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portfolio of / hans m. f. halleraker / 2008 - 2014


Š 2014 Hans Martin Frostad Halleraker Architect M.Arch. All-rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission of copyright owner except in the context of reviews. Published by Hans Martin Frostad Halleraker Pilestredet Park 18 0176 Oslo Norway Phone NO: +47 93 82 45 71 Phone US: (310) 430-6532 Hans.Halleraker@stud.aho.no Hans_Halleraker@sciarc.edu hansmartin@120hours.no web: www.hanshalleraker.com web: www.120hours.no PRINTING: LuLu @ www.lulu.com TYPEFACE: Kalinga: Regular, Bold ISBN 978-1-105-69851-4


contents /

4

INTRODUCTION

8

DIPLOMA Threshold Ministry

32

WORKS FROM SCI-Arc

34 50

Radial Crystallization Office and conference center Incongruos Surfaces Black box theatre

62 70

disFIGURE Visual Studies ETFE Tectonics

78

WORKS FROM AHO

80 92

Breaking Barriers Urban Design Two Houses Japan Studio

104 114 122 128

High School Harestua Hotel */***** Student Housing Herlsebsgate Urban Design Look to Glomma

136 138 140 142

Small Summer Cabin Gressholmen Concrete tables Workshop Brick wall Workshop Steel recliner Workshop

144

120 HOURS


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introduction

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My story / July 14th 1987

Born in Oslo

1990 - 2000

Childhood at Stord Island

2000 - 2011

Citizen of Oslo

June 2006

Graduated from High School College

2006 - 2007

Served in the Royal Norwegian Navy

Spring 2008

Traveled the world

August 2008

Inaugurated at AHO

June 2010 - 2011

Arhitectural Assistant at HAV Eiendom AS

09.29.2010

Proud uncle and Godfather of Sander

Winter 2010 - present

Founding Director of 120 HOURS

Summer 2011

Moved to Los Angeles

August 2011 - 2012

SCI-Arc M.Arch 2

02.27.2012

Proud uncle of Magnus

2013 - 2014

Intern at Space Group

August 2012 - 2013

AHO Master Studios

January 2014

Graduated from AHO

Please see full CV and more information on www.hanshalleraker.com

Experience /

Space Group Architects 2013 - 2014 • • •

Venice Biennale Nordic exhibition 2014 “PostZerobygget” - Nordic Built Challenge Novosibirsk Arena

Link Arkitektur 2011 - 2014 • •

Meieribygget Hamnegata

Oslo Association of Architects 2012 -2013 •

Board Member

HAV Eiendom 2010 •

Bjørvika Development

Hordfast 2010 - 2013 6

Paladio AS 2010 - 2014


About me / I am an architect with experience from two very different schools of architecture, respectively in Oslo and Los Angeles. I am the founder of 120 HOURS, the world’s largest and most prestiguos architecture competition for students. I have a multifaceted work experience and high ambitions in everything I do.

tremely exciting learning environment. This avant-garde school of architecture has a reputation for pushing the boundaries of academic study. You’re constantly being pushed to the next level, and your work is always being reviewed in a highly professional, critical, inquisitive and respectful way. A truly worldclass institution.

I started my education in Oslo in 2008, in a school heavily influenced by its pioneers Christian Norberg-Schulz and Sverre Fehn. Its focus is mainly on technical, environmental and programmatic issues, as well as the architecture’s relation to the landscape. This was one of the most characteristic features of Fehn’s architecture: “When I build in a place where the natural landscape is completely pristine and untouched, it is a struggle - the attack by our culture intact nature. In this confrontation I try to create a building that makes people more aware of the beauty of this place.” (Sverre Fehn)

With the experience from SCI-Arc, I went back to the Oslo School of Architecture to take my Diploma, and graduated in January 2014. In 2010, me and two fellow students founded 120 HOURS - an architecture competition for students, by students. We wanted to provide a new arena for discussion and new ideas, by creating a competition for students, completely independent from the schools of architecture.

I started my M.Arch. 2 graduate studies at SCI-Arc in 2011 and was introduced to a very different but ex-

The competition is now the world’s biggest student-driven architecture competition, with thousands of participants from universities all over the world. Read more about 120 HOURS on page 144.

Honors and Awards /

Skills /

Excellence in Urban Design and Planning

Project: Breaking Barriers (page 80) Issuer: Agency for Planning and Building Services, Oslo

American-Scandinavian Foundation Award Issuer: American-Scandinavian Foundation / NORAM Scholarship Award, 2012

SCI-Arc Scholarship

Issuer: Southern California Institute of Architecture

Creative Crossdisciplinary Collaboration Issuer: BI + KHiO + AHO Winner, 2012

Excellence in Concrete Innovation

Project: Concrete Tables (page 138) Issuer: The Oslo School of Architecture and Design

Software: Rhino Autodesk Maya Autodesk AutoCad Adobe Illustrator InDesign Photoshop Grasshopper ArchiCAD Modelling: Advanced shop experience (wood and metal), casting, CNC milling, 3D printing, laser cutting, and more. Please see full list of skills and more at www.hanshalleraker.com

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8


diploma /

threshold ministry aho, fall 2013

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threshold ministry

facilitating political power centers AHO Diploma - Fall 2012 / Supervisor: Espen Vatn External Supervisor: Gary Bates

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The thesis seeks to investigate the relatively new reality that we face in our cities, where protection of buildings of political power has become one of the top security priorities. The constant threat of terror attacks forces us to challenge our understanding of the city as an open, public space. The buildings of political power are the modern sanctuaries in which we need to protect. The sanctuary is defined as a space set apart within an open territory and as such a the safe meeting point for different clans or fugitives. The sanctuary is both open to different subjects and parties and closed in order to preserve its safety towards everything outside itself, which gives them an inherent dialectic of openness and exclusion. This dialectic makes these buildings and areas especially interesting as architectural research objectives. How we as architects deal with the security issues in the city could be essential to how the urban space is perceived in the future. By working on two scales with thresholds withing safety architecture, and by seeing centers of political power in the light of being modern sanctuaries within the city, the diploma aims to give new ways of understanding and facilitating for governmental power centers.

11


Key questions in the thesis are: • • • •

Can the city still be an open, public space? What does the security boundaries look like? What is a limit? Does the security measurements need to be wall-like boundaries, or are there other solutions to the problem?

These are all questions that we must ask ourselves when planning the prerequisites for a common but restricted experience of an urban space. The thesis argues that we need to create the space of the intermediate - a gradient, instead of boundaries. These spaces are the thresholds of our daily lives. The threshold must be carefully distinguished from the boundary. The threshold is a zone formed by precise tectonics, an area of knowledge and even of knowability.

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The project is working with thresholds on multiple levels: 1. The physical threshold, in which we physically encounter and move through. 2. The mental/visual threshold, in which we experience and have no direct, physical contact with. This can be a definition of the distance between the outside and the inside, the transitional experience of moving from one perceptible state to another, etc. 3. The threshold of memory-psychology, which is deeply connected to both (1) and (2), but which adds the dimension of remembrance. In most cases, this is not a directly physical nor visual space or element, but is something that activates the spaces of the intermediate in our memory. The main goals of the thesis project is to work architecturally with thresholds as a tool to facilitate for modern sanctuaries within the city, to enhance the public experience of such buildings and areas, and to create a safe place for political activity. The role of the public, and the building as a shared space of both political and public activity is the leading parameter in the project.


1958-alternative The original plan from the original building in 1958. Open plan, including public ground under the Government Building. Very few or no security measures. Access control in the building. 0-alternative Plan before 22/7-11. Resticting water surface around the H-block. Bollards along Akersgata. Ground floor closed off to the pulic. Access control in the building.

The government wall - max The Government area totally enclosed by a massive wall. Physical wall around the Government Quarter and nearby buildings. No gradual transition from the public street to the building. Access control at the wall. The most secure alternative, but no public qualities. The government wall - PARK The Government area totally enclosed by a massive wall. Physical wall around the Government Quarter. No gradual transition from the public street to the building. Access control at the wall The second most secure alternative, with some public qualities. gradient 1 Possible access right up to the vital Government buildings. Barrier elements arranged parallel to the H-block. Access control in the building. Increasing density of elements and experience of a gradual access control.

gradient 1 Possible access right up to the vital Government buildings. Barrier elements arranged radially from the center of the H-block. Access control in the building. Increasing density of elements and experience of a gradual access control.

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The Government Building in Oslo (The HBlock) has been housing the Office of the Prime Minister from its completion in 1958 until the bombing in 2011. In the thesis project, this program is being reintroduced in the building. As well as being an architectural masterpiece, the The Government Building an important symbol of political power and democracy. This symbolism is enhanced through a relocation of the State Council Hall and the representative spaces of the building. The public ground and the public interaction with the Ministry offices throughout the building is challenging our perceptions and prerequisities of the modern sanctuaries in our cities. By working on two scales with thresholds withing safety architecture, and by seeing centers of political power in the light of being modern sanctuaries within the city, the diploma aims to give new ways of understanding and facilitating for governmental power centers. The diploma project is both a practical architectural thesis on solving an urban problem on multiple scales, as well as being a theoretical thesis on the significance of thresholds in architecture. The text on the following pages is the theoretical part of the thesis in its entirety.

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THE SANCTUARIES OF OSLO On the 22nd of July 2011, Norway was subject to a dual terrorist attack that traumatized the Nation and shocked the world. One of the targets was the Government Quarter in Oslo, more precisely the Office of the Prime Minister, situated in one of the most symbolic buildings in Norway. The attacks led to huge public discussions on the safety of our Government, the openness of our society and the location of political power centers. This diploma aims to facilitate the new Office of the Prime Minister, by actively working with thresholds within safety architecture, and by seeing centers of political power in the light of being modern sanctuaries within the city.

Sacred places is, and have always been arenas for spirituality and contemplation, as well as conflict. They have throughout history been heavily exposed to acts of violence, and the threats from various enemies have always been present.

The very origin of the city as political space was precisely the foundation of a sacred place, the definition of a limit in which one is sacred and the other is wild, natural. The sanctuary is a space set apart within an open territory and as such the safe meeting point for different clans or fugitives.

The Government Quarter in Oslo is representing these issues in the highest extent. It is, alongside Stortinget, the City Hall and the Royal Castle, one of the foremost modern sanctuaries in Oslo. (See drawing on the far left.) It’s strong position as a political power centre and the hypervigilance following recent events, made the Government Quarter a natural choice of site and research objective for the thesis.

The sanctuary is both open to different subjects and parties and closed in order to preserve its safety and difference towards everything outside itself. The dialectic of openness and exclusion implied in sacred space is thus one of the most ancient manifestations of the political, and a concept Ibelieve is important to the current condition of architecture.

The thesis argues that centers of political power are the modern sanctuaries, because of their position as places of large gatherings, their inherent dialectic of openness and exclusion and the vulnerability towards violent acts. The political power centers are often situated in highly urbanized areas, and with the modern threats of terrorism, cities are forced to develop strong attitudes towards safety.

Working with safety concerns in architecture are basically about how we treat transitions and boundaries; in which I argue, forms the actual thresholds of our daily lives. The thresholds are areas, or zones in which 15


we move from one spatial experience to another. The architectural formalization of threshold affects the architectural elements of ground and envelope, and thereby becomes a symbol of larger geopolitical issues.

PM’S RESIDENCE

Throughout history of architecture, ground and envelope has been representational devices of political power. How we as architects treat the ground and how we relate to the envelope of the building and its surroundings is always a political statement. This is particularly crucial today, when architects are limited to working with envelope and ground as communicative elements.

ROYAL CASTLE

GOVERNMENT QUARTER

CITY HALL

PARLIAMENT

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE

200 M

SANCTUARIES

16

N

THRESHOLD ZONE GOVERNMENT QUARTER EXPANSION 1:2000


Generic solution for establishing physical thresholds around modern sanctuaries in the city:

01 Establishing grid around building

02 Defining the security zones in the grid, on the basis of the building significance and movement patterns

03 Introducing vertical elements of increasing density, according to the security zones. The decreasing width between elements dictates which kind of movement that can take place.

04 Manipulate the topography accoriding to the security zones, with an increasing depth toward the sanctuary. This creates a shifting and uncertain ground, that together with the vertical elements introduces the element of surprise and unpredictability.

05 The relationship between the vertical elements and the topography creates a physical threshold that you have to move through in order to get to the building. The physical presnence of the designed threshold creates a mental threshold that gives a sense of distance and respect for the building’s significance. This is an area you don’t move through unless you really have to. The generic threshold area is the given programmatic features and functions to facilitate for the specific area and building.

element properties The elements of the threshold field have different properties, placed both randomly and specifically, in order to add to the field’s element of surprise and for amusement.

01 Traking lights

02 Fog

03 Water

04 Colored lights

05 Sound

17


THE THRESHOLD Thresholds in architecture is a widely misunderstood and improperly used term, which requires a higher attention in order for it to function as an architectural tool. A systematic critique of the threshold will hopefully help us to reconstruct the discipline as an effective link between transitions, safety and politics. The German critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin, uses the phrase “threshold magic” (der Schwellenzauber) as an evoking of the magical effect produced by places of transition, such as porches, doorways and vestibules; sites usually protected by some form of monitoring. Influenced by reading the ethnologist Arnold van Gennep’s 1909 work “The Rites of Passage”, which documented the various ceremonies that mark the successive stages of human life, Benjamin observes that, aside from falling asleep and waking up, performing daily rites has become a rarity. “We have grown very poor in threshold experiences.” As a result it is more imperative than ever to precisely identify threshold situations that mark the moments of our life. He notes: “The threshold must be carefully distinguished from the boundary. A Schwelle (threshold) is a zone. Transformation, passage, wave action are in the word schwellen, swell and etymology ought not to overlook these senses. On the other hand, it is neces18

sary to keep in mind the immediate tectonic and ceremonial context which has brought the word to its current meaning.” “Thus waking up is not a caesura, but the creation of a doorway, a passage to be crossed through a series of rites, leading from the world of dreams to the waking state (das Erwachen). The threshold is a zone formed by precise tectonics, an area of knowledge and even of knowability (die Erkannbarheit)“ Passages and peristyles, porticos and arcades, pronaos and portals, doorways and vestibules, triumphal arches, spaces sacred and profane (from the Latin pro-fanus, in front of the temple): these imaginary and tectonic lines create not boundaries, but the space of the intermediate. A figure both in space and in time, the threshold is that which is in the middle, an interval between things. A medium, in a way, that, by allowing entry, opens up the possibility of being in between. Designing for safety architecture is about defining and facilitating the thresholds that we encounter in our daily activities and rites; both in the small scale of private spaces and buildings and in the urban scale of the city floor. By looking at the current situation of Oslo’s political center, how can an architecture


create sanctuary within the city that is both common public ground and areas of extreme safety? How can we by working with the dialectic of openness and exclusion define what safety thresholds in urban areas means today? The project encounters the issues of thresholds and modern sanctuaries on two scales; the city and the symbol, in which the latter is the main thesis project.

By working on two scales with thresholds within safety architecture, and by seeing centers of political power in the light of being modern sanctuaries within the city, the diploma aims to give new ways of understanding and facilitating for governmental power centers.

the gradient field

By increasing the density of elements, the threshold field is able to filtrate different kinds of movement as they move from the public urban sphere and closer to the sanctuary. Along the edge of the field, almost any kind of movement can take place. As the threshold field gets denser, cars can no longer get through. Further in, bikes and similar means of transportation is hindered. In the densest parts of the area, you won’t even be able to war a backpack or any similar accountrements. Only the human body is allowed to move all the way through the gradient threshold field.

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20


21


R4

S-BLOCK

MAIN ENTRANCE

LOBBY

RECEPTION/ SECURITY

SECURITY ADMINISTRATION OPEN AREA

EXHIBITIONS, ETC

GRUBBEGATA 1

GOVERNMENT SECURITY OPERATION ROOM

Y-BLOCK

R5

Ground floor plan

22


PUBLIC LIBRARY OF NORWEGIAN POLITICAL HISTORY

Plan 2nd floor

MINISTRY OFFICES

Plan 3rd - 13th floor

PUBLIC CAFE

KITCHEN

MINISTRY CANTEEN

Plan 15th floor

BAR

PUBLIC TERRACE

Plan 16th floor

WARDROBE

NEGOTIATION ROOM 1

PRESS LOUNGE

REPRESENTATIVE SPACE

STATE COUNCIL HALL

NEGOTIATION ROOM 2

PRESS PREP

PRESS ROOM

23 Plan 17th floor


Longtudinal section

24 Transverse section


Elevation east

25 Elevation west


26


Photos from the Universitas article “Unge og urbane utopier� (2014-02-05) Photo credit: Birte Nystad Magnussen/Universitas

27


From the exhibition “Høyblokka Revisited” at 0047 (1:50 model) Photo credit: Luismi Romero/0047 Oslo

28


From the exhibition “Høyblokka Revisited” at 0047 (1:50 model) Photo credit: Luismi Romero/0047 Oslo

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30


From the exhibition “Høyblokka Revisited” at 0047 (1:50 model) Photo credit: Luismi Romero/0047 Oslo

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sci-arc /

the SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE Selected works

33


radial crystallization 2GBX Manferdini studio - Deep surface - Spring 2012 / Instructor: Elena Manferdini Co-instructors: Tom Wiscombe and Andrew Atwood / Collaboration with Gaella Bongo

34


The project investigates the relationship between interior and exterior - inside and outside. The building responds to this architectural problem by creating a multilayered surface towards the city, whilst the inner courtyard and garden is characterized by a faceted, highly reflective surface. The differences between the two surfaces create a duality in the experience of the building. The most significant feature of the project is the scripted linework of the outer facade, which also can be seen on the left here. The polarization of the lines creates an optical illusion in the experience of the surface. The double-layering and depth of surface enhances this experience by confusing the spectator of what is outside and what is inside. The script is developed from a voronoi structure, where every triangle in the voronoi polygons consists of 75 arrayed lines that all meet in the center of the polygons and creates a radial effect. The concept of the facade emerged from this script, and through the initial exercises which can be seen on the two next pages. The project is an office building and conference center on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California. The project is organized by having the office spaces in the elevated hexagonal volume over ground, while the auditoriums and parking areas is placed in 4 underground storeys. 35


Initial scripted drawing as presented at finals

36


Macro photography of the third drawing

37


38 Siteplan


39 Elevation Sunset Blvd / Holloway dr.


Elevation Sunset Blvd north

40


41


42 View from interior


43 View from exterior


7th FLOOR - MEZZANIN

6th FLOOR - OFFICES & CAFE

5th FLOOR - OFFICES

4th FLOOR - OFFICES

3rd FLOOR - OFFICES

2nd FLOOR - OFFICES

1st FLOOR - OFFICES

LOBBY/ENTRANCE

LARGE AUDITORIUM

SMALL AUDITORIUM

44

Section A-A


PARKING LEVEL 1

PARKING LEVEL 2

PARKING LEVEL 3

PARKING LEVEL 4

45


46 Plan 4th floor


47 Interior courtyard


48 Model 1:200


49


incongruos surfaces 2GAX studio - Incongruos figures - Fall 2011 / Instructor: Marcelyn Gow Co-instructors: Florencia Pita and Ramiro Diaz-Granados

50


This project is an investigation of two different kinds of surfaces for a new REDCAT theatre in Santa Monica, California. The surfaces are different in the way of being strict and sharp in one ontology and completely loose and organic in the other. They are forming the building envelope by dissolving, merging and nesting into each other The idea emerges from the discoveries from the discoveries from the first exercise (shown on this page), where the volumes between the ramping structure came out very interesting. The coloration of the two surfaces amplifies the meeting between these two ontologies The bulky ground represents the third ontology. It enhances the meeting between building and ground and is both leading and unifying.

Initial exercise - Exploded axonometric

51 Initial exercise - Unrolled mapped surfaces defining the difference of ontologies

HANS MARTIN FROSTAD HALLERAKER / INGONGRUOUS FIGURES 2GAX - MARCELYN GOW


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53


54


Plan ground floor

55 Plan second floor


Section B-B - longitudinal

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57


1. Cafe / ramp to theater 2. Gallery 3. Gallery mezzanine 4. Parking 5. Ocean Park Blvd

Section A-A - transverse

58


Elevation Ocean Park Blvd

59 Elevation Main Street


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disFIGURE 2GAX Visual Studies - Fall 2011 / Instructor: Elena Manferdini TA’s: Caroline Dieden and Brian Henry

62


The work of the class as a whole critically participates on the current debate about the state of technology for the production of drawings and images, and questions the ideological and formal implications of various digital representational modes. The seminar speculates that contemporary surfaces have the ability to breed new sensations and seeks to extend the effective potential of figure, focusing on issues of material, chromatics and their relationship to flat and curved sheets. During the first part of the semester we conducted a series of highly focused experiments dealing with the relationship between geometrical relief, coloration, surface treatment and materials. We explored the way in which texture and color is reflected and refracted throughout matter: as painters utilize particular techniques of contrasting scales of luminosity and texture through brush stroke to invoke volume within the two-dimensional pictorial frame, the class looked to this medium for its methods of capturing and materializing light deep within the compositional and material qualities of the painted canvas. The class as a whole compiled a Still Life Collection of floral disfigures. During the second part of the semester the class focused on fabrication from digital models. We created a feedback loop relationship between the form of analog and digital matter, establishing a rich geometrical and material vocabulary. The final result is an intricate composition of the flowers printed on vinyl, made possible through painting in ZBrush, developable unrolls in Rhino and mapping in Maya.

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ETFE TECTONICS 2GAX Applied Studies - Advanced Tectonics - Fall 2011 / Instructor: Marcelo Spina TA’s: Robbie Crabtree and Al Ataide / Collaboration with Marcus Westberg, Kai Reaver Varouzhan Adamian, Aaron Olko and Aladdin Mogeem

70


This class is a research platform and testing ground for the exploration of manifold structures, surface tectonics, material assembly and digital fabrication in relation to both relevant historic precedents and influential contemporary projects. The course looks at the historic relationship between structure and surface in architecture through the lens of contemporary digital fabrication, intricate tectonic assembly and advanced materials, focusing its emphasis on the research, design and development of complex and integrated building envelopes for specific performances and applications. Our group researched the plastic material ETFE, and focused on using the attributes of the material to rethink and redevelop the opportunities that lies within the material. We developed a series of investigations, where each one questions the material attributes in its own way. The first model that we developed for midterm investigates ETFE’s tensile strength, and its ability to be interconnected with itself without the use of a secondary material. We did this through the use of temperature by using a heat gun to attach the material to itself. As we moved towards the final presentation, we focused on the tensile strength of the material, and introduced steel as a secondary material to allow the construction of a larger structure.

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01_ Two similar strips of ETFE connecting

72

02_ The sheets welded together with a heat gun

03_ Space is created between the strips, by pulling them apart

04_ Total surface


73


Design Process for Final / As we progressed forward with our design, we moved from the concept of self adhering the ETFE through heat to constructing frames out of different mediums. Shown here (left to right) is a further evolved design strategy from our midterm work of self-adherence and heating to create volumetric, tensile forms to an aluminum frame panel supporting a tensile ETFE component.

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Right Side Elevation

Front Elevation

60 .5°

59

°

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4'-0"

3'-0"

3'-0" 4'-0"

3'-0" 191.6° 47.

2° 2° 47.

2'-9 1/2"

98.4

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62

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31

1'-11 1/2" 4'-2 3/4"

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Construction Drawings

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27.7°

130.9

4'-2 3/4" 2'-9 1/4"

15.7°

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Back Side Eleva

Left Side Elevation

4'-2 3/4"

2'-9 1/4"

°

2'-1 1/4"

2'4'-2 3/4"


"

6

2'-

"

3'-

1"

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63

3'-

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3'-8 3/4"

1'-5 3/4"

10 3/4"

7 1/2" 79

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10 3/4"

2'-1"

4'-4 1/4"

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9 1/2"

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119.7°

22.8°

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Unrolled Surfaces for Frame Assembly and Sheet Cutting

1'-5 3/4"

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2'-1 1/4"

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°

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9 1/2"

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2'-2 1/2"

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"

Bottom Up

3'-8 3/4" 11"

3'-2

Top Down

22 .9 °

ation

-1 1/2"

3'-9

1/2

1'-3 1/4"

4"

1'-10 3/4" 2'-10"

10 3/4" 10 3/4"

3'-8 3/4"

77


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AHO /

the oslo school of ARCHITECTURE and design Selected works

79


breaking barriers Studio Complex Buildings AHO Master Studio, Spring 2013 / Instructors: Johanne Borthne, Fredrik Krogeide

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By breaking the barriers of Nylandsveien and Gallery Oslo, the city of Oslo will obtain a more integrated and holistic experience.

INTEGRATION

ACCESS

The project is suggesting to redevelop the whole site, connecting the different parts of the city with a porous organization and introduce a very high density in order to make it profitable.

DENSITY

POROUSITY

The project won the award for Excellence in Urban Design and Planning at AHO WORKS in 2013 and recieved great attention from the Agency for Planning and Building Services in Oslo, among others

DIVERSITY

PROFITABILITY

The site could obtain a much higher density and be activated with a diverse and sensitive selection of program.

EAST/GRØNLAND

WEST/JERNBANETORGET

MULTICULTURAL OSLO

DOWNTOWN OSLO

SOUTH/BJØRVIKA

OSLO CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

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strategy 01 _ removing the barrier of gallery oslo The site where Gallery Oslo is located is totally redeveloped, introducing a more porous structure with new connections in the east-north direction.

strategy 02 _ removing the barrier of the highway Nylandsveien decends down to Schweigaardsgate after the crossing of the rail tracks. A controversial, but highly feasible move. The Akerselva culvert is opened up all the way to the railtracks, and a new avenue connects Schweigaardsgate and Grønland. A new tunnel connecting east and west eases the traffic pressure on Schweigaards gate.

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83


CURRENT SITUATION:

GROUND LEVEL LEVEL +9

CURRENT PEDESTRIAN ROUTES

CURRENT ROAD SYSTEM

CURRENT RECREATIONAL AREAS

The pedestrian movement today is relying on a path system 6 meters above ground level (level +9). This was initially welcomed as a genious urban move, but doesn’t work at all in real life.

A huge eleveted highway crosses the area with two arms connecting to Schweigaards gate.

The only park in the area is the Vaterland park. Not much used by the public.

The infrastructure is taking up a huge space, which could be used for development.

The Akerselva river goes into a culvert where the highway obstructs its continuation. The culvert ultimately ends up behind the Opera House in Bjørvika.

REDEVELOPMENT OF BUILDING MASS

REDEVELOPMENT OF ROADS

Gallery Oslo is totally demolished, and the Bus Terminal is moved to a new location (not included in the project).

The highway with both its arms is demolished.

REDEVELOPMENT OF ROADS AND BUILDING MASS

The primary pedestrian connection to Grønland goes behind the Bus Terminal and under the highway, and is a very unpleasant place. In the new Oslo S masterplan, all pedestrian movement is moved to the ground level, and that forces developers to rethink the logic of Gallery Oslo.

A part of the housing in Grønlands Torg is opened up to give access to the new area. The level +9 is terminated, and the bridges over the roundabout in the west is demolished. (The old post hall (purple) is also demolished, but this is a realistic project currently under development.)

84

The connection from the bridge from Bjørvika is redeveloped as tunnel, and the road is no longer connected to Schweigaards gate.

The project is suggesting to redevelop the whole site, connecting the different parts of the city and introducing a very high density in order to make it profitable.


LAND /

RGET

GRØN

GSTO

AKERSELVA RIVER PARK

YOUN

TØY EN

PROPOSED SITUATION:

ND NLA

ET

+M

RO

GRØ

BJØRV IKA

OSL O

S/

BU

S

METRO

BJØR VIK A

GA

MLE BY

EN

DEFINITION OF BUILDING SITES

PROPOSED ROAD SYSTEM

ACCESS ROUTES AND SPACE DEFINITION

After the demolishment of Gallery Oslo and the highway, two sites are defined for the new devolopment, split by the new river route

The main changes to the road network in the area is the following:

The development site is located in an ideal position in relation to the rest of the city.

1. The Nylandsveien highway bridge descends down to Schweigaardsgate, continues to connect with Grønlandsleiret.

The development in Bjørvika and the new Central Station makes the Gallery Oslo site a superattractive place in the city. The area connects to important parts of the city, such as Grønland, Jernbanetorget, Youngstorget and Bjørvika, and will be an attractive area for businesses and other development parties if the density is high enough.

For decades, the Akerselva river has been hidden in a culvert, from Vaterlandsparken to Bjørvika. The project urges to open up the river, and it is now only hidden under the railtracks. The project builds upon the ideals that was important for the Bjørvika masterplan; to create a green area around the river. This project then completes the municipal plan of making a green lung from Maridalen to Bjørvika.

2. The Vaterland tunnell continues in a culvert under Schweigaardsgate, and connects to “Østre Tangent” bridge.

Movement continues through development area, and defines places for gathering. These places are essential for the final project proposal.

DEFINITION OF BUILDING SITES AND VOIDS

DEFINITION OF BUILDING HEIGHTS

PROGRAM STRATEGY

The access routes refines the development sites into building sites and footprints, with a high level of porousity.

To achieve the desired density of the site, along with the desired porousity, the project proposes tall buildings with a small footprint.

The project is searching to connect east and west and create activity throughout the site. It is doing that by establishing attractive and diverse program in both ends.

The colors represent the height of the buildings on each plot, with the tallest in the west. This area currently hosts the tallest buildings in Norway, and the project adds to this.

The cultural programme (Oslo House of Architecture) in the east will generate activity by being a open public space, as well as being a signal building, while the dense areas in the west with both offices and the largest hotel in Scandinavia, will generate huge activity. This will activate the areas in between, which will be an attractive space for commercial businesses, retail and restaurants.

Squares and plazas are defined in the open spaces between the volumes.

The highrises are located in a way that will create as much sunlight as possible to the squares and plazas of the project. The project also contributes to the debate of highrises in Oslo. I mean that highrises are ok, but they should be located in a defined area, and the best way to do it is to add to the excisting high rise area.

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western SITE

eastern SITE

This site is dominated by the existing hotel, and the new proposal will also suggest an extension to the hotel.

This is the far largest of the two sites, and provides a total clean slate situation after the demolishment of Gallery Oslo. The main focus of the site is to create movement in both the west - east direction along Schweigaards gate and in the diagonal directions in order to connect Grønland to the rest of the city.

The area is focusing on a super-high density, with a diversity in programs. The diagonal inner street in the west of the site gives an extra access to the river, and is meant to be a green urban space.

The project proposes a high-rise megastructure in the south-west part of the site, with a public plaza in the back. There is a diverse set of typologies, with both towers, lamellas and a signal building.

total floor area: 62 900 m2

The cultural program in the east (OHA) is meant to generate activity to the area, and bring the masses over to this side of the site. HOTEL AND CONFERENCE

The site connects to Grønland and Grønlands Torg by splitting the housing structure in the north.

HOUSING OFFICES

total floor area: 84 450 m2

COMMERCIAL/RETAIL CULTURE/PUBLIC PROGRAMME

THE NEW SKYLINE OF OSLO

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total floor area: 147 500 m

2


OSLO SPEKTRUM

CONFERENCE CENTER

GRØNLAND TORG

RADISSON BLU HOTEL OSLO PLAZA

CAFÉ CONFERENCE CENTER AUDITORIUM 2

RETAIL

CONFERENCE CENTER AUDITORIUM 1

SONJA HENIES PLAZA RETAIL CAFÉ

CONFERENCE CENTER RESTAURANT OFFICE TOWER ENTRANCE

RESIDENT ENTRANCE

RESTAURANT

VATERLAND SQUARE

MARKET HALL

RETAIL

OSLO CENTRAL STATION

MANHATTAN PLAZA RETAIL

RETAIL

MARKET HALL

RETAIL

RESIDENT ENTRANCE

RETAIL PARKING ENTRANCE RESIDENT ENTRANCE TOWER ENTRANCE

OFFICE ENTRANCE

RETAIL

PARKING ENTRANCE

RETAIL

RESIDENT ENTRANCE

RETAIL

PARKING ENTRANCE

POST ZERO SQUARE

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

RESIDENT ENTRANCE

PARKING RESTAURANT CAFÉ/BAR RESTAURANT

OFFICE ENTRANCE

MARKET SQUARE

CAFÉ/BAR

POSTHUSET

CONVENIENCE STORE OFFICE ENTRANCE

OFFICE ENTRANCE

RETAIL

AUDITORIUM

RETAIL

RETAIL RETAIL RETAIL

NORDEA COMPLEX (planned)

CAFÉ/BAR RETAIL GALLERY

0

5

10

25

CAFÉ 50

MEETING ROOM

100

GALLERY

THE OSLO HOUSE OF ARCHITECTURE (OHA)

SCHWEIGGARD PLAZA BOOKSTORE

RIVER PLAZA

MONIQUE SQUARE VATERLAND PARK

FEHN SQUARE

STATOIL HQ’S (Planned)

TOLLHUSET

Plan Ground floor

OSLO Z

0

OSLO SPEKTRUM

5

10

25

50

100 ANETTE THOMMESENS PLAZA GRØNLAND TORG

TAX MINISTRY

HOTEL TOWER 1

HOTEL TOWER 3

SONJA HENIES PLAZA

HOTEL TOWER 2

OFFICE TOWER

VATERLAND SQUARE

OSLO CENTRAL STATION

STUDENT HOUSING

MANHATTAN PLAZA

HOUSING

OFFICES

OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL TOWER

POST ZERO SQUARE

HOUSING

HOUSING

MARKET SQUARE MEGASTRUCTURE TOWER 2

HOUSING

POSTHUSET

MEGASTRUCTURE TOWER 1

OHA OFFICES

MEGASTRUCTURE TOWER 3

NORDEA COMPLEX (planned)

SCHWEIGGARD PLAZA RIVER PLAZA

MONIQUE SQUARE FEHN SQUARE

TOLLHUSET

Plan 5th floor

87 OSLO Z ANETTE THOMMESENS

STATOIL HQ’S (Planned)


0

Section through the site

88

5

10

25

50

100


View from west / Biskop Gunnerus gate The new tunnell brings most of the automobile traffic underground, and facilitates for a much nicer pedestrian environment in this area, while still allowing cars and buses to inhabit the street environment. The new situation also facilitates the new Central Station (arches to the right).

View from north / New boulevard The Nylandsveien road will still have the same amount of traffic as today, but it will be brought down to street level. The highway becomes a boulevard, and the bridge doesn’t start until it has to - right before the railtracks. This area will be inhabited of both pedestrians and cars, which could be a perfect urban mix, if done right.

View from east / Schweigaardsgate This is already an area with a lot of development. Annette Thommesens plaza is established as a place with lots of potential and new office buildings gives the street more activity. But Gallery Oslo and the bus terminal prevents the true renaissance of the area. The project proposes multiple smaller plazas along the streets in this area, and the proposed buildings have cultural and public programme on the lower floors. Opening up this area to the public will connect two important urban sprawls in the city: Bjørvika, and Grønlandsleiret.

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1:200 model

90


91


Introvert living Studio Two Houses - The studio for research and production of architecture AHO Master Studio, Fall 2012 / Instructors: Neven Fuchs-Mikac, Joanna Sรก Lima Guest instructor: Jun Igarashi

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“A TRUE GENTLEMAN SHOULDN’T LOOK OUTSIDE. (...) HE SHOULD BE CONCETRATED ON HIS FAMILY AND THE FAMILY LIFE”

The assignment of the studio was to design two houses, one urban and one rural. We were given two sites on Hokkaido, in northern Japan. One is located in the city of Sapporo and the other in a village close to Asahikawa. The sites have very different conditions, but the climatic conditions are almost the same. By thinking about these two different conditions simultaneously we would clearly recognize the significance and influence in the design process. The residential program of both houses is the same. But the architectural content and the “rule of the site” for each of them is different. Consequently, their architecture is different. My project, “Introvert Living”, investigates the possibility of an introvert living through the architecture of the housing unit. The two houses does this through indirect lightning in the urban site and by creating a second nature in the rural. The first house presented here is the Sapporo house, located in an urban, narrow site. Its focus is on creating good living spaces in a very limited site.

Sapporo House, Plan 2nd floor

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94


95


PLAN 1 1:100

96

PLAN 2 1:100

PLAN 3 1:100

PLAN 4 1:100


Plan 4

Plan 4

Plan 3

Plan 3

Plan 2

Plan 2

Plan 1

Plan 1

SECTION A-A 1:50

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Asahikawa House, interior

98


The Asahikawa House is located on a rural site in northern Japan. The site is a 20 x 25 m rectangle in a large open field. The house is partly over and partly under ground, and the functions of the house is carefully located to accommodate the two different conditions. The house has the shape of a tweaked circle, where the windows of the house are directed towards the middle of the circle - the garden.

SITEPLAN

N

C-1,0 m

C-1,25 m

C-1,75 m

C-2,25 m

C-0,75 m

C-1,75 m C-1,25 m

PLAN UNDERGROUND

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N C+0

C-0,5 m

C-1,0 m C+0

C-1,25 m

C-0,25 m

C-0,75 m

C-1,25 m

PLAN GROUND FLOOR

100


SECTION A-A

101


From the studio presentation at AHO WORKS (1:33 models shown in the back) Photo credit: AHO

102


From the studio presentation at AHO WORKS (1:33 models shown in the back) Photo credit: AHO

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HARESTUA HIGH SCHOOL 4th semester studio project - Spring 2010 / Instructors: Bente Kleven, Marius Nygaard and Aina Dahle / Collaboration project with Morten Celius

104


Harestua High School is a building for diversity and flexible use. The school is characterized by communication and interaction across year levels. It allows for a creative and innovative environment. We want to anchor the school in the area, both physical and with visual contact with the adjacent areas. Our goal has been to create a good framework for developing a cohesive and forwardlearning environment, with flexibility in terms of tomorrow’s educational and social challenges. With spacious solutions for diverse activities and good public arenas The school is a functional facility characterized by active social meeting point instead of futile corridors. That is the school of the future.

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Grupperom

Grupperom

Teknisk

Grupperom

Flexirom

Avfall

Grupperom

Baseområde

Baseområde Server Garderobe Garderobe

Auditorium

Mopperom

INDUSTRIPORT 4x6m

Flexirom

INDUSTRIPORT 4x6m

Kopi Stillerom

Garderobe Stillerom

Lærerbase Materialrom

Garderobe Garderobe

Naturfag - Fysikk

Naturfag - Kjemi

Materialrom

Forb. rom

A

Garderobe

A Naturfag - Biologi

Servering

Vekstrom

A

Garderobe

Mat og helse Lager

Materialrom Kantine

Garderobe

Bibliotek

Scene C+0,6

Ungdomsklubb

Kunst & Håndverk

Keramikk

Atelier K.ovn

Resepsjon

Lager Lager

Maskinrom; sag o.l.

Plan 1st floor

106

Lager

Maling/lakk

Treforming/verksted

0


Grupperom

Grupperom

Teknisk Åpent ned Flexirom Baseområde

Grupperom Grupperom

Åpent ned

Baseområde

Arkiv

Garderobe Garderobe

INDUSTRIPORT 4x6m

Auditorium

Flexirom Åpent ned

INDUSTRIPORT 4x6m

Kontorer Resepsjon

Personalrom

Åpent ned

Åpent ned

Garderobe

A

Gr.rom

A

A

Gr.rom

Baseområde

Flexirom

Åpent ned

Åpent ned Åpent ned Konf. rom

Mezzanin

Konf. rom

Lager

Vaktmester

Konf. rom

Åpent ned Øvingsrom Øvingsrom

Lager

Musikkrom Helsesøster/ legesenter

N 0

25

50 m

Plan 2nd floor

107


0

25

50 m

Section A-A

108 Inner courtyard


To understand the project it is important to know the characteristics, history and limitations of the given site. The site is an old, abandoned timber plant in Lunner Municipailty north of Oslo. This huge area is the site for the new city centre of Harestua, and every team of students were given a program to develop on the site. It was desired by the studio to keep some of the old structures on the site. This project keeps and restores the old warehouse in the south, and develops this as a multifunctional hall that serves the entrance of the school, the youth club, the cafe and the library.

Natural climate system

The steel structure of the school and multi-purpose sports hall connects to this structure and enables large spans to accommodate the flexible learning environment (see next page). The environmental issues of big glass areas are solved passively by the surrounding deciduous trees. They provide shade to the interior in the hot summer climate to cool down the spaces, and provide light and heat in the cold and dark winter months.

Construcion diagram

Flow diagram

109 West facade


Interior view of classroom situation

110


550 mm trykkfast isolasjon

Takpapp

Beslag

Dampsperre

Tosidig HSQ-bjelke

200mm forspent hulldekke

Akustiske himlingsplater

Linoleum på korkment

Armering

Avretting

Ensidig HSQ-bjelke

400mm forspent hulldekke

2 x 13mm gips Dampsperre

Panel i ubehandlet furu

Luftsjikt

150mm isolasjon

Eksempel på oppheng

200mm isolasjon

Påstøp Betonggulv

Gulvisolasjon

Ringmur i betong

111 Construcion details


112


113


hotel */***** 6th semester studio project - Spring 2011 / Bachelor thesis B.Arch. / Instructors: Dagfinn Sagen and Kathrine Lund

114


The project is a study of the relationship between the serving and the served elements of a hotel. Hotel *****/* is a synthesis of the programs hotel and hostel. The hostel and its guests are functioning as the serving part of the complex. The mix of programs occurs as a class distinction, developed as an architectural concept. The semester started with a series of photoand model studies, that will follow on the next page. The photos on this page is of the finished project.

115


Photo-study of large-scale hotels with 100 rooms or more. The photoworkshop documented the hotels extent of repetition and all the objects that is arranged and ready to take in the impressions of guests; the awaiting repetition

Model studies attempting to grasp the the awaiting repetition in a hotel, and attempts to find a distinction of front and back - of guest and host - a distinction of the serving and serviced areas.

Study of the relationship between the serving areas in a hotel and representative areas. The model is a sequence of a larger structure. The structure aims to separate these two different types of rooms, while also creating an interaction between them. 116


!! !! !

Bre

ta ga

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!

!! G !! rønlandsleir! et

us g

ate

!

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a at

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!!!!!!! !! ! !!! ! !!!!

GRØNLAND BASAR

!!

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The site is located on the border between the bustling districts Grønland and Tøyen. It is in direct contact with the active street Grønlandsleiret and has good walking connections to Bjørvika business district, the main railway station Oslo S and the public transport hub Jernbanetorget.

!! !

en ek k

! ! ! ! !!! !!! ! GRØNLAND TORG ! ! ! !

! Area plan !!!

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ts ga te

Motz feld E

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!!

m

! CITY ! C EN ! TR

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igata

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ENERHAUGEN

!

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Site plan

117 Site section


THE HOSTEL SCTRUCTURE / The hotel and hostel are two different types of social programs, and that must also be reflected in the architecture. The hotel section is developed with a completely conventional, rectangular architectural floor plan, with a basic limestone facade. The hostel and the representative spaces are placed in the middle of the complex and flows out into the first floor. It also breaks through the hotel structure on the upper floors. The structure is interpreted architectonically as something different, and something that differs from the conventional hotel section. There have been desired that the structure VORONOI PRINCIPLE should be random and uniform. Rooms are formed where there is a need and opVORONOI PRINCIPLE

portunity for it. The rooms' dimensions are controlled entirely by the structure. Several types of structures have been tested, and the algorithm generated Voronoi structure was the ultimate answer to these needs. The system provides a habitable structure between the hotel blocks, as well as on the first floor. The structure itself is constructive and provides a rigid shape. The Voronoi formula gives a seemingly random form that can be used spatial if it is generated with the proper parameters. The Voronoi structure consists of a series of cells. The cells that provide a flat floor and an acceptable ceiling height are used as hostel rooms - dorms, kitchens, resting areas and bathrooms.

VORONOI PRINCIPLE

CLASSIC VORONOI DIVISION CLASSIC VORONOI DIVISION vs. SEMIvs. CLASSIC ORTHOGONAL VORONOI VORONOI DIVISION DIVISION SEMIORTHOGONAL VORONOI vs. DIVISION SEMIORTHOGONAL VORONOI DIVISION 3D SEMIORTHOGONAL VORONOI DIVISION 3D SEMI-

118

ORTHOGONAL VORONOI DIVISION 3D SEMIORTHOGONAL VORONOI

Base form of serving volume

Grid for orthogonal adjustment

128 points placed in grid

Generate 3D voronoi

Base form of serving volume

Grid for orthogonal adjustment

128 points placed in grid

Generate 3D voronoi


KITCHEN

RESTAURANT

WC GUESTS WC/SHOWER STAFF

BAR

LAUNDRY

RECEPTION/LOBBY

WASTE ROOM

MANAGERS OFFICE LUGGAGE STORAGE

Plan 1st floor

119 Plan 2nd floor


Section A-A

120 Section B-B


CONNECTING THE STEEL FRAME

CONSTRUCTION / The building consists mainly of two structural systems. The first is the Voronoi structure, which carries itself and the two hotel volumes. It is a steel structure with a thickness of 150 mm. The principle of installation shown in the detail on the left.

Round steel duct pipe 150 mm, thichness 10 mm Hollow steel sphere 10 mm

STRUCTURE OF THE CELL WALLS 1.

On the first floor, the Voronoi structure is cut in all cases, and appears as a series of randomly placed columns. These columns are the primary construction for the hotel volumes. The hotels volumes are built by conventional precast concrete elements, and differ clearly from the Hostel’s structure. In those cases where the steel structure forms habitable rooms, elements which separates and isolates are being put into the cell wall. The elements are totally prefabricated and generated from digital models in order to achieve ultimate precision. How this is built can be seen in the bottom detail.

3000

2.

3500 4500

3.

Plywood 2x10 mm Polyurethane insulation 155 mm Wooden lath 25 mm Aluminum plating Wooden fastening piece Steel flange 30 mm Round steel duct pipe 150 mm, thichness 10 mm

121


tøyen

student housing 3rd semester studio project - Fall 2009 / Instructors: Bente Kleven, Marius Nygaard, Cathrine Vigander / Collaboration project with Emil Pira

122


The student apartments are placed on an infill site in the bustling town Tøyen in Oslo. The apartments are intended to give students a good quality of living at an affordable price. To achieve this, the apartments are throughout, with a narrow plan. The bedroom on one side gets the morning sun over the quiet street of Herslebsgate, while the living room is aimed towards the sunny, tranquil courtyard. There are 16 apartments, 2 of them are twostory. At its maximum, the building can accommodate 36 students. The building’s structure with semi-displacement plan provides exciting situations on the ground floor and at the rooftop. The offset provides an ­interesting facade.

123


Construction diagram

124

Site section (K-K)


Plan 3rd floor

Section I-I

Facade Herslebsgate

125


126

Construction detail - Bay window

Construction detail - Balcony

Construction detail - Roof

Construction detail - Fire wall


127


look to glomma uRBAN DESIGN

5th semester studio project - Fall 2010 / Instructors: Lars Haukeland, Snorre Gundersen, Wenche Andreassen, Minna Riska, Floire Nathanael Daub / Collaboration project with Elisabeth Amundsen and Erik Folmo

128


The Norwegian city Sarpsborg is a city with huge challenges in urban planning. Its beautiful city center is being choked by its own densifying development. The city’s identifiable areas; the river, the waterfall and the historical grounds is inaccessible because of heavy industry and the railroad tracks. We create new possibilities through developing a huge industrial wasteland close to the city center and placing the railroad underground. This is a visionary project underlining Sarpsborg’s identity. The proposal has made a broad appeal in local political forums.

Model view 1:1000

129


The project aims to solve the most important issues that the city of Sarpsborg has been struggling with for many decades while creating a different and better urban environment through the development of the large industrial area located north of the city center.

Construction detail - Balcony

By developing this area, we will give the city back its identity by linking the historically important parts of the city. Glomma - Norway’s largest river - has always been important for the expansion of the city. But through the tremendous development of the industry giants of Hafslund and Borregaard Industries, the access to the river has been blocked. This project doesn’t want to put down this important industry to gain access to the river, but rather develop the huge abandoned timber plant belonging to Borregaard Industries. There are parts of this area (northern area) which is still in use, and it may remain even after this development. The project will also link the city center back to the historically important area of Borgarsyssel, which is also blocked by the industry. The most important factor for the development of this area is to relocate the railway area, and put this in a tunnel under the city center. This will open the city to its new areas. Densification and migration has been a major problem for Sarpsborg city. This project aims to solve this through allowing for extension of the existing city center and enhancing the qualities that are already located here. The renewal of the railroad will improve the public transport to Oslo and Europe, which is key for this mediumscaled city 130

Another important factor of the project is to move the busy highway 118 out of the city, and redirect it onto a bridge over Glomma River, north of the developed area. This will clean the city air and also enable the development of large recreation areas. The new district consists of a new high school, library, cultural center, new train station, commercial buildings and residential buildings.


BICYCLE PATH TO HAFSLUNDSテ郎

AREA ARRIVAL

WALKWAY TO CITY CENTRE

AREA ARRIVAL Rv.118

AREA ARRIVAL AREA ARRIVAL Rv.118 WALKWAY TO CITY CENTRE

WALKWAY TO SARPEFOSSEN WALKWAY TO BORGARSYSSEL

BICYCLE PATH TO HAFSLUNDSテ郎

Site/area organization

131


TRAIN STATION

A

C HIGH SCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTRE

SPORTS HALL

B

MUSEUM AND RESTAURANT

KINDERGARTEN

A

C

B

TOURIST ROAD

132

Site/area plan


PARK/RESIDENTIAL AREA

TOURISTROUTE

Communication

Open public area

Footprint

URBAN AREA

133


Park area

134

Riverbank situation - recreation and residential areas


Urban area

Urban situation - looking at community centre

135


gressholmen small summer cabin

3rd semester intense studio project - Fall 2009 / Instructors: Bente Kleven, Marius Nygaard, Cathrine Vigander

136


Intended as an easily accessible retreat for the city-dwellers of Oslo, this small summer cabin is situated comfortably near the top of a ridge on the small island of Gressholmen in the Oslo Fjord. It is a simple construction that is easy to set up and leaves a minimal footprint when taken down. 3-week intense studio project done ​​ solely through physical modelling.

137


concrete TABLES

3rd semester project - Fall 2009 / Instructor: Magne Magler Wiggen

138


This is the result of a very exciting concrete workshop at NorBetong in Slemmestad, Norway. The two tables intend to challenge gravity. The concrete is in both cases heavily reinforced, so that the slim shapes can take much bigger loads than they look like. The tables won 1st prize in the award ceremony following the workshop.

139


brick wall workshop

4th semester project - Spring 2010 / Instructors: Bratsberg brickworks

140


This wall is the result of a one-day workshop at Bratsberg brickworks in Lunde, Norway. It demonstrates the wide variety a brick provides in terms of shape, surface and texture.

141


steel recliner workshop

1st semester project - Fall 2008 / Instructors: Erik Fenstad Langdalen, Anna Røtnes and Søren Sandved

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Inspired by insects and natural forms, this metal construction is a flexible form intended to function as a nice recliner. It’s total weight, plus the weight of a human body hangs like a pendant, and changes its form in proportion to body movements. The installation was part of a series of 3 projects intended to give an introduction to the facilites at school and to gave knowledge that forms the basis for further studies at AHO.

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120 hours

founder and project manager The world’s largest and most prestigious student-driven architecture competition / Founded in 2011

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The competition 120 HOURS is as an independent competition organized by students on a non-profit, voluntary basis without the involvement of a school administration. The organizing committee of 120 is recruited from the student masses of the three main architecture schools in Norway, BAS, AHO and NTNU, with the three founders as the leading project managers at all time. The competition runs over 120 hours (five days), and is an idea/conceptual competition. This short time span is well suited accommodate an already time-consuming education The objectives It is becoming increasingly challenging to establish a name as a young architect. Clients and contractors seek the safety of experience and proven ability, thus excluding many young architects. The “solution” for these architects is too often to participate in countless competitions and unpaid work to build their portfolio. 120 HOURS offers fresh ideas on relevant architectural topics while giving students a voice in the current architectural discourse. 120 is challenging and fun to participate in, and gives students a relevant first encounter with architectural competitions. In short, we are giving deserving young talents a head start at the game. 120 HOURS will benefit the architectural community as a whole. 120 is as an independent competition organized by students on a non-profit, voluntary basis without involvement of a school administration. 120 HOURS is a mark of quality, something that all students will aspire to, and put into his or her portfolio for future reference.

“120 HOURS is already established as Norway’s most important architectural competition for students. I believe that this competition should be included in the curriculum of all Norwegian architectural schools from the very first year. 120 HOURS provides a very good exercise in creating good concepts in a short amount of time, and in that way become a better architect.” Geir Brendeland, Head of Jury 2012 “120 HOURS is an important contribution to the architectural education in Norway. I think the competition can help to increase the level of Norwegian architecture, and have an effect in open Norwegian competitions. The project should continue to be relevant to society, and promote discussion outside of the architectural field. 120 have the ability to become an important arena of competition for architectural students world-wide.” CATHRINE VIGANDER, Jury member 2012 “Architectural competitions both nationally and internationally should be conducted in the same way as 120 HOURS. A short time frame with more focus on the concept and main measures will lead to fewer working hours being wasted on rejected proposals. 120 is a very good initiative and have great transfer value to professional competitions.” SIXTEN RAHLFF, Jury member 2012 “I think the life as a practicing architect is closer to 120 HOURS than it is to the academic life. As an architect you have to make quick and good decisions. In that way, 120 can be just as interesting as a diploma that you have spent half a year on developing. Architectural offices seek employees who can deliver quality in a short time.” OGMUND SØRLI, Jury member 2012

PLEASE SEE WWW.120HOURS.NO FOR MORE INFORMATION, VIDEOS, PROJECTS, ETC 145


Contact information / Hans Martin Frostad Halleraker Pilestredet Park 18 0176 Oslo Norway Phone: +47 93 82 45 71 Web: www.hanshalleraker.com E-mail: hansmartin@120hours.no hans.halleraker@gmail.com

Thank you for reviewing my portfolio!

ISBN 978-1-105-69851-4

90000

9 781105 698514


Portfolio of Hans M. F. Halleraker 2008 - 2014