiscuss referralthe with the person or person family is experiencing, referral with the or Roubie Younkin, an MSU an Extension Roubie Younkin, MSU Extension 893-4398 893-4398 The Big Fall Classic Classic TheYearling Big Fall Yearling The One and Only Sheep The One and Only Sheep be. addition, family (“Itfamily sounds/looks like you are feeling ernIn should be. In addition, (“It sounds/looks like you areagent feelingin Valley this re- this reagent County, in Valleycompiled County, compiled featuring over 2000 outstanding NE featuring over 2000 outstanding NE Auction Auction of 2012 of 2012 t Grain Feed Seed tportBuying and t_____ Grain Feed Buying and She ng the follow-the _____. I think could help could youSeed deal with re exhibiting follow_____. I think _____ help you deal with fromt Extension sources. can be port from Extension sources. She can be Richland Richland Montana yearling steers & spayed Montana yearling steers & spayed & All Class Auction & Cattle All Class Cattle Auction dal intent, it is intent, youritsituation.â€?) on or suicidal ist your situation.â€?) reached atreached (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ Fertilizer Merchandising Grain t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain 724-3353 724-3353 and tested open heifers and tested open heifers m with profes5. Explore the individual’s or family’sor willonnect them with profes5. Explore the individual’s family’s will- valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net. EARLY CONSIGNMENTS EARLY CONSIGNMENTS cries for asAll possible. All criest forAg Chemicals t Ag Chemicals t Agronomist t Agronomist Opheim Opheim All Class Cattle Auction All Class Cattle Auction seriously. ** 570 Steers ** 570 Steers t Petroleum Services t Petroleum Services e:ion include: 762-3231762-3231 875 - 925# green flesh, 76% 875 - 925# green flesh, 76% 440 Highway 2 West 2• Glasgow • Across• from thefrom Fairgrounds 440 Highway West • Glasgow Across the Fairgrounds wd movements, face, slow movements, 24% Red/RWF/Char. Cross Black/BWF, 24% Red/RWF/Char. Cross PleasePlease call in consignments call in consignments Black/BWF,

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so buyers can becan notiďŹ ed. so buyers be notiďŹ ed. 406-228-9306 406-228-9306 P.O. Box 129 P.O. Box 129 Glasgow, MT 59230 MT 59230 Glasgow, gsi@nemont.net gsi@nemont.net www.glasgowstockyards.com www.glasgowstockyards.com

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** 120 Steers ** 120 Steers 900 - 950# Blacks with few with BWF few BWF 900 - 950# Blacks ** 200 Spayed ** 200Heifers Spayed Heifers 900# Blacks and Redsand Reds 900# Blacks & All Class Auction & Cattle All Class Cattle Auction

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SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

SAMAR FAY /wheat HI-LINEharvest FARM & RANCH On a hot August morning, a combine makes sweeps up and down an endless field of grain on Whatley Road southeast of Glasgow. As of the last week of August, the winter was 92 Onpercent a hot August morning, a combine makescrop sweeps and down an endless field of grain on Whatley Road southeast of Glasgow. As of the last week of August, the winter wheat harvest was 92 complete, and the spring wheat was up 38 percent cut. percent complete, and the spring wheat crop was 38 percent cut. If the country doesn’t produce commodicontract with them. On the other hand, there economy. Ifties, the country produce commodiwith them. the other hand, there economy. they aredoesn’t very concerned. Some of these contract is Columbia Grain,On owned by Marubeni, “The return we see from the products we ties, they areare very concerned. of these iswhich Columbia owned by Marubeni,Ten of “The return we see from themore products we countries buying land in Some other countries; has aGrain, big presence in Montana. sell is realized economically signifiCONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 countries are buying land facilities; in other countries; which has a big presence inare Montana. Ten of sell is realized economically moreeconomic signifisome are buying export some are its 20 Montana elevators on the Hi-Line. cantly than other products. The CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 some are buying export facilities; some are itsMarubeni 20 Montana elevators areGavilon, on the Hi-Line. than other products. The economic farmers,” Raska said. “We’re concerned if investing in research. recently bought owner of cantly impact is tremendous of wheat and barley farmers,” concerned research.in Montana are owned Marubeni recently Gavilon, owner of a impact is tremendous of wheat barley there areRaska strikessaid. and “We’re blockages. We seeifthe ef- investing Mostinelevators three elevators in bought Montana. EGT negotiated sold out of state. Money fromand other counthere strikes andmove. blockages. We seeit’s thekind efelevators in have Montana are owned elevators of state. Money from other fect are if trains can’t Otherwise, byMost companies that an interest in Japan, three union contractinaMontana. couple of EGT yearsnegotiated ago. Co- a sold triesout rolls into Montana. Think howcounmany fect trains can’t move. Otherwise, it’s kind byFalcon companies union contract of years Cotries rolls intodollars Montana. of if arm’s distance.” said. that have an interest in Japan, lumbia Grainaiscouple operating with ago. replacement times those turnThink over, how frommany the of arm’s said. lumbia Grain is operating with replacement times those turnthe over, from The the buildFooddistance.” security is very significant for Japan Falcon The new EGT elevator in Kintyre Flats workers. farmer, thedollars elevator, railroad. Food is very significant Japan Theofnew EGTiselevator farmer, railroad. and forsecurity other Asian countries withfor growing east Nashua owned in byKintyre a pair ofFlats Japanese workers. Falcon emphasized the importance of ing of the the elevator, economythe from wheat The and buildbarley and for other and Asian countries with growing Nashua is owned of Japanese Falcon emphasized the importance of the ing the economy from wheat and barley population growing demand, Falcon said. east andofinternational firms,by anda pair the ILWU has a Montana’s export products for building is of huge.” population and growing demand, Falcon said. and international firms, and the ILWU has a Montana’s export products for building the is huge.”

GrainExports ExportsAt AtIssue Issue Grain

Grainy Grainy OutlookIn In Outlook Contract Contract Dispute Dispute

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SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH SAMAR FAY / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

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YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA. YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA.

nion disputes with managenion disputes with management over contracts are ment over contracts are in not usually a big factor notfarmer’s usually profit a big factor in a Montana at harvest a time, Montana farmer’s profit at harvest but that could change this year. time,As butthethat couldriver change this year. golden of grain moves As the golden river of grain moves from fields to combines to elevators from to combines to elevators and fields westbound trains, longshoremen and westbound trains, longshoremen are in a bitter dispute with export terare in a owners bitter dispute with minal that thy sayexport could terslow minal owners that thy say could slow export shipments and depress prices. export depress prices. At shipments left, trucksand laden with local grain At left, trucks laden with local grain line up at Farmers Elevator in Glasgow line up attheir Farmers Elevator in Glasgow to drop burden and head back to tothe drop their burden and head back to field for more. the field forFay more. Samar reports on Page 2. Samar Fay reports on Page 2.


Hi-Line Farm & Ranch 2013