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Editor’s Letter

BRIGHT IDEAS Interiors trends come with a tangible sense of optimism this spring. Clean lines and bright colours combine with natural materials and lavish touches to create simple yet sophisticated looks – all with a sense of effortless elegance.

From the craftsmanship of a Chelini armchair to the eccentric flamboyance of A Modern Grand Tour’s ostrich-feather lamp, a thread of celebration is present not just in our main trends for spring, but also throughout the issue. Which is just as it should be. Good design is worth celebrating – and here you’ll find plenty of reasons to do just that. We explore what has made Nordic design so influential over the last 50-plus years; we flick back through the archives to pick out the most enduring designs of the 20th century; and we salute the timeless appeal of three bastions of design in Baccarat, Fornasetti and Georg Jensen. It’s not just heritage brands that are grabbing our attention, though – we come bang up to date with a look at the home of the future, complete with smart appliances; and we meet Bethan Gray, one of the UK’s hottest designers, who tells us what she loves about London. For more from Gray, and the lowdown on SS15’s key home trends, watch the videos on the Harrods Interiors digital issue by downloading the Harrods app. Don’t forget, too, to check out our selection of London’s most desirable homes – 50 pages of the finest properties in the most exclusive areas from the peerless portfolio of Harrods Estates, all ready and waiting to be decorated with the most celebratory of furnishings.

GUY WOODWARD EDITOR

HARRODS HOME & PROPERTY MAGAZINE DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE MARKETING Deborah Bee DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE OPERATIONS Beth Hodder ART DIRECTOR Barney Pickard PUBLISHER Dawn Hall Editorial EDITOR Guy Woodward ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jan Masters LIFESTYLE EDITOR Amy Broomfield FASHION FEATURES EDITOR Lindsay Macpherson ASSISTANT BEAUTY EDITOR Rebecca Baio CHIEF SUB-EDITORS Lisa Hillman, Nicolette Thompson SENIOR SUB-EDITORS Caroline Hunt, Jo Mattock SUB-EDITOR Marnie Clarke Art Burri Boo Mosquera SENIOR DESIGNER Rachel Escudier JUNIOR DESIGNER Gina Hollingsworth PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKINGS EDITOR Wendy Hinton PROP STYLIST Jennifer Kay PRODUCER Emily Sellers PICTURE ASSISTANT Kiaan Orange

Fashion FASHION EDITOR Victoria

Gaiger Rock SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT Becky Branch JUNIOR FASHION ASSISTANT Olivia Halsall DEPUTY FASHION EDITOR Poppy

Digital DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Arnaud

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CONTENTS Spring / Summer 2015

29/ Top 20

79/ Ice gems

The latest trends in homewares, appliances & accessories

Cutting-edge designers ensure Baccarat’s styles are sharp and future-proof

32/ Zeitgeist

82/ Nordic thrillers

What everyone’s talking about right now

Abba and Sarah Lund’s sweater were fun while they lasted. But northern European interiors brands have been rocking design for more than 50 years

39/ Why I love London

COVER Photography BROTHERTON-LOCK Stylist EMILIO PIMENTEL-REID

With influences from Welsh crafts to Islamic art and architecture, designer Bethan Gray is as happy in Portobello Road shops as on Hampstead Heath

87/ Room service From pieds-à-terre to Mediterranean resorts, The Studio creates lavish living spaces all over the world

42/ Urban wonders Inspiring and enduring, these London buildings are top of the list for design aficionados

91/ Rest assured 47

45/ News Sacha Lakic for Roche Bobois; summer cool with Indian Ocean; Lalique Art-Deco crystal; Clive Christian on bespoke furniture design

95/ Rock on Jeweller Stephen Webster’s clifftop retreat combines Arts and Crafts with his rock’n’roll aesthetic

47/ Sitting pretty From mid-century masterpieces to the latest models, some chairs are built to take centre stage

49/ News Hand-knotted Rodarte rugs; floral bed linen by Schlossberg; tableware from Bernardaud and Christofle; Le Creuset updates its classic lines

51/ Higher ground Wake up and smell the coffee with barista-style machines and elegant cups

52/ Crystal clear Cut-glass accents will add presence to any interior H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Those looking for an exceptional bed are spoiled for choice; so lie back, relax and enjoy the search

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54/ News Create a home cinema; online working with Sprout by HP; Devialet’s Phantom speaker; supersized curved-screen TVs

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65/ Light-bulb moments When illuminating your home let your imagination run wild, with new designs blazing a brilliant trail

56/ Only connect

71/ Applied arts

The future of our home appliances lies in linking them to the internet, then taking control via smartphone and tablet

From humble beginnings, Georg Jensen built a silverware empire

61/ Fit to print Cool, quirky, eclectic and surprising, Italian interiors brand Fornasetti’s designs continue to hit the mark

73/ Object lessons The 20th century’s most enduring products share a balance of form and function that ensures they remain as rewarding to use as they are to behold

101/ Material world Trends in interiors aren’t dictated by colour but by textures and finishes… it’s time to get touchy-feely

107/ All things bright and beautiful A sense of optimism is flooding interior trends, all delivered with a dose of effortless elegance

118/ The ultimate flight of fancy Classic furniture gets the exotic treatment courtesy of Kristjana S Williams

121/ Harrods Estates Luxury homes to buy and rent in central London

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TOP 20

The latest trends in homewares, appliances & accessories

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1/ B&O

3/ BeatWoven

The lightweight, wireless B&O BeoPlay A2 speaker uses Bluetooth and has up to 24 hours of battery life.

Fabric and music combine at BeatWoven; the Stardust cushion depicts the sound waves of the Beatles’ “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”. £240 each.

7/ Harrods Estates

9/ Flexform

Working with exotic woods, Andrianna Shamaris creates organic, one-of-a-kind pieces of furniture. Stool £869.

The Harrods Estates team knows that location is key; it can advise on proximity to schools and transport when helping clients find the perfect property.

Less is more in Flexform’s Effortless Style range, which includes Ciao tables in brushed metal with frosted glass. From

Fabric Library, Third Floor

Classics Room, Third Floor

Call 020 7225 6506

Named after the Greek god Apollo, cristallerie Saint-Louis’ 15-light chandelier was inspired by the stemware collection of the same name. Price on

4/ Grange

6/ Montblanc

8/ Joseph Joseph

For those who dream of creating their own Palace of Versailles, Grange reworks traditional French styles for modern homes.

The latest in Montblanc’s Great Characters pen series honours JFK; “A Time For Greatness” is engraved on the cap ring. From £535.

request. Luxury Home, Second Floor

From £2,971. Beds, Third Floor

The Great Writing Room, Second Floor

Placing recycling at the forefront of design, Joseph Joseph’s waste disposal unit has multipurpose sections and an odour filter. From £175.

£299. Bang & Olufsen, Third Floor

5/ Andrianna Shamaris

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£2,237 each. Flexform, Third Floor

2/ Saint-Louis

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Cookshop, Second Floor

10/ Grant Macdonald In a limited edition of 10, Grant Macdonald’s Murano glass and sterlingsilver bowl is exclusive to Harrods. £22,500. Luxury Home, Second Floor

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Top 20

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11/ Hamam

13/ Ralph Lauren

Towels should be luxurious and soft to touch, with good absorption; Hamam’s Pera range, made from 100% Aegean cotton, is just that. From £24.95.

The crisp, nautical design of the Porte de Riviera bed-linen collection from Ralph Lauren is inspired by the south of France.

Bathshop, Second Floor

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From £419. Bed Linens, Second Floor

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15/ Villiers Brothers Handcrafted from vintage silver, the chunky Revolution mirror is part of the latest range from English brand Villiers Brothers. £7,998. Classics

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17/ Meissen

19/ Meng

Guéridon tables from Meissen are a lesson in modern marquetry, as dark wood meets porcelain and crystal. £4,750. Luxury

Fashion and homewares brand Meng sees fabric as a canvas. In its Zodiac cushion collection, Chinese symbols are interlaced with abstract animal prints.

Home, Second Floor

£189. Fabric Library, Third Floor

Room, Third Floor

18/ Timothy Oulton “Creature comforts” has a whole new meaning with Timothy Oulton’s Yeti easy chair, upholstered in New Zealand sheepskin.

12/ Êverie

14/ Porada

The Êverie programmable room diffuser showcases 16 fragrances. Diffuser

The Lolita chair – one of Italian designer Emmanuel Gallina’s latest collaborations with Porada – captures his elegant signature lines. £949.

16/ Frato

Porada, Third Floor

Third Floor

£279 and capsules £9 each; exclusive to Harrods. Home Fragrance, Second Floor

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The Deco-inspired Alpine cabinet from Portuguese brand Frato wouldn’t be out of place at Jay Gatsby’s mansion. £5,999. Frato,

£1,200. Timothy Oulton, Third Floor

20/ Harrods Estates The lettings service at Harrods Estates will do the groundwork for you, whether you are looking to rent your home or find one. Call 020 7225 6506

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


ZEITGEIST

People and places in the air right now By GUY WOODWARD & JOSH SPERO

DESIGN: LEE BROOM He counts Kanye West and Matthew Williamson among his fans, and designed Roman Abramovich’s private box at Wembley Stadium. But Lee Broom started out as a thespian. Perhaps it was that keen sense of drama and appreciation of narrative that led to his status as a showman of the interiors world. Certainly there is an innate theatre to his works, which range from shop, bar and restaurant design to decanters. However, it is his collections of furniture and lighting that have seen the

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Shoreditch-based designer, who started his own label in 2007, emerge as something of a darling of the urban set. Dubbed the “pin-up of British manufacturing” by The Times, Broom is a supporter of British craftsmanship and techniques. As if to prove his commitment, he worked neon lighting tubes into his early chairs and tables. “It was painstaking to bend the tubes,” he said. “I could have used LED instead, but there would have been no craft to it.” Today, his lighting collections are a little more subtle, but no less dramatic.

TOP Lee Broom; ABOVE Lee Broom

One Light Only pendant lights from £225 each. Available from Contemporary

Furniture, Third Floor

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


COSTANTINI PIETRO FOR MALERBA We hear much about the durability and elegance of Italian design, but it is in Slovenia that furniture maker Costantini Pietro sources its key component: beech wood. Its short, fine grain and high density give the wood the sturdiness that has marked the family firm’s 90year history. Strength is nothing without beauty, of course – something Costantini Pietro’s frames achieve via the application of several layers of piano lacquer. The wood is polished repeatedly, by hand, to ensure a silken but hardwearing finish, as seen in the brand’s Memory collection for contemporary furniture specialist Malerba. Memory chairs from £1,039 each. Available from Malerba, Third Floor

TORI MURPHY VIYA HOME It probably didn’t take long for brother and sister Vikram and Divya Goyal to come up with the name for their luxury interiors brand, Viya Home. However, the skills and craftsmanship behind their latest creations draw on a more intricate and deep-rooted evolution. The inlaying of precious stones and shells in stone or wood furniture can be traced back centuries. Viya’s range of Celestial cocktail tables take the skill a step further, though, setting materials from malachite and mother-of-pearl to brass. The tables can be customised with gold, silver or bronze finishes. Celestial cocktail table prices on

She learned her trade in Milan, but today Tori Murphy is keen to promote her homewares brand as “woven and made in England”. Harnessing the skills of Lancashire weavers, Yorkshire finishers and Nottingham machinists, her latest kitchen collections feature dots, chevrons and geometrics in a muted palette. From £25. Available from Cookshop, Second Floor

request. Available from Classics Room, Third Floor

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Damien Hirst & Lalique Eternal panels photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates © Damien Hirst and Lalique, 2015

DAMIEN HIRST FOR LALIQUE From a shark in formaldehyde to a diamond-set skull, Damien Hirst has long explored the magical and the macabre. Now, in collaboration with French crystal house Lalique, the one-time bad boy of British art is taking inspiration from butterflies – the ancient Greek symbol of the soul. Hirst has designed three crystal panels, titled Love, Beauty and Hope, to illustrate the butterfly’s metamorphosis. The range as a whole has been given the name Eternal and, according to Hirst, the panels take on an almost religious feel as the light filters through them. “They bring to mind stained-glass windows, which I’ve always adored, in the way they capture colour and light so completely and throw it back out at you,” he says. The three designs come in 12 colourways, each limited to 50 numbered pieces, and all panels have the artist’s signature engraved in the bottom right-hand corner. Damien Hirst by Lalique Eternal Beauty crystal panel from £12,000. Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor

CHRISTOPHER GUY He made his name crafting oversized mirrors and cemented his reputation by producing 500 hand-carved pieces of furniture and a 130,000-piece mosaic for the redesign of the Georgian restaurant on the Fourth Floor last year. But Christopher Guy has always favoured a streamlined aesthetic for his furniture, including the Voltaire table. As with his latest sofas and chairs, the design marries classic French style with a sleek, contemporary vibe. Voltaire table £1,789. Available from Classics Room, Third Floor

CHELINI It was in 1892 that Nicodemo Chelini founded a small company in Florence dedicated to hand-making mirrors, lamps and small wooden furniture. The furniture has become a little larger in scale, and the output a little greater in volume, but otherwise, not much has changed. Today, the third generation of the Chelini family recreates styles of the past with exuberant flourishes, not least in a Regency-influenced carved wood headboard. Headboard £10,989. Available from Chelini, Third Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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EXHIBITION: Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden Painting, we are regularly told, is dead. Now art is all about rooms filled with random objects or drawings that only exist online. Marlene Dumas, a South Africanborn, Amsterdam-based artist, begs to differ, and has been reaffirming the importance of canvas with her erotic and political portraits drawn from pop culture and her life. Instead of craggy, wrinkled pictures of perfect precision, though, we get broad planes of silvers and purples with rough eyebrows and stubby noses, suggesting a more emotional approach – one charged with insight into the psychology of the subject and of society. This show will be intense, but worth it. Until 10th May at Tate Modern Helena’s Dream by Marlene Dumas Philip Treacy for Alexander McQueen butterfly headdress

This highly anticipated show was a smash in New York; now the elemental vision of hyper-beauty that Alexander McQueen pioneered – tartan ball gowns, butterfly headdresses – will come crashing into town. The tinge of tragedy only serves to heighten the artistry, making us all the more grateful for what McQueen left behind. The V&A has pioneered revolutionary fashion exhibitions, from Hollywood costumes to glam rock – but this will set a new standard. Until 2nd August at the Victoria and Albert Museum

EXHIBITION: Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden

A View of the Cascade, Bushy Park Water Gardens by the studio of Marco Ricci

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From McQueen to the queen. Queen Elizabeth’s predecessors accumulated quite a collection of palaces and paintings, manuscripts and statues. Now they (the paintings, at least) are being put to public enjoyment. If there’s one thing English people are obsessed by – after their dogs and their manners – it’s their gardens, so this is a canny show. Expect the royal curators to dust off works by Leonardo da Vinci and Carl Fabergé, as well as beautiful botanical drawings, to chronicle the changing character of the garden from the 16th century to today. Until 11th October at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Butterfly headdress Anthea Sims; A View of the Cascade Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

EXHIBITION: Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty


Q&A

The Conn ught

Quo V i est u nt

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e th

WHY I LOVE LONDON With influences from Welsh crafts to Islamic art and architecture, designer Bethan Gray is as happy in Portobello Road vintage shops as she is in the woods of Hampstead Heath

Hampstead Heath Getty Images; Grooming AMANDA WRIGHT

By PHOEBE FISHER/Photographer ANDY BATE/Illustrator NATALIE BOO MOSQUERA

ABOVE The Ruby Tree

Stripe collection from £900 and bowl £3,995

After earning a degree in three-dimensional design, being mentored by Tom Dixon and winning the New Designers Innovation Prize, Bethan Gray went on to hold the reins at Habitat before launching her own brand in 2008. Calling on her diverse background (her maternal family is from Rajasthan, and she was raised in Wales), Gray has created functional-chic furniture with exquisite detailing. For her latest venture, The Ruby Tree, Gray has joined forces with Islamic art scholar Mitchell Abdul Karim Crites. Working with semiprecious stones, they have translated ancient materials into contemporary home accessories. She tells Harrods Home & Property Magazine what she loves about living and working in the capital.

What is it about London that inspires you? The mix of people. There’s such an intensity of cultures and things to do; there are all these different cuisines to try, and I love all the galleries.

Where is home for you? I moved to London about 15 years ago. I’ve been lucky to live in lots of different areas, but home now is Hammersmith/Shepherd’s Bush. It’s lovely because I can walk along the Thames, and it’s near lots of quiet streets. For me, home is about being near leafy, green areas.

Do you have a go-to market? Golborne Road at the top of Portobello Road. The street has great vintage shops and coffee shops. It’s not a glamorous market, but if you go early, you can get some good finds. I’ve found a couple of bits and pieces for my home there, like an amazing Japanese rocking chair. X

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Favourite hotel? The Connaught, partly because it feels quite cosy and has exquisite interiors. And – oh my god – the smell... I don’t know what kind of scent it is, but it’s gorgeous. Favourite building? The Natural History Museum. The architecture is just amazing; the brickwork with all the stripes and spirals is beautiful, and there are always cool things going on there.

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Q&A

R EGEN T’ S PA R K OLD STREET

R NE L BO GO

D ROA

Shoreditch House

MA WESTBOURNE PARK

R PO

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AD RO CL E

EDGWARE ROAD

ROYAL OAK

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OXFORD CIRCUS

AD RO

LIVERPOOL STREET

T L BE O

LADBROKE GROVE

SHO R ED ITCH

ANGEL KING’S CROSS

H IG H ST

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H A MPSTE A D HE ATH

HOLBORN

LO

PADDINGTON

A RO D

Quo Vadis

QUEENSWAY

Lowry & Baker NOTTING HILL GATE HOLLAND PARK

The Connaught H Y DE PA R K

PICCADILLY CIRCUS

SHEPHERD’S BUSH GREEN PARK

HYDE PARK CORNER HAMMERSMITH

Natural History Museum

GR EEN PA R K Tate Modern

KNIGHTSBRIDGE

LONDON BRIDGE

WATERLOO

SOUTH KENSINGSTON

VICTORIA

VA U

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BR

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BAT TER SE A PA R K

Where do you go to escape? Hampstead Heath. You can get to places where you don’t see any buildings, and just walk for ages. It’s like going to the countryside for the day.

Favourite museum? The V&A; I’ve used it a lot for research. It has excellent temporary exhibitions, I love the courtyard in the middle, and the restaurant is a lovely setting.

If you had to be locked in a building for a night, which would you choose? The Tate Modern, because it would be great to see the paintings uninterrupted and then have a perfect view for dinner in the restaurant at the top, which I’d invite all my friends to. Then we’d party in the Turbine Hall.

Best place to go for a drink? I haven’t been out for a drink in a while, since having a baby. But Shoreditch House [in a converted east London warehouse] has a great vibe – especially the rooftop bar.

Best restaurant? Quo Vadis in Soho. Jeremy Lee, the chef, is amazing. It’s modern European cuisine, and the dishes aren’t too big or too small. The staff are excellent, and it’s got a friendly atmosphere. ABOVE Bethan Gray Boutique collection Stud mirror £1,849 and side table £1,620. Available from Bethan Gray, Third Floor

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Best place to grab a coffee? Lowry & Baker on Portobello Road. It’s a nice little independent café, and they do really good cappuccinos.

What’s your favourite park? This question is hard, because I’ve lived close to so many parks and I love them all. Regent’s Park and Hyde Park are my favourite city parks, and I love that Ravenscourt Park is just down the road from home. HMN

XWATCH Download the Harrods Magazine app to find out more about Bethan Gray’s design inspiration H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Architecture

Urban wonders Inspiring, and in many cases enduring, these London buildings are top of the list for design aficionados By JOSH SPERO / Illustrator NATSKO SEKI 1/ Victoria and Albert museum, South Kensington Around every corner in this Victorian masterpiece is a blast of beauty. A rainbowglass chandelier by Dale Chihuly dominates the atrium; turn right for the spare, meditative Medieval galleries; head straight on for the John Madejski Garden, with its shallow pool, perfect for reviving tired feet. From the sparkling jewellery gallery and Asian art rooms to the overwhelming Cast Courts, with their very own plaster cast of Michelangelo’s David, the V&A is every aesthete’s dream.

2/ Lloyd’s building, City of London Few buildings can claim to have changed London, but Richard Rogers’ insurance-

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company HQ did. By putting its guts – pipes and lifts and power lines – on the outside, Rogers gave architects licence to turn buildings inside out. You don’t need to go inside for the revolution, though: its confrontational modernity is best seen from street level. And, sweetly, the building has kept the stone façade of its neoclassical predecessor on the site – which only makes it more dramatic.

3/ Wilton’s Music Hall, Shadwell The location may be near the Tower of London, but the treasure here isn’t crowns or sceptres. You can drink modern cocktails in the 18th-century bar – where sailors and Swedish merchants once supped – or turn back the clock by booking a ticket for the 19th-century

music hall. The wooden gallery, the gilt fittings, the original paintwork – long neglected, now loved – take you back hundreds of years with their dark glamour.

4/ British Museum Great Court, Bloomsbury London mixes ancient and modern well. At the heart of this 18th-century compendium of society – everything from Benin bronzes and Assyrian lions to (ahem) the Parthenon Frieze – there was an open-air courtyard around the Reading Room. Then, in 2000, Sir Norman Foster gave it a roof – an undulating swell of glass that rises and subsides like the sea. Fact: every triangular glass panel in the roof curves differently to accommodate the “wave”. H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


5/ “The Gherkin”, City of London

7/ Elder Street, Spitalfields

9/ Tate Britain, Millbank

30 St Mary Axe, as it’s properly called, means perhaps more to London than any other skyscraper. It’s not simply that its cucumboid shape makes it as recognisable as (and far nicer than) the Shard. It’s also that the Norman Foster tower, opened in 2004, represents the City’s promise and power. Standing for the capital’s revival, it’s a reminder that, despite economic woes, things can go right again.

Less and less of London’s past is left; we bulldoze our history for glass and steel. But this unassuming road just north of the City’s towers is complete, cobblestones and all. Its 300-year-old houses rest peacefully, elegantly, concealing artists and writers and all manner of modern thinkers. You can simply sense the centuries roll back as you stroll through. And once you’re here, you’ve no excuse not to get a bagel or a balti on Brick Lane.

Yes, the building is beautiful – a neoclassical pile. Yes, the renovation of the atrium has brought a ’30s marble chic to the gallery. But the real reason to come is the beauty hanging on every wall: the national art collection, dating from 1500, has been re-hung in chronological order, giving the display a purity and rigour few galleries can match. From Hans Holbein to Francis Bacon, don’t miss a stroke.

6/ The Houses of Parliament, Westminster Which vision of London – architectural, practical or, indeed, moral – is complete without the Palace of Westminster? Rebuilt in 1834 after a fire, Charles Barry’s masterwork revived not just the home of our legislature, but an ancient vision of Britain. His oldfashioned Gothic turrets and tracery linked the earliest stirrings of British democracy to our then-empire. It’s best viewed from the South Bank at night when you can catch its twinkling reflection in the Thames. H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

10/ Sir John Soane’s Museum, Holborn 8/ Inner Temple and Middle Temple, Victoria Embankment Most people visit lawyers unwillingly, but if all lawyers worked in such grand premises as these, you’d go in a heartbeat. Around these squares (courts, properly) are barristers’ chambers and grand rooms where piles of legal papers teeter and great brains tick. A cross between an Oxford college and a Dickens novel, Temple evokes the proper mystery of the law. And after a browse, visitors can sit in the gardens and watch the river rolling by.

Eclectic collections are as English as gruff tolerance and the 50 meanings of “sorry”. Architect Soane filled the house he built on Lincoln’s Inn Fields with William Hogarth’s eight A Rake’s Progress paintings, Napoleonic medals, the model for the Bank of England, classical bronzes, medieval glass, Egyptian scarabs and 8,000 books, all cheek by jowl by bust. A visit is like stepping inside Soane’s brain. Josh Spero is editor of Spear’s magazine and the art critic of Tatler

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News

AN INTERVIEW WITH CLIVE CHRISTIAN Known for introducing crystal chandeliers into kitchens in the 1970s, Clive Christian is a pioneer in the world of opulent interiors. He discusses the beauty of bespoke.

FURNITURE’S RACY DESIGNER With a passion for fast cars and bikes, Sacha Lakic’s first career was as a designer for Peugeot and Yamaha. Lakic then joined forces with Roche Bobois in 1996 and has collaborated with the brand on over 30 furniture collections, with the Bubble sofa the latest addition. Covered in honeycomb wool, the handmade recliner is designed to give a feeling of lightness and security. But there’s still a spark of Lakic’s racing past via a colour palette of Ferrari red and Lamborghini yellow. Sofa from £4,210. Available from Roche Bobois, Third Floor

RETROSPECTIVE

Lazy summer days are meant for alfresco meals and sipping chilled glasses of rosé. Luckily, Indian Ocean is on hand to set the scene. On the Azzura daybed, you can spend your time relaxing in style. Made from the best quality teak, the queen-size summer bed is weatherproof so can be stored outdoors. £3,500.

René Lalique’s traditional themes were women, flora and fauna, and the French brand references all three in its latest lighting collection, Serene. Teaming up with Munich’s Windfall lighting studio, Lalique has produced chandeliers, sconces and table lamps with an Art Deco feel. Motifs from Lalique’s archives, including designs taken from the Orient Express’ carriages, are etched into baguette-cut crystal prisms and arranged to create beautiful shadows and mesmerising twinkles. £42,925.

Available from Indian Ocean, Third Floor

Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor

INDIAN SUMMER

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

How have you seen design change since you launched your brand? For me, the heart of the home has always been the kitchen. In the 1970s, we knocked out walls to make the room bigger, changing it from a utility room into a place for entertaining and for family. Today, our larger projects embrace panelling and intricate marquetry. Renovating a home is costly and time consuming, so it’s a considered investment. Sometimes a trend comes along, but we never bow to them. Talk us through the process of designing a bespoke kitchen. Customers get a feel for the beauty of the woods we use and the quality of our British craftsmanship in-store. They pick out the style they like and work with our designers to select the finishes. Projects can be personalised with marquetry detailing, such as including a coat of arms or family crest within the panelling. Everything is then handmade in Lancashire. How would you describe your brand’s typical style? If you want a knockout kitchen that will be the envy of all, then that’s us. I simply strive to be the best and deliver what the client wants. What are your top considerations when styling your own home? I recently renovated a 300-year-old Queen Anne country house in Cheshire. I always decorate with photography and pieces of art from my travels, or that my children have made. Lighting is crucial – everything is on a dimmer switch. But I prefer candleor firelight. – By Phoebe Fisher Available from Clive Christian, Third Floor

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Must-haves

SITTING PRETTY From mid-century masterpieces to the latest models, some chairs are built to take centre stage Photographer BENEDICT MORGAN

ABOVE, FROM LEFT Fritz Hansen Drop chair £1,485; Ligne Roset Torii chair £1,472; Porada Lolita chair £949

ABOVE, FROM LEFT Fritz Hansen Series 7 chair £525; Vitra Vegetal chair £355; Tom Dixon Slab chair £350

ABOVE, FROM LEFT Vitra Panton chair £205 and Plywood Group DCW chair £1,070; Roche Bobois Lady B chair from £1,300 Available from Fritz Hansen, Ligne Roset, Porada, Roche Bobois, Tom Dixon and Vitra, Third Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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News

MOBILE DINING Alexander Calder is best known for his sculptural kinetic art of the 1940s. Now, modernist mobiles are winning over a new audience. Storied French porcelain exponent Bernardaud has created a limited-edition set of six dinner plates with Calder’s work hand-painted in poppy red and black. £474 for set of 6. Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor

FROM RUNWAY TO HALLWAY When decor meets couture, expect an explosion of print and colour. Sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the force behind Rodarte, are known for their conceptual and ethereal fashion collections; now, in collaboration with The Rug Company, they’ve expanded their repertoire to include dressing floors. The LAbased designers cite their American heritage and love of all things whimsical as the inspiration behind their hand-knotted rugs. Ivy Trellis rug by Rodarte for The Rug Company £7,697. Available from The Rug Company, Third Floor

CELEBRATING IN STYLE Classic homeware brand Le Creuset celebrates its 90th birthday this year, and is marking the event by updating its signature cast-iron pots and pans. The classic Volcanic casserole dishes now include larger handles and more advanced interior enamel to enhance durability and performance. 20cm casserole £145.

Kate and Laura Mulleavy Autumn de Wilde

Available from Cookshop, Second Floor

SWEET AS HONEY BLOOMING LOVELY Sweet dreams are made of pretty pillowcases and luxury linens. For Spring/Summer 2015, a number of bed linen brands are jumping on the floral bandwagon with covers and throws that draw on botanical prints. Linen experts at Swiss brand Schlossberg have launched the Parfum d’Été range, which takes inspiration from fragrant blooms in summer gardens, while Italian label Somma packs in the flora with a wild-flower-print duvet set. Somma Oxford duvet set from £349; Schlossberg Fanny pillowcase £37.95. Available from Bed Linens and Luxury Linens, Second Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Having supplied European royalty with crystal and glass for 185 years, Christofle knows how to set a dinner table. The Madison 6 line adds glamour, delicately decorated in silver-gilded hexagonal patterns inspired by honeycomb. Teacup and saucer £70. Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor

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Style

DeLonghi Dedica £199.99

Jura Impressa J80 £1,750

DeLonghi Eletta Cappuccino Top £899.99

Higher ground Wake up and smell the coffee with our pick of barista-style machines and elegant cups

Sage by Heston Blumenthal The Smart Grinder £199

Nespresso by Magimix Maestria £349

Nespresso by KitchenAid Artisan £349

Villeroy & Boch Anmut coffee cup & saucer £34.45 and Sereno teaspoon £8.50; Alexandre Turpault napkin £24.95

Nespresso by DeLonghi Lattissima Touch £279

The

Photographer, main photo Mowie Kay; stylist Emma Marsden

COFFEE CUP

1

Rosenthal TAC Low £27.95

2

Zaha Hadid Rim Vessel £37.95

3

Alessi Fruit Basket by Sanaa £62 for a pair

Available from Alessi, Cookshop, Entertaining at Home and Home Appliances, Second Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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News

AHEAD OF THE CURVE Curved screens have gone ultra-highdefinition as well as supersized, ensuring TV is high impact as well as high drama

Sony CINEMA PARADISO No more shh-ing strangers and cursing the giant who sits in front of you; cinema is coming home. An in-store team will design a home cinema around your requirements using the best audiovisual technology. And if the idea of watching the latest flicks in the comfort of your own living room isn’t enough, D-box technology turns the recliner into a motion seat, mimicking the movements on screen for the most stimulating viewing experience yet. Popcorn optional. Price

KD75S9005 75” Curved 4K Ultra HD Smart 3D LED TV 3D viewing, realistic 4K detail and a multi-angled sound system enhance an already ingenious Smart TV that connects to apps and allows viewers to catch up on programmes. £7,199

on request. Available from Harrods Technology, Third Floor

SPROUTING WINGS Now there’s proof technology gets better by the day. With Sprout by HP you can send 3D images of objects at the click of a button. It features an Immersive Computing system that combines a scanner, depth sensor, highresolution camera and projector, making it possible to capture physical items and then integrate them into a 3D digital workspace. The device also makes it easier to collaborate remotely; users can connect online, then jointly manipulate digital content in real time.

Samsung JS9500 SUHD TV Nano-crystal technology in the JS9500 delivers twice the brightness of ordinary TVs and vivid colour, ideal for everything from wildlife documentaries to swashbuckling adventures. Price on request

£1,899. Harrods Technology, Third Floor

HIGHER FIDELITY French audio specialist Devialet has set the bar ludicrously high for home audio. After 10 years in production, 77 patents and the input of 40 engineers, the brand’s compact spherical unit – The Phantom – is like going from a pager to a state-of-the-art tablet. Remarkable for its size, the 25cm speaker emits serious bass without a sub-woofer – or wires. A Wi-Fi connection is all that’s needed for Devialet’s exclusive ADH technology, which combines analogue and digital to create supreme clarity of sound. And if one unit isn’t enough, synchronise up to 24 around the home for the ultimate integrated experience. From £1,390. Available from

LG 105UC9V Curved Ultra HD TV At 105 inches and with a resolution of 11 million pixels, the LG 105UC9V is perfect to blow viewers away with the special effects of those Oscar-winning flicks. £60,000, exclusive to Harrods Available from Harrods Technology, Third Floor

Devialet, Third Floor

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Only connect The future of our home appliances lies in linking them to the internet, then taking control via smartphone and tablet By JEREMY WHITE / Photographer PIOTR GREGORCZYK

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Technology

B

race yourselves. It may not feel like it, but right now we are approaching the next consumer device revolution. The last time the technology landscape changed this significantly was the arrival of the mobile. I’m referring, of course, to the somewhat clumsily named “Internet of Things”. Despite the monstrous moniker, the science behind this revolution will improve all our lives. Better still, you don’t have to be a techie to be able to exploit it. More and more devices are being created that are either “smart” (able to make their own decisions) or “connected” (have access to the internet). Or both. What this all means is that we are moving into an age where you will be able to run your home, and the gadgets and gizmos within it, remotely. Away on holiday and want to switch off the heating or turn on some lights at night? Not a problem: open an app on your phone from your sunlounger and tap a few buttons. Fancy returning to a clean and tidy living room? Just tell your robot vacuum to do a quick onceover as you touch down in the UK. There are, though, some factors to consider before upgrading to a new, improved smart home. And top of the list is to beware of throwing too many different brands into the mix. Rather than slipping seamlessly into your existing set-up, most will require individual

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

routers and programs to let you operate them remotely. Before you know it, you could be dealing with five or six product hubs to your main router. Not only will this look unsightly, but it will also be far more complicated than it needs to be – especially when you have to use different apps to operate each individual device from afar. To future-proof your choices, what you are looking for is a brand that is committed to the smart-home ethos and, rather than waiting for consensus on a single standard, is already linking its products in one cohesive, largely wireless system. At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Samsung’s global CEO Boo-Keun Yoon set out the company’s commitment to this strategy by devoting his entire opening keynote speech to the importance of the Internet of Things and how it will change our lives. This is not hyperbole. Samsung is walking the walk as well as talking the talk. Take a look at some of its latest products. I never thought that laundry could be an exciting enterprise, but right now I’m testing Samsung’s new WW9000 washing machine. It’s remarkable. Thanks to its Wi-Fi connection, not only will this 10kgload washer smartly dispense just the right amount of detergent from a reservoir that holds up to a month’s supply, you can also set it from a phone or tablet and receive handy notifications when cycles have finished. X

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Samsung HW-J8500 Curved Wireless Soundbar with Wireless Subwoofer, price on request, and M7 Wireless Audio Multiroom Speakers £329 each; OPPOSITE PAGE Samsung JS9500 SUHD Curved TV, price on request

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Technology

What’s more, the machine can be updated with specialist programs for targeting specific stains – just swipe the five-inch touchscreen and select the relevant setting, from doing away with dirt to getting rid of grease. Samsung is looking to convert the kitchen’s previously dumb appliances in a similar manner – witness the multiple settings of the WaterWall dishwasher, whose vertical jets ensure constant pressure. It is the 900-litre T9000 refrigerator that stands out, though – and not just for its size. An in-built system allows for the conversion of the cavernous internal compartments from fridge to freezer mode at the touch of a button. What’s more, through its web connectivity and touchscreen, you can source recipes and use apps like Evernote to make shopping lists to access later on your phone, ensuring a hassle-free trip to the supermarket. To the living room, where gone are the days when your television merely delivered programmes and films. Now it’s connected to the web and, in some cases, almost as powerful as a PC. Samsung’s new flagship set is the mightily impressive SUHD JS9500. The “S” denotes that this set goes beyond ultra-high definition (UHD), or 4K, to offer viewers 64 times more colour expression than conventional TVs as well as being 2.5 times brighter. And now, once again flaunting those Internet of Things credentials, all Samsung televisions

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will run its Tizen open-source platform, making them compatible with other devices and transforming the humble telly into the control centre of your home. To mirror the splendour of the SUHD’s rounded design, Samsung has unveiled the Curved Wireless Soundbar that not only produces exceptional audio to go with the quality images, but also connects wirelessly to any Samsung TV, meaning less cable spaghetti. Indeed, all of Samsung’s latest range of speakers come in a wireless format, and can be connected to any device in any number of rooms. No more straining your ears when you pop to the kitchen to fix the dinner. As for that dream of returning to a home cleaned by friendly robots, the diminutive Powerbot VR9000 is your man, with 60 times more suction power than conventional cleaners. This is not solely what sets it apart, however. Its large wheels mean it can roll over bumps with ease; the FullView sensor lets it identify the smallest of obstacles; and a Point Cleaning feature means you can take control directly using a remote, and even beam a light onto any particularly troublesome areas. The problem with all this ingenuity, of course, is that there’s no excuse not to do the housework. The good news is that you’ll barely have to lift a finger to do it. HMN Jeremy White is the product editor of WIRED magazine

THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT

Samsung DW9970 WaterWall dishwasher £899 and Powerbot VR9000 vacuum cleaner £699; OPPOSITE PAGE Samsung T9000 fridge-freezer £2,699 Visit the Samsung Innovation Zone in the Brompton Road windows between 3rd and 24th April. Available from Samsung, Second Floor; and Harrods Technology, Third Floor

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Provenance

Barnaba, the self-confessed “hippy” son – a product of the ’60s – often clashed with his headstrong father. “He was stern but affectionate – a benevolent grouch,” Barnaba says. Twinkly eyed and a sharp dresser, Barnaba is, like his father, a dapper eccentric. He still lives in his childhood home, the house his grandfather Pietro built in Milan in the late 19th century, when its now urban setting was fields. It is filled with Fornasetti designs, from Farfalle butterflies across every surface to his own more recent furniture designs. When his father died in 1988, aged 74, Barnaba inherited an unwieldy archive of “I’m not influenced work – over 13,000 individual by market demands, designs – and a company out of and in debt. “It wasn’t an and I don’t worry fashion easy operation,” he says. “My father about not being left a legacy of great artistic value ‘contemporary’” but with big financial problems. I had to reinvent myself as a businessman, albeit an artistic one.” The brand’s reinvention has been impressive, coinciding with the early noughties’ rejection of ’90s minimalism and enthusiastic embrace of decoration. Barnaba has sought to give Fornasetti a stronger brand identity, less tied to the personality of his father, he says. Are they different? “I think I find it slightly easier to compromise than he did, while still sticking to firm principles.” How does he choose which designs to revive? “It’s just intuition – hard to explain,” says Barnaba. “I’m not influenced by market demands, and I don’t worry about CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT not being ‘contemporary’.” Cole & Son Fornasetti II But it’s not just his father’s previously unseen work Nuvoletti wallpaper £240 per set of two rolls (68.5cm x 10.05m) that has helped Fornasetti flourish. Barnaba’s own and Multiplette frieze £190 per designs are witty, whimsical pieces that draw on the roll (52cm x 7.5m); Fornasetti Fornasetti canon but give it a 21st-century twist. A set Marianne chair £3,500 and Balaclava chair £3,500, both of mid-century chairs feature Cavalieri’s monochrome exclusive to Harrods in the UK; face covered in a coloured balaclava; a cabinet features Piero Fornasetti in 1958 her face obscured by neon stripes. And, in one of his Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor most recent pieces, a set of three nesting side tables

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called Shoot and Tell features an old-fashioned pistol and an apple. Barnaba has also produced two collections for wallpaper company Cole & Son. The first includes a popular Mediterranean design, a cityscape of roofs and gilded domes. (Piero’s original, from the late 1940s, graced the entrance hall of his home.) The second series, from 2013, is a collection of theatrical Monty Python-esque designs including clouds, pen nibs, antique flying machines, architectural details, owls and suits of armour. He has recently collaborated with designer Nigel Coates, too, on a series of unconventional furniture pieces. This spring, an exhibition showing over 1,000 of Fornasetti’s designs – appropriately titled La Folie Pratique, or Practical Madness – will open at the Les Arts Décoratifs museum in Paris. A retrospective based largely on a similar show in Milan from 2013 (the centenary of Piero’s birth), La Folie Pratique is a portrait of Fornasetti and his extraordinary archive; it also shows his wide-ranging influence on designers including Philippe Starck. The exhibition includes more of the company’s contemporary work, including the new, limited-release Marianne collection, again based on a human face, rendered in red and black across a chair, a table, two trays and a silk scarf. Fornasetti is continuing to do what it always has: create exquisite everyday objects with a touch of high art, humour and, yes, madness. Its pieces bring a smile to the face and add a much-needed dose of fun to our lives. This, surely, is its real achievement. Why is the brand so popular? “I’m not sure it is,” Barnaba says. “It’s exclusive. There are still many people who don’t know who Fornasetti is – and I’d like to keep it that way.” HMN Piero Fornasetti: Practical Madness is at Les Arts Décoratifs, Paris, from 11th March to 14th June Hannah Booth is Interiors Editor of The Guardian H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Lighting

LIGHTBULB MOMENTS When it comes to illuminating your home you can let your imagination run wild, with new designs blazing a brilliant trail

Set Photographer build Cloud Tktktktktktktk & Horse

Photographer ANIA WAWRZKOWICZ

SET IN STONE

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Flos Arco floor

lamp £1,645; Lee Broom Tube light £3,200 and Globe table lamp £3,960; Flos Biagio table lamp £3,570; Verpan side table £612; Artek Pendant Lamp A330S from £318; PAINT Little Greene Green Verditer Intelligent Matt Emulsion £21 per litre H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Photographer Tktktktktktktk

MONO MASTERCLASS

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Artek Pendant Lamp

A333, £350 and Pendant Lamp A338, £318; Flos Rosy Angelis floor lamp £395; Anglepoise Giant 1227 Pendant – Classic £350; Flos Chasen pendant £1,295; Fritz Hansen China Chair £4,858; Artemide Fato White lamp £265; Decode Vessel S pendant £288; PAINT Little Greene Lemon Tree Intelligent Matt Emulsion £21 per litre

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H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Photographer Tktktktktktktk

Lighting

GOLDEN GLOW

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT Lasvit Clover Floorlamp

£2,880; Flos IC Lights S pendant £274; Artek Pendant Lamp U336, £349; Ligne Roset Passe-Passe coat rack £237; Lee Broom Clear Crystal Bulb & Pendant £199; Vitra Occasional Table LTR Gold Leaf £415; Tom Dixon Beat Table Brass lamp £475; PAINT Little Greene Milk Thistle Intelligent Matt Emulsion £21 per litre H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Photographer Tktktktktktktk

Lighting

SUNSET BOULEVARD

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Tom Dixon Base Copper Floor Light £845; Lee Broom One Light Only Walnut Large pendant £495; Decode Dipper pendant £384; Verpan System 123 Lounge Chair from £768; Artemide Dalù lamp £72; PAINT Little Greene Angie Intelligent Matt Emulsion £21 per litre

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H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Lighting

FORCES’ FAVOURITES

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Anglepoise Original 1227

desk lamp £235; Tom Dixon Beat Stout Grey pendant £285, Tall Grey pendant £285 and Wide Grey pendant £285; Vitra Eames Elephant £173; Lee Broom Tile Lamp Large Blue £1,950; Vitra Metal Side Table from £430; Tom Dixon Fin Round Blue pendant £300; PAINT Little Greene Brighton Intelligent Matt Emulsion £21 per litre Available from Anglepoise, Contemporary Furniture, The Fabric Library, Ligne Roset, Tom Dixon and Vitra, Third Floor

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Provenance

APPLIED ARTS From humble beginnings, Georg Jensen built a silverware empire, making his name – and that of some of the 20th century’s top designers – in the process By GUY WOODWARD

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

Georg Jensen Cobra candelabra £140, carafe £53.95 and candlesticks £99.95 per pair Available from Entertaining at Home, Second Floor. Georg Jensen Silverware will open in June 2015

The details of Georg Jensen’s early life do not make for promising reading. Born into a humble Danish family, the seventh of eight children, Jensen had little schooling and worked with his father at a knife factory from an early age. At 14, he became an apprentice goldsmith, though his ambition lay elsewhere. His aim was to be a sculptor, and he pursued that vocation. But by his early thirties, his sculpture had been rejected, his business affairs were in tatters and, having been widowed, he was bringing up two boys with little by way of money, work or reputation. Today, Jensen is recognised as one of the world’s pre-eminent silversmiths and a pioneer of Scandinavian design. The firm he founded celebrated its 110th anniversary last year, a fact made all the more startling considering the path he followed. In the early 20th century, mass-produced goods were threatening independent businesses’ artisan approach. Against that backdrop, having retrained as a silversmith, Jensen set up on his own, making jewellery that he sold

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

from his workdesk in a small premises in Copenhagen. Cheaper to make than hollowware or flatware, the jewellery was an immediate success, and Jensen soon attracted interest from other artists, who gave him the confidence and backing to expand his range. Jensen was a romantic – an artist first, a businessman second. He cut an eccentric figure, dressed in his artist’s smock and carrying a silver-topped cane, and was often seen in the local café, working on designs over lunch. By teaming up with artist Johan Rohde to produce flatware, he found a more considered, conservative presence who was able to address longer-term planning. Collaborations with other artists – whom, unusually, Jensen allowed full creative freedom – followed, and were key in providing his company continuing stability. Far from diluting Jensen’s identity, these artists actually helped strengthen his renown. Some of the most recognised 20th-century designers, including Harald Nielsen and Henning Köppel, would go on to produce works for Jensen. Original designs by Rohde, Nielsen and Köppel are still handmade in the Jensen silversmithery in Copenhagen, and the company continues to pursue new partnerships. A line of hollowware by groundbreaking Australian designer Marc Newson, now of Apple, will be released in the autumn. But the company is perhaps best known for its Living homewares range, made from stainless steel, porcelain and other materials. Living was created after World War II, when silver was in short supply, as a way of democratising design. Today, not only have works from artists such as Köppel been reimagined in stainless steel, but the collaborative approach originally employed by Jensen has been applied to this more everyday range of homewares – as seen in the popular Cobra tableware by Constantin Wortmann. It is a holistic approach from a company that, as Newson says, “champions both pure design and the importance of the individual craftsperson” – just as Jensen first envisaged. HMN

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Design

OBJECT LESSONS The 20th century’s most enduring products share a balance of form and function that ensures they remain as rewarding to use as they are to behold By TRISH LORENZ

Some people see home appliances as purely functional. Such people surely own the wrong appliances. For there are certain products that not only enhance a room, but also transform tasks into something less workaday. From lamps to lemon squeezers, fans to food mixers, these designs have achieved classic status via their ground-breaking, trend-setting form, and made stars of their inventors.

ABOVE Anglepoise Original

1227 inventor George Carwardine; Anglepoise Original 1227 Brass pendant light £100 and wall light £125; Original 1227 Brass desk lamp £235

ANGLEPOISE Britain’s best-known desk lamp was, in fact, invented by a car designer. George Carwardine specialised in suspension systems; his understanding of how to balance weights using springs, cranks and levers inspired him to create a lamp that combined a semi-industrial aesthetic with a delicate, almost human-like movement. Today that lamp – the Original 1227 – is considered a classic (in 2009, it was even featured on a postage stamp). It has been emulated by so many other brands that it has become the archetype for desk lighting the world over.

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

Carwardine founded Anglepoise in 1932, and the Original 1227 was released in 1935. Deyan Sudjic, director of London’s Design Museum, praises Carwardine’s creation for its longevity in his book The Language of Things, lauding it as “still desirable and functionally perfect.” Its beauty, says Anglepoise innovation and brand director Simon Terry, is that it was fundamentally designed around movement and function. “There’s nothing superfluous or decorative about it.” Its movable arm incorporated a spring that enabled a full range of movement while allowing it to stay firmly in the position in which it was set. Today Anglepoise works with some of Britain’s bestknown designers: Sir Kenneth Grange, creator of the Kenwood mixer and the InterCity 125 train, is design director for the brand, and his Type 75 has given the original a 21st-century face. Paul Smith has created a colourful version too, while wall lights and pendants have been added to the range. There’s also a patent on file for an entirely new balancing system. Desk lamps may be about to get a whole new look. X

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ALESSI With its spider-like legs and organic body, the Juicy Salif citrus juicer stalks across kitchen worktops like some miniature alien spaceship. Designed for Alessi by Philippe Starck in 1990 (a 25th-anniversary edition has just been created), the juicer has become emblematic of the Italian brand’s quirky yet design-driven style. Alberto Alessi originally briefed Starck to design a tray. Months went by with no response, then an envelope landed on Alessi’s desk. Inside was a paper napkin with a few sketches of a new citrus squeezer. Starck had been on a family holiday on the Italian island of Capri eating a plate of baby octopus when the molluscs gave him the inspiration for the design. Starck, who has designed more than 2,500 products ranging from toothbrushes to wind turbines, has a reputation for imagination and subversiveness. “Back in the 1980s, design was an elite proposition far removed from everyday life,” says Henrietta Thompson, Wallpaper’s editor-at-large. “Now you can’t pick up a Sunday supplement without reading about design, and there are so many more design celebrities... Starck was

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the first, a leader who naturally recognised this shift.” He is also a natural fit with Alessi, which hasn’t so much influenced the kitchenware sector as given it a gentle poke in the eye. From bottle openers to coffee makers, clocks to cat bowls, Alessi’s products have long combined elegance and fine materials with a pop-art feel and postmodernist knowingness. “Juicy Salif is very important in our history,” Alessi says. “It’s on the border of what is feasible between function and emotion.” DYSON An empty circle emitting a gentle breeze? Watching a Dyson Air Multiplier in action is a bit of a conundrum, for the fan has no blades. It’s simply a cross-section of a tube on a pedestal base. In fact, it’s the pedestal that acts as the vehicle for blowing air, via an electric motor that takes in air and feeds it into the tube and then out of a small slit. Without blades, the fan is safer to use, quieter and easier to clean than traditional models. Launched in 2009, the Multiplier is just one in a line of products created by inventor and industrial designer James Dyson, the man Wired magazine called “the Jobs

ABOVE, FROM LEFT

Alessi Juicy Salif citrus juicer £49 (white special edition available from 15th June); Juicy Salif designer Philippe Starck; inventor and industrial designer James Dyson with the Dyson Air Multiplier from £219; Cinetic Big Ball Animal vacuum cleaner £469

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Design

ABOVE Egmont Arens,

designer of the KitchenAid Model K stand mixer; the range of Artisan stand mixer colours available today; spokeswomen demonstrate the latest mixers; KitchenAid Artisan stand mixer £429

and Wozniak of home appliances: equal parts designer, engineer and marketer.” (In response, Dyson said the secret to his success was failure, reworking Edison’s famous quote: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”) Dyson’s first invention, in 1974, was the Ballbarrow – a wheelbarrow with a sphere for a front wheel. But he’s best known for the colourful, bagless Dual Cyclone, which launched in Japan in 1983 and in the UK 10 years later, where it became the country’s fastest-selling vacuum cleaner. Both the bladeless fan and the bagless vacuum cleaner typify Dyson’s approach. “Like everyone, we get frustrated by products that don’t work properly,” he says. “But as design engineers, we can do something about it. We’re all about invention.” For Dyson, function has always been more important than form. But with their bright, contemporary styling and transparent design, the vacuum cleaners shook up what was a traditionally staid product. Now the Multiplier is doing something similar: its sleek lines and fan-free face convey the impression that the future has finally arrived.

H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

KITCHENAID If any product evokes the America of the 1950s, it’s the KitchenAid stand mixer; as emblematic of the decade as full skirts, bobby socks and soda fountains. Designed by engineer Herbert Johnson, the stand mixer was actually launched much earlier, in 1919. By 1927, the company was selling 20,000 units a year. In 1936, Egmont Arens, a product designer and editor of Vanity Fair no less, refined the product to create the Model K. Arens’ design remains virtually unchanged. The stand mixer was the company’s first product, but it soon added more; in 1946, KitchenAid was among the pioneers of the domestic dishwasher. In 1955, it was the first company to add colour to its kitchen products, making the stand mixer available in colours including Petal Pink, Sunny Yellow and Island Green. Today the company’s range includes blenders, toasters and coffee makers – but the mixer remains the standard bearer. The stand mixer was always a relatively expensive product, and originally many stores refused to stock it. So the company hired a door-to-door, predominantly female sales force, one of the few employment opportunities for X

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Provenance

ICE GEMS Collaborations with cutting-edge designers ensure crystal house Baccarat’s styles are sharp and future-proof By DOMINIC LUTYENS

TOP Philippe Starck’s half-

submerged chandelier at Baccarat’s headquarters; ABOVE Baccarat Our Fire candlestick £750

No matter how illustrious a brand, it needs to move with the times to survive. To do so means treading a fine line between being perceived as super-classical – and thus irrelevant by a younger audience – and wholeheartedly embracing modernity, which can alienate older customers. Crystal brand Baccarat is an example of how to do it right. The French firm’s savvy approach to marrying its heritage with contemporary culture has come via collaborations with hip creatives from all over the world. France’s Philippe Starck, Israeli Arik Levy, Spaniard Jaime Hayon and Dutch designer Marcel Wanders have all been persuaded to create pieces that nod to their signature style even while employing what, for many, is a new – not to say challenging – medium: crystal. In the process, Baccarat provides these celebrated guest designers with all the expertise its glassblowers, cutters and engravers have developed since the firm was established, with the blessing of Louis XV, in the village of Baccarat in Lorraine in 1764. In 250 years, Baccarat hasn’t strayed far from its roots, and its factory remains in

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Lorraine. However, although the house was established by royalty – and later patronised by the great and the good, from maharajahs to presidents – Baccarat allied itself to avant-garde culture in 2003 by moving from a cramped, unremarkable Paris shop to a new flagship store on the city’s Place des États-Unis. Starck redesigned parts of the interior of this former palace of Viscount Charles de Noailles and his bohemian wife Marie-Laure. The couple were patrons of the Surrealists, collected paintings by Salvador Dalí and financed experimental films by Luis Buñuel and Jean Cocteau. (Dalí himself designed candlesticks and a perfume bottle with an eccentric sun-shaped stopper for Baccarat.) They were also known for their hosting of anarchic, Surrealist salons and balls, and Starck duly infused that spirit into his design. Outlandish flourishes include a chandelier half-submerged in a giant water-filled tank, and mirrors sprouting arms bearing electrically lit torches, like those in Cocteau’s film, La Belle et la Bête. Yet, in Starck’s hands, the past also collided with the present; in the store’s restaurant, modern industrial finishes, including exposed brickwork, are juxtaposed with baroque gilt frames and satin-covered banquettes fit for a king. A major milestone in Baccarat’s early history was receiving its first royal commission in 1823; Louis XVIII ordered a bespoke set of glasses. Others soon followed suit. Napoleon III adored Baccarat’s chandeliers, while Tsar Nicholas II was notorious for tossing every X

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Provenance

Baccarat glass out of which he had drunk over his shoulder, lest any lesser mortal should sip from the same one. In the 20th century, celebrities clamoured for Baccarat’s confections. Coco Chanel and Josephine Baker ordered tableware. Franklin D Roosevelt owned water glasses engraved with his initials. The writer Arthur Miller decorated the Manhattan apartment he shared with his wife Marilyn Monroe with Baccarat’s limited-edition Sun Clock, designed in 1948 by Georges Chevalier, the company’s long-time artistic director. Inspired by the Sun King, Louis XIV, the Sun Clock is more elaborate than “The company is other Chevalier pieces, such as his dertermined to look forward streamlined Art Deco panthers and d’Eau chandelier. That said, not as well as back. In the past Jets all Baccarat’s wares had been ornate decade, it has collaborated until this point. Take its Harcourt with cutting-edge designers” stemware of 1841, which, with its six flat facets, is relatively understated and timeless in style. Last year, as Baccarat celebrated its 250th birthday, it held a retrospective at Paris’ Petit Palais and released a book, Baccarat: Two Hundred and Fifty Years. But the company is determined to look forward as well as back. In the past decade, it has collaborated with cuttingedge designers more often than in its entire history. While many of the world’s oldest crystal brands are keen to embrace a contemporary aesthetic, Baccarat’s collaborative policy has been made easier by the fact that popular taste has become more decorative in the past 10 years; as such, the brand is now more in tune with the times than 20 years ago, when minimalism was the order of the day. In 2007, Arik Levy created his Intangible FROM TOP LEFT Baccarat collection for Baccarat. Levy is known for his ultraHarcourt glasses from £115; geometric aesthetic inspired by rock formations, and his a display at Paris’ Petit Palais Baccarat pieces, too, have a strongly geometric look with marking the brand’s 250th birthday; Baccarat Sun Clock their oblong, bas-relief patterns and linear incisions. £88,500 and New Antique Jaime Hayon, who is renowned for his baroque vase £23,900 aesthetic, took to designing for Baccarat in 2009 like Available from Luxury Home, Second Floor a duck to water, creating the limited-edition Crystal

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Candy collection which, aptly, comes in juicy boiledsweet shades. “I wanted to replicate the richness of fresh tropical fruits [such as pomegranates and pineapples] using crystal and other materials,” he said at the time. The collection is innovative and playful in its fusion of ceramics and glass, as well as in its use of metallic finishes in coppery tones. The following year, Marcel Wanders dreamed up Baccarat’s United Crystal Woods collection, which encompasses whimsical candelabras in the shape of deer topped with engraved-crystal candleholders, highly ornate crystal glasses with metallic bases, and a decanter with a stopper modelled on Wanders’ head wearing a red clown’s nose. Unusually for Baccarat, the collection allowed for humour and irony. Wanders was also free to reference his own flamboyant design vocabulary; one of his trademark motifs is the aforementioned clown’s nose. And one of his vases for the collection was etched with another of his signature motifs: lace patterns. Wanders and the crystal brand were a good fit, given that the designer, more than almost anyone else, helped spearhead the past decade’s revival of more decorative design. Such partnerships are essential to the brand’s continuing success but, as ever, Baccarat will be keen to maintain a balance between fostering relationships with directional designers and capitalising on its heritage. The next stage of its evolution is the launch, this April, of the Baccarat Hotel in New York, an extension and tangible symbol of what the French call l’art de vivre, or stylish living. While the hotel will be decorated with lavish statement pieces from the brand, it will also feature lifestyle pieces from its Everyday Baccarat range, designed to showcase its more modest products for the home. Again, balance between luxury and function is key, though you can be sure that Baccarat will always have the style to dazzle. HMN Dominic Lutyens writes about architecture and design for The Daily Telegraph, Elle Decoration and the Financial Times H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


Design

Nordic thrillers Abba, clogs and Sarah Lund’s sweater were fun while they lasted. But showing a lot more longevity are northern European interiors brands, which have been rocking the design world for more than 50 years By KATE WORTHINGTON

Think of a design classic – the first one that pops into your head. Chances are, either its designer or manufacturer (or both) come from northern Europe. Since the middle of the 20th century, Nordic countries have led the way in furniture, lighting and interior design, with many of the works produced in this golden era achieving cult status. Classic designs such as the Organic chair by Eero Saarinen and Charles Eames, and the Heart Cone chair by Verner Panton – both produced by Vitra – are as popular today as when they were introduced over 50 years ago. Likewise, Artek’s A110 Grenade and TW003 lamps are still fresh and contemporary. What’s their secret? What characterises these pieces and makes them so enduringly beautiful? The key lies primarily in the Nordic aesthetic: organic and sculptural, yet minimal and highly functional. The idea at the heart of this ethos is that everyday objects should be appealing to the senses. After World War II, there was a movement to democratise design so that it was available to all. The result was an explosion of creativity and an archive of masterpieces. The designers driving this shift focused on materials and pioneered ground-breaking manufacturing techniques such as moulded wood veneer and plastics. One designer fascinated by this new technology was Arne Jacobsen, who used pressure-moulded wood to create both the Grand Prix and Series 7 chairs for Fritz Hansen. His Drop chair, designed – along with the now famous Swan and Egg chairs – for the SAS Royal Hotel in Copenhagen, was relaunched in 2014 after having been out of production for 50 years. With a similarly proud heritage, the likes of Verpan and BoConcept are today at the forefront of contemporary design, with Nordic names driving the current trend for minimalist furniture and accessories in pastel shades and pale timbers. Then there’s Klaus Haapaniemi, who draws on Finnish folklore for intricate, fairy tale-like illustrations on cushions and rugs. Yes, Nordic design is still going strong – in pieces that are beautiful, functional, and made to love forever. HMN Kate Worthington is news editor of Livingetc

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Fritz Hansen

FROM LEFT Grand Prix chair

with leather seat from £512, Series 7 chairs £407 each and Drop chair in leather £1,485

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Design

Artek

FROM LEFT TW003

pendant lamp £187 and A110 pendant lamp £318

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Vitra

FROM LEFT Heart Cone

Chair £2,415 and Organic chair from £1,355 Available from Artek, Fritz Hansen and Vitra, Third Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Interview

A London apartment interior designed by The Studio

ROOM SERVICE From London pieds-Ă -terre to Mediterranean resorts, The Studio creates lavish living spaces all over the world By GUY WOODWARD

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and Chanel in the creation of residences “I like to spend time with for clients is one of The Studio’s goals.” the family and see how For the moment, though, Dalby is they interact, how they use working on projects in Miami and India, adding to a CV that, as design the space they’ve currently director of hotel and residential design got, and find out what consultancy Yoo, took him to Dubai, they feel is missing” China, Russia, Japan, the US and Turkey, and exposed him to a variety of approaches to interior design. “How people live in Rio is very different to how people live in Hong Kong,” Dalby says. “In Rio, most apartment blocks have balconies, but the balconies are glassed in, as part of the living area, with the dining room, where the family sits together. In Hong Kong, nobody really eats in; they dine out. So the focus is different.” And just as living habits differ, so, too, do tastes. “The Russian market enjoys luxurious materials, textures and finishes, whereas in northern Europe they like to work with the purity and integrity of different woods. So there’s lots to be aware of.” Dalby has worked on everything from a 1,200sq m, three-storey energy-efficient home in the Cotswolds to multi-million-pound penthouses in Candy & Candy’s One Hyde Park, where he says he saw craftsmanship CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT on a level he’d never seen before. Later, at Yoo, he The shower room of a London apartment; the master worked with a global who’s who of creative directors, bedroom of a pied-à-terre from Philippe Starck and Marcel Wanders to Kelly in Marylebone; a workspace Hoppen and Jade Jagger. in a Cotswolds cottage H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

So which of the current generation of designers does he admire? He cites Bethan Gray (whose work – notably the recent Ruby Tree collection – he describes as “joyful”) and design duo Eley Kishimoto (who have moved over from the fashion world to specialise in surface patterns) as two sources of inspiration. But he tends to take notice of trends more than individual designers. And right now, he says, the trend is for a pared-down, streamlined aesthetic, in keeping with more austere times. “There’s always going to be opulence, but we’re seeing a lot of simple, geometric forms right now,” Dalby says. “There’s a lot of wire work; framed furniture rather than over-cladding of pieces; a lot more honesty and integrity in the use of base materials.” The rapid progress of technology in the home has also had a huge impact. “Ten, 15 years ago, you used to have a couple of CD racks on the wall, or a shelf filled with box sets of The Sopranos and Six Feet Under, and that was how you’d express your taste and personality,” he says. “Now that space has been freed up, and people are expressing themselves through design.” And, he says, with the countless design magazines, websites and blogs that have sprung up in the last 20 years, “society is much more design-aware.” We are all designers now, it seems. But that doesn’t mean we can’t all still do with a helping hand from the experts. HMN The Studio, Third Floor

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Beds

Rest assured

Those looking for an exceptional bed – whether traditionally made from natural materials or hi-tech and smartphone-controlled – are spoiled for choice; so lie back, relax and enjoy the search By FIONA BECKETT It’s 11am and I’m curled up on the most comfortable bed ever. No, it isn’t a lie-in at a luxury hotel. I’m trying out different mattresses – in public. “Forget how you look; it’s the only way to do it,” the bed specialist says. Without trotting out the cliché about the amount of time we spend in it, a bed is a significant purchase, the most-used piece of furniture in the house. It’s important to get the right one – which means doing proper research. Here are eight key elements to consider.

Approach Too many people, it seems, test a bed via the “gorilla” technique – a quick lean forward with knuckles pressed into the mattress. Or by kneeling or sitting on it, which merely puts all your weight on one spot. To do a mattress justice – and make sure it’s the right one – you need to lie in your usual sleeping position. And always try mattresses with the same pillow – it will affect the way they feel.

Time Getting a full appreciation of a bed’s qualities means lying on it for at least five minutes – preferably 15. It’s best not to buy one off the back of a single visit, either. Come back a few times, and make sure to bring your partner. Shopping in person is absolutely essential; few people would buy a jacket online and expect it to fit perfectly, after all. And a bed is far more important.

Springs or foam? ABOVE A deconstructed

Hästens 2000T bed

Although I’ve got a memory-foam mattress at home, as I bounce from bed to bed, I find myself loving the extra

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bounce of pocket springs, which seem to wrap themselves round me. “You’re sleeping in a mattress not on a mattress,” the adviser says. It’s the fact that the springs are individually crafted that gives this super-supportive feel.

Materials Most of the best beds are made of natural materials, principally horsehair. Horsehair is perfect for mattresses because it’s both resilient and moisture-repellent, while wool and fleece lend softness and help maintain an even temperature. It’s amazing how different these fillings feel. Just as surprising is to find, gazing at a cross-section of a mattress, that horsehair is curly. Turns out it goes through a process a bit like a perm to give it extra spring.

Firmness It’s a myth that harder beds are better for you – this is only the case with cheaper mattresses. Regular visitors to the chiropractor tend to favour a hard mattress; when they’re still uncomfortable, they pick an even harder one. The key is to choose the right mattress for your weight. Those under 70kg (12 stone) should go for a relatively soft mattress; pick a medium one if you weigh between 70kg and 100kg, and a firm one if you weigh over 100kg.

Tension Each brand, of course, has its own interpretation of soft, medium and firm, which is why you need to test them. But what if – as seems likely – you and your partner are different weights? Most top-level brands can adjust the tension of each side of the mattress for you by altering X

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1

2

the size and density of the springs – a painstaking process that accounts for the higher cost of a handmade mattress. Obviously, you then have to stick to your own side of the bed – but apparently most people do.

3

uses natural materials, but it offers a greater degree of customisation in terms of support, materials and patterns. Best for: The design-conscious

3/ Hästens 2000T bed Size Always get the biggest bed you can fit in the room. If a 3ft single bed is comfortable for one person, then a 6ft (superking) bed seems a bare minimum for two. Like to spread out? You may want an emperor (7ft) or a even a massive 8ft Caesar.

Base Don’t dismiss the importance of the base. I tried a mattress on the floor that I had liked when it was on its sprung divan; it wasn’t a fraction as comfortable. “You don’t want to buy a mattress and put it on an old base,” I’m told. “Thats like putting old tyres on a new car.” And just as with cars, a proper test drive is imperative.

FIVE BEDS FOR FIVE TASTES 1/ Vispring Regal Superb A manufacturer of traditional English-style mattresses, Vispring, established in 1901, makes divan bases and mattresses by hand at its factory in Plymouth, with the tension adjusted to the customer’s weight. Handmade calico-covered pocket springs and hand-stitched edges enable the whole surface of the bed to be used. The filling is of natural materials: British wool, horsehair and cotton. Springy and wonderfully supportive. Best for: Those looking for a classic British mattress

2/ Savoir Beds No. 2 Savoir Beds were originally commissioned by the owners of the Savoy Hotel in 1905, who were looking for the perfect bed for their well-heeled customers. The No. 2 was the original, and is still referred to as The Savoy. Like the Vispring, it’s handmade, pocket-sprung and

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Nordic beds are as cool as Nordic fiction, and Swedish brand Hästens makes some of the best. They, too, are handmade using pocket springing and natural materials – including a higher percentage of horsetail hair (häst is Swedish for horse, and the best hair comes from the tail). The Swedish pine base is slotted, rather than screwed together, to eliminate noise. I love the cheery blue-andwhite cover and tailor-made mattress topper too. Best for: Those who want the finest – i.e. most resilient and breathable – natural materials

4

4/ Tempur Original Deluxe Mattress The original “memory-foam” mattress, the Tempur Original is an ideal choice if you like a slightly firmer bed. It moulds itself to your shape and provides prescriptive, pressure-relieving support, which is why you shouldn’t use another manufacturer’s topper with it. You also don’t need a sprung base. You can place the mattress on slats, which makes it a good choice for low bed bases. Best for: Those who want a firmer mattress

5

5/ Jensen Majestic 2 Dynamique Adjustable bed Another Scandinavian bed manufacturer, Jensen specialises in hi-tech beds with adjustable positions and a massage function you can control with your phone. It even has lights and in-built air-conditioning. The filling is a combination of pocket springs and latex, and the topping is designed to be resistant to bacteria and dust mites, making it ideal for those who suffer from allergies. Best for: Techies HMN

1. Vispring Regal Superb kingsize bed £6,250; 2. Savoir Beds No. 2 king-size bed, £15,300 plus fabric and upholstery; 3. Hästens 2000T king-size bed £21,220; 4. Tempur Original Deluxe king-size mattress £3,049; 5. Jensen Majestic 2 Dynamique Adjustable king-size bed £33,599

Fiona Beckett publishes the blog A Good Night’s Sleep: http://secretsofagoodnightssleep.com/author/fibeckett/

Available from Hästens, Jensen, Savoir Beds, Tempur and Vispring, Third Floor

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Style

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Style

MATERIAL WORLD This season’s moods in interiors aren’t dictated by colour but by textures and finishes. For statement decor, it’s time to get touchy–feely By HENRIETTA THOMPSON

Pierre Frey Gong wallpaper £130 per 10m roll Ginger & Jagger Leaf mirror from £3,909

Eichholtz Chaumon table lamp £589

Tom Dixon Beat Fat Brass pendant light £285

obe to C v lli

Roche Bobois Precious cocktail table, large £1,240

Roberto Cavalli dress £8,810

Villiers Brothers Revolution console table £18,909

Amy Somerville Lantern table from £4,439

Moooi The Golden Chair £522 Georg Jensen Cobra candleholder £99.95 for a pair

HIGH SHEEN The latest lustrous metallic finishes are perfect for adding a Midas touch to your world. The mirror shine of mixed and matched platinum, silver and chrome can reflect light into a room, while antique golds, copper and bronze all add eye-catching accents through statement pieces. Whether you choose to show off your ore values with one of Tom Dixon’s signature pendant lights, The Golden Chair from Moooi or a Pierre Frey wallpaper, this spring there’s a treasure trove to choose from. H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Style

Lee Broom One Light Only Walnut Small pendant lights £395 each

Cole & Son Woods & Pears wallpaper £78 per 10m roll

Tom Dixon Fossil Bookends £200 per pair Vitra Spindle clock £317

Porada Cozy room divider, price on request Linley Equus desk £35,700 Porro Balancing Boxes side table £1,750

Chloé dress £2,550 and shoes from a selection

Adrianna Shamaris Tktktkt ktktkt £xxx

Chloé

Giorgetti Hug armchair £7,139

BoConcept candlesticks £19 each

INTO THE WOODS The smooth, warm tones of natural wood lend an instant sense of serenity and wellbeing to any interior. A new generation of designers is capitalising on those long-wearing, timeless and tactile qualities, with this season’s directional pieces promising to get even better with age. Whether choosing the rich tones of sustainable hardwoods such as teak, walnut and ash, or distinctive and rare veneers, one thing is assured: a natural instinct is the one to follow in 2015.

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Style

Artek Floor Lamp A808 from £2,555

Designers Guild Tucson faux leather £52 per metre

Bethan Gray Stud mirror £1,849 B&B Italia Mart armchair £5,548

Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci jacket £2,950, trousers and boots from a selection

Givenchy

Vitra MVS Chaise £1,660

Munna Miss Feet table £1,079

Buster + Punch The Rockstar whisky bar from £3,709

Eichholtz Clock Graham £139

Linley Ebury Giant Match Holder £175

BIKER CHIC Black leather has long been appreciated by modernists for its ability to render objects more distinctive; for 2015, it branches out of the bachelor pad to become a key interior look across the board. Feel the embrace of leather’s tactile toughness as you curl up in B&B Italia’s Mart armchair, or succumb to the decadent darkness of the Tucson leather wall covering from Designers Guild or The Rockstar whisky bar by Buster + Punch. H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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Style

Baccarat New Antique vase £18,600

Osborne & Little Travertino wallpaper £56 per 10m roll

Lee Broom Chamber Large pendant light £960

Fritz Hansen table £3,432

Hugo oss

BoConcept Loops sculpture £139

Hugo Boss trench coat £700 and shoes from a selection

Ginger & Jagger Primitive Console £10,369

Villeroy & Boch Tiko vase (above) from £103 and Nek vase (right) from £62

Abyss & Habidecor Stone bath mat £149

Timothy Oulton Marble dining chair £550

STONE AGE The trend for natural stone indicates a fundamental shift towards designing with solid and lasting materials. Marble, quartz and granite are all beautiful, cool and elegant, and can be counted on to provide a rock where we need it most – tables from Fritz Hansen and Ginger & Jagger make perfect centrepieces. But these monumental materials are just as attractive in small items too – witness Baccarat’s New Antique range or the Lee Broom pendant lights. Available from Bathshop, Entertaining at Home, The Great Writing Room and Luxury Home, Second Floor; B&B Italia, Bethan Gray, BoConcept, Classics Room, Eichholtz, The Fabric Library, Giorgetti, Porada, Roche Bobois, Timothy Oulton, Tom Dixon, Vitra and Yoo Home, Third Floor; and harrods.com

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Trends Trends

ALL THINGS

bright & beautiful From elemental materials to clean colour palettes, a sense of optimism is flooding interior trends this spring, all delivered with a dose of effortless elegance Photographer BROTHERTON - LOCK / Stylist EMILIO PIMENTEL-REID

Photographer Tktktktktktktk

RESTORATION CHIC

FROM LEFT Eichholtz Newson side nesting tables £829 for a set of three and Soho lamp £159; Cire Trudon Ernesto candle £84.95; Chelini armchair in Decape Antico fabric £4,599; Bottega Veneta Intrecciato linen cushion £259; Osborne & Little Pasha Palas fabric in chartreuse/silver (used as cushion cover) £65 per metre; Flamant Chapel mirror £379; RUGS, FROM LEFT The Rug Company Persian Seneh £540, Persian Ghashghaee £675 and Persian Taleghan £975 H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E

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RESTORATION CHIC

FROM LEFT Eichholtz Chamberlain chair £2,379, Fokker aeroplane £299 and Lantern Luna 60cm lamp £1,349; Timothy Oulton balloon picture £390, vintage globes from £542 each, elephant picture £625 and Log Glove side table £775; Roche Bobois Coda sideboard £3,650; Flamant Adelaide ASYM sofa £4,729, square Mitchell coffee table £1,149 and dice-box game £87.95; Bottega Veneta photo album £585; Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques wooden box £100, Mâchoire de Requin jaw bone £221 and Tele Fermier Rajasthan figure £41; Ligne Roset Atelier lamp £555; CUSHIONS, FROM LEFT Rubelli Mirafiore Rosso fabric (used as cushion cover) £174 per metre; Designers Guild Soft Pantigre Papaye fabric (used as cushion cover) £98 per metre; Rubelli Mirafiore Smeraldo (used as cushion cover) £174 per metre; RUGS, FROM LEFT The Rug Company large cowhide £485, Persian Seneh £540, Persian Taleghan £975, Persian Ghashghaee £675, Persian Bakhtiyar £1,280

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TAILORED SCANDI

FROM LEFT Zanotta Sushi armchair £4,795;

Designers Guild Brera Largo saffron fabric (used as cushion cover) £62 per metre; The Rug Company by Kelly Wearstler Arial 2.74m x 1.83m rug £1,680; Giorgetti Aton corner sofa £19,399 (as shown); ON SOFA, FROM LEFT Georg Jensen Henning Koppel Turnip bowl with lid £72.95; Designers Guild Ventaglio Wedgwood fabric (used as cushion cover) £85 per metre; Colefax and Fowler Willowbrook fabric (used as cushion cover) £38 per metre; Designers Guild Brera Fino saffron fabric (used as cushion cover) £62 per metre; Wilcox Baptiste Geometric pictures £1,089 each; Bethan Gray Carve side table £1,095; Roche Bobois G3 coffee table £860; Vitra Gir wooden dolls £89.95 each; Tom Dixon Bash large bowl £295 and Cog medium candle holder £100 and tall candle holder £120; Porro Balancing Boxes side table £1,750; Fritz Hansen Egg chair £10,820; Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques Jean Paul Gaultier blue-andwhite stripe cushion £140; Lelièvre for Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques Marylin cushion £75; Anglepoise Type 75 Maxi floor lamp £625; PAINT, FROM LEFT Little Greene Intelligent Matt Emulsion in Little Greene Shirting and Little Greene Mister David £21 for one litre/£75 for five litres

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BROOKLYN INDUSTRIAL Rodarte for The Rug Company Ember 2.74m x 1.83m rug £4,187; Cattelan Italia Arabesque sideboard £3,579; The Ruby Tree Petal marble bowl £2,099; Saint-Louis Diamantic vases in medium £1,165, large £1,800 and small £825; BoConcept Perfectly Melancholic photo art picture £299; Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques Théâtre du Cap d’Ail Jean Cocteau plate £750; B&B Italia Joker plant pot £169; Psiche mirror £2,007, Acanto dining chair £1,019 and marble dining table £9,478; Tom Dixon Plum ice bucket £200; Ligne Roset Fifty dining chair £544; ON TABLE, FROM LEFT Georg Jensen Cobra dinner plates £18.95 and lunch plates £16.95 each, medium tumblers £25 per pair, medium bowls £18 each and Pyramid cutlery £349 for a 24-piece set; Alexandre Turpault Florence napkin £24.95 each; Riedel Vinum glasses £45 per pair and Veritas glasses £55 per pair; Baccarat Harmony tumbler £80 and highball glass £80; Zaha Hadid Braid candle holders from £155 each and Radia stool £1,499; Lladró Dazzle Macaw Bird sculpture £1,620; Moooi Dear Ingo chandelier £2,700; Bottega Veneta leather, bronze and glass screen £16,945; Porada Belt bench £1,929; Rubelli Terrazzo fabric (used as cushion cover) £95 per metre; PAINT, FROM LEFT Little Greene Intelligent Matt Emulsion in Milk Thistle and Pink Slip £21 for one litre/£75 for five litres

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HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR FROM LEFT Fendi Diamond Murano table

lamps £5,070 each, Canova bedside tables £8,930 each, Zenoria cushions £789 each, fox plaid with silk tulle £10,909, Gaia chair without arms £3,190, Canova Lady Ellypse desk £10,340 and Giano folding screen £6,340; Puiforcat Etchea Art Deco frame £731 and Art Deco 1937 candlestick in silver-plated finish £914; Giorgetti Plaza rug 4.0m diameter £5,039; Frato Hervé headboard £10,379 and Lagoa bed £4,059; Celso de Lemos Hella square pillow case £149, Hella Oxford pillow case £139, Bourdon Oxford pillow case £129, Hella king-size duvet cover £759 and Hella super-king flat sheet £359; Christofle Reef wooden tray £161, Silver Story tea pot £668, wooden tea caddy £161 and Albi tea cup and saucer £60; Frato Madison bench £2,649; Roche Bobois Panthère Bagheera sculpture £1,056; Baccarat small plate £44 and coaster £67; Ladurée Les Marquis Pink Prestige chocolates £6.70; Prada Cappelliera case in rettile £21,500; Osborne & Little Keshi velvet in Pardus (used as cushion cover) £110 per metre; Mikhail Pietranek for Dedar curtains in Argentina fabric £136.50 per metre; Lalique Dahlia large perfume bottle No. 3 £355, Fleurde crystal perfume bottle £1,000 and Martinets vase £1,570

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Trends

HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR FROM LEFT The Rug Company by Kelly Wearstler Flaunt 2.74m x 1.83m rug £5,691; A Modern Grand Tour ostrich feather lamp £3,300; Frato Madison bench £2,649; Fendi Fox plaid with silk tulle £10,909

Available from Food Halls and Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor; Bed Linens, Entertaining at Home, Home Fragrance, Luxury Home, Luxury Linens and Wedgwood, Second Floor; Anglepoise, Bang & Olufsen, B&B Italia, BoConcept, Bottega Veneta, Cattelan Italia, Classics Room, Eichholtz, The Fabric Library, Fendi Casa, Flamant, Frato, Giorgetti, Harrods Technology, Ligne Roset, Porada, Roche Bobois, Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques, The Rug Company, Timothy Oulton, Tom Dixon, Vitra and Yoo Home, Third Floor Freelance Art Assistant IDA JAKOBSON Styling Assistant BEN VICENTE

X WATCH Download the Harrods app to hear our stylist discuss the trends

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Ultimate

The Ultimate

FLIGHT of FANCY

Classic furniture gets the exotic treatment courtesy of Kristjana S Williams Growing up in Iceland, Kristjana S Williams remembers little in the way of colour in the landscape. “Everything seemed grey,” she says. “Stark and unforgiving.” She’s certainly made up for it since. Her exuberant artwork features an exotic array of flowers, birds and butterflies. In one-of-a-kind collages, Williams piles layer upon layer of bold flora and fauna images; the most notable of her murals, featuring Victorian-style

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fine etchings, introduced a whole new vibe into The Connaught hotel in Mayfair last year. Now, Williams’ work can be seen in a vibrant range of cushions and a similarly striking range of furniture – including Chesterfields that fuse classic shapes with her startling style. Safari on a sofa. Sofa price on request. Available from The Fabric Library, Third Floor H A R ROD S HOM E & PROPE RT Y M AG A Z I N E


CENTRAL LONDON’S

Most Desirable LUXURY HOMES


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HARRODS REWARDS EXCLUSIVE OFFER

Receive up to 1 million Harrods Rewards points* For a limited time, Harrods Estates is offering up to 1 million Harrods Rewards points (worth up to ÂŁ10,000)* to those buying, selling or letting a property. Simply appoint us on the sole instruction of your property before 1st July 2015. To find out more, please call +44 (0)20 7225 6506 or email nicola.clark @harrodsestates.com

KNIGHTSBRIDGE OFFICE: T: +44 ( 0 )20 7225 6506 MAYFAIR OFFICE: T: +44 ( 0 )20 7409 9001 CHELSEA OFFICE: T: +44 ( 0 )20 7225 6700 KENSINGTON OFFICE: T: +44 ( 0 )20 3650 4600

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SALES

SALES

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THE LANCASTERS Hyde Park, W2 Located in a highly sought-after Hyde Park development, this apartment of 1,345sq ft (125sq m) comprises a reception room with high ceilings and ornate cornices, a dining area, a kitchen and two spacious bedrooms (both with en-suite bathrooms). The apartment also has air conditioning and Lutron lighting throughout. The building has a grand portico entrance, secure valet parking, and a swimming pool and spa. EPC rating E. Leasehold: Approximately 996 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ3,500,000 020 7409 9346 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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HAMILTON TERRACE St John’s Wood, NW8 Hamilton Terrace is a magnificent 12,453sq ft (1,157sq m) Georgian house built circa 1850 that has been the subject of a major renovation behind the period façade. Available fully furnished and with award-winning landscaped gardens, the detached double-fronted house is laid out over five floors and has four bedroom suites, a reception room, two kitchens and a magnificent lower-ground-level entertaining and leisure suite with a swimming pool, bar area, gymnasium, Jacuzzi, sauna and home cinema. EPC rating D. Price on request 020 7409 9346 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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UPPER GROSVENOR STREET Mayfair, W1 In a sought-after building moments from Hyde Park and Grosvenor Square, this beautifully presented apartment of 1,062sq ft (99sq m) comprises a large reception/ dining room, a fully fitted kitchen and two bedrooms – both with en-suite bathrooms. The building also has a concierge and 24-hour security. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 112 years remaining Guide price: £2,650,000 020 7409 9205 michael.davis@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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THE LANCASTERS Hyde Park, W2 Located in a highly sought-after Grade II-listed, stucco-fronted development in Hyde Park, this newly renovated one-bedroom apartment has a reception room with high ceilings; a modern, fully fitted kitchen; and a large master bedroom with en-suite bathroom. The 626sq ft (58sq m) apartment also comes with access to a secure parking space, a swimming pool, spa facilities, a concierge and 24-hour security. EPC rating F. Leasehold: Approximately 995 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ1,350,000 020 7409 9346 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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GREEN STREET Mayfair, W1 Situated on the first and second floors of a well-presented building, this three-bedroom duplex apartment has a south-facing reception room with high ceilings and balcony; a large kitchen/dining room; a master bedroom with en-suite bathroom; two further double bedrooms; and a separate bathroom. The apartment, of 1,580sq ft (147sq m), has been refurbished to a high specification and offers excellent storage throughout. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 120 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ4,500,000 020 7409 9346 robert.cox@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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QUEENS GROVE St John’s Wood, NW8 Queens Grove is a newly constructed detached residence of almost 11,000sq ft (1,022sq m) located close to Regent’s Park. The home has a large reception room, study, kitchen, dining room and four bedroom suites, including a master suite with his-and-hers dressing rooms and en-suite bathrooms. The property comes with a spa area including pool, Jacuzzi, hammam, gym and bar, plus a cinema, staff area with two bedrooms, utility room and garage parking for two cars. EPC rating D. Price on request 020 7409 9205 michael.davis@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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THE KNIGHTSBRIDGE APARTMENTS, SW7 Located on the fifth floor of a prestigious residential building, this one-bedroom apartment of 704sq ft (65sq m) has been refurbished and interior-designed to the highest specifications. The building has a reception area, a 24-hour concierge and security plus secure underground car parking with valet. In addition, there’s a world-class leisure suite with a gym, spa and swimming pool, and an exclusive business suite available for residents’ use. EPC rating B. Leasehold: Approximately 990 years remaining Guide price: £2,950,000 020 7225 8044 henry.browne@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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LINCOLN HOUSE Basil Street, SW3 This 1,256sq ft (117sq m) apartment is located on the fourth floor of a well-run apartment block. The accommodation includes two reception rooms and two bedrooms, but could easily be rearranged into a three-bedroom property. Lincoln House is a purpose-built Edwardian apartment block on the north side of Basil Street, a short walk from all Knightsbridge has to offer. The block benefits from a large entrance/reception hall, a resident porter, security and a lift, and has a communal garden at the rear of the building. EPC rating D. Leasehold: Approximately 993 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ3,500,000 020 7225 8044 henry.browne@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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ALBERT COURT Prince Consort Road, SW7 An impeccable two-bedroom first-floor lateral apartment in a Grade II-listed mansion building, this property has been refurbished to the most exacting standards. Accommodation in the 1,368sq ft (127sq m) apartment comprises a reception room, a study, a kitchen/dining room, a master bedroom with dressing room and en-suite shower room finished in Pietra marble, and a guest bedroom with en-suite shower room finished in Fior di Bosco marble. The building features grand communal areas and there is a 24-hour concierge. EPC rating B. Share of freehold Guide price: ÂŁ3,950,000 020 7225 6797 reem.dougramaji@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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ONE HYDE PARK Knightsbridge, SW1 Situated on the second floor of an exclusive development, this one-bedroom apartment of approximately 1,027sq ft (95sq m) has been designed by Candy & Candy, with bespoke furniture, luxurious finishes and cutting-edge technology. The development has access to the facilities at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park hotel, including a private cinema, games room, squash court, gymnasium, spa and swimming pool, as well as a full range of concierge services including valet parking and maid service. The apartment is offered fully furnished and includes one underground parking space, a separate storage unit and wine storage. EPC rating C. Guide price: ÂŁ5,600,000 020 7225 6508 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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THURLOE PLACE Knightsbridge, SW7 Located on the second floor of a portered block with magnificent views of the Brompton Oratory and Brompton Road, this three-bedroom 1,700sq ft (158sq m) apartment comprises a triple-aspect reception room, an ultra-modern Poggenpohl kitchen, three double bedrooms and two bathrooms. The master bedroom has a spacious en-suite bathroom and a dressing room with hand-crafted fittings. The apartment has been refurbished to the highest specifications, incorporating 21st-century technology and materials including rare marbles, Swarovski crystal, 24kt gold-plated ironmongery, Italian leather and Murano glass. Empire House was built in the late 19th century and is located at the junction of Brompton Road and Thurloe Place. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 90 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ5,950,000 020 7893 8343 leila.dyominova@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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HANS PLACE Knightsbridge, SW1 Arranged over six floors, this Grade II-listed sevenbedroom home of approximately 5,167sq ft (480sq m) comprises a reception hall, a dining room, a kitchen with breakfast room, a library/sitting room, a drawing room, a master bedroom with dressing room, two double bedrooms with dressing areas and en-suite bathrooms, and three further bedrooms. There is a gym, a utility room and a wine cellar, and a self-contained staff flat with a separate entrance in the basement comprising a reception room, a bedroom, a kitchen and a bathroom. EPC rating C. Freehold Guide price: ÂŁ14,500,000 Also available for long-term rental 020 7225 6508 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

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WELLINGTON COURT Knightsbridge, SW1 This Grade II-listed mansion flat of 2,326sq ft (216sq m) has the perfect combination of high ceilings, period features and the latest technology. With immaculate finishes, including silk hand-embroidered wallpaper, marble and hand-stitched leather, no expense has been spared to create the ultimate in luxurious living. The property also has a 24-hour porter and air conditioning throughout. Set in the heart of Knightsbridge, this triple aspect apartment is a short walk to Harrods and the area’s shops and restaurants. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 150 years remaining Guide price: £8,750,000 020 7893 8343 leila.dyominova@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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HANS COURT Hans Road, SW3 This 3,728sq ft (346sq m) five-bedroom apartment is located on the fourth floor of an elegant purpose-built mansion block in central Knightsbridge. Meticulously refurbished to the highest specifications, the apartment has three large reception rooms and five bedroom suites, including two master suites. Hans Court is directly opposite Harrods and consists of a small number of large apartments. The block benefits from a lobby and communal parks, resident porters and security. EPC rating E. Leasehold: Approximately 157 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ12,950,000 020 7225 6797 reem.dougramaji@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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WALTON PLACE Knightsbridge, SW3 Behind this classic white-stucco faรงade is a spacious townhouse arranged over five floors with the extensive entertaining and reception rooms located on the lower ground, ground and first floor levels. The house is currently arranged with four bedrooms, and benefits from two roof terraces and an internal patio garden. Walton Place is located between Pont Street and Hans Road, and is extremely convenient for all the world-class amenities that Chelsea, Knightsbridge and Sloane Street have to offer. EPC rating F. Freehold Guide price: ยฃ14,500,000 020 7225 6508 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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KENSINGTON MANSIONS Earls Court, SW5 Located in a sought-after red-brick mansion block in Earls Court, this two-bedroom apartment of 1,297sq ft (120sq m) is ideal for entertaining or as a pied-Ă -terre, and has access to landscaped communal areas. The apartment has a bright reception/dining room, a kitchen, a master bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe and en-suite bathroom, a second double bedroom and a family bathroom. EPC rating D. Share of freehold Guide price: ÂŁ1,500,000 020 7225 6700 andrew.gunnforbes@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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WYATT DRIVE Barnes, SW13 This four-bedroom end-of-terrace house of 2,626sq ft (244sq m) is located in tranquil Barnes Waterside and offers an exceptional standard of quality and comfort throughout. The property has a Bulthaup B3 kitchen/ dining room that features Gaggenau and Miele appliances and leads onto a west-facing garden designed by Declan Buckley; a first-floor double reception room with parquet flooring; a master bedroom with en-suite bathroom; three further bedrooms, one of which is en-suite; a family bathroom; and an integrated garage/utility room. The property was featured in Homes & Gardens magazine and benefits from off-street parking. EPC rating C. Freehold Guide price: ÂŁ2,450,000 020 7225 6700 andrew.gunnforbes@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

145

THE BELVEDERE Chelsea Harbour, SW10 This penthouse apartment of 4,780sq ft (444sq m) is in the private marina of Chelsea Harbour. Situated on the 18th, 19th and 20th floors, the property has impressive 360-degree views of London. Entertaining spaces include a reception room with double-height ceilings that is flooded with natural light. In addition, there are four en-suite bedrooms, multiple terraces, three underground parking spaces, 24-hour concierge and security, and an internal lift. Chelsea Harbour has a five-star hotel, gym, spa and restaurant. The mainline station at Imperial Wharf (0.1 mile away) provides direct links to Clapham Junction and West Brompton, and the River Bus service calls at Chelsea Harbour. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 98 years remaining Price on request 020 7225 5752 john.harris@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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BRADBOURNE STREET Fulham, SW6 An end-of-terrace house of 2,512sq ft (233sq m) located in the Peterborough estate, this property has been in the same ownership for more than 40 years. The accommodation includes a reception room, dining room, kitchen, seven bedrooms, four bathrooms, a utility room and a private garden. Bradbourne Street is located in the heart of Parsons Green, with many shops and restaurants nearby. EPC rating D. Freehold Guide price: ÂŁ2,750,000 020 7225 5752 john.harris@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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PAULTONS STREET Chelsea, SW3 This family house of 1,626sq ft (151sq m), set on a pretty residential street in Chelsea, comprises a double reception room, kitchen, dining room leading to a south-facing garden, four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Paultons Street is well located just off the King’s Road, close to the many shops and restaurants of Chelsea and South Kensington. EPC rating D. Freehold Guide price: £3,250,000 020 7225 6700 andrew.gunnforbes@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

148

EVELYN GARDENS South Kensington, SW7 A recently refurbished first-floor, two-bedroom apartment of 652sq ft (61sq m) is split over two levels and comprises a reception/dining room with high ceilings, a kitchen, a master bedroom, a second double bedroom, and a family bathroom with underfloor heating. The communal areas and exterior of the red-brick building have been finished to an exacting standard, and there is access to communal gardens. The property is ideally located for the shops and restaurants of South Kensington and Chelsea. EPC rating E. Leasehold: Approximately 33 years remaining Guide price: ÂŁ1,200,000 020 7225 5752 john.harris@harrodsestates.com

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SALES

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OLD CHURCH STREET Chelsea, SW3 This newly built townhouse of 2,067sq ft (192sq m) offers bespoke contemporary living. The most discerning attention to detail has been employed towards every element of the design and the materials used. Located on Chelsea’s oldest street, the house is moments from King’s Road and the River Thames. EPC rating C. Freehold Guide price: £4,750,000 020 7225 5752 john.harris@harrodsestates.com

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KENSINGTON OFFICE: 48-50 KENSINGTON CHURCH STREET LONDON W8 4DG T: +44 (0) 20 3650 4600

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LETTINGS

LETTINGS

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PARK LANE PLACE Mayfair, W1K Available furnished, this three-bedroom duplex apartment benefits from two private terraces with views over one of London’s finest landmarks, Hyde Park. The approximately 2,000sq ft (186sq m) apartment has a spacious living room, fully integrated kitchen/breakfast room, master bedroom suite, two further double bedrooms, separate shower room, guest cloakroom and storage room. Other benefits include a 24-hour porter, a secure underground parking space and air conditioning. Direct access to the London Marriott Hotel Park Lane facilitates room service and access to the hotel’s gym and swimming pool for a separate fee. EPC rating C. Price: £3,990 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £246 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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PARK HOUSE Mayfair, W1 Park House, a new landmark building, features a 24-hour concierge and an underground car park. With generous use of light and space, each of the 39 apartments – ranging from one to three bedrooms – is unique in layout. Inside, high-spec finishes demonstrate a meticulous attention to detail. All of the properties are furnished in a contemporary style and feature smarthome technology with fully integrated Crestron and the latest AV systems. EPC rating from C to D. Please call for rents and availability Property fees (£180 admin & £312–£450 checkout). References: £42 per person* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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LETTINGS

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GREEN STREET Mayfair, W1 Providing approximately 2,300sq ft (214sq m) of living space, this single-level apartment comprises a spacious reception room, fully integrated kitchen, master bedroom with en-suite bathroom, further double bedroom with en-suite, and a guest cloakroom. The building has a daytime porter, and Green Street is conveniently located in Mayfair within easy reach of shopping, entertainment and transport facilities. Available unfurnished. EPC rating B. Price: £2,950 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £210 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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55 PARK LANE Mayfair, W1 With apartments ranging from one to four bedrooms, 55 Park Lane benefits from 24-hour security, an underground car park and concierge. The utilities are included with the rent, along with a twice-weekly maid service. The minimum letting period for these properties is 90 days. EPC ratings from B to E. Price on request, plus property fees (£180 admin & £165 to £300 checkout). References: £42 per person* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants

020 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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WELBECK STREET Marylebone, W1 These beautifully furnished one-bedroom serviced apartments are located moments from the shops and amenities of Oxford Street. The apartments have a 24-hour telephone concierge that can provide in-room spa treatments, grocery delivery services, dinner reservations and taxi bookings. The rent includes a twice-weekly maid service as well as utilities, Wi-Fi, Sky and Netflix. Available for lettings of 90 days or more. EPC rating C. Price: From £1,500 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £165 checkout). References: £42 per person* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7409 9158 robin.boghhenrikssen@harrodsestates.com

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BROMPTON PLACE Knightsbridge, SW3 Arranged over two floors, this one-bedroom terraced house of 744sq ft (69sq m) has a rear patio leading off the dining room. Upstairs, the bright, well-proportioned bedroom has built-in wardrobes and a large en-suite bathroom. Located just off the Brompton Road, Brompton Place is well situated for the amenities of Knightsbridge and is just a short walk from Harrods, Hyde Park and Sloane Street. The property would make an ideal pied-à-terre and has a secure underground parking space in the Harrods car park, and valet service, which is included in the rent. EPC rating D. Price: £895 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £165 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6602 karen.boland@harrodsestates.com

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THE KNIGHTSBRIDGE APARTMENTS, SW7 Located on the fifth floor of the 199 Knightsbridge residential building, this spacious one-bedroom apartment of approximately 704sq ft (65sq m) has been totally refurbished and interior designed to a high specification. The building has 24-hour concierge and security, and a secure underground car park with valet service. There is also a leisure suite with gym, spa and swimming pool, and an exclusive business suite available for residents’ use. Available now for long-term rentals on a furnished basis. EPC rating B. Price: £1,895 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £165 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6602 karen.boland@harrodsestates.com

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LETTINGS

163

EBURY STREET Belgravia, SW1W Refurbished to a high standard, this three-bedroom apartment of approximately 1,636sq ft (152sq m) on the raised ground floor of a portered building in Belgravia has wooden flooring throughout. There is a spacious reception room/dining area, a kitchen, a master bedroom with an en-suite bathroom and a dressing room, a further two bedrooms and a bathroom. Ebury Street is within walking distance of Hyde Park Corner and Victoria. Available now for long-term rentals on a furnished basis. EPC rating C. Price: £1,650 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £210 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6759 katarina.rhodes@harrodsestates.com

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HANS COURT Knightsbridge, SW3 This five-bedroom 3,721sq ft (346sq m) apartment comprises a grand entrance hall, two reception rooms, a formal dining room, modern kitchen, four double bedrooms, a further bedroom/study, five bathrooms and a storage area. It also has state-of-the-art AMX electronics throughout. Hans Court is situated a short distance from Harrods and all the shopping and transport amenities of Knightsbridge. Available immediately for long-term let on a furnished basis. EPC rating D. Price: £9,750 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £300 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6602 karen.boland@harrodsestates.com

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LETTINGS

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CHEVALIER HOUSE Knightsbridge, SW3 Furnished by Harrods and Fendi Casa, this eighth-floor apartment of approximately 1,470sq ft (137sq m) comprises a reception room with open-plan kitchen leading to a large terrace with views of Harrods, three double bedrooms and two bathrooms. The building has a 24-hour concierge and is available now for long-term rentals on a furnished basis. EPC rating C. Price: £3,250 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £210 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6759 katarina.rhodes@harrodsestates.com

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HERBERT CRESCENT Knightsbridge, SW1X Refurbished to a high standard, this first-floor, one-bedroom apartment of approximately 902sq ft (83sq m) comprises a reception room, an eat-in kitchen, a double bedroom with an en-suite bathroom and a guest cloakroom. Herbert Crescent is conveniently located for Hyde Park and all the shopping, entertainment and transport facilities of Knightsbridge. Available now for long-term rentals on a fully furnished basis. EPC rating B. Price: £1,400 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £165 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 6602 karen.boland@harrodsestates.com

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LETTINGS

169

PONT STREET Belgravia, SW1X Located on the ground floor of a period building in the heart of Knightsbridge, this two-bedroom apartment of approximately 1,190sq ft (110sq m) includes a reception room, a kitchen, two double bedrooms, a bathroom and a shower room. The apartment has wooden floors throughout as well as high ceilings and a caretaker. Pont Street is conveniently located for the amenities of Knightsbridge and Hyde Park. Available now for longterm rentals on a furnished basis. EPC rating D. Price: £1,350 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £180 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 5881 candice.fletcher@harrodsestates.com

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THE TOWER St George Wharf, SW8 On the 33rd floor of London’s tallest all-residential development, this two-bedroom apartment has views towards Battersea Power Station and Albert Bridge. The property has been interior designed by Staffan Tollgard with high-specification contemporary furniture and fittings throughout. The accommodation of approximately 1,261sq ft (117sq m) comprises an openplan kitchen/reception/dining room, a master bedroom suite with a large walk-in wardrobe and an en-suite bathroom, a further bedroom, a second bathroom and a sky garden. The development has a 24-hour gym and concierge, shops and a spa. Available now on a furnished basis. EPC rating B. Price: £2,100 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £190 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 5881 candice.fletcher@harrodsestates.com

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LYFORD ROAD Wandsworth, SW18 This detached family home has been recently refurbished to a high specification. The accommodation of approximately 7,000sq ft (650sq m) over four floors comprises, on the lower level, a large soundproof entertainment room leading to a garden and a heated swimming pool, a cinema room, a gym, a steam room, a laundry room, a temperature-controlled wine cellar, and a staff annexe with two bedrooms, a kitchenette and a separate entrance. The ground floor has a bright kitchen/ breakfast room and access to the terraces and garden, a dining room and a formal reception room. On the top two floors are a spacious master suite plus five further double bedrooms and four bathrooms. Though the property is less than five miles from Knightsbridge, the house has a rural feel, with views over Wandsworth Common, and is set back at the end of a no-through road with three off-road parking spaces. The house is available immediately for long-term rentals on an unfurnished basis. EPC rating E. Price: £3,950 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £500 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 5881 candice.fletcher@harrodsestates.com

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EGERTON CRESCENT Chelsea, SW3 Located in a quiet, leafy crescent a short walk from Harrods and the amenities of South Kensington, Chelsea and Knightsbridge, this apartment of approx 3,428sq ft (318sq m) comprises, on the lower floor, a large eat-in kitchen with access to a paved garden and a utility room. On the ground floor there is a dining room, a reception room and a study. A large formal reception room takes up the entire first floor, which has a balcony and views of the communal garden to the front. The master bedroom, a bathroom and a dressing room are on the second floor; and on the third floor are a double bedroom, a single bedroom, a large walk-in wardrobe, and a bathroom. Such a house is rare to the lettings market, and is available for short-term rentals. The tenant will benefit from a live-in housekeeper who has her own quarters (included in the rent), the option of a butler trained at Buckingham Palace (by separate negotiation), use of the private rear garden and access to the front communal garden. Available for short-term let. EPC rating D. Price: £18,500 per week plus property fees (£180 admin & £310 checkout). References: £42 per person.* *http://www.harrodsestates.com/tenants 020 7225 5881 candice.fletcher@harrodsestates.com

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PRIME LOCATION, PREMIUM DESIGN

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS

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BERNERS ST LOFTS Fitzrovia, W1 In the heart of the West End, adjacent to the Sanderson hotel and Berners Tavern, this boutique development comprises six lateral two-bedroom apartments and one triplex three-bedroom penthouse with a large roof terrace. The interiors are all architect-designed to a high specification, all bedrooms have built-in storage and en-suite bathrooms, and there is lift access. Leasehold: Approximately 999 years remaining Guide price: From £1,975,000 to £4,495,000 020 7409 9001 simon.barry@harrodsestates.com

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RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS

175

SOHO SQUARE London, W1 Five two- and three-bedroom apartments are available in an exceptional new development behind a double-fronted, Grade II listed façade overlooking one of London’s most historic garden squares. Adjacent to Tottenham Court Road Crossrail station (opening in 2018), the apartments are offered for sale with full interior design and concierge services provided by Quintessentially. Leasehold: Approximately 999 years remaining Guide price: From £2,500,000 to £5,950,000 020 7409 9001 simon.barry@harrodsestates.com

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RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS

176

MANHATTAN LOFT GARDENS, London, E20 Manhattan Loft Gardens is a double-cantilevered 42-storey tower in Stratford City, on the site of the London 2012 Olympic Games. Located next to Westfield shopping centre, Stratford International railway station and the new Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, the tower includes 248 apartments, three sky gardens and a 145-room hotel. The developer, Manhattan Loft Corporation, whose portfolio includes Chiltern Firehouse and St Pancras Renaissance London Hotel, estimates completion in 2018. Register your interest in an apartment now. Leasehold: Approximately 240 years remaining Guide price: From ÂŁ625,000 to ÂŁ2,000,000 020 7409 9001 simon.barry@harrodsestates.com

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ASSET MANAGEMENT

177

ASSET MANAGEMENT Harrods is world renowned for the quality of the products and services it provides, and Harrods Estates Asset Management is no exception Harrods Estates Asset Management provides an unrivalled property and estate-management service on behalf of developers, landlords and resident management companies. We offer an impressive high-profile and award-winning portfolio across London.

NO TASK IS TOO SMALL, NO REQUEST TOO EXTRAORDINARY In the world of high-profile luxury developments, a hotel-style concierge service is essential. Harrods Estates Asset Management concierges are highly trained, professional, discreet and trustworthy. Naturally, they will be happy to undertake everyday tasks, such as receiving deliveries and greeting tradespeople,

screening and escorting visitors, making restaurant recommendations and reservations, arranging maid services, booking travel or simply hailing a taxi. Furthermore, our concierges can call on all the resources of Harrods to ensure that your “front desk” is run to impeccable standards. Flowers, food, gifts and personal items can be delivered at short notice, while your concierge will be able to arrange everything from a chauffeured limousine to a private helicopter.

We are committed to providing an optimum service to our clients, and we offer a range of services including, but not limited to: • Service-charge administration • Ground-rent collection • Supervision of on-site staff • Supervision of maintenance repairs, including major works • Concierge services • Acting as company secretary for resident management companies For more information, please contact us on 020 3626 7565.

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Harrods Estates Property Management service is designed to meet your requirements and provide a personal touch In addition to our Sales and Asset Management services, Harrods Estates is pleased to provide a five-star total Property Management service to individual homeowners and landlords. Whether you spend a significant amount of time abroad – meaning your property is frequently unoccupied – or you are looking for a new owner or tenant, we can provide a Property Management service that is tailored to meet your requirements.

PERSONAL SOLUTIONS, FIRST-CLASS SERVICE As you would expect from Harrods, we go one step further in order to provide bespoke solutions and a first-class service. We pay particular attention

to identifying and surpassing the needs of our clients. This, combined with our expert property knowledge, has enabled Harrods Estates to provide property management to individual homeowners and landlords. The unique position of Harrods Estates in the Harrods group of companies allows us to call on the enormous corporate resources of the group in support of our property management activities, delivering outstanding results in terms of quality, responsiveness and professionalism. Harrods Estates manages a broad range of properties, catering for everything from studios to large family houses. Services include: • Maintenance work such as plumbing, painting and decorating

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• Sorting post • Laundry • Weekly inspections • Plant care • Cleaning • Ironing For more information, or to discuss your property and your requirements, please contact Monica Kent, who heads our Property Management team, on 020 7225 6758.


Harrods Home & Property Magazine Spring/Summer 2015  

Interiors trends come with a tangible sense of optimism this spring. Clean lines and bright colours combine with natural materials and lavis...

Harrods Home & Property Magazine Spring/Summer 2015  

Interiors trends come with a tangible sense of optimism this spring. Clean lines and bright colours combine with natural materials and lavis...

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