Page 1

Volume 11, Issue 2  Undergraduate Program Newsletter

E-NEWSLETTER October 25, 2010  IN THIS ISSUE CALENDAR WANTED

CALENDAR

CAREER SERVICES OIP

November 2, 3:30PM, Fong Auditorium—  Sophomore Orienta on, (Undergrad Program) 

BUREAU OF STUDY COUNSEL

WOODBERRY POETRY ROOM

November 5—Junior essay dra s DUE (Tutors only) 

EVENTS & INFO

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

         Final‐term Seniors thesis DUE (Undergrad Program) 

November 11—Veternan’s Day Holiday (offices closed) 

FACULTY WRITINGS

ADVISING

Director of Undergraduate Studies Dan Donoghue — Barker 208 dgd@wjh.harvard.edu

Creative Writing Bret Johnston—Barker Center 067 bajohnst@fas.harvard.edu

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS The Harvard Advocate www.theharvardadvocate.com The Harvard Book Review www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hbr/main The Harvard Crimson www.thecrimson.com The Journal of Medieval Studies

SUBMISSIONS Submit to the Analecta  Analecta, the University of Texas at Aus n's official literary and arts journal, is  accep ng submissions of all types of crea ve wri ng between now and December  15. Undergraduate and graduate students at all universi es are eligible. Winners  will have their pieces printed in Analecta 37, to be published this spring, and will  receive two free copies of the journal. Two featured writers will also receive $100  prizes. Please find detailed submission guidelines and contact informa on  at www.analectajournal.com. Analecta was recently featured in the New York  Times ArtsBeat blog, which you can find here   Submit to Tuesday Magazine   Tuesday Magazine is now accep ng submissions for its fall 2010 issue.   As Harvard's only general interest magazine, we specialize in fic on, nonfic on,  art, and poetry. However, we accept for any kind of high‐quality student expres‐ sion. If you have an interes ng piece of wri ng or art, no ma er what form or  genre, we want to see it! Fic on, repor ng, travel wri ng, poetry, transla ons,  confessions, grocery lists, gchats, pain ng, photography, sculpture, install‐ ment...send it our way!  Submit online at h p://www.tuesdaymagazine.org/submit.htm by November  1st.   

www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hujms/ The Harvard Lampoon www.harvardlampoon.com The Gamut www.hcs.harvard.edu/~gamut

Perspective Magazine!

Literary Laundry Submissions  Call for submissions in crea ve wri ng:  We would like to introduce Literary Laundry, a new online journal that aims to  publish outstanding contemporary fic on in the genres of poetry, prose fic on,  and one‐act drama.     We are excited to announce our second issue, and with it, our second wri ng  compe on. We are offering the following cash awards: $500 for the best poem, 


QUICK LINKS  Harvard

College

www.college.harvard.edu

 FAS

Website

www.fas.harvard.edu  The

www.ocs.fas.harvard.edu

10.25.10 MONDAY  Exploring Careers in Travel and Hospitality*  4:30–5:30pm, OCS Reading Room: 54 Dunster Street  Micro‐Finance Simulcast Series*  7:00–9:00pm, OCS Seminar Room: 54 Dunster Street 

Writing Center

www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr

10.26.10 TUESDAY  Designing for the Future: A Career Chat with Sam Truslow '94, Associate Partner at 

Grad School in the Sciences and Engineering: Applying, Surviving, and Thriving*  4:00–5:30pm, Maxwell Dworkin G135: 33 Oxford Street 

Exploring Careers in Education  4:30–5:30pm, OCS Conference Room: 54 Dunster Street 

10.27.10 WEDNESDAY  Virtual Grad School Fair (co‐sponsored by Harvard and MIT)  Visit gradschools.careereco.net to register and learn more.  Ace Your Interview: Strategies for Success  4:00–5:00pm, OCS Conference Room: 54 Dunster Street    Junior Orienta on: The Internship Search and On‐Campus Interview Program (OCI)  4:00–5:00pm, Boylston Hall, Fong Auditorium  Self Promo on for Performing Ar sts  5:00–6:00pm, OCS Reading Room: 54 Dunster Street  10.28.10 THURSDAY  Virtual Grad School Fair (co‐sponsored by Harvard and MIT)  Visit gradschools.careereco.net to register and learn more.  Academic Programs Abroad in Paris: Informa on Mee ng  4:00–5:00pm, OCS Reading Room: 54 Dunster Street  Exploring Careers in Social Enterprise, CSR, and Non‐Profit Consul ng*  4:00–5:30pm, OCS Conference Room: 54 Dunster Street  10.29.10 FRIDAY  Start Your Internship Search at OCS  12:00–1:00pm, OCS Conference Room: 54 Dunster Street 

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

www.fas.harvard.edu/~oip/

Spring term study abroad program commitment deadline  Monday, Oct 25, 2010     Pembroke/Kings Summer Study Abroad Program Info Mtg  Tue, October 26, 4:00pm – 5:30pm  OCS Reading Room (54 Dunster Street) (map)  Informa on Mee ng with Nick Godfrey of Pembroke College, Cambridge, about the 8‐week "PKP" sum‐ mer program. Includes discussion of the Thouron Scholarship for study at Pembroke with returned  Thouron Scholars.    Academic Programs Abroad in Paris: Info Mtg  Thu, October 28, 4pm – 5pm  OCS Reading Room, 54 Dunster Street (map)  Academic Programs Abroad is one of Harvard's approved study abroad programs in Paris. Come meet  the director; bring your ques ons!  Financial Aid Study Abroad Supplement deadline for Spring 2011 study abroad  Friday, Oct 29, 2010     Undergraduate Summer Internships to Japan Info Session 


BUREAU OF STUDY COUNSEL Procras na on Group

h p://www.bsc.harvard.edu/index.html

with Diane Weinstein Sessions: Tuesdays, Oct. 26, & Nov. 2, 4:15‐5:30 p.m. Through discussion and prac cal exercises, this group works on understanding the experience of procras na on and on  freeing one’s self to use one’s crea ve processes in moments when one feels resistant, blocked or paralyzed. Pre‐group  consulta on required.   Time Management Workshop  with Claire Shindler  One session:  Friday, Oct. 29, 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. Through exercises and discussion, this workshop offers students an opportunity to build and develop  me management  strategies and to work towards understanding the priori es in their lives in order to make  me for what is important to  them. To register, email (cshindler@bsc.harvard.edu). Maximizing Your Approach to Learning with Jennifer Page & Claire Schindler One session:  Wednesday, Nov 3, 1:00‐2:30p.m. Have you wondered why you learn be er in one class than another or wondered why you find some classes harder and  some easier? Some mes this is because your learning style doesn't match the way the course is taught or you're using  learning strategies that are not the best fit for you. We all have different learning styles—characteris c strengths and pref‐ erences in the way we take in and process informa on. This workshop focuses on helping students iden fy their learning 

AMBIENT REEL  the New York School  Wednesday, October 27, 3:00pm 

TIME: Recordings of 

Back by popular demand, this ambient experience will focus on recordings by poets in the New York School and its ex‐ tended “family.” Stop by the Poetry Room and overhear early readings by John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch and Barbara  Guest, among others. And, for those who missed last year’s documentary film of Frank O’Hara, this is your chance.  Woodberry Poetry Room, Lamont Library, Room 330  Free and open to the public.  January Intensive Poetry Workshop  ALL THE ARCHITECTURES I AM: Structure as Revolu on in Contemporary Poetry  January 17‐21, 2011   INSTRUCTOR: Jen Bervin  Registra on Deadline: Sunday, October 31   This poetry wri ng workshop will seek to explode the concept of poe c form, u lizing insights from such disciplines as the  visual and performing arts, architecture, and design. Poe c styles and subject ma er are o en the focus of wri ng work‐ shops; what would an emphasis on poe c structure, space, layout and typography make possible? So o en the choice lies  between inherited forms and free verse, but the la er isn’t necessarily free. It o en falls into very dis nct, prefabricated,  socially‐dictated categories. In this workshop we will challenge ourselves to develop an organic structure that permits the  fullest integra on of our experien al and imagined worlds. For informa on about the January Intensives, please email  arts‐hum@fas.harvard.edu. Sponsored by the Office for the Arts, in conjunc on with the Woodberry Poetry Room.  Workshop Schedule: The workshop schedule will include 3‐hour daily workshops and opportuni es for interdisciplinary  collabora on with fellow January Intensive ar sts.  Applica on Process: Please send an email with your name, year, concentra on and: 1. Statement of Purpose: A one‐ paragraph statement describing why you are interested in taking this class, how it will contribute to your experience in  the humani es, and which crea ve wri ng classes (if any) you have taken and 2. Wri ng Sample: Three pages (one‐sided) 


EVENTS & INFO ON‐CAMPUS EVENTS   

Coffee with Professor Marjorie Garber  Instructor of: English 132, on Metaphysical Poetry, English 199, on Exper se  and also author of (among others) Dog Love and Quota on Marks  Open to everyone and all; no need to RSVP   (but please do bring ques ons!)  Wednesday, November 3, 5‐6 p.m.  Barker Center 133  Humani es Center at Harvard  Undergraduate Commi ee   

Talk by Professor Lisa Brooks  Assistant Professor of History and Literature and of Folklore and Mythology  Hosted by The Department of Compara ve Literature with support from the Renato Poggioli Lecture Fund      "They Had Different Kinds of Minds":  Reading through Language(s) in Na ve North American Literatures  Monday, November 15th  6:00 pm  Barker 133   

OPPORTUNITIES   Blue Engine Applicants Wanted  Let’s face it. Next year looms large.  There are opportuni es out there, but you’re not 100% sure about taking that next  step.  Maybe graduate school, but not now, not yet.  You want to work hard.  You want to be challenged.  You want to  work directly with young people.  You want to surround yourself with a talented group of like‐minded peers while gaining  ground‐level experience in educa on reform and social entrepreneurship.  Most of all, you want to make a difference.     You are the innova on we are looking for.  Blue Engine was founded for a simple reason.  In schools and communi es all across the na on, we do an excellent job of  selling students on the dream of college without adequately preparing them to succeed once they get there.  This prob‐ lem is compounded in low‐income communi es, where only 15 of every 100 students entering college each year com‐ plete bachelor’s degrees.      So what’s the problem?  Success in college is shaped by many factors, but research has consistently shown that academic rigor during high school  is the strongest predictor of whether students sink or swim that first year.  The challenge, then, must be finding ways to  help students master more advanced academic skills before arriving on campus in the first place.     That’s where you come in.  Introducing Blue Engine, an urban educa on fellowship year in New York City designed for talented recent college gradu‐ ates to connect with small numbers of students in a different way—not as teachers, but as full‐ me teaching assis‐ tants.  During one‐year terms of service, Blue Engine Fellows conduct small group tutorials (4‐5 students per period)  alongside experienced classroom teachers, working in teams from 7:30 a.m. un l 6:00 p.m. to help en re grade levels  make drama c progress in core coursework.  By channeling thousands of direct service hours to address one of our na‐ on’s most pressing challenges, we are proud to join the na onal movement dedicated to expanding educa onal oppor‐ tunity in America.     


Want to learn more?  Read profiles of current Fellows, check out the applica on, and watch a short video of our work at  www.blueengine.org.  Sign up here to receive no fica on once the online applica on goes live on January 1, 2011.  Join us on Facebook to receive updates and more informa on about the Blue Engine Fellowship year.    Right now, on college campuses throughout the country, we are looking for a small number of top‐notch can‐ didates to get involved with Blue Engine from the ground up.  The admissions process will be compe ve, with  our next class of approximately 20‐30 Fellows set to begin service in New York City in August of 2011. 

MATCH Corps  The mission of the MATCH Corps is clear: success in college and beyond for our students.  Most of the students  we serve come from low‐income families, are Black or La no, have about a 1 in 20 chance of gradua ng from  college, and enter MATCH significantly behind grade level.  Each tutor's job is nothing less than to change the  arc of his/her students' lives.     The MATCH Corps program began in 2004 and is the first of its kind in the na on. The Corps is a group of 90  top recent college graduates who work one‐on‐one with six to eight MATCH High School or Middle School stu‐ dents each day for an en re academic year. Corps members live together in apartments nearby the Middle  School and in a dorm on the top floor of the High School. Both schools are award‐winning open‐admission  Charter Public High Schools in Boston, MA. This full‐ me service year program is designed to fully close the  academic Achievement Gap between minority students and their non‐minority peers, one student at a  me.  Each Corps member works to guarantee the academic success of MATCH students while building personal rela‐ onships. Corps members also undertake secondary projects such as serving as teaching assistants, and may  also coach teams and power extracurricular programs.     We also offer an op onal teacher training program called MATCH Teacher Residency. In MTR, Corps members  receive addi onal training on the weekends with the aim of becoming unusually effec ve first year teachers in  high‐poverty schools. Graduates of MTR go on to teach at some of the most highly regarded charter schools in  the country and tend to outperform other rookie teachers in the classroom.     The highly‐selec ve MATCH Corps allows idealis c and dedicated young people to invest their  me and energy 

Undergraduate Program Newsletter, 25 Oct. 2010  

Harvard Department of English Undergraduate Program Newsletter

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you