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MAGAZINE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DEBORAH BEE PUBLISHER BETH HODDER ART DIRECTOR BARNEY PICKARD

EDITORIAL DEPUTY EDITOR FLEUR FRUZZA ACTING BEAUTY EDITOR JAN MASTERS FASHION WRITER LINDSAY MACPHERSON STAFF WRITER AMY BROOMFIELD CONTRIBUTING WRITER MARIA MILANO ASSISTANT BEAUTY EDITOR REBECCA BAIO CHIEF SUB-EDITORS LISA HILLMAN, NICOLETTE THOMPSON SENIOR SUB-EDITOR CAROLINE HUNT

ART DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR SONJA BURRI ART EDITOR NATALIE BOO MOSQUERA SENIOR DESIGNER RACHEL ESCUDIER JUNIOR DESIGNER OLIVER JAMIESON ART ASSISTANT JENNIFER KAY PRODUCER EMILY SELLERS PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKINGS EDITOR WENDY HINTON PICTURE ASSISTANT KIAAN ORANGE PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKINGS ADMINISTRATOR LAIDE PITAN

FASHION FASHION EDITOR VICTORIA GAIGER DEPUTY FASHION EDITOR POPPY ROCK SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT BECKY BRANCH JUNIOR FASHION ASSISTANT OLIVIA HALSALL

DIGITAL DIGITAL MANAGER CLAUDIA ORRELL ACTING DIGITAL MANAGER ARNAUD BURTIN HEAD OF DIGITAL DESIGN BOB DEVSI DIGITAL DESIGNER JAIME RIVERA JUNIOR DIGITAL DESIGNER TAK YEUNG CHEUNG DIGITAL SUB-EDITORS JANICE MORTON, ROSE VICKERS

PUBLISHING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER ALETHEA QUARTEY ACTING MANAGING EDITOR SUZY CHAPMAN PUBLISHING ASSISTANT PHOEBE FISHER

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER HAYLEY YOUNG PRODUCTION ASSISTANT CAMILLA JOSEPHS

HARRODS STORE IMAGE GROUP DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE AFFAIRS KATHARINE WITTY DIRECTOR OF CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL SHOPPING CHIARA

VARESE

HARRODS MEDIA MEDIA SALES DIRECTOR GUY CHESTON HEAD OF MEDIA SALES CHARLOTTE MARKS MEDIA SALES MANAGER NICOLE IVASCHENKO ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MICHAELA HUNT MEDIA MARKETING MANAGER KATIE ARNAUD MEDIA MARKETING ASSISTANT LAURA PARSONS MEDIA PLANNER CASSANDRA ASHFORD MARKETING & MEDIA SALES MANAGER, BEAUTY VIRGINIE DUIGOU MEDIA SALES EXECUTIVE, BEAUTY LOUISE FISH MARKETING EXECUTIVE, BEAUTY ABIGAIL SEKWALOR MEDIA SALES MANAGER, FASHION & FASHION ACCESSORIES SOPHIE READ MEDIA SALES EXECUTIVES, FASHION STELLA BUBEL, OLIVIA YOUNG MEDIA SALES EXECUTIVE, FASHION ACCESSORIES LAURA MONTIGIANI MEDIA SALES MANAGER, FINE JEWELLERY, FINE WATCHES AND LUXURY JEWELLERY

LUCINDA ANDREWS MEDIA SALES EXECUTIVE, FINE JEWELLERY, FINE WATCHES AND LUXURY JEWELLERY HARSHEEL RANA MEDIA SALES ASSISTANT, FINE JEWELLERY, FINE WATCHES AND LUXURY JEWELLERY ELISE HAWKINS MEDIA SALES, FOOD HALLS & RESTAURANTS EMMA-LOUISE GEARY MEDIA SALES MANAGER, HOME CHRIS SWEET MEDIA SALES EXECUTIVES, HOME ADELE BROUSSE, HASHIM JAVAID

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HARRODS, 87–135 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7XL Tel ɓɔtwww.harrods.com All information and prices are correct at time of going to press. We hope you enjoy reading Harrods Magazine. As we are committed to providing the highest level of customer service possible, we would love to hear your comments. Please email magazine@harrods.com The paper in this magazine originates from timber that is sourced from responsibly managed forests, according to strict environmental, social, and economic standards. The manufacturing mill has both FSC and PEFC certification, and also ISO9001 and ISO14001 accreditation. To discover more, download the digital edition of Harrods Magazine or visit harrodsmagazine.com from the App Store

124,957 Period: 1st July 2013 to 31st December 2013


EDITOR’S LE T TER

Flowers always seem to make an appearance in the spring/summer shows. This season, however, our most inventive designers have put a fresh spin on an old faithful. Florals appear as textbook-style botanical illustrations mixed up with polka dots and leopard print – even as poisonous blooms. It’s not just florals that have had a bit of a rethink. The notion of dress codes is also out the window. There’s no longer a time and a place for fashion rules, so a full-length embroidered dress now makes the cut at a wedding; a sheer lace gown is cool anytime, anywhere, especially when paired with flats; and gentlemen, your suit will be all the more contemporary minus a tie and socks. In this issue of Harrods Magazine, we also celebrate the wonderfully eclectic world of Prada with a special section that reflects all the exciting activity that’s going on throughout the store. Get to know more about this hugely influential design powerhouse by visiting Pradasphere on the Fourth Floor, and a showcase of new collections in the Brompton Road windows throughout May.

Photographs Ishi

Editor-in-Chief

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TOP 20

3H\UJOLZZWLJPHSVăLYZHUKL]LU[ZMVY4H` 1. Bee Goddess Violet collection There’s never an idle motif from Bee Goddess. The latest collection, Violet, symbolises tender love and harmony. Necklace £1,900. Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor

2. House of Hackney fabrics Interiors brand House of Hackney makes printed wall coverings and fabrics with big personalities. Midnight Garden fabric £98 per metre. Fabric Library, Third Floor 3. IWC Portuguese Perpetual Calendar The watch connoisseur’s favourite, the Portuguese Perpetual Calendar, is now available in stainless steel. £21,500. The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor

4. YSL Opium L’Objet Rare In a gold-leaf-covered bottle, Opium L’Objet Rare pays homage to China with a blend of bergamot, mandarin and jasmine accords. £1,600. The Perfumery Hall, Ground Floor

5. Crème de la Mer A new dual-action day cream from Crème de la Mer, The SPF 50 UV Protecting Fluid offers protection from UVA and UVB rays. 40ml, £65. The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor

6. Coach bags America’s favourite bag brand is gaining friends in the UK for its ladylike offerings. Bag £575. Designer Accessories, Lower Ground Floor

7. La Prairie gift with purchase A case containing Cellular Radiance Cream and Eye Cream is complimentary with the purchase of two products, one of which must be a moisturiser. The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor

8. Ashiana jewellery Designer Anastasia Buisman uses the fruits of her travels to bring a mix of precious and semiprecious stones to her stackable jewellery. Bracelet £39.95. Swimwear, First Floor

9. Boucheron Quatre collection The new Radiant edition is the latest in Boucheron’s Quatre collection, in yellow or white gold with diamonds. Yellow-gold ring £7,850 and white-gold ring £8,800. The Fine Jewellery Room, Ground Floor

10. Philosophy Full of Promise Delivering a double whammy of goodness, Philosophy’s Full of Promise lifts the upper eye lid and firms the lower eye lid. £35. The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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TOP 20

11. Pradasphere Throughout May, Harrods is celebrating the world of Prada with exclusive ranges across the store, and a Fourth Floor exhibition covering historic collections and unique collaborations. 12. Billionaire SS14 The larger-than-life Italian brand has reined in its print-tastic tendencies with an indigo linen jacket that goes with anything. Jacket £1,865. Men’s International Collections, Ground Floor 13. John Hardy Bamboo collection Inspired by Balinese fishing rods, the Bamboo collection from John Hardy is made from silver, sparked by black sapphires. From £1,520. Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor

14. L’Agent by Agent Provocateur The second collection by the Cruz sisters, Penélope and Mónica, and Creative Director Sarah Shotton, mixes clashing colours with playful styles. Bra £50 and briefs £28. Lingerie, First Floor

15. Monica Vinader bracelet Make the renowned Friendship Bracelet even more personal: the latest addition to the range has a plate that can be engraved. £85. Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor

16. Mark Cross leather goods The zenith of the Mark Cross history was a vanity case appearance in Rear Window; the company is now back, making its leather goods in the original workshops. Luggage Box £1,565. Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor

17. Monogrammed Linen Shop With the elegance of French vintage style, Monogrammed Linen Shop uses traditional techniques and good old-fashioned fabrics. £16 per letter. Bed Linens, Second Floor

18. Molton Brown Orange & Bergamot Molton Brown’s Orange & Bergamot is celebrating its 30th birthday. Formerly known as Naran Ji, the fragrance has a heart of bitter orange tree. Aroma Reeds, £44. The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

19. Origins deluxe sizes Exclusively for Harrods, Origins has made deluxe sizes of its bestsellers, so fans will never run out. Make A Difference Plus+ 75ml, £36. The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

20. Adidas by Stella McCartney McCartney’s latest sportswear collection for Adidas applies her edgy aesthetic to the most high-performance fabrics. Trainers £140. House of Adidas, Fifth Floor

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PEOPLE & PLACES in the air in May BY LINDSAY MACPHERSON & BEN FELSENBURG

Whatmough Benjamin McMahon

INTERIORS Lisa Whatmough of Squint (and Stanley the Beagle) “If you want to focus on something, you have to squint if you really want to see it. Squinting helps you get rid of the extraneous detail,” explains Lisa Whatmough about the origin of her company’s name. That said, you’re unlikely to notice anything else when you’re looking at a Squint design; the independent company, founded in 2005, has become synonymous with a maximalist approach to made-to-measure furniture. Whether it’s a chaise longue for a stately home or a love seat for a chic apartment, the brand will produce a piece to fit. “Our ethos is about an excellence of manufacture and design, and a desire to create beautiful bespoke homewares that move from one generation to the next,” Whatmough says. When it comes to fabric, Squint sources textiles from British companies such as Osborne & Little, Designers Guild and the Gainsborough Silk Weaving Company, and the texture and colour possibilities are endless. “We may choose 20 clashing colours patchworked onto one sofa to create a standout piece,” Whatmough says. “Or we may choose a single colour and vary the fabrics to create a subtle, more luxurious look, where just the textures produce the patchwork effect. If you choose beautiful fabrics, you can’t go wrong.” Available from The Fabric Library, Third Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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ZEITGEIST Viggo Mortensen, Oscar Isaac and Kirsten Dunst in The Two Faces of January

EXHIBITION Mammoths: Ice Age Giants There’s something about mammoths that seizes the imagination: perhaps it’s the fact that, though these vast exotic creatures are now extinct, they walked the earth as recently as the dawn of human civilisation. In what’s sure to be one of the most popular family events of the summer, the Natural History Museum invites us to inspect mammoth fossils, some of which have been incredibly well preserved in the permafrost of the Arctic. Bringing back to life the vast scale of the Ice Age animal kingdom, the exhibition also includes the fearsome sabre-tooth cat, the giant cave bear and the mastodon, that other gigantic relative of the elephant. Natural history lovers can look forward to being utterly enthralled. From 23rd May to 7th September at the Natural History Museum

FILM The Two Faces of January

Woolly Mammoth Mural illustration by Velizar Simeonovski

MUSIC Emmylou Harris With her keening voice and sublime songwriting skills, Emmylou Harris had long been known as the queen of country – but anyone who thought they had her pegged was forced to reconsider with the release of Wrecking Ball in 1995. On an album swathed in atmosphere, she found new layers and meanings in songs by Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Neil Young, who joined her in the recording studio along with Steve Earle and U2’s Larry Mullen Jr. The result was a critical success that rebooted her career. For two nights only, Harris performs the entire album at London’s Barbican, backed by a band including the record’s producer, Daniel Lanois. 25th and 26th May at the Barbican

Opens on 16th May in the UK

FILM Chef

John Leguizamo, Emjay Anthony and Jon Favreau in Chef

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Director Jon Favreau has been cooking up something special with Chef. He stars as the put-upon title character who goes back to Miami to start up his own travelling food truck after his Los Angeles restaurant fails. This comedy at the kitchen cutting edge has attracted an outstanding cast, including John Leguizamo, Dustin Hoffman and Scarlett Johansson. And look out for Robert Downey Jr; here he reunites with the Iron Man films’ director, leaving behind the superhero epic for an altogether smaller-scale film that promises to take both performers back to the comedy roots at which they originally excelled. Opens on 9th May in the UK

January Alamy; Chef Alamy; Harris Jack Spencer

It’s a lesser-known book by Patricia Highsmith, but The Two Faces of January is the basis for a new period adaptation. Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst star as an American couple touring Greece who meet a guide (Oscar Isaac) and bring him with them on their trip. But there’s more to each of the [YPV[OHU^LÄYZ[Z\ZWLJ[


FA SHION Andy Warhol’s Shoes, 1980

DANCE Rambert It’s always a delight for dance lovers to welcome the Rambert to Sadler’s Wells, and now the premier British contemporary-dance company returns to Islington to present a rich feast of a programme, offering an incredible range of emotion and audience experience. Combining live music with impeccable technique, there are works choreographed by Merce Cunningham, Richard Alston and Lucinda Childs on the bill. But for many the highlight will be Christopher Bruce’s Rooster, being presented by Rambert for the first time in 13 years. With a soundtrack entirely made up of Rolling Stones songs from the 1960s, it’s a scintillating distillation of the energy from that extraordinary decade, full of delightful surprises and balletic grace. From 20th to 24th May at Sadler’s Wells

EXHIBITION Master Editions

THEATRE A Small Family Business Back in 1987, A Small Family Business was awarded Best Play at the Evening Standard Awards, and the revival of this ferociously funny social satire at the National Theatre (where it made its debut) is a welcome prospect for theatregoers in search of intelligent, timely fare. Acclaimed playwright Alan Ayckbourn was at the peak of his powers when he penned this tale, in which Jack McCracken takes over his father-in-law’s business, only to discover that each member of the family is hiding dark, embarrassing secrets. What ensues is a sublimely engineered piece of farce. From 1st April at the National Theatre

For those in search of a work by a great artist to grace the walls of their home, the purchase of a print may be the perfect solution. Among those on display at the Master Editions exhibition in the Halcyon Gallery are prints by Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Henri Matisse. Owning a work by these HY[PZ[ZVăLYZHSPUR[V[Y\L genius. Halcyon Gallery, Second Floor Margaret, Duchess of Argyll wearing Hartnell in 1933

Rambert Catherine Ashmore

EXHIBITION Wedding Dresses: 1775-2014 If there’s a garment that excites emotions like no other, it must be the wedding dress. Now, the V&A brings together visions in white from almost 250 years to reveal how a changing society and the inspired creations of great designers have shaped the star attraction on the big day. Dresses by Norman Hartnell, John Galliano and Vivienne Westwood feature, along with those of stars like Gwen Stefani. To accompany the exhibition, the book The Wedding Dress: 300 Years of Bridal Fashions by Edwina Ehrman, fashion curator at the V&A, details how the wedding became an elaborate affair. The Wedding Dress: 300 Years of Bridal Fashions is available from The Harrods Bookshop, Second Floor; Exhibition from 3rd May to 15th March at the Victoria and Albert Museum HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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INTERV IE W

Hollywood CALLING Currently the star of a worldwide TV hit about Leonardo da Vinci, Laura Haddock will soon be heading across the Atlantic with intergalactic success in her sights

Fendi dress £1,720; Annoushka ring £2,600 and earrings £8,200

BY HARVEY MARCUS PHOTOGRAPHER PAUL FARRELL DEPUTY FASHION EDITOR POPPY ROCK HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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INTERV IE W

B

Oscar de la Renta dress £11,750; Jimmy Choo shoes £595; OPPOSITE PAGE J Mendel dress £5,200; Carat ring £389. Available from Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor; International Designer and The Shoe Salon, First Floor THIS PAGE

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oth on camera and off, the last year has been a momentous one for Laura Haddock. So much so that it would be entirely understandable had she acquired a few of the more, shall we say, objectionable airs associated with stardom. There’s not, though, a smidgen of artifice about the 28-year-old actress, who came to the fore in the BBC’s Upstairs Downstairs and then starred in 2011’s The Inbetweeners Movie, which broke UK box-office records on its opening weekend. Since then, Haddock’s profile has gone up a few more notches. She’s currently playing Lucrezia Donati, the female lead in Da Vinci’s Demons, the steamy global hit (it airs in 150 countries) that reimagines Leonardo da Vinci’s life as a young man. And on the domestic front, she and her long-term beau, Hunger Games heartthrob Sam Claflin, tied the knot in a secret ceremony last July, and overnight became arguably Britain’s hottest acting couple. A few days before we met, she and Claflin had walked the BAFTA red carpet together, arm in arm in Burberry, giving Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie a glamorous run for their money. “If you’ve got your buddy there, it’s much nicer,” she says, recalling how nervous and excited she was during previous BAFTAs. And Haddock was happy to lend her 27-year-old husband to his adoring followers. “It’s frenzied for Sam,” she says. “Bless him. They’ll go crazy until Leonardo DiCaprio turns up and he’s pushed out of the way!” At film producer Harvey Weinstein’s BAFTA after-party, Haddock got a surprise embrace from Oprah Winfrey. “I think it was a mistake,” she laughs. “As she was leaving she hugged me and said, ‘Darling, I love your dress!’ And I hugged her and said, ‘I love your dress!’ Then she left and I was thinking, Well, that was Oprah giving me a massive hug. Sam and I just burst out laughing. He was like, ‘Do you know her?’ and I was like, ‘Not a clue. Obviously. Never met her!’ But she was lovely.” This summer, Haddock gets her own crack at a Hollywood franchise, playing Meredith Quill (that’s all she can reveal) in Guardians of the Galaxy, a superheropacked affair with an A-list cast including Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana and Benicio Del Toro. So did she and Cooper have a chat at the BAFTAs? “Sam’s just worked with his girlfriend [Suki Waterhouse] in a film called Love, Rosie, so you kind of meet people.” But, she says, “I didn’t tell him we were going to be in the same film. He was nominated [for American Hustle]… he had a big night. He’s lovely, but it just didn’t come up.” Being “overly pushy” is also not the done thing for wellbrought-up girls (Haddock’s father, Ian, works in finance; her mother, Debbie, practises reflexology) from leafy Harpenden, Hertfordshire. A modern-day English rose, she looks to the likes of Kate Bosworth and Miranda Kerr for style inspiration, and has a penchant for designers such as Isabel Marant, Christopher Kane, Chanel and Oscar de la Renta. As a 10-year-old, she would transcribe scenes from her favourite movies, Pollyanna and Hook, then recruit her younger siblings, Beth and Jack, to perform “with” her in front of the family – “But I’d do all the parts and wear all the costumes,” she says. “So a lot of the time, they’d just be standing there.” Though she always wanted to be an actress, at 16 she was torn between that and her other “big love”, lacrosse – at which she represented southeast England.


INTERV IE W

“When you’re in your house and in your jammies and you’ve got your dog, and you’re cooking… whatever you’re doing is just normal” “Then I broke my leg, and took it as a bit of a sign.” By the time she finished studying drama at Chiswick’s Arts Educational School, she had already found herself an agent who would prove pivotal on both a professional and personal level. Four years ago, having forged a solid career in theatre and TV, Haddock auditioned for a role in My Week with Marilyn. Also up for the film was fellow hopeful Claflin. It was, she says with enviable certainty, love at first sight. “We always thank those guys who were involved with that film. I was hoping he’d be bad so I’d be put off and wouldn’t have to fall in love!” Haddock called her agent right after the audition, telling him how much she liked Claflin. It transpired that the two shared the same agent – and the young actor had made a similar call: “We lived minutes apart and didn’t know it,” she says. Given their twin successes, the couple has to be apart for long periods. Currently, Haddock is spending eight months a year filming Da Vinci’s Demons in Wales, while Claflin is based in Atlanta, working on Parts One and Two of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay. “It’s hard,” Haddock confesses. “Thank goodness we don’t have anything to compare it to; it’s been like that since we met.” Other young actors might blanch at the difficulties of fame, but Haddock and Claflin are able to maintain a sense of perspective and gratitude for their good fortune. “I absolutely love this job,” she says. “You know, Sam and I daydream all the time about having our own production company, where we can put all of our talented mates in one production, just hang out together and make a film. It would be a dream.” While their transatlantic lifestyle has its challenges, and is far from normal, any nascent Brad and Angelina comparisons are way off the mark; in fact, the couple’s dinner parties are mostly reserved for “buddies we’ve had for years”. “When you’re in your house and in your jammies and you’ve got your dog, and you’re cooking… whatever you’re doing is just normal,” Haddock continues. “Sam, to me, is like a massive geek, husband, person who I just clean the house with…”. Talking of which, it seems the couple is very particular when it comes to domestic chores, with Haddock admitting something of an obsession in that area. “Sam’s got it as well,” she laughs. “I like things at right angles and I’m constantly wiping things down. But if I start doing it in other people’s houses, I should get it seen to.” HMN Da Vinci’s Demons premieres on 4th April on Fox UK Harvey Marcus has written for Elle and Marie Claire, and now runs his own film company, Pigtail Productions

Hair and Make-up CIONA JOHNSON-KING at AartLondon Photographer’s Assistants JAMES KEMMENOE and SIMON TANG HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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THE LATEST LOOKS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CATWALKS

Petal PUSHERS

Fashion’s flower fixation is in full bloom this season as designers cultivate their new collections to include the most captivating floral prints, petal appliqués and bold botanical embellishments

Anthea Simms

BY LINDSAY MACPHERSON

Michael Kors dress £2,125 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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Temperley London dress £1,399

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Burberry Prorsum clutch £795

Erdem

Erdem sweater £1,550

Gucci jacket £2,060

Oscar de la Renta dress £2,675

Christopher Kane dress £950

Tory Burch tote £375

Petals iStock

Available from Designer Accessories, Lower Ground Floor; Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor; and Eveningwear and International Designer, First Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

Christian Dior dress £9,400

Gucci

“The lyrically romantic becomes dangerous; a beautiful rose garden becomes poisonous”

Dolce & Gabbana dress £9,600

Dolce & Gabbana

Christian Dior

Shourouk necklace £670

Christopher Kane

A

t first blush, this season’s flower-strewn offerings might seem somewhat clichéd. After all, floral prints for spring aren’t exactly groundbreaking. But look again: fashion’s vibrant new crop is far from garden-variety. Proving that even old favourites can benefit from a fresh perspective, designers have put a seriously inventive spin on their blooms. Alice Temperley of Temperley London cross-pollinated her pink lilacs with leopard prints, for example, while Oscar de la Renta set his saturated florals against polka dots for a playful 1950s feel. At Christian Dior, the vivid prints on spliced and pleated dresses looked positively toxic, the antithesis of the classically pretty florals of past seasons. Raf Simons’ vision was a world where, he says, “the lyrically romantic becomes dangerous; a beautiful rose garden becomes poisonous,” and his posy prints’ hothouse hues were reflected in the plant life (some fresh, some fake) that fell around the catwalk. Simons’ collection ran the gamut of floral references from garden-themed mantras typed across dresses to jewel-toned garlands draped around jackets and ditsy wildflower prints worked into jacquard bustiers. These are powerful statement pieces, best juxtaposed with black or neutrals to avoid gilding the lily. Extreme artisanship set the dresses at Dolce & Gabbana apart. The duo’s almond-blossom prints came alive with delicate three-dimensional petals, while black lace was enlivened with embroidered roses. Michael Kors’ collection also took the trend back to its ultra-feminine roots. A ’40s-style cornflower dress was the most intricately crafted piece, constructed from sheer lace and Raf Simons overlaid with layers of appliquéd silk petals. In the hands of another designer it could have looked prim; styled as it was – cinched at the waist with a snakeskin belt – it had bite. Floral accessories were a blossoming trend too. There were petal clutches at Burberry Prorsum and tote bags printed with botanical illustrations at Tory Burch. Bold, crystal-encrusted flower jewellery abounded at Shourouk and Lanvin. And even labels following fashion’s sports-luxe trend weren’t immune to florals’ chintzy charm. At Erdem, a slouchy white sweater was adorned with supersized 3D flowers, while Gucci’s Frida Giannini used Erté’s Art Deco swirls to render stylised blooms on sheer bomber jackets. Ever the contrarian, Christopher Kane was the most unconventional of all. For SS14, the Scotsman reinterpreted botanical illustrations from his school biology textbooks as petal-shaped portholes and crystal-encrusted, floral crocodile clips. Not just an exercise in undiluted creativity, the collection was didactic too: the pieces that depicted cross-section diagrams of flowers also served to highlight the lack of sex education in schools. Cerebral yet stylish, Kane’s stems are proof that, this season, the smart way to get your point across is to say it with flowers. HMN

Temperley London

FA SHION


FA SHION I N T E RV IE W

It’s a family AFFAIR

Getty Images

Etro’s bohemian mix of prints and patterns has been underpinned by four close-knit and incredibly talented siblings – not to mention their father By LINDSAY MACPHERSON

It’s not only the dolce vita aesthetic that defines Italian fashion houses, but also craftsmanship, a rich tapestry of tradition, and family. Companies from Fendi to Ferragamo have taken a dynastic approach. On the surface, Milanese fashion brand Etro might seem to be the same, yet it’s actually something of an anomaly. For its first two decades, the fashion house focused purely on fabrics, carving out a niche producing silk, cashmere and cotton for couturiers and fashion companies. It wasn’t until 1984, when founder Gerolamo “Gimmo” Etro discovered paisley print on a trip to India, that he made his first foray into fashion. Etro’s ascension to fully fledged design firm was swift, and the family grew at a similar pace. But being born an Etro wasn’t an automatic pass into the business and, with no concerted succession plan in place, it seems to be purely serendipitous that the Etro siblings are where they are today. “We weren’t really encouraged to enter the family business by my father,” confirms Veronica Etro, who is Creative Director of womenswear and, at 40, the youngest of Gimmo’s children. “It was my brother Kean who asked me to join the design team while I was in my last year at Saint Martins.” Still, even with a fashion degree under her belt and the endorsement of Kean behind her, Veronica was expected to pay her dues. She joined Etro as an apprentice, spending two seasons assisting Kean (who started at Etro as an intern in 1982, only graduating to design eight years later) before taking over womenswear design for the Spring/Summer 2000 season. “I remember that summer when I was designing the womenswear collections really clearly,” she says. “I dreamt of the fashion show every night. It was such a huge responsibility and I really felt the pressure.” Despite her apprehension, the collection was well received – both critically and commercially – and today Kean and

Veronica Etro at the SS14 fashion show in Milan

Veronica’s clothes generate sales that are central to Etro’s success. This is in contrast to most luxury brands, where profits from fashion collections are boosted – or eclipsed – by perfume and accessory sales. Combined, the siblings’ collections account for around 70 per cent of Etro’s revenues, which last year were €325m, up four per cent from 2012; in emerging markets such as China, they rose by a massive 120 per cent. Those figures make Etro an attractive target for investors, yet one of Gimmo Etro’s key tenets is that the company should remain a family concern, and today it’s one of the few Italian fashion houses that remains wholly owned and operated by its family. “It’s not often that you’re able to blend the professional with the personal,” concedes Veronica. “But we’re a very tight family and we share an appreciation of our heritage, a respect for our history and a real love for what our father started.” What’s key, Veronica believes, is that each sibling has a clearly defined role within the different sectors of the business. This is something that’s allowed the family’s X HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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“I design for a woman who isn’t afraid of colour or a touch of eclecticism, so for each collection I push new techniques that create innovative materials and prints” patriarch, now in his seventies, to step back into semiretirement, though he still helps out when necessary. “Each of us is responsible for a different aspect, and we allow one another the freedom to make decisions,” Veronica explains. Kean has complete control of the menswear collections, as Veronica does with womenswear, while Jacopo, the eldest, oversees communications, as well as the accessories, home and textiles divisions. Ippolito, the second youngest – who worked his way up the ranks in Etro’s New York office – was, until recently, both CEO and CFO, a role that meant he was occasionally responsible for reining in his siblings’ spending or some of their more avant-garde ideas. While they might not always have consensus on creative direction, it’s clear that they don’t let conflict come between them. “Obviously, when you’re working with family members, you can get into heated debates,” Veronica acknowledges, “but the honesty and openness you get in a family business is also one of the greatest advantages. You can really push those creative boundaries.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Etro dress £3,375,

gown £2,775, dress £1,399, dress £3,275 and gown £3,150

When it comes to Etro – a brand whose beloved paisley emblem seems to be the fulcrum of all its creative output – one might not think that boundary-pushing would be high on the agenda. Yet Veronica and Kean are committed to evolving Etro’s artsy, bohemian aesthetic every season and, while the paisley print is pivotal to each collection, both of them continually recast and rework it. For SS14, Kean branded it onto leather, while Veronica deconstructed it, hand-sewing paisley prints onto a spliced, multicoloured collage. “Each season we take a very different tack with our paisleys,” says Veronica, whose prints have riffed on everything from Russian ceramics to traditional Romanian dress. “Sometimes we look at it through a classic lens and sometimes we totally revolutionise it. It doesn’t ever feel restrictive.” For SS14, Veronica began as she always does – immersed in her family’s extensive archive of textile art at the fashion house’s headquarters in Milan. “I spend months gathering images and swatches of fabric, and taking notes of things


Kean Etro and model Anthea Simms

FA SHION I N T E RV IE W

that inspire me,” she says. “I design for a woman who isn’t afraid of colour or a touch of eclecticism, so for each collection I push new techniques that create innovative materials and prints.” Her starting point this season was a series of 1940s fabric-bound books that once belonged to her grandmother. Her prints were formed from a mash-up of the books’ bold floral motifs and the brand’s signature paisleys. They appeared on 1970s-style maxidresses, slouchy tunic tops in faded pastels, and draped dresses with intricately wrought chainmail plackets and metallic fringing inspired by the Ottoman Empire. They were glamorous without being overtly sexy, and individual without being outré, which neatly sums up the Etro style. Everyone from Beyoncé to Michelle Obama, Elle Macpherson to Italian fashion doyenne Anna Dello Russo is a fan of Veronica’s clothes, which are, in her own words, “timeless rather than trendy”. Kean’s menswear designs are – to borrow another well-used phrase – classics with a twist, combining Italian tailoring and Etro’s colourful prints with a quirky, offbeat

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE RIGHT Kean

Etro (right) with a model at the SS14 catwalk show; Etro jacket £850 and shirt £270; shirt £330 and trousers £575; jacket £1,199, trousers £210 and scarf £575; shirt £220, trousers £574 and scarf £180

execution. His inspirations are sometimes esoteric, sometimes playful. His SS14 collection celebrated the fictional character Zorro, which translated into vivid horse prints, Mexican-style embroidery, and slim, tailored trousers with chap-style panels. Kean has also gained a reputation for staging unconventional catwalk productions, such as commissioning an Inuit shamanic healer to produce the soundtrack for his SS13 show, and converting his AW05 catwalk into a car wash. “Kean is a true virtuoso,” says the London-based architect and gallery owner Rabih Hage, a longtime Etro client. “One of my favourite pieces is a sharply tailored pinstripe suit; it looks very traditional from a distance, but when you get up close, you realise the pinstripes are all different widths. That’s typical of his designs – first you notice the classicism, but on closer inspection, you see the inherent wit that really sets them apart.” “Kean and I both design under a principle we call new tradition. That means we try to balance the heritage of the brand with a modern touch,” Veronica explains. X HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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How to wear WHITE SHOES Shrug off your preconceptions; white stillies have reinvented themselves as the shoe du jour

“We work very closely together and rely on one another to share ideas and discuss our vision, which is something that’s really important to us. Our company keeps getting bigger and bigger, but I love the fact that the family at the centre of it all remains so small.” Still, the Etro clan is growing. Is Veronica, a mother of two, already eyeing up the next generation of talent? Or will she assume the same rather laissez-faire attitude to succession as her father had? “I don’t know yet,” she says. “They’re far too young. What’s important for now is to just let them develop their skills and passions without any restrictions. My youngest son is creative, so he may well go into design. But then again, he equally might go into architecture – he’s five and does great Lego construction.” HMN Available from Mens’ International Gallery, Lower Ground Floor; and International Designer, First Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

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Available from Christian Louboutin Boutique and The Shoe Salon, First Floor; and harrods.com . To watch a video of this feature, download the Harrods Magazine app Laura Barton is a feature writer for The Guardian. She also writes for Q, The Word, Vogue and Red

Credits TK Images

“We try to balance the heritage of the brand with a modern touch. We work very closely together and rely on one another to share ideas and discuss our vision”

People have an awful lot to say about women who wear white shoes. First, that anyone who might step out in anything as preposterously impractical as Carvela’s opentoed sandal, with its metal ankle cuff and spiky heel, is obviously living some sort of red-carpeted life of Riley in which one doesn’t have to contemplate the grubby irritations of pavements and puddles. Second, people like to cast aspersions about a lady in white stilettos. It’s that old Essex-girl stereotype dredged up from the silty depths of decades past: the brassy postcard blonde in a short skirt, low-cut top and frosted pink lipstick. So when you slip on your divine Manolo Blahnik white stiletto, do so with the knowledge that white stilettos have become a byword for all that is tacky and common and end-of-the-pier, no matter the cut or the crafting or, indeed, the price tag. And no, not even in this instance, with Blahnik’s coloured detail on the toe – nothing can distract from the fact that you are wearing white stilettos. We can call this season’s white-shoe flurry a reclamation of a much-maligned item of footwear but, really, doesn’t that sound too grand for something so unequivocally fun? Because this is precisely how to wear those fabulous Blahnik heels: with levity, with a knowing wink, with a look that says, “I may or may not drive a Ford Escort and drink Malibu.” The white boot is another matter. It’s a little bit punk and a little bit space age, and must therefore be worn with insouciance, as if you really don’t give a damn about the fate of your Christian Louboutin ankle boots with their pencilthin heel and metal toe, since you are a sharp-tongued hell-raiser channelling your inner banshee. Or, in the case of Saint Laurent’s exquisite Chelsea boot, you are too busy moonwalking, or hitching a ride to the jet age, or whatever it is that hepcats are doing nowadays. FROM TOP Carvela sandals Lastly, let us consider the orthopaedic nature of £120; Manolo Blahnik white shoes, as exemplified delectably by Nicholas shoes £575; Christian Louboutin boots £895; Kirkwood’s cut-out flat sandal. While to those and Saint Laurent in the know they are delightful summer footwear, boots £780; Nicholas to the untrained eye they might seem the sort of Kirkwood sandals £430 shoes endorsed by your podiatrist. I recommend you ignore the naysayers and relish your pretty-yet-practical sandals. After all, how often does fashion give us a season to rest our bunions?

Credits TK Images

Veronica Etro with a model at the SS14 catwalk show

Veronica Etro and model Jason Lloyd Evans

By LAURA BARTON


NEWS

Queen Victoria

My favourite THINGS

“My aim is to create the perfect dress,” pronounced Victoria Beckham when she launched her first collection. Today, five years on, her words have proved prescient indeed. Not only has she mastered the high-impact dress in her mainline collection (everyone from Olivia Palermo to Gwyneth Paltrow has professed their love for her precisioncut sheaths), but in her Victoria, Victoria Beckham line, she has produced a definitive selection of day dresses. The designer’s preAW14 collection includes geometric jacquardprint dresses with playful sheer panels, simple 1960s-style dresses in burnished gold, and a drop-waisted shift dress with an inverted front pleat. From left Victoria, Victoria Beckham dresses £560 and £675. Available from Studio, First Floor

by Lindsay Macpherson

Top HATS

He’s feted by the fashion industry for his outré designs (remember the replica 18th-century sailing-ship headpiece for Isabella Blow?) but Philip Treacy can turn his hand to conventional headwear too. His SS14 collection interprets flowers and natural forms in original, inventive and wearable ways: berets are adorned with hand-curled feathers and scrolls of buntal (a Philippine palm fibre), while satin pillboxes feature sculptural roses. Then there’s Treacy’s ode to the orchid (a variety was named after the milliner last year): a face-framing sun hat with oversized silk Vanda orchids and a violet butterfly. Philip Treacy hat £7,525. Available from Millinery, First Floor

Amazing LACE

Fine lace, dominant in high fashion this season, also features in haute joaillerie. The historic house of Buccellati has been making ultra-delicate jewellery inspired by traditional Italian lacemaking for more than two centuries, and its latest efforts look like spun gold. Due to the delicate process, each piece can take up to three years to make, with the new Bartolomeo necklace one of the Milanese jeweller’s most ambitious undertakings to date; master artisans have not only handcrafted an intricate honeycomb pattern, but have woven in 646 diamonds with a combined weight of 52.16cts. Buccellati necklace and earrings, both price on request. Available from The Fine Jewellery Room, Ground Floor

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“When the Serpentine Gallery staged a Jean-Michel Basquiat retrospective in 1996, I was first in line: he’s always been my favourite artist and when I was in art school he was a huge inspiration. I bought a Basquiat-print T-shirt by Paul Smith with Sugar Ray Robinson scrawled on it in chalk and a really crude drawing of a face. I was a painter and hadn’t considered being a T-shirt designer, but I remember being struck by how something so simple – a black print on a white background – could make such an impact. When I was a teenager I had a huge collection of badly fitting band T-shirts – I see them as a sort of blank canvas; I love that you can use them to express your personality and signify your taste. My Black Score label is really influenced by that tribal aspect: FROM TOP Simeon Farrar the designs are all Ice Cream T-shirt £99.95, informed by music Duck Print T-shirt £99.95 and pop culture. and I’ll Follow You T-shirt Since I became a dress £125. Available from T-shirt designer I’ve Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor pretty much only worn my own designs – my Basquiat T-shirt is the only exception. It’s pretty battered and weathered… when I got it out today I realised, to my horror, that I’d splashed paint on it. It’s also got holes in it and is all faded, but I still wear it. When a T-shirt is all beaten up, it’s part of the charm, isn’t it? T-shirts should be worn to death. It adds character. I love it whenever I see someone wearing a really early Simeon Farrar T-shirt – it’s cool to see them age along with people. At the beginning I made everything by hand, sewing every T-shirt myself; I’m not sure if those ones will have stood the test of time – they may be crop tops by now.”

Illustration T S Abe

Since launching his first screen-printed and hand-painted T-shirts in 2004, fine-arttrained designer Simeon Farrar has won the British Fashion Council’s NEWGEN award three times. He talks to Harrods Magazine about a T-shirt that’s stayed close to his heart.


FA SHION

The TRANSLUCENT BOMBER

Burberry Prorsum coat £1,195 and dress £895

The ultimate utilitarian staple was given an ultra-luxe upgrade for SS14, as designers juxtaposed bomber jackets’ sporty shapes with see-through fabrics and finely crafted embroidery Jay Ahr jacket £1,099

Burberry Prorsum

Raquel Allegra top £365

3.1 Phillip Lim jacket £1,075

Victoria Beckham shirt £1,050

Jay Ahr

Sheer GENIUS

Focusing on feather-light fabrics and transparent cutouts, this season’s take on sheer offers a compelling new aesthetic

Erdem jacket £1,375 J Mendel dress £2,880 Christian Louboutin shoes £745

Dark, spidery lace and fragments of mirror gave Tom Ford’s sheer dresses an edgy sensibility. Tom Ford gown £15,000

Joseph dress £835

Christian Louboutin shoes £675

Emanuel Ungaro dress £2,025

Available from Christian Louboutin Boutique, Designer Studio and International Designer, First Floor; and Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

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Stylist Olivia Halsall

CHOICE

J Mendel

*EDITOR’S

Fendi dress £1,530


FA SHION

Prints charming

In 2006, Carolina Herrera declared, “I don’t ever want to be trendy.” The designer is still proving the point that she’s a purveyor of classic – rather than relentlessly au courant – clothing by curating a greatest-hits collection in prints from seasons past. The second crop to make the cut in the series includes Herrera’s whimsical Love Letters print from Resort 2011 and the nautical Swimming Ladies print (left) that appeared in the SS05 show. Carolina Herrera dress £1,025, skirt £699 and white shirt £420. Available from International Designer, First Floor

FLORAL tribute

Not content to base its creations on any old flower, the historic jewellery house of Piaget instead looks to its very own bloom. The full-blossomed and fragrant Romantica rose was named after the company’s president, Yves Piaget. The rose has inspired countless designs, including a series of sculptural pink opal pendants. The Limelight Blooming Rose watch is the latest creation to take its cue from the influential flower, with a delicate diamond pavé case in the form of peony-esque petals. The Blooming Rose has an ingenious twist: turning the gem-set case reveals four hidden petals. Piaget Limelight Blooming Rose watch £35,100. Available from The Fine Jewellery Room, Ground Floor

American dream

The boys behind NYC-based brand Rag & Bone are rightly proud of their “made in America” manufacturing stance, but their design style has always been more informed by their British roots. For SS14, the duo proved they can do all-American design with aplomb too. The pair paid homage to American sportswear and pioneer-era workwear, offering a polished, 1990s-inflected collection of creamcoloured outerwear, deconstructed shirting and embroidered dresses. Left Rag & Bone jacket £1,225; right shirt £245. Available from Designer Studio, First Floor

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An interview with

MICHELLE SMITH by Maria Milano

Harrods Magazine spoke to designer Michelle Smith just moments before she unveiled her AW14 line for Milly at New York Fashion Week. Here she reveals who the bright new stars on the style scene are, what inspired her romantic collection and why, even after more than 20 seasons, preparing for a show is still daunting. “I named my collection Dusk, inspired by the moody colour palette of nightfall. There are some beautiful, romantic alabasters and blush pinks that transition into the natural colours of the night. For my silhouette, I looked to classical dance, as I’ve been going to the ballet a lot recently and think ballet is where it’s at. I get inspiration from everywhere; it’s always a personal thing. I feel like the new ballerinas coming up are the new style stars. They have really cool off-duty looks, and I think it’s their moment in fashion. Maria Kochetkova of the San Francisco ballet, in particular, has a wonderful Instagram account called Balletrusse – I’m obsessed! Most of my show panic comes three months beforehand. I’m calm now, but I get jittery when I really have to make a decision on what my silhouette’s going to be, FROM TOP Milly what my colour palette is dress £415 and dress and when I have to have £600. Available from Studio, all the fabrics ordered. And the first few sketches First Floor; and harrods.com are always very hard. Sometimes I have so many ideas in my head, I can’t sketch fast enough. So I have to write little notes for myself so I don’t forget. But then I gain momentum and it all comes together. I’m always looking forward to the next thing. I wear my own clothes, so I’m always thinking, What would I want to wear? Last fall I was in a sporty mood and the collection was all about very technical fabrics. This season is more classical with a touch of technicality. After my shows, I celebrate. I heave a big sigh of relief and go out for drinks with friends and team members.”


NEWS

Ringing the changes The name Jil Sander has been synonymous with understatement since the 1980s, when her less-is-more aesthetic ushered in an era of minimalism in an age of excess. Yet even the biggest proponent of pareddown design can change her spots, and this season – her last at the helm of the label – Sander did just that. Trademark tailored jackets were reimagined in fluorescent floral-print jacquards, while cotton poplin blouson shirts got a surprise sporty twist courtesy of contrasting fabric panels, a zippered front placket and elasticated cuffs. From left Jil Sander shirt £495, trousers £475, jacket £495 and shorts £305. Available from Men’s International Gallery, Lower Ground Floor

Knit KNACK

His tailored suiting is practically the gold standard in sartorial elegance – but Giorgio Armani’s prodigious talents don’t stop there. As those in the know are well aware, the designer’s ultra-stylish, Italian-made knitwear manages to strike the perfect balance between classic and contemporary. His SS14 collection is a case in point, comprising monochrome crewnecks emblazoned with geometric trompel’oeil prints, and a navy blue Argyle-style sweater with semi-sheer diamond patterns. From top Giorgio Armani sweaters £699 and £1,099. Available from Men’s International Collections, Ground Floor

Reverso engineering

How does one improve on perfection? Or, put more plainly, how can Swiss watchmaker JaegerLeCoultre refine the Reverso, a model that has endured almost unaltered for eight decades? The answer, it seems, is to remain faithful to the watch’s original aesthetic principles while making a few tweaks that reference its history. The result is the Grande Reverso Ultra Thin 1931, incorporating the original swivelling mechanism in a slender 7.3mm rose-gold case; this sits under a sleek face in the same shade that was introduced in the 1930s. There’s also an allusion to the Reverso’s polo heritage: the leather strap is made by Casa Fagliano, an Argentinian polo outfitter. Jaeger-LeCoultre Grande Reverso Ultra Thin 1931, £12,900. Available from The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor

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The Grooming Guru

gets fresh

As much as I adore the rich, warm smokiness of oud and the dark complexity of spicy woody scents, at this time of year I like something new in my fragrance repertoire. So I turn my attention to lighter, fresher cocktails with an unmistakable sense of summer. Traditionally, fragrances big on citrus notes, such as Dior’s timeless Eau Sauvage (one of my all-time favourites and still going strong nearly 50 years after its launch) are my go-to scents, mainly because they have such effervescent brightness and add “zing” to the skin. But if you still like your summer fragrances to embrace some warmth and sexiness, try Floris’ Spencer Hart Palm Springs, which features a raft of citrus notes, but rounds them out nicely with warm amber, musk and vanilla. Alternatively, check out Ferrari’s new woody-but-clear Cedar Essence, bursting with exhilarating notes of orange, lime and FROM TOP Dior Eau ginger that gradually Sauvage eau de toilette 50ml, £46; Floris Spencer give way to the Hart Palm Springs eau soft creaminess de parfum 100ml, £139; of cedar wood. Ferrari Cedar Essence eau It’s an addictive de parfum 100ml, £79; combination. Then Dior Homme Eau For there’s Dior Homme Men eau de toilette 50ml, £48; Salvatore Ferragamo Eau For Men – Acqua Essenziale Blu eau a superb scent de toilette 50ml, £43; Terre that’s spicy, but with d’Hermès Eau Très Fraîche a clean, powderyeau de toilette 125ml, £77. Floris is exclusive to but-masculine Harrods. Available from quality to it. The Gentleman’s Lounge, Perfumers can also Lower Ground Floor; generate an uplifting The Beauty Apothecary and The Perfumery feel by recreating Hall, Ground Floor; and the clarity of water, harrods.com often with the help of an element called cascalone – which features prominently in Salvatore Ferragamo’s Acqua Essenziale Blu, deliciously clean with a crisp edge. I love this. A similar fragrance, which achieves a tingly freshness by the addition of compounds called aldehydes, is Terre d’Hermès Eau Très Fraîche, a lighter version of the contemporary classic Terre d’Hermès. It’s like adding a fresh white shirt to your wardrobe. Lee Kynaston is the Online Grooming Editor of menshealth.co.uk and has his own blog at groomingguru.co.uk


FA SHION Haider Ackermann jacket £2,625

the METALLIC 3.1 Phillip Lim jacket £1,999

Dolce & Gabbana jacket £2,710

The ACCESSORIES

Sleek, pared-down shapes and ’70s colour palettes set the new leather accessories apart

the PERFORATED

Haider Ackermann

1

Burberry Prorsum bag £495

GSR by Belstaff jacket £999

Hide and CHIC

Vivienne Westwood jacket £1,299, exclusive to Harrods

Innovative textures, eye-catching colours and masterful cuts lend an appealing modernity to this season’s leathers Versace jacket £6,050

the BLUES Just Cavalli jacket £750

The BOLD BRAND Nobody does skin-tight leather better than Donatella Versace. For SS14, her designs are edgy, irreverent and brimming with attitude.

Versace

Dolce & Gabbana card holder £110

Juun J jacket £1,950

Gucci jacket £3,700

Available from Men’s Accessories, Men’s Casuals and Men’s International Gallery, Lower Ground Floor; and Men’s International Collections, Ground Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

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Stylist Olivia Halsall

the NEUTRAL

Givenchy pouch £330

Gucci

the BRIGHT


FA SHION

Hannah Coffin gown £3,999; Manolo Blahnik shoes £695; Chopard earrings, price on request HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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THIS PAGE Xxxxx jacket £XXXX; Xxxxx shirt £XXXX; Xxxxx glasses £XXXX; THIS PAGE Lanvin gown OPPOSITE PAGE Xxxxx £4,550; Vickisarge bracelet jacket and trousers from a£XXXX selection; OPPOSITE £XXXX; Xxxxx PAGE Oscar de lashirt Renta £XXXX; Xxxxx socks dress £5,399; Stephen £XXXX; shoes Webster Xxxxx cuff £2,320; £XXXX Lola Rose bangle £110


Zuhair Murad gown ÂŁ6,775


FA SHION

THIS PAGE Saint Laurent dress £2,550; OPPOSITE PAGE Jenny Packham gown £7,225

Hair TONY COLLINS at Streeters using Bumble and Bumble; Make-up LIZ DAXAUER at Caren using Givenchy Teint Couture and Le Rouge; Model DIANA KHULLINA at Premier; Junior Fashion Assistant OLIVIA HALSALL; Photographer’s Assistants ROMAIN FORQUY and LOIC GIRARD Available from The Fine Jewellery Room and Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor; Eveningwear, International Designer and The Shoe Salon, First Floor; and harrods.com . To watch a video of this feature, download the Harrods Magazine app. Shot on location at Hever Castle, Kent HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA SHION

URBANE LANDSCAPE

The contemporary woman’s wardrobe is filled with key pieces that mix, match and mismatch. Enter Harrods of London, the exclusive signature brand created with a knowledge and understanding of the needs of our modern-day customers PHOTOGRAPHER JASON ELL / DEPUTY FASHION EDITOR POPPY ROCK

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FA SHION

THIS PAGE Harrods of London gilet £1,950 top £350 and leather miniskirt £250; Christian Louboutin shoes £435; OPPOSITE PAGE Harrods of London gilet £1,950 and sweater £179 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA SHION


FA SHION

THIS PAGE Harrods of

London dress £400;

OPPOSITE PAGE Harrods

of London gilet £4,450, sweater £179 and skirt £250; Christian Louboutin shoes £435 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA SHION

THIS PAGE Harrods of London cape £1,450 and dress £400; Christian Louboutin shoes £435; OPPOSITE PAGE Harrods of London jacket £899 and skirt £300 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA SHION

THIS PAGE Harrods of London dress £699; OPPOSITE PAGE Harrods of

London sweater £179 and skirt £499; Christian Louboutin shoes £435 Hair MARK FRANCOME PAINTER Make-up SILVER BRAMHAM using Chanel Hydra Beauty Nutrition and SS14 Model JADE MEZARD at Elite Senior Fashion Assistant BECKY BRANCH Photographer’s Assistants SCOTT ARCHIBALD, ELIZABETH FRANKS and MATT WASH Available from Christian Louboutin Boutique, Designer Collections and Luxury Collections, First Floor. To watch a video of this feature, download the Harrods Magazine app HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NEW PERSPECTIVES Contemporary tailoring uses innovative fabrics and a lean silhouette to challenge its classic reputation, allowing the most traditional of two-pieces to pack some personality PHOTOGRAPHER JOHN SPINKS / FASHION EDITOR VICTORIA GAIGER


FA SHION

THIS PAGE Harrods of London suit £599; Thomas Pink shirt £89; Club Monaco tie £70; Tateossian cuff links £279; OPPOSITE PAGE Brioni suit £3,750; Thomas Pink shirt £89; Tateossian cuff links £279; Paul Smith shoes £190 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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THIS PAGE Brunello Cucinelli overcoat £1,350, suit £2,425 and shirt £299; Prada glasses £190; OPPOSITE PAGE Givenchy tuxedo jacket £1,650 and trousers £330; Thomas Pink shirt £89; Falke socks £13; Paul Smith shoes £190


FA SHION

THIS PAGE Saint Laurent

jacket £1,775, shirt £290, trousers £310, tie £145 and shoes £605; OPPOSITE PAGE Dolce & Gabbana jacket £1,430 and trousers £340; Valentino shirt £290; Paul Smith glasses £190 Grooming MATT RAINE at One Represents Models WILL BRUNNEN, DILL, and AARON GATWARD at Select; DUNCAN PYKE at Elite Senior Fashion Assistant BECKY BRANCH Photographer’s Assistants KITTY GALE and SARAH LLOYD Available from Men’s Accessories, Men’s Shirts & Ties, The Men’s Shoe Salon, and Men’s Socks, Underwear & Nightwear, Lower Ground Floor; Men’s International Collections and Men’s Tailoring, Ground Floor; and harrods.com HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FOOD

XXXXXX XXXXXX

PRADA SPECIAL

HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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Photograph, previous page Ishi

Throughout May, Harrods is celebrating the world of Prada. The Brompton Road windows are showcasing sophisticated new womenswear and menswear collections, Luxury Accessories on the Ground Floor is home to a cornucopia of exclusive bags in a rainbow of shades, and a pop-up shop features special limited editions. The collaboration culminates in Pradasphere, an exhibition on the Fourth Floor that traces the extraordinary activities of the Italian design powerhouse, including fashion, accessories, events, architecture, cinema and beyond. The specially curated selection pays testament to the creative evolution of the brand and covers historic collections, unique partnerships and artistic experiments. The exhibition is adjoined I`[OLÄYZ[7YHKHZWOLYL*HMt^OPJO^PSSZLY]L Italian delicacies with customary Prada style. Pradasphere combines the history, the modernity and the intelligence of Miuccia Prada in a glorious celebration of her singular creative vision.

PREVIOUS PAGE Prada fur stole £610, jacket £3,320, blouse £865 and skirt £2,185


READY-TO-WANT In celebration of Pradasphere, bringing the world of Prada to Harrods, the fashion house presents a collection of pieces that perfectly embody the brand’s signature aesthetic PHOTOGRAPHER ISHI / FASHION EDITOR VICTORIA GAIGER


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada fur gilet £3,935, exclusive to Harrods; dress £1,615, bag £2,000 and shoes £485; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada dress £3,410


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada dress £1,615, exclusive to Harrods; and shoes £485; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada fur coat £9,615, exclusive to Harrods; and dress £1,215


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada dress £1,835, exclusive to Harrods; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada fur jacket with attached scarf £9,180 and skirt £605


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada coat £1,615, exclusive to Harrods; and skirt £960; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada coat £4,195, blouse £780, skirt £605 and shoes £485

Hair TONY COLLINS at Streeters using Bumble and Bumble; Make-up ALEX BABSKY at Frank Agency using Lancôme; Manicurist SHREEN GAYLE at Premier; Model AMANDA MURPHY at IMG; Junior Fashion Assistant OLIVIA HALSALL; Photographer’s Assistants CLARK FRANKLYN, JOSEPH MOLINES and TOM ORTIZ Available from International Designer and The Shoe Salon, First Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app


PR A DA S PHER E

FINISHING TOUCHES Eclectic yet focused, gloriously luxurious and way ahead of the fashion curve, Prada accessories are the cornerstone of the Italian powerhouse, and now include a collection that’s exclusive to Harrods PHOTOGRAPHER ALAIN COSTA

Prada green clutch £670, pink clutch £2,900, orange bag £3,150, yellow bag £3,850 and purple bag £4,500


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada shoes £1,200 per pair; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada bag in yellow £2,400 and white £2,250


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada black bag £11,000, white bag £1,300, sunglasses £455, white bangle £950 and black bangle £600; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada bag in red, black and white £1,300 and in yellow, black and white £1,300, sunglasses £325, purses in white and yellow £340 each and red wallet £350


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada black bag £1,630 and white and papaya bags £5,800 each; OPPOSITE PAGE Prada sandals in green £890, peacock £690,

fuchsia £690 and mandarin £830


PR A DA S PHER E

THIS PAGE Prada black briefcase £13,500, black document holder £8,000, blue document holder £2,900, shoes £1,800 and wallet £950; OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP Prada blue document holder £760, blue wallet £300, blue briefcase £4,650, shoes £1,800, grey document holder £2,800 and grey wallet £330 Available from Luxury Accessories and the Brompton Road windows, Ground Floor; and Pradasphere, Fourth Floor


PR A DA SPHER E

The ultimate IMAGINARY FLOWER We’ve been waiting for it: the next chapter in the story of Prada Candy. And now it’s here. Prada Candy Florale, a scent like no other PHOTOGRAPHER CHRIS TURNER

You remember Candy. How could anyone forget her? So full of verve and vitality. The inspiration for joyful and seductive Prada Candy and the oh-so-tempting Prada Candy L’Eau. Well, she’s back, and this time, she’s on another planet. Seems Candy’s been craving a new fragrance that captures her perfect flower. And since this is Candy we’re talking about, it has to be out of this world. Which is why perfumer Daniela Andrier, under the creative direction of Miuccia Prada, set out on a voyage around the universe in a quest to find this elusive and exclusive flower. What they discovered was a fantasy bloom bursting with life and sensuality, reflecting the many facets of Candy’s character – the perfect heart for new Prada Candy Florale. The fragrance sparkles with light and airiness, unfurling to reveal tender, powdery notes, full of spring-like grace, followed by a whisper of warmth and honey. The bottle itself beams with pink floral tones, highlighting the delicate rosy shade of the fragrance. At the touch of the half-moon cap, which reminds Candy of the pure white cosmos, gravity – just like any man – cannot hold her. Away she floats, in a haze of pink clouds and organza blooms. Which just goes to prove that what Candy wants, Candy gets. 50ml, £41. Available from The Perfumery Hall, Ground Floor


SKINCARE / COSMETICS / FRAGRANCE

Natural SELECTION

Skincare embraces apple extracts and honey, regenerating rose petals and seaweed-rich serums, as nature meets science head on BY JAN MASTERS / PHOTOGRAPHER

ANDREW O’TOOLE

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Hair KEIICHIRO HIRANO at David Artists using Bumble and Bumble Make-up PHYLLIS COHEN at DWM using Giorgio Armani Manicurist NINA LEWIS at Joy Goodman Model RAGNHILD JEVNE at IMG Assistant Beauty Editor REBECCA BAIO Photographer’s Assistant LIAM AYLOTT Available from The Beauty Apothecary and The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor; Urban Retreat at Harrods, Fifth Floor; . and harrods.com For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

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BE AU T Y

For a complexion pick-me-up, I love this mask from Omorovicza, the skincare line that incorporates minerals from thermal springs in Budapest. The formulation also contains hyaluronic acid to hydrate, a wheat extract that has a lifting effect, and colloidal gold to reduce irritation and inflammation. In just 10 minutes, it leaves skin with a velvety finish. 50ml, £110

Looking for something that’s moisturising, protecting and re-plumping, as well as ultracomfortable on the skin? My pick is the Extreme Global Anti Ageing Line from EviDenS de Beauté, the specialist in anti-ageing for sensitive skin. The Cream, Serum, Eye & Lip Solution and Neck & Décolleté Solution all include the brand’s Triple Collagen ingredient, oligo-peptides and 10 botanical extracts, combining to provide a regenerative action. From £550; exclusive to Harrods

HIGH Beauty Editor Jan Masters reveals her top five beauty treats for the month

The latest addition to Yves Saint Laurent’s Oriental Collection – Splendid Wood – is a fragrance of contrasts; cardamom dazzles through the smoky, woody warmth of incense, wrapped in the creamy soft petals of jasmine sambac. It’s deliciously rich, and I adore the bottle too, with the classic YSL “Cassandre” logo resembling a Moroccan decorative screen. 80ml, £195; exclusive to Harrods

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Having enjoyed the gentle cleansing action of micellar waters, I couldn’t wait to try Decléor’s Micellar Oil. This formula transforms into a delicate milk on contact with water, leaving the complexion cleansed, refined and supple. Sweet almond oil, which is rich in essential fatty acids, helps to strengthen the skin’s barrier. True radiance is achieved in just three weeks. 150ml, £25; exclusive to Harrods

Nurse Jamie, aka Jamie Sherrill, is an aesthetic nurse and co-owner of Santa Monica medical spa Beauty Park. Now we can all get a piece of her skincare action with the ACCELerator Ultra, a toning device for the face and body. How does it work? Ultrasonic waves produce thermal energy, and the skin responds by making new collagen, which tightens and tones the complexion. £175; exclusive to Harrods

Available from The Beauty Apothecary, and The Cosmetics and Perfumery Halls, Ground Floor; and harrods.com

Creams Alamy

FIVE


FROM LEFT Dior 5 Couleurs in Sundeck £41, Rouge Dior in Trafalgar £26, Dior Addict Fluid Stick in Wonderland £26, Capture Totale DreamSkin £79

Dior summer

SCHOOL

Reflecting the sleek chic of the Dior SS14 catwalk show, Jamie Coombes, Dior’s International Pro Team artist, gives a textbook lesson in seasonal style BY REBECCA BAIO / PHOTOGRAPHER BENJAMIN KAUFMANN

RADIANT WITH RED STEP 1: Create a canvas “A pared-down look is perfectly on-trend. Boost natural glow by hydrating with a dab of Capture Totale DreamSkin, mixed with a little touch of Glow Maximizer primer for added luminosity. For foundation, I love Airflash, a lightweight spray foundation that gives a gentle veil of colour. Direct a few short bursts onto the five points of the face (forehead, nose, chin and both cheeks), keeping an elbow-to-shoulder distance away. Blend any excess with a brush. For a special touch, frame the outer area of the eye with Diorskin Nude Tan – the golden shimmer catches the light and accentuates the brow and cheekbones.”

STEP 2: Focus on lips “Giving just one feature a pop of colour looks great, and if using classic red, it doesn’t have to be hyper-pristine – a slightly softer look still hits the spot. Help lipstick glide on with a Lip Maximizer base, then apply Rouge Dior in Trafalgar straight from the bullet and a top coat of Dior Addict Fluid Stick in Wonderland, concentrating on the centre of the lips; for a diffused effect, you can smooth it out with your finger. To tidy up the outline, simply fold a tissue and, while holding both edges taut, rock the edge along the lip line. A dab of concealer on the outer edges also gives definition without adding hard colour. Keep eyes simple with an iridescent shadow washed onto primed upper lids – 5 Couleurs in Sundeck works well. Finish with a lick of Diorshow Iconic Waterproof mascara.” Dior Glow Maximizer primer £28.50, Airflash spray foundation £33, Diorskin Nude Tan £30, Lip Maximizer £22.50, Diorshow Iconic Waterproof mascara £23; Dior Addict Fluid Stick in Wonderland £26

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GOING FOR GOLD STEP 1: Contour in bronze “For a sun-kissed complexion with a sophisticated finish, start by misting with Airflash CC Primer. This works to neutralise uneven tones and bring light to the centre of the face. The trick to creating a contoured look that’s fresh and modern is to then shadow the outline of the face. Mattify with soft bursts of Diorskin Airflash Matte Touch (it comes in a universal shade that adapts to most skin tones) and emphasise by applying Diorskin Nude Tan bronzing powder with a brush. Blend this inwards for natural, golden graduation.” ABOVE RIGHT Dior Diorskin Nude Tan bronzing powder £34, Diorshow Maximizer Lash Plumping Serum £23, 5 Couleurs in Atlantique £41; LEFT powder brush £43

1 STEP 2: Brown eyes blue “Blue complements a tan beautifully, and using it on lashes creates a subtle yet intriguing effect, especially if you plump up the lashes with a bold, matt blue. To achieve this, take a clean mascara wand and cover the brush with a generous helping of Diorshow Maximizer Lash Plumping Serum. Smudge this with some intense blue eye shadow to create a paste – try vibrant shades from 5 Couleurs in Atlantique. Apply to lashes just as you would mascara. Complete with a touch of Diorshow Mono in Pavillon on the lids – this really brings out the blue lashes. A final dab of Rosy Glow in Petal on the lips creates a subtle, matt flush to balance the completed look.”

2

Dior Airflash CC Primer £30, Diorskin Airflash Matte Touch powder £30, Diorshow Mono in Pavillon £24, Rosy Glow blush in Petal £30.50

Available from The Colour and Cosmetics Halls, Ground Floor; and harrods.com . To watch a video of this feature, download the Harrods Magazine app HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NEWS

Fun in the SUN

Chanel’s new-season collection, Reflets d’Été, plays with light in a range of hot pinks, When Lyn Harris bounced into the fragrance glimmering world in 2000, lilacs and vibrant tangerines. she brought a burst of fresh air with her bespoke There scents are even and two waterproof mascaras that sometimes eclectic and quirky approach. The give Miller lashes Harris a playful violet or orange touch. menu has citrus, floral, oriental, chypre and woody Chanelfragrances is also having fun with nail polishes – for all seasons, and includes Le Pamplemousse,the an line-up enlivening is designed to be mixed, matched scent inspired by the organic gardens at La Palmeraie or mismatched in at whim, for instance by Marrakesh. 100ml, £95; exclusive to Harrods. applying a different colour as an accent nail Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground on theFloor index finger. Star of the talon show is Eastern Light, an opaque white shade that can be applied to the whole nail and teamed with a coloured tip, or used in a reverse French manicure – apply a summery shade such as Sweet Lilac, then paint a white border around the bottom and up to the top of the nail. From £18. Available from The Colour and Cosmetics Halls, Ground Floor

SUNNY NATURE

That’s radical

30ml, £95; exclusive to Harrods. Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

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Silk Blossom is the delicious new limitededition fragrance from Jo Malone London, inspired by the tree that bears pink pom pom flowers and is irresistible to hummingbirds and butterflies. Opening with notes of white pepper, its powder-soft, silk blossom heart unfolds on a base of moss. The fragrance is also available as a charity candle in support of the brand’s ever-growing Garden Trust. Cologne 100ml, £82 and candle £42. Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

SEE A DIFFERENCE

Citrus soufflé Spanish skincare house Natura Bissé has whipped up a great addition to its C+C Vitamin range – the Soufflé Mask. Bursting with repairing and protecting vitamin C and full of hydrating power, it helps improve skin’s elasticity and luminosity. It also has a soft lightening effect on dark spots. With an invigorating tangerine aroma, it lifts your spirits too. 75ml, £32. Available from The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor

If you’re using eye cream but still noticing deep-set wrinkles and crow’s feet, it may be time to consider stepping up your eye care to include the Perricone MD Neuropeptide Eye Therapy. The treatment features Dr Perricone’s new neuro-oligopeptide complex, which helps the eye area to look smoother, and feel more supple and resilient to creasing. 15ml, £128; exclusive to Harrods. Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

Chanel Alamy

Wrinkles are not the only reason skin appears older. Dark spots and \UL]LU[VULHSZVÅHN\W HUHNLPUNJVTWSL_PVU ^OPJOPZ^OLYL9HKPJHS :RPUJHYL»ZUL^4\S[P )YPNO[LUPUN:LY\T JVTLZPU>P[OZL]LU HJ[PVUZ[OH[[HYNL[ TLSHUPU[OYV\NOV\[P[Z SPMLJ`JSLMYVTP[ZPUP[PHS Z[PT\SH[PVU[VSVUN Z[HUKPUNWPNTLU[H[PVU [OLZLY\TOLSWZZRPU appear even and radiant.

FRINGE BENEFITS


MISS HEAVEN SCENT falls for this season’s flower power Call me old-fashioned, but I like floral scents to smell of fresh flowers rather than indistinct sweet cocktails. So when some new-season fragrances popped up, bursting with petal-fresh clarity, I was one happy perfumista. I love Atkinsons fragrances. They are full of uncompromising character and never cloying, and I couldn’t wait to try the new creations from the Contemporary Collection. Rose in Wonderland is more like “Rose in Reality” because it’s just like burying your nose in the quintessential garden bloom. Lavender on the Rocks is aromatic, with the cool note of freshly cut lavender on a woody base. And Posh on the Green, while not a floral, is as crisp and verdant an homage to the manicured lawns of the royal parks and the All England Tennis Club as you could imagine. With petitgrain, galbanum and geranium, it’s just right for when temperatures soar. Designer brands too are big on flowers this year. Dennis Basso’s vibrant new fragrance, Summer eau de parfum, bursts with accords of poppy, jasmine, orchid and gardenia. The effect is deliciously light and airy. The bottle even has a band of flowers decorating the edge, a detail FROM TOP Atkinsons Rose in Wonderland, Lavender on echoing some of the floral appliqué the Rocks and Posh on the and printing in Basso’s ready-to-wear Green 100ml, £150 each; collection and bridal designs. Dennis Basso Summer 75ml, Gianni Versace Couture is also £65; Versace Gianni Versace blossoming, introducing three new Couture Jasmin, Violet fragrances, each with a flower at its heart: and Tuberose 100ml, £300 each; Salvatore Ferragamo Jasmin – exotic and radiant; Violet – Mini Fragrance Collection delicate, yet full of individuality; Tuberose Signorina EDP, Signorina – heady and seductive. And all opulent, EDT and Signorina Eleganza just like a Versace gown. 20ml, £30 each; Byredo Flowerhead 100ml, £130; Perfectly playful, fancy and fun, Atkinsons, Dennis Basso the Mini Fragrance Collection from and Salvatore Ferragamo, Salvatore Ferragamo is another trio of all exclusive to Harrods. scents, with bottles designed to resemble Available from The spinning tops reminiscent of childhood. Perfumery Hall, Ground Signorina eau de parfum unfurls a floral Floor; and harrods.com heart, including a delightful touch of peony on a creamy base; Signorina eau de toilette blends juicy notes with rose; while Signorina Eleganza eau de parfum is rich with osmanthus. Finally, there’s Flowerhead (which could be my new nickname) by Stockholm-based fragrance house Byredo. Creative Director Ben Gorham has excelled himself here. Inside the beautifully minimalist bottle, the creation celebrates the way flowers are used in Indian wedding ceremonies – especially the flowerheads, which are strung together on giant garlands. The scent swirls with jasmine sambac, tuberose and rose petals (traditionally scattered at Indian weddings), while the fizz of lemon, lingonberry and angelica seeds gives it a shot of piquancy. It is amazing. – By Jan Masters


Prop stylist Jennifer Kay

HOT CHEESE

Gruyère, everybody’s favourite fondue fromage, is making a bid for cheeseboard credibility. Say bonjour to a range of nutty, fruity and floral flavours, from mild Classic to fully aged Premier Cru BY PATRICK M C GUIGAN / PHOTOGRAPHER STEVE LEE FOOD STYLING & RECIPES EMMA MARSDEN

Villeroy & Boch Bernadotte glass £23.50 and Purismo Specials brandy goblet £23.50; Jasper Conran for Wedgwood Chinoiserie bowl £28; Arthur Price Rattail cheese knife £45; MacKenzie-Childs Flower Market salad plate £37.95; Alexandre Turpault napkin £24.95 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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are added to the milk in open vats, transforming it into a soft curd that’s pressed by hand into large, wheelshaped moulds. The pale, young cheeses are then bathed in saltwater and rubbed with a brine solution to create a rind that protects the curd as it matures. “Most of the dairies are run by families with a long history of making Gruyère,” Daysh says. “They work long days, starting production at 5am and finishing around lunchtime. In the afternoon they tend the cheese in the cellars where it is aged.” The maturing process – or affinage – is a vital step from milk to cheese. The 35kg wheels of Gruyère are kept in temperature- and humidity-controlled rooms, where they must be turned regularly as the enzymes slowly develop the flavour and texture. The affineur is like a talent scout, nurturing promising cheeses until they’re ready to take centre stage; some impress as youngsters, while others have the X-factor to make an impact when much more mature. “The cheesemakers are masters of their domain,” Daysh says. “The fact that Gruyère has won the World Cheese Awards more than any other cheese speaks volumes about the skill of the cheesemakers. Without their knowledge, Gruyère would be a completely different product.” HMN

TOP Jasper Conran for Wedgwood Chinoiserie 27cm plate £25; Arthur Price Rattail cheese knife £45; ABOVE Cows grazing in the Swiss Alps

Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor; and Entertaining at Home, Villeroy & Boch and Wedgwood, Second Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app Patrick McGuigan writes for Square Meal, ShortList and Restaurant

Cows Getty Images

he bubbling centrepiece of countless 1970s dinner parties has made a remarkable comeback of late. Fondue is back on the menu in many London restaurants, a part of the retro food revival that has swept the capital over the past few years. In Switzerland, however, the dish has never gone out of fashion; there, the communal pleasure of dunking bread into molten cheese is a national obsession. Fondue recipes usually call for a blend of cheeses, but top of the ingredients list will always be Gruyère, Switzerland’s favourite fromage. Produced in the Swiss Alps since at least the 12th century, the cow’s-milk cheese is a star of the kitchen, perfect for melting and baking in traditional dishes such as potato rösti, quiche and cordon bleu (schnitzel filled with cheese). “When Gruyère melts, it doesn’t split, but goes to a beautiful, creamy consistency,” explains Helen Daysh of Interprofession du Gruyère, a trade body that represents all 172 of Switzerland’s Gruyère dairies. “It’s great for any recipe that requires melted cheese, because it doesn’t leave an oily residue.” Clearly Gruyère is adored by chefs – but its value extends well beyond the kitchen. It’s a heavyweight table cheese, rated by turophiles (cheese connoisseurs) as one of the best in the world. A mature Gruyère has been Supreme Champion at the prestigious World Cheese Awards three times, surpassing thousands of other cheeses in blind tastings. “Gruyère is much more than a cooking cheese,” Daysh says. “It deserves to take pride of place on any cheeseboard.” Gruyère is split into different categories of maturity. The milder Classic cheese, aged for five months, has a sweet, nutty flavour and pliable texture that makes it perfect for cooking; the more intense Réserve is ripened for at least 10 months; while Gruyère Premier Cru is aged for 14 months or longer, making it even more complex, with fruity, floral and savoury notes all wrapped up in a smooth, creamy texture. The subtle layers of flavour in Gruyère owe a huge debt to the landscape in which the cheese is made. During the summer months, cows roam the lush Alpine pastures, grazing on wild herbs and flowers, while in the winter they are fed hay from the same hills and valleys. “The cows are only allowed natural fodder with no additives or silage [feed made from fermented crops],” Daysh explains. “To make 25 litres of milk, a cow will need to drink 85 litres of water and eat 100kg of pasture. When you consider it takes 400 litres of milk to make one wheel of Gruyère, you can see why the milk is so important.” The rules specifying what the cows can and cannot eat are part of the cheese’s Appellation d’Origine Protégée (AOP), strict regulations that guarantee “Le Gruyère” is made using traditional methods in specific areas of Switzerland. Another vital condition of the AOP is that the creamy milk is never pasteurised. That process, which involves heat-treatment, would kill off the natural flora, essential in giving Gruyère its unique flavour and texture. So raw milk from local farmers is delivered to dairies, where cheesemakers work their magic. Cultures and rennet


A magazine on the MOVE TAP, SWIPE, WATCH AND PLAY Fashion / Beauty / Lifestyle

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ASPARAGUS, PEA AND BEAN SALAD WITH GRUYÈRE SHARDS Serves 4 as a light lunch or starter

GRUYÈRE AND RICOTTA CHICORY BOATS

1 Mix together all the ingredients for the dressing, season well and set aside. 2 Put the red onion in a bowl with a pinch of salt and the vinegar. 3 Line a baking sheet with a piece of tin foil and brush with the olive oil. Sprinkle the Gruyère onto the foil. Grill until the cheese is golden and bubbling, then set aside to cool. For the salad ½ red onion, finely sliced 4 Steam the asparagus, fine beans and peas until 1 tbsp Chardonnay vinegar just tender. Refresh in iced water, then drain well. 5 Put the asparagus, beans and peas into a large 2 tsp olive oil bowl. Scatter over the radish, pea shoots and 50g Gruyère, grated capers, then pour over the dressing and toss well. 200g fine asparagus 6 Divide the salad among four plates, then dot 200g green beans each one with three teaspoons of crème fraîche. 100g peas, podded 7 Use a palette knife to remove the crisp Gruyère 8 radishes, finely sliced pieces from the foil, then break them up into 100g pea shoots small shards. Push one into each teaspoon of 1 tbsp capers crème fraîche, and serve. 4 tbsp crème fraîche

4 tbsp ricotta 1 tsp freshly grated horseradish 25g Gruyère, grated 1 head of red chicory, leaves separated 6 slices Parma ham 3 tbsp amaranth microleaves

For the dressing 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 tsp finely grated lemon zest 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 shallot, finely chopped

Serves 4 as a starter 1 Mix the ricotta, horseradish and Gruyère together in a small bowl, and season well. 2 Using a teaspoon, scoop up a small bit of the mixture and place it into the bottom of each chicory leaf. 3 Continue to do this until all the chicory leaves are filled. Top with a little Parma ham and some microleaves. Serve immediately.

Serve with... Domaine de Pallus Chinon Les Pensées de Pallus 2009, £19.95

Serve with... Mont de Joie, Henri Bourgeois Sauvignon Blanc 2011, £12.50

MacKenzie-Childs Flower Market salad plate £37.95; Gien Filets Verts plate £24.95 and Pont aux Choux dinner plate £32.95; Villeroy & Boch Bernadotte wine glass £23.50; Alexandre Turpault napkin £24.95

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Jasper Conran for Wedgwood Chinoiserie 27cm plate £25


RED PEPPER SOUP WITH GRUYÈRE CROUTONS

ROASTED TOMATO AND GRUYÈRE TART

Serves 4 as a light lunch or starter

Serves 4 as a starter, or as a main course with salad

1 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, very finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 red peppers, chopped 400g can chopped plum tomatoes 1 tbsp sun-dried tomato paste 600ml hot chicken or vegetable stock A sprig of thyme 30g Gruyère, grated

110g pitted black and green olives, marinated in oil 40g Gruyère, grated 1 tsp rosemary, finely chopped Half a 320g ready-rolled puff pastry sheet 250g red, yellow and orange baby tomatoes, halved 50g rocket leaves

For the croutons 2 thick slices of sourdough bread 1 tbsp olive oil 60g Gruyère, grated A sprig of thyme

1 Heat the olive oil in a pan and fry the onion for around 15 minutes over a low heat, until very soft. Stir in the garlic, and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. 2 Stir in the peppers and continue to cook for 5 minutes until they start to caramelise. 3 Stir in the tomatoes, sun-dried tomato paste and stock, then cover and bring to the boil. Simmer for 15 minutes. 4 Preheat the oven to 200ºC/400ºF/Gas 6. Cut the slices of bread into chunks, then put on a lipped baking sheet. Drizzle the oil, cheese and thyme over the bread. Season well and toss everything together, then bake for 10–15 minutes until golden. 5 Whizz the soup until smooth, then spoon among four bowls and top with the croutons. Garnish with Gruyère and thyme before serving.

Serve with...

Serve with... Massaya Classic Red 2010, £16.50

1 Preheat the oven to 220ºC/425ºF/Gas 7. Line a rectangular baking sheet with baking parchment. 2 Whizz the olives with 1 tsp of their oil in a food processor until finely chopped. Add half the Gruyère and whizz again to blend. Stir in the rosemary and season well. 3 Unroll the puff pastry sheet. Score a 2cm border around the edge, then use a fork to prick the middle all over. Transfer to the baking sheet, cover with another sheet of baking parchment and put another baking sheet on top. This ensures the pastry will be thoroughly cooked through and crisp. Bake for 15 minutes. 4 Take the pastry out of the oven and remove the top baking sheet and parchment. Allow to cool for 5 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 200ºC/400ºF/Gas 6. 5 Sprinkle the border with half the remaining Gruyère. Spread the olive paste in the middle then arrange the tomatoes over the top. Top with the remaining Gruyère and bake for 10 minutes. 6 Scatter the rocket leaves over the tart and serve.

Domaine Joseph Voillot Volnay Vieilles Vignes 2005, £52.50

Jasper Conran for Wedgwood Chinoiserie bowls £28 each and white bowls £18 each; Villeroy & Boch Sereno soup spoon £12.50

Wine available from The Wine Rooms, Lower Ground Floor; Homewares available from The Gourmet Cookshop and Villeroy & Boch, Second Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NEWS

Seasonal exotic fruits

Cacao pods are good for more than making chocolate; the fruit is just as delicious fresh. Scooped out from a split pod, the flesh is sweet, with slight citrus notes. £30 per kg

Catch of the day With a leg span of 1.4m and a weight of 10kg, the Alaskan King crab deserves its name. Farmed in the Bering Sea between Russia and Alaska, the species is most famous for the tasty meat in its legs (which alone are 28cm long) that is best eaten with a squeeze of lemon and a few drops of melted butter. As well as crab legs, there are other fish, including wild

salmon, Dover sole, sea bass and shellfish available to buy within 24 hours of being caught. The Food Halls experts can suggest the best seasonal catches, create bespoke platters for last-minute dinner parties, or advise on how best to cook a type of fish to suit the occasion. Fish from £11 per kg. Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor

The Sri Lankan-grown King coconut is high in vitamin E, iron and calcium; both the milk and the meat have a much sweeter flavour than that of regular coconuts. £14 per kg

Pradasphere Café

SUPERFOOD of the SEA Though it’s been a dietary staple in Asia for centuries, seaweed is at last becoming popular in Britain. Chef and restaurateur Nathan Outlaw uses it regularly, and Heston Blumenthal recommends it as a salt substitute. Fiona Houston and Xa Milne, founders of Mara Seaweed, use only sustainably harvested Scottish and Irish seaweed in the company’s products. As for the algae’s nutritional benefits, it has high levels of iron, magnesium, calcium, fibre and vitamin B12, and is naturally low in sodium. Mara’s latest offering, the Sea-Spice Collection, is a range of seaweed-rich seasonings that enhance the flavours of meat and fish as well as of sweet dishes such as chocolate and ice cream. From £4.95. Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor

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Buttery and sweet, Alphonso mangoes are in season for a short time; they’re best enjoyed on their own, but are also excellent in desserts, smoothies and cocktails. £28 per kg

Don’t be fooled by the spiny exterior of the rambutan. Inside is a glossy, white flesh that’s firm yet soft, and tastes like a cross between a lychee and a longan. £30 per kg

With a flavour best described as a combination of strawberry, pineapple and banana, the soursop is not only tasty, but also high in vitamins C, B1 and B2. £30 per kg Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor

Coconuts, mangoes, pizzas Alamy; cacao, rambutan Getty Images

During May, Italian design powerhouse Prada will be taking over the Fourth Floor to celebrate its most memorable collections from the last 100 years. Pradasphere will showcase clothing from its archives as well as a limited-edition capsule collection. Alongside the exhibition is the Pradasphere Café, a stylish stop-off serving cicchetti (Italian tapas), cheeses, mini pizzas and cured meats. Pradasphere, Fourth Floor


IN TER IOR S

Material BENEFITS

Tom Dixon has stamped an elegant imprint on the world of interiors through two decades of groundbreaking design

Credits TK Images

BY AMY BROOMFIELD

Tom Dixon Etch pendant lights ÂŁ325 each HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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TOP RIGHT Tom Dixon and his dog Molly; FROM TOP Tom Dixon Fan black birch chair £495, Fan oak chair £545, Screw table top (large) with Fan base £650, Beat Lights (wide/tall/fat) £275 each, Jack Light £285 and Offcut oak stool £150

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There is a tiny white dog under Tom Dixon’s jacket: a rescue dog named Molly. She regularly co-stars in his shoots and, like him, is unfazed by the camera flashing away. In the limelight, Dixon is cool and affably confident. Yet despite the fact that he is a globally established designer with a 20-year career, when we sit down to begin the interview, he’s surprisingly shy. Dixon’s urban headquarters are in the basement of a converted Victorian wharf building in London’s Portobello Dock, shared with the Dock Kitchen restaurant. The space is modern and edgy: a cast aluminium brogue doorstop holds the door open; exposed brick walls are the backdrop to matt black furniture. Above us, a dozen different pendant lights hang from the wood-beamed ceiling. Dixon is in his high-backed Fan chair (with Molly in the crook of his arm) as he tells me about the start of his career. “I was a bassist in a band and I broke my arm in a motorbike accident, which meant I couldn’t play professionally any more. While recovering, I spent time on a hobby – welding. I started making things and those things began to sell. I thought I could turn that into my job.” Despite a lack of training, Dixon’s start, with little more than a creative eye, worked in his favour. “Being self-taught liberated me,” he says. “I was influenced by the music business and the punk era, which was a time of freedom and creativity, so I wasn’t restrained by any rules.” During the late 1980s, his work came to the attention of Cappellini, a company whose design partners have included Piero Lissoni, Alessandro Mendini and Londonbased duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby. And it was in 1991, while working with the Italian powerhouse, that Dixon created the S Chair, a wicker model that’s now part of the permanent collection at the V&A. After Cappellini, Dixon spent 10 years at Habitat where as Creative Director he revived the brand, reissuing a number of classic designs by Verner Panton and Robin Day as well as commissioning new creations by Ineke Hans and Marc Newson. During that period he was awarded an OBE for his services to British design (2001) and set up his eponymous company (in 2002).

Dixon describes his designs as a reinvention of British interiors – pieces made by challenging the traditional uses of copper, marble or plastic – and credits much of his success to a deep interest in and familiarity with these materials. “I find inspiration from the factories I visit,” he says. “We manage all our own production, so I’m very familiar with the processes.” It’s obvious Dixon has a talent for elegant creations, but does he consider their utility? “I’ve never been as interested in functionality as I should be,” he says. “Design is a fait accompli; good looks come from knowing your material and having a good sense of proportion.” Nonetheless, every week he joins the Dock Kitchen staff as a sous chef to gain an insight into how his products are used. “The restaurant has been influential to our designs,” he says. “When I work there, I’m back to the bottom of the pile, but through that I get a sense of how people use our furniture and accessories. I’m a better designer because of it.” After two successful decades in the industry, Dixon has clearly tapped into an enduring demand. “We’re about solidity and honesty in our materials, and I think that’s something that appeals to everyone,” he says. Among his most popular pieces are the Beat Lights – a design inspired by brass cooking pots in India – as well as the classic Jack Light, which marked a turning point in Dixon’s career when he moved into industrial-scale design. Now he’s opening a café in Harrods. “I’m very involved in the menu,” he reveals. “We’re hoping to demonstrate a lifestyle, rather than just furniture.” Not everyone is as fortunate as Dixon, stumbling upon a design talent by accident and going on to achieve worldwide success. But his advice to budding designers includes a clue as to how he did finally find his way. “Maintain your uniqueness,” he says. “It’s hard nowadays, being bombarded with imagery from everywhere… my advice would be to fight for your originality.” HMN Available from Tom Dixon, Third Floor. To watch a video of this feature, download the Harrods Magazine app

Tom Dixon Benjamin McMahon

IN TER IOR S


FA SHION

MASTER stroke

Credits TK Images

Montblanc celebrates 90 years of craftsmanship with elegant new product ranges

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SH P R OFMAO TION

Telling stories since 1924 Every brand has a pivotal moment. For Montblanc, that moment came early – in 1924, with the creation of the Meisterstück fountain pen. The design (that translates rather aptly as “masterpiece”) was a triumph in every way; it represented a new quality in writing instruments, with each part handcrafted using the finest materials. The pen became the lifetime companion of scholars, writers, statesmen and leaders of industry. Even in today’s digital age, the Meisterstück is still one of the world’s most famous luxury icons, and this year, to celebrate 90 years since its creation, Montblanc has unveiled the Meisterstück Collection – a selection of elegant leather goods, meticulously crafted timepieces and refined men’s jewellery, all accompanying a new writing instrument collection. The Meisterstück Soft Grain leather collection, in black and beige, includes briefcases, messenger bags and wallets, plus covers for tablets and smartphones. Handcrafted in Florence, the range showcases the brand’s attention to detail: metallic buckles in palladium, jacquard linings based on the 1924 logo and the snow-cap emblem. Montblanc is also launching the inaugural Meisterstück Heritage timepiece collection. Made in the company’s Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland, the collection reflects the values of the Meisterstück and the traditional codes of Swiss watchmaking in the finest detail – as illustrated by the highly complex perpetual calendar with its moonphase display. And, of course, no Meisterstück anniversary is complete without a range of writing instruments, including limited and special editions. The crowning glory is the 90 Years edition in precious black resin, adorned with red-gold fittings on the clip, cap and nib, and elegantly engraved (for a limited period) with “90 years”. Other new designs include the Limited Edition 90 with guilloche engraving and a cap with 90 diamonds, and a Skeleton fountain pen with ruthenium-plated fittings. Available from The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor; and The Great Writing Room, Second Floor

OPPOSITE PAGE

Montblanc Meisterstück 90 Years 149 Fountain Pen £620; TOP Montblanc Meisterstück Heritage Perpetual Calendar watch £14,400; RIGHT, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT

Montblanc Meisterstück cuff links £245, Soft Grain briefcase £820 and wallet from £190


NEWS D

MUST-SEE TVs

BANG & OLUFSEN BEOVISION 11 With six in-built speakers, each with its own amplifier, the BeoVision 11 delivers a complete surround-sound experience. £10,225

TEA story With a heritage of making fine china that dates back to 1759, Wedgwood knows a fair amount about the English tradition of tea-drinking. Its latest collection, Daisy Tea Story, is designed to remind us of the romance of the afternoon pastime, with a floral pattern in a pastel palette. The set includes delicate cups and saucers with gentle curves to suit the botanical theme, a tea caddy, a sandwich tray and a two-tier cake stand. From £30 for a mug. Available from Waterford Crystal, Wedgwood, Royal Doulton, Second Floor

Eclectic avenue Working for his father’s antique business gave Timothy Oulton an eye for design; fast forward to 2014 and his own interiors brand has introduced four new ranges. Jet and Adventurer pay homage to Britons such as speed-record breaker Donald Campbell and fictional explorer James “Biggles” Bigglesworth, with leather finishes and polished steel; Age of Elegance touches on the Jazz Age, with Art Deco references; while Coastal Drift (left) mixes wood and metal, and features slouchy sofas in super-soft linen. Castaway desk £3,100 and Regatta bucket chair £360. Available from Timothy Oulton, Third Floor

LG 55EA8800 GALLERY OLED TV A sleek frame surrounding its 55-inch screen makes the wall-mounted Gallery OLED TV the perfect showcase for photos or artworks in digital form. TV and frame £7,000 as shown

SAMSUNG U8500 SERIES UHD TV With UHD picture quality, the curved screen of the U8500 delivers detailed colour and a balanced viewing experience. From £2,800

BRILLIANT CUT

What better place to keep your precious diamonds than in a diamond-shaped box? More than 100 hours of work go into each special-edition Linley Diamond Jewellery Box. Handcrafted in solid sycamore, the box has a beautiful grey-stained marquetry veneer that highlights the angular shape. On top of the box is a sterling-silver plaque for bespoke messages, dates or initials, while the interior has been upholstered in luxurious blue velvet. £9,500. Available from Linley, The Great Writing Room, Second Floor

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SONY BRAVIA X9 Just in time for the World Cup finals, the X9, with enhanced picture and audio specs, creates a stadium atmosphere. From £2,800 Available from Harrods Technology, Third Floor


COOKING MASTERCLASSES

Throughout May, cheese cuisine will take centre stage on the Second Floor as major brands including KitchenAid, Zwilling and Miele host demonstrations using the product of the month: Gruyère

KitchenAid Friday 2nd, Saturday 3rd, Saturday 17th & Sunday 18th May, 11.30am– 4pm in The Kitchen, Second Floor The mixer of choice on The Great British Bake Off, the classic KitchenAid appliance is a baking stalwart; discover how to get the best from it, and how to make both sweet and savoury bites.

Le Creuset Friday 9th May, 10am– 4pm in The Gourmet Cookshop, Second Floor A series of pastry demonstrations will be hosted by Le Creuset as the long-established company puts its cast-iron kitchenware through its paces and showcases its latest non-stick ranges.

Vitamix Friday 9th, Saturday 10th & Sunday 11th May, 10am–6pm in The Kitchen, Second Floor Renowned for retaining nutrients due to its high-speed processing, the Vitamix blender is put to the test by chefs whizzing up a series of homemade, health-conscious soups and experimental ice creams.

Zwilling Friday 16th May, 12pm–4pm in The Gourmet Cookshop, Second Floor Enjoy a masterclass in chopping and professional dicing and slicing from the precision knife-makers at Zwilling, a company with 280 years of cutting know-how.

Cuisinart Saturday 24th May, 12pm–5pm in The Kitchen, Second Floor Blend, dice, mix and – now – simmer with the Cuisinart team as they create the perfect fuss-free French onion soup with their latest Soup Maker, which includes an integrated heating element.

Miele Friday 30th May, 12pm–5pm in The Kitchen, Second Floor Multitasking German brand Miele delivers elegance and versatility with its Combination Steam Oven, ideal for baking, roasting or even drying fruit. And the Miele chef will create the perfect alfresco menu.

Sage Saturday 31st May, 11am–6pm in The Kitchen, Second Floor With simplicity and practicality at the forefront of its designs, Sage is favoured by culinary groundbreakers like Heston Blumenthal. Join the team for high tea as they share tips for deliciously light cheese scones and reveal how to create stir-free risottos in the Multi Cooker. The Le Creuset and Vitamix masterclasses fall on the store-wide 10% discount weekend, Friday 9th to Sunday 11th May For more information, please call 020 7730 1234 and ask to speak to The Kitchen or The Gourmet Cookshop

VARIUS RUBRACER ///// Caran d’Ache, Maison de Haute Ecriture, introduces the latest addition to its Varius collection: Varius Rubracer. Intense. Dominant. Determined. The Varius Rubracer exploits the qualities of high-tech rubber with a spirit of sport and urban living that is unmistakably masculine. Caran d’Ache. Swiss Made excellence since 1915

The Great Writing Room, Second Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE


KENSINGTON GATE Kensington, W8 Set on a prime residential garden square, this substantial stucco-fronted Grade II* listed house has an adjoining mews house connected via a secluded, paved, south-facing garden. 8LITVSTIVX]FIRI½XWJVSQKIRIVSYWIRXIVXEMRMRKWTEGIW MRGPYHMRKEPEVKI½VWX¾SSVJSVQEPVIGITXMSRVSSQ[MXLEFEPGSR] overlooking the garden square, and a beautiful kitchen by David Linley. Accommodation includes a master suite and three further bedrooms, separate staff quarters with separate entrance, a gym, a cinema room and a study. The connecting Victorian mews house has a reception room, three bedrooms and a garage that has access onto Queen’s Gate Mews. Kensington Gate is a few minutes’ walk from Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, with access to the shops and restaurants of South Kensington, Kensington and Notting Hill. EPC rating D. Price: £13,500,000 020 7225 6508 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

H AR R O DSEST AT ES.CO M


GREEN STREET Mayfair, W1 7MXYEXIHSRXLI½VWXERHWIGSRH¾SSVSJXLMW[IPP presented building is a beautiful three-bedroom duplex apartment. The property features a south-facing reception room with high ceilings and a balcony, a large kitchen/ dining room, a master bedroom with en-suite bathroom, two further double bedrooms and a separate bathroom. 8LIETEVXQIRXLEWFIIRVIJYVFMWLIHXSELMKLWTIGM½GEXMSR and offers excellent storage throughout. EPC rating C. Price: £4,500,000 Leasehold: Approximately 120 years remaining 020 7409 9047 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

KNIGHTSBRIDGE OFFICE: 82 BROMPTON ROAD LONDON SW3 1ER T: +44 (0)20 7225 6506 MAYFAIR OFFICE: 61 PARK LANE LONDON W1 1QF T: +44 (0)20 7409 9001 CHELSEA OFFICE: 58 FULHAM ROAD LONDON SW3 6HH T: +44 (0)20 7225 6700 HARRODSESTATES.COM


U LT I M A T E

THE ULTIMATE

PINK THINKING In any shade, the latest beautifully crafted Prada tote would be hard to ignore. In this particular head-turning hue, it’s impossible to resist PHOTOGRAPHER ALAIN COSTA

The only thing more heavenly than a luxuriously big crocodile tote bag is a luxuriously big crocodile tote bag in pink. Prada’s new Double Bag, as the name suggests, has two nappa compartments on the inside blended into one on the outside with a single piece of leather. Minimal in style, maximal in shade, the Double represents the quality of design and precision of craftsmanship you would expect from Prada. The fact that it’s pink only adds to its allure. As a particularly intuitive fashion designer once said, “You never see a person in pink looking sad.” Prada Double Bag £25,000. Available from Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor. For more information, download the Harrods Magazine app

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Harrods Magazine May 2014  

In this issue of Harrods Magazine, we celebrate the wonderfully eclectic world of Prada with a special section that reflects all the excitin...