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December 2011

A taste of

Elegance Tastebuds CafĂŠ caters to the palate

Holiday traditions Cross family opens their home

Bedazzling Christmas Design World showcases trees


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MANAGEMENT Erica Slone President & Publisher EDITORIAL Michael Hansberry Editor Gregg L. Parker Staff Writer Michelle Smith Staff Writer MARKETING Chris Dickey Marketing Consultant

This year, it feels like stores started FROM flooding their shelves THE PUBLISHER early with holiday dÊcor and ornaments the day after Halloween. In this issue, you get an inside view of this holiday cheer. We take you inside the home of Pat and Roger Cross and show you their family’s Christmas traditions.  Tastebuds Cafe offers great alternative food not found anywhere else in this area.We decked the halls with Design World, which offers a variety of home decor. You will love the many themed trees and ornaments sold in the store. We have captured the essence of Madison during Christmastime and we want to share it with you. Madison County residents fill our county with a rich amount of culture, creativity and compassion. We are ecstatic to bring those stories to you and hope you enjoy reading them as much as we enjoy covering them. We would love to hear any story ideas of people and places you would like to see featured in the next issue of Madison Living. Email your story ideas to me at Erica.Slone@ madisonlivingmagazine.com.

Janelle Thomas Marketing Consultant OFFICE MANAGER Laura Samples Customer Service PRODUCTION Daniel Holmes Design Jamie Sparacino Design Sarah Brewer Photographer

Madison Living P.O. Box 859 Madison, AL 35758 erica.slone@madisonlivingmagazine.com Advertising Iquiries 256.772.6677 Madison Living is published monthly by Madison Publications, LLC. MadisonLivingMagazine.com Madison Living 3


features 5

Arts & culture To the Beat

25

Great gifts HOliday finds

27

Wellness Alabama Special Section

52

out & About outings around town

70

To your health Marathon Man

73

In the biz bedazzling christmas

21 70

style 10

fashionistas Fashion icons

home 15

home christmas traditions

food 21

Let’s eat a taste of success

22

recipes tastebuds cafe

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ARTS & CULTURE

27

To the beat

of her own drum...

Written by gregg l. parker Photographs By Sarah Brewer Madison Living 5


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enry David Thoreau wrote about hearing a different drummer. That distinct cadence has led Deborah Adelsperger on her march throughout life. In the 1970s, Adelsperger’s career started as a flight attendant for 10 years. In 1982, she entered college and, for her senior thesis, traveled to Tanzania. “I always wanted to live (in Africa),” she said. “Peace Corps was the best way.” She lived in Mutheni, Kenya for two years, soon realizing the futility of agriculture improvements in the parched earth. “They were drinking water from mud holes,” Adelsperger said. Her goal translated into providing clean, potable water. Adelsperger was drawn to “the sense of community. It was about the love and compassion of the people. How they lived was quite an experience.” Her quarters had no doors, windows, kitchen, bathroom or running water. Adelsperger hauled water from the river or chief ’s camp. She bought a motorcycle battery for electricity to run a radio. “What did I gain from not having those modern conveniences? I gained my love of reading back, my love of quiet back ... just being me,” she said. She never felt in danger but was always “culturally sensitive ... not wanting to hurt people,” Adelsperger said. “When I realized I was fluent in Swahili, the world opened up.” Kenyan friends taught her to play African drum, with its “very powerful sound that hits at your belly. You lay the drum on the ground, straddle it and lean over to play the top,” she said. Drum circles perform for spiritual support, maybe a well drilling, rain for crops, healing the sick — even a Kenyan solider who never returned from World War II. At her Madison home, Adelsperger’s Wall of Life displays photos of villagers Kyveti and Mama Kyveti, Mr. Masumba, Kioko, Yola and Ketula in the Comba tribe. Every couple of years, Adelsperger

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PAGE 5: Kenyan friends taught her to play African drum, with its “very powerful sound that hits at your belly.” ABOVE: In the 1970s, Adelsperger’s career started as a flight attendant for 10 years. In 1982, she entered college and, for her senior thesis, traveled to Tanzania. RIGHT: Adelsperger was drawn to “the sense of community. It was about the love and compassion of the people. How they lived was quite an experience.”


at

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returns to their village. After Peace Corps, Adelsperger helped in relief for water projects in Somalia, the Rwandan genocide and in The Congo. In the United Kingdom, she entered Loughborough University and the Water and Engineering and Development Center and later earned a master’s degree in water resource management at the University of New Mexico. She then traveled to Bangladesh after a flood and, for the United Nations, helped Albanian refuges in the Kosovo War. “The Soviet Union breakup wasn’t a totally positive event. Countries couldn’t get chlorine for water systems because Mother Russia had supplied it,” she said. In January 2011, Adelsperger organized the Green Room Writers’ Group at 16 Main Gallery (16maingallery.com). Aspiring and accomplished writers gather on Sundays from noon to 3 p.m. “Everyone works on something different,” she said about timed writings, magazine articles and book text. “We read back to each other and tell how we hear it.” Adelsperger is writing a mystery/documentary about a humanitarian aid worker whose child is kidnapped. Currently, Adelsperger is working with the Huntsville chapter of Engineers Without Borders. “We have a water and malarial prevention project in northwest Zambia in the Kanyama Chiefdom,” she said. For more information about supporting this effort, visit “Engineers Without Borders - Huntsville Chapter” on Facebook.

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STYLE

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Hair by: Laurie Brandon at Mod Squad Makeup by: Angie Raetz at Sassy Bo Makeup Stylist: Arielle Bergman with Altr’d State Clothes from: Angela Thomas, Manager at Altr’d State in Bridgestreet

Model: Brittani Riggin Clothes: Jeggings by Flying Monkey - $59.50 Brown Camisole by Zenana - $12 Long Sleeve Offthe-shoulder Sweater by Ryu - $59.50 Vintage Brown Eagle Boots by Corral - $295.00 Golden Stella Earrings - $17.50 Madison Living 11


Model: Kelsey Johnson Clothes: Avocado Camisole by Zenana - $12 Rust V-neck Stripe Sweater by Bluebird $44.50 Retro Blue wideleg Jeans by Free People - $108 Genuine Parrot Feather Earrings by Serefina - $45 Colada Boots by Bamboo - $49.50 Long Cross Necklace with Pearls by Diana Warner - $88   12 Madison Living


Model: Llauryn Hendrix Clothes: Etched Elephant Dress by Judith March - $109.50 Jade Velveteen Jacket by Judith March $159.50 Golden Stella Earrings - $12.50 Brandice Boots by Bamboo - $64.50 Madison Living 13


Model: Leilani Dimeler Clothes: Navy Military Jacket by Cecico - $89.50 Scarf by Fashion Able - $42 Strappy Shoulder Dress by My Beloved - $59.50 Brown Rider Boots by Breckelle’s - $64.50 14 Madison Living


HOME

Cross family honors

Christmas traditions Written by Gregg L. Parker Photographs By Sarah Brewer

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raditions in decorating schemes and family customs fill Roger and Pat Cross’ home at Christmastime. All trees and trimmings have themes reflecting family interests, experiences and travels. “I’m always looking for new Santa Clauses,” Pat said. The Cross’ home in the Oakstone neighborhood features an Old World and European design with five bedrooms and three baths in 3,100 square feet. Red, green and gold embellishments repeat a classic look for the season throughout their home. Pat’s office has a Santa-only tree, while Roger’s office tree is covered in space vehicles. “A small white tree is trimmed with breast cancer ornaments, celebrating my now 18 years as a survivor of breast cancer,” Pat said. A large bonus room upstairs is the grandchildren’s ‘bunkhouse’ with a white tree boasting colorful, whimsical ornaments. The children call this room the “lager” (German for storage space), after daughter Kelley Grant and family lived in Germany for five years. During that time, the Crosses frequently visited and explored Europe. Ornaments from Germany adorn a tree to remind Roger and Pat of their travels. A tiny tree holds blown-glass ornaments of characters from Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” The tree sits among a village of Dickens-esque lighted houses. Relatives and friends treasure Pat’s handsewn Christmas stockings made of felt and sequins. Their daughter still hangs the stocking that Pat made in 1970. Pat has sewn 31 stockings and is completing three more this season. “Making stockings for others gives me great pleasure. Everyone is always so appreciative,” she said. Their Christmas season officially ‘opens’ on Thanksgiving evening at her sister’s home. “The girls, my sister and our children and grandchildren exchange cornucopias filled with gifts,” Pat said. On Christmas Eve at the Cross home, the family enjoys an early dinner of favorite foods and then gathers around a towering tree in the great room for their “program.”

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The couple’s kitchen.

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First, they read the Christmas story from the Bible. The grandchildren then sing or recite poetry from a school or church program. The family shares the poems “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” “The Village Blacksmith” and “’Twas the Night Before Christmas.” Everyone receives a Christmas “cracker,” or wrapping paper twisted into sections that pops to reveal hidden surprises inside. Finally, the family opens gifts from underneath the tree. Christmas morning centers on the grandchildren as they race to their stockings. The family sets out a jigsaw puzzle, which they must finish by New Year’s Eve. The Cross’ older daughter, Kelley Grant, and husband, Douglas, live in Madison with daughter Carsen, 12, and sons Connor, 10, and Camden, 7. Their younger daughter Whitney Milam, and husband, Jason, live in Peoria, Ill. with daughter Eva, 5. Pat and Roger Cross are natives of Hamilton County, Ill. Pat retired after teaching in Metamora and McLeansboro, Ill. and Huntsville. Roger is semi-retired after working forin the aerospace  industry  from the Apollo moon landing through the Constellation program.

PAGE 18:The family’s Christmas season officially ‘opens’ on Thanksgiving evening at her sister’s home. LEFT: The couple cherishes Christmas ornaments.

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Success A taste of

LET’S EAT

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Written by MICHAEL HANSBERRY Photographs By Amy Kilburn Douglass

Jessica Erwin knows what pleases the palate. Her goal is to have her restaurant, Tastebuds Café, and her catering service, Tastebuds Boutique Catering, viewed as the best by her clientele. Erwin isn’t in the business of making everyday food. She instead sets her business apart from all others. “We aim to be different than our competitors,” she said. “I joke with clients that we are not your meatball and cheese cube caterer (although there is nothing wrong with meatballs, and I love cheese). It’s just not something I specialize in.” Instead, Tastebuds’ menu offers items such as sweet and savory crepes, orzo chicken, cilantro Mexican salad and maple soy glazed salmon, to name a few. Erwin said food should always please all five senses. That’s how you know it’s good. “Unfortunately, it doesn’t always,” she said. “We have a real fresh and creative approach to food. Nothing you buy from us looks like something you could by from another place. “We aim to make food you can make at home. You won’t see a chocolate chip cookie here. They are great, but you can get them anywhere. Instead, you can get a pecan pie cookie or the lemon zucchini cookie. Where else can you get those?” Erwin has won international awards for her food at the Catersource conference, a learning and networking trade show and seminar. A couple years ago, she entered and won a competition that involved making creative lunch boxes for corporate clients. After being in the catering business for five years, she decided to open Tastebuds Café in July 2011. “It’s always been a dream of mine to serve people on a regular basis,” she said, “and all of our sauces, dressings and pastries are from scratch. You can’t find that at any chain. Everything is made in-house.” She also follows food trends — staying on top of the “latest and greatest” recipes. Erwin grew up in California and moved to the Madison area from Washington, D.C. “We’re not from the South, so we have a different view on Southern food,” she said. “But you can always expect the highest quality of service and high quality food.” Tastebuds Café is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit the restaurant’s site at Tastebudsboutiquecatering.com or on Facebook at TastebudsBoutiqueCatering. 22 Madison Living

Salted Caramel Apple Pie Ingredients Pie Crust: 1 recipe of your favorite crust butter pie crust 1 egg, beaten Raw sugar Sea salt Salted Caramel: 1 cup sugar 1/4 Cup of Water 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1/2 heavy cream 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt

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Apple Filling: 4-6 lemons 5-6 large Granny Smith apples 1/3 cup raw sugar 2 Tablespoons flour 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon allspice 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

Directions

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Roll the bottom crust to fit a 9-inch pan. Cut the top crust as a lattice in 1-inch thick ribbons. Chill the dough while you prepare the apples and

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caramel. To make the caramel, cook the sugar and water together over low

tem

heat until dissolved. Add the butter and bring to a slow boil. Continue

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cooking at a low boil until the mixture turns a deep, golden brown color. Remove from heat and immediately add the heavy cream. Add sea salt and whisk mixture together well. To make the apple filling, juice the lemons into a large mixing bowl. Peel and thinly slice the whole apples. Dredge apples in lemon juice to prevent browning and add flavor. To make the apple filling seasoning, combine sugar, flour, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg. Sprinkle over apples, using your hands to gently mix and coat the apple slices. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Layer 1/3 of the apple mixture into the bottom of the pie crust. Pour 1/3 of the caramel over the apples. Repeat twice, ending with a layer of caramel. Reserve a small amount of caramel for the top of the pie. Assemble the lattice crust and flute the edges. Pour the remaining caramel on top. Brush the crust with beaten egg and lightly sprinkle with raw sugar and sea salt. Bake the pie on a baking sheet for 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 and bake for another 25-35 minutes. Pie is done when the apples are just soft and the crust is golden brown. Madison Living 23


Sally Byram, Jessica Erwin and Melanie Dearden.

Butternut Squash & Goat Cheese Crustini Ingredients Baguette Extra Virgin Olive Oil 2 cups Roasted Butternut Squash, diced 1 tablespoon Maple Syrup (real, not fake!) 3/4 cup Goat Cheese Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions Preheat oven to 375. Slice baguette into thin slices. Lightly brush with olive oil and put into hot oven until toasted, about 10 minutes. Gently mix squash with maple syrup, and add salt and pepper to taste. Spread goat cheese on finished toast, and spoon squash on top. Enjoy!

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holiday

GREAT GIFTS

Parisian frames by Wild Sorbet, 5x7 size, price: $55

finds at 16 Main “Madonna & Child� Painting. Artist: Michelle Lee Price: $85

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n

es. dd

Sliver Spoon Earrings Artist: Kristy Stewart Price: $35

Ornament Artist: Kristy Stewart Price: $30

Knitted Octopus Artist: Katherine Sharitt, Willow Oak Price: $28

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December 2011 A Supplement to Madison Living

Aqua Zumba Butterfield loses 165 pounds with bypass surgery

Wellness


R

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Running Alone...

...Can only get you so far Get Results No matter how hard you work, without the proper nutrition for your body, you won't get the results you are looking for. At Absolute Nutrition of Madison we will give you the products you need to ensure you get the results you are looking for! Come by and talk with one of our staff about your goals, and let us get you on the right track today!

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Call Us at : 256-325-0679

Madison Living 29


Holland

Written by Brittney Jones Photographs By Cristen Smith

aims to please patients

Amanda Holland, DC, MS, owns Aligned Chiropractic.

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r. Amanda Lockhart Holland, DC, MS has been working in the chiropractic field since she was 17. She opened Aligned Chiropractic in April 2011. Her venue provides two private adjusting rooms with different adjusting techniques, tables, instruments and hands-on adjusting styles, customized for each individual patient. She also offers ultrasound, muscle stimulation therapies and massage therapy by a Licensed Massage Therapist.

Wellness

Holland’s journey in life took a few major turns that made her into the woman she is today. The first was on April 3, 1974. She was 5 years old. “To the best of my memory it was just days before a horrific tornado would hit and destroy everything my family had,” she said. “My kindergarten teacher told us what to do in a storm. She sent us home with a pamphlet with pictures. Holland can remember her family waiting for a while watching the rain, then it became quiet.


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“Soon after this, a tremendously loud wind began to blow and trees began snapping and it seemed as though houses were exploding,” she said. Holland said she stood holding her dad’s hand, though she knew she had nothing she felt like she had everything. The saddest thing for Holland was not the lost of her home or the toys, but the loss of her little friend, also named Amanda. “She would never talk or run or play again, she lived the rest of her short life in a special wheel chair.” Holland graduated salutatorian from high school and went on to college. While there, Dr. Tim Pierce, a chiropractor who asked her to work as a part-time Chiropractic assistant in his office while she was college. Holland said within her three months of working and learning about the art and science of the philosophy of chiropractic as well as being patient, she then wanted to become a Chiropractor. “As we say in chiropractic, ‘Only the Power that Made the Body has the Power to Heal the Body,’” said Holland. For the past 18 years, Holland has treated thousands of patients. However, she now finds herself in a place in her life where she has the desire to serve my community in many ways. “I delight in serving others and pray for God to send me the people he would have me to treat, I give Him all the Glory,” Holland said. Aligned Chiropractic & Decompression Center is located at 401 Hughes Road in the heart of Madison, across from Kroger and the Madison Library. You can reach Aligned Chiropractic at (256) 325-1222 or contact them through their website at HollandDC.com.

Aligned Chiropractic also works with children.


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Aqua Zumba Written by MICHAEL HANSBERRY Photographs By Cristen Smith

Wellness


Butterfield loses 165 pounds with bypass surgery

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After Wellness

ot always does diet and exercise work out. For people like Tracy Butterfield, losing weight went from a desire to a necessity. Butterfield lost 165 pounds after undergoing gastric bypass surgery. “I had tried every diet and fad and pills out there to lose weight but would always gain it back,” Butterfield said. “I was willing to  take part in a medical research project for a new weight loss pill that was not yet approved by the FDA, and during the process, I found out I was too heavy for their study and they turned me down.” At 328 pounds, Butterfield said that was the last straw. After months of deliberation, she decided to have gastric bypass surgery in August of 2008. “I only wished I had done it 10 years earlier,” said Butterfield, who has been overweight for the majority of her life. The process leading up to the surgery took a lot of time and preparation. She had to be approved by her insurance company before undergoing the operation. Butterfield had to have proof from a doctor stating she was overweight, proof from a psychiatrist stating she was mentally stable and proof that she has tried to lose weight before. “I began a strict diet of protein shakes for two meals and very small dinner for several weeks prior to surgery,” she said. “The hardest part was the brain hunger when you think you are hungry, but you really aren’t. “I found that I ate out of boredom or nervous eating. I used food as a reward even though it was killing me.”


Before

It took two to three weeks before Butterfield began to lose the weight. “I was on liquids only for two weeks, then pureed foods, then slowly solids, but only high-protein foods,” she said. Recuperating wasn’t easy. There were times when she could barely move. “After the first month, I started walking up and down the street,” she said. “My daughter would walk with me, then I would walk the block, and then I was able to walk faster. “My husband was the best, he took over cooking his and the kids’ meals. Once the weight started coming off, the scale would jump 4 to 7 pounds at a time. It was very encouraging.” When the Hogan Family YMCA opened in November 2010, Butterfield joined and enrolled in Zumba classes. She started going four to five times a week before becoming a certified Zumba Gold instructor, which is for older adults who have joint or spine problems. It involves less twisting, jumping and directional changes. She also teaches Aqua Zumba Saturday mornings at the YMCA. Butterfield said working out in water is especially beneficial to those with back issues and joint problems because it relieves pressure. She said it also increases blood flow and heart rate. “I would recommend the surgery to anybody who at least has a 100 pounds to lose,” she said. “It totally changed my life.”

PAGE 33: Butterfield lost 165 pounds from gastric bypass surgery she had three years ago. She regularly works out and eats well to keep the weight off. PAGE 34: Butterfield said once the weight started coming off, the scale would jump 4 to 7 pounds at a time. RIGHT: Butterfield’s weight peaked at 328 pounds.

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Madison Living 35


36 Madison Living


Little time, maximum results

Written by Gregg L. Parker Photographs By Christen Smith

Curves member Sandy McCombs works out on the Curves circuit.

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omen who can’t make time in their schedules for exercise have found the answer at Curves of Madison. Curves’ 30-minute workout exercises every major muscle group and burns up to 500 calories through a proven program of strength training, cardio and stretching. “The comprehensive workout can’t be achieved at a gym,” owner Brenda Bodin said. Many Curves locations are closed between noon and 3 p.m. “During lunch, women are looking after family and friends or having lunch — one of the few times we have

to socialize,” Bodin said. “Before work and after work are our busiest times.” “Women generally don’t like to work out in mixed company,” she said. Even working out with coworkers or superiors at the company gym isn’t always pleasant. “Mature women work on physical strength and fitness. A female environment is more comfortable.” “You can ‘let your hair down’ at Curves,” Bodin said. Curves’ equipment includes 13 hydraulic pieces and 13 aerobic stations. A cue tape announces, “Change stations now,” for everyone simultaneously to switch to different equipment. Heart rates stay up for the entire 30 minutes. Using hydraulics is like “walking in water. The faster

Wellness


you move the harder it gets,” Bodin said. Wardrobe changes aren’t necessary at Curves — clients even can wear a suit. Any clothing you wear at work or cleaning house is fine, along with rubber-soled shoes, she said. “We absolutely get to know each other. Early morning groups have lunch together or hold yard sales,” Bodin said. “When a good product (hits the market), everyone knows by the end of the day.” In 2008, the company introduced CurvesSmart, a personal coaching system that individualizes each workout by monitoring heart rate, workout intensity, range of motion and repetitions. A progress report totals calories burned and other accomplished work. “CurvesSmart is an electronic coach at each station,” Bodin said. Members place a key in the equipment for real-time readouts and then take the key to a kiosk for summarized workout results. “You work harder. We have members in their 70s who are using this. Other women who are athletic will be amazed at the difference.” Curves is located at 181 Hughes Road, Suite 7 in Hughes Plaza. Curves is open on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3 to 8 p.m.; and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Members are welcome at any Curves location — not just their home base. All Curves locations are owned individually but belong to Curves International. “Curves is the largest fitness center in U.S. and worldwide,” Bodin said. For more information, call 772-8776 or follow Curves on Facebook and Twitter.

Wellness

Any clothing you wear at work or cleaning house is acceptable at Curves.


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Madison Living 39


Exercise: The Fountain of Youth Written by Michael w. cantrell. md

W

e all know we should exercise routinely. Regular exercise enhances muscle and joint function and decreases risk of heart attack and stroke. In women, regular exercise can decrease the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Additionally, regular exercise decreases stress and releases endorphins; natural chemicals that give us a sense of well-being. Regular exercise is a veritable fountain of youth. But how can we who are past our physical prime drink from this fountain without choking, or worse, drowning?

Here are a few tips. * Listen to your body. As you age, you may find that you are not as flexible as you once were or that you cannot tolerate the same types of activities that you did years ago. Don’t let this discourage you from starting a new exercise routine. Just modify your activities to accommodate your body’s new limitations. * Consider taking lessons or using a personal trainer when starting a new exercise program. Whether you’re a beginner or have been playing a sport for a long time, lessons can be a worthwhile investment. Proper form and instruction reduce the chance of injury. * Develop a balanced fitness program that incorporates cardiovascular exercise, strength training and flexibility. A personal trainer can help with this. In addition to providing a total body workout, a balanced program will keep you from getting bored and lessen your chances of injury. * Add activities and new exercises systematically. No matter if you’ve been sedentary or are in good physical shape, don’t try to take on too many activities at one time. It’s best to add no more than one or two new activities per workout. * Use the 10 percent rule. When changing your activity level, increase it in increments of no more than 10 percent per week. If you normally walk or run 2 miles a day and want to increase to, say, 4 miles, slowly build up distance each week until you reach your goal. Also use the 10 percent rule as your guide for strength training. * Always take time to warm up and stretch before physical

Wellness

activity. Research has shown that cold muscles are more prone to injury. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling or running or walking in place for 3 to 5 minutes. Then slowly and gently stretch, holding each stretch for 30 seconds. * Be careful not to succumb to the “weekend warrior” syndrome. Compressing physical activity into two days sets you up for trouble and does not increase your fitness level. Try to get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every other day. * Invest in good equipment. You certainly don’t need to over-buy, but you shouldn’t be playing tennis with that old wooden racquet, either. Be sure to select the proper shoes for your sport and use them only for that sport. When the treads start to look worn or the shoes are no longer supportive, replace them. * If you have or have had a sports or orthopaedic injury like tendinitis, cartilage or ligament injury, or stress fracture, consult an orthopaedic surgeon who can help you recover and prevent future injuries. * Above all else, HAVE FUN! Cantrell is a doctor at The Orthopaedic Center Sports Medicine – TOC Sports. He is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon.


Highly skilled specialists ... world-class care

7

Convenient Locations

30

Gilbert M. Aust, MD Ginger K. Bryant, MD Steven L. Buckley, MD Richard C. Burnside, MD Michael W. Cantrell, MD Brian R. Carter, MD Joseph W. Clark, MD Stanton B. Davis, MD Matthew J. DeOrio, MD Ray A. Fambrough, MD

10 Orthopaedic Specialists

Centers of Excellence

1

Cyrus Ghavam, MD W. Allen Goodson, MD John J. Greco, MD David B. Griffin, MD Louis G. Horn III, MD Michael G. Lawley, MD Mark A. Leberte, MD Craig E. Lincoln, MD Philip A. Maddox, MD Vandana M. Maladkar, MD

Group for Comprehensive Care R. Allan Maples, MD Jeffrey W. McKee, DPM Howard G. Miller, MD Michael E. Miller, MD Saranya Nadella, MD Larry M. Parker, MD F. Calame Sammons, MD Brian M. Scholl, MD Morris B. Seymour, MD Thomas J. Thomasson, MD

Huntsville • Madison • Decatur • Guntersville • Scottsboro • Fayetteville, TN

1-800-242-2381

www.visitTOC.com

Madison Living 41


Nature’s Apothecary Written by MICHELLE M. SMith Photographs By sarah brewer

I

t doesn’t take long to sense the passion and enthusiasm Derrick Mitchell of Nature’s Apothecary has about living a healthy lifestyle based on healthy foods and supplements. Mitchell’s knowledge regarding vitamins, supplements and foods that support a healthy immune system and protect against certain illnesses and diseases is impressive. He strongly believes in using what the earth provides as an alternative to prescription drugs. He and his wife Karen, a biologist, founded the business in 2007. “We sell supplements that support healthy living,” Mitchell said. “For example, we have products and supplements that will support healthy blood pressure and stress.” He explains that Hawthorne berry is good for controlling high blood pressure, while red yeast rice is a natural statin that lowers cholesterol. For those desiring stronger nails and healthier hair, they have the supplement Biotin, which a B-vitamin. “Of course, it is important to consult your physician when you are taking herbs with any prescriptions,” Mitchell added. So why do people choose alternative herbal supplements over standard medications? “Our clients don’t like the side effects of drugs and prefer herbs as a natural alternative,” Mitchell said. Nature’s Apothecary only provides products from companies that are pioneers in the industry, such as Barlean’s Organic Oils and Carlson Nutritional Supplements.

Wellness

“These companies are leaders in the natural food industry, many of them family owned and very reputable. They stand by what they say. I won‘t jump on any fad, it has to be a reputable product sold by a reputable company. I have to trust in the products I sell so it doesn‘t compromise the trust my customers have in us.” Mitchell has created a customer base that shares his belief in alternative healthy choices. Mitchell believes what sets his business apart from others is the emphasis he has placed on trust between his customers. “Health is a very personal thing, and the element of trust is very important,” Derrick said. “Our customers come to us because of the convenience of having the products they need and the knowledge they obtain through our consultations. They like being able to shop locally rather than purchase similar products online because of the trust they have in us and the relationship we have built with them over time.” The store features an extensive line of vitamins, herbal teas, herbs, health and beauty items, gluten-free groceries, pet supplies, cleaning supplies and much more. Nature’s Apothecary is located at 7441-B Highway 72 West, Madison and hours are: Monday through Friday: 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Saturday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. To find out more about Nature’s Apothecary, call 722-9198 or visit their website at Naturesapothecaryinc.com.


Michael Cantrell, M.D.

Brian Carter, M.D.

Stanton Davis, M.D.

John Greco, M.D.

Larry Parker, M.D.

Drs. Cantrell, Carter, Davis, Greco, and Parker of the TOC Sports Medicine Team are board-certified orthopaedic surgeons who specialize in diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. TOC Sports Physicians get you back at task no matter your age or activity level.

Top Doctors for Top Performers.

visitTOC.com/TOCsports

Visit us on Facebook @ facebook.com/tocsports 256.539.2728 e 1-800-242-2381 Huntsville • Madison • Scottsboro • Guntersville

Madison Living 43


Sample Circuit Training Exercises Quick workout tips from II Fit Personal Training

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Swiss-Ball Pike

Single-leg Swiss-Ball Hip Raise & Leg Curl

Assume the push up position with your arms completely straight.

Rest your shins on a Swiss ball. Your body should form a straight line from your head to your ankles.

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Position your hands slightly wider than and in line with shoulders.

Raise your right leg in the air so that it’s a few inches off the ball, nearly in line with your left thigh. Place your arms out to your sides at 45-degree angles to your torso.

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Body-Weight Wall Squat

Lean back against a wall with your feet about 2 feet away from it and shoulder-width apart.

Push your hips up so that your body forms a straight line from your shoulders to your knees. Brace your core and squeeze your glutes as you lift your hips.

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Keeping your back against the wall, bend your knees slightly so that your body descends a few inches. Now hold that position for 5 to 10 seconds.

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*Without pausing, pull your left heel toward you and roll the ball as close as possible to your butt.

Pause, then return the ball to the starting position by lowering your hips and rolling the ball backward.

Reverse process and switch legs.

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Without bending your knees, roll the Swiss ball toward your body, raising your hips as high as you can.

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Continue to lower yourself a few inches at a time, four more times. In the last position, your upper thighs should be parallel to the floor.

Wellness

Once you’ve paused at all positions, stand up and rest.

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Medicine Ball Pushup Place both hands on a medicine ball, and to do a push up.

Tire Chops

Swiss-Ball Reverse Crunch

Grab a sledge hammer and hold it with both hands above your right shoulder (your arms should be straight).

Lie face up on a Swiss ball with your legs bent. Hold on to a sturdy object for support. Position the middle of your back on the ball.

Rotate your torso to your to your right. Brace your core and set your feet shoulder-width apart.

Bend your knees 90 degrees.

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Prowler

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Swing the sledge hammer down and to the outside of your left knee by rotating to the left and bending at your hips. Reverse the movement to return to the start. Complete the prescribed number of reps toward your left side then do the same number on your right side, holding the sledge over your left shoulder don’t round your lower back.

This is usually done while running. Horizontal push: The horizontal bar makes an individual lower his or her hips to drive the prowler forward.

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Vertical push: This is the easiest motion to do with the Prowler. Grabbing the two vertical posts, sink your hips and push.

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Lift your hips up and in, pause, and then lower them back to the starting position. Raise your knees toward your chest Your hips and lower back should raise off the ball.

References: * The Men’s Health Big Book of Exercises, By Author Adam Campbell * II Fit Personal Training, CEO Scott Miller II


Another advantage from Crestwood’s robotic surgery team, skilled in the art of da Vinci®.

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Crestwood Medical Center now brings you the advantages of the da Vinci® Robotic-Assisted Surgical System. This advanced system may be used for hysterectomies and other gynecological surgery, as well as for prostate, urologic and kidney procedures. In the hands of skilled surgeons, these minimally invasive procedures may mean less pain, less scarring and less time in the hospital for many patients. To learn more, visit CrestwoodMedCenter.com.

*Typical results depend on many factors. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of da Vinci® Robotic-Assisted Surgery for your condition. Crestwood Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.

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A difference you can trust.

Fitness close to home No matter where you live in Madison, it’s a short drive to Madison Wellness Center. Our amenities include state-of-the-art exercise equipment, heated pools, saunas, steam rooms and complimentary towel service. With expert staff who specialize in fitness and nutrition, you can experience fitness with a health care background. Visit us in Madison Medical Park, on the corner of Balch Road and Highway 72.

huntsvillehospital.org

(256) 265-WELL (9355)

Experience. The Difference.

The future of health care arrives in 2012. madisonalhospital.org

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Dance On. Let some of the area’s most advanced knee, hip and spine procedures get you back to what you love. Crestwood Medical Center has been named a Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement® as well as for Spine Surgery® for better overall quality of care and results for patients having these surgeries. So turn to the orthopedic specialists at Crestwood Medical Center. And dance on!

For more information, call 256-429-5760.

CrestwoodMedCenter.com Crestwood Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff. Note: Designation as Blue Distinction Centers means these facilities’ overall experience and aggregate data met objective criteria established in collaboration with expert clinicians’ and leading professional organizations’ recommendations. Individual outcomes may vary. To find out which services are covered under your policy at any facilities, please call your local Blue Cross and/or Blue Shield Plan; and call your provider before making an appointment, to verify the most current information on its Network participation and Blue Distinction status. Neither Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association nor any of its Licensees are responsible for any damages, losses, or non-covered charges that may result from using Blue Distinction or other provider finder information or receiving care from a Blue Distinction or other provider.

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OUT & ABOUT

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ALDI Opens

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ALDI grocery opened Nov. 3 on Highway 72 West. ALDI is a low-cost grocery store, serving residents in Madison County. This is the second location in Madison County. 1. Amy O’hoyt and Laura Meyers 2. Katie Beecher 3. Charlene Pugh and Jesse Lopez 4. David Cothran and Michelle Nesin 5. Kellun Feree and Dave Hassen

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6. Tim Holcombe and Dale Strong 7. Chris Loyd 8. Cheryl Lueke and Dean Pearson 9. Quenisha Hazzard, Wendy Tietz and Tabitha Hartman

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Hertz After Hours The Madison Chamber or Commerce held its After Hours at Hertz Rental Licensee Thursday, Oct. 6.Hertz is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1. Stephanie Whitt and Kathy Belcher 2. Denise Duncan and Dennis Sanders 3. Sam Safie and Brent Von Kanel

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4. Mary Kelley, Crye-Leike Realtors and Patricia Wyernandt

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5. Lori King Taylor

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Daddy Daughter Date Night Fathers brought their daughters to Chickfil-A for Daddy Daughter Date Night Oct. 15. Dads and daughters had reserved spots and enjoyed a meal together. 1. Scott and Aybra McCranie 2. Joel Kreipe and Kim Barnes 3. Avery and Doug Nunnally 4. Bobby and Ashley Neutze

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5. Tom Morris 6. Brett and Ansley Kate Chapman 7. Mike and Marissa Conway 8. Dan and Brittany Reisker

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Emmy’s No Mo Chemo Celebration

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Emmy Harrison battled cancer. A fundraiser was held in her honor. The event was held at Madison United Methodist Church, 127 Church St. on Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 1. Ramsey Harris, Alice Baker and Julie Groover 2. Judy Harrison 3. Kay and Jessica Reynolds 4. Jim and Shannon Heinrich 5. Matt, Rebecca, Emmy and

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Sophia Harrison 6. Patricia Daly and Al Turbovich 7. Phillip Harrison and Bary Turbovich 8. Maria McKinstry and Shannon Fausz 9. Julia, Jayse and John Mark Ingalls

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ESI Ribbon Cutting Engineered Solutions, Inc. is an innovative and problem-solving company located at 300 Research Blvd. ESI was formed in 1987 as a consortium of nuclear engineering experts. 1. Tessy Cabrera and Amanda Weaver 2. Shelby Underwood and David Ziegler 3. Ralph Martin and Felecia McInnish 4. Ray Journey, Jennifer Watson and Richard Hatcher

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5. Mark Watson and Brandon Baratta 6. Mark Austin 7. Chamber members and guests

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Business Expo

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The Madison County Business Expo was held Nov. 1. The Expo provided an opportunity for the community to learn about local businesses. 1. Cindy Martin, Michelle Nesin, Tiffany Kennedy, Liz Dubberley and Janine Nesin 2. Shannon Davis and Tracey Warick 3. Sandy Hartlex, Nacy Curul and Glenna Chaffin 4. Gay Pepper and Leslie McGill 5. Carrie Shaw. 6. Tracey Young and Jill Waltress

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7. Abby Guasti 8. Cindy Kosanda and Amy Gilmore 9. Phabeian Mastin and John Tumminello III

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Grove Park ribbon cutting

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Grove Park townhomes held its ribbon cutting Sept. 7. Grove Park is a neighborhood of luxury homes. 1. Chris Meadows and Dustin Taylor 2. Shelby Underwood and David Ziegler 3. Jackie Lusher and Chris Hulser 4. Mayor Paul Finley and Sandra Steele 5. Bo Jennings, Jackie Luscher and Regina Green 6. Sherri Hagedobler and Chuck Coan

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7. Rhonda Furr and Eric Jacbos

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Haunted Hayride

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Madison kids got the fright of their lives when they participated in the citysponsored haunted hayrides. 1. Jaydon, Jasmine and Kim Hill 2. Rebekah Hicks and William Gilley 3. Sloan Shaw 4. Amber Vaughn, Conner Staggs, Jimmy Sutton and Sloan Shaw 5. Madison Brock, Taylor Casals, Hope Boyette and Jaryd Brock 6. Luke Koger and Noah Scoggings

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7. James and Ava Column 8. Lexi Kroger, Brea Scoggings, Olivia Carroll, Taylor Phillips and Madison Column

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B & G Equipment

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B & G Equipment had its ribbon cutting Friday, Oct. 21 at its location at 15040 Highway 20. B&G Equipment and Supply is a multi-location renter and seller of top-of-the-line equipment and construction supplies.  1. Mike Brazier and Tessy Cabrera 2. Barbara Sanders and T.J. Sanders 3. David Free and Jimmy Brook 4. Heith Pike and Landon Ogletree 5. Jimmy Summers, Justin Taylor and Buford Hanson

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6. Danielle Yarbrough and Tara Sands 7. Jay Sanders and Mayor Paul Finley

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Little Libby’s grand opening

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Little Libby’s Catfish and Diner had its grand opening Wednesday, Nov. 2. Libby’s is located at 234 Lime Quarry Road. 1. Ashley, Diana and Lori Jackson 2. David Cochran and Doug Kiser 3. Cindy Morse and Ardella Stebbins 4. Faye Mitchell and Amanda Mears 5. Tommy Perry, Bobby Parriss and Melvin Duran 6. Whitney Story and Kathryn Wendt

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7. Whitley Mears and Gracie Clark

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8. Pam Blackburn and Kristy Poole

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Surie of Madison Surie of Madison held its After Hours Thursday, Nov. 3. Members of the Madison Chamber of Commerce got the chance to connect and network at the event. 1. Melinda Tsang 2. Marlyn Pinshaw and Susan Voiers 3. Peter Mernandez, Myra Sawyer, Michelle Nesin and Liz Dubberley 4. Janie Day and Andrea Gutherie 5. Lisa Norris, Felica Sparks, Rich Ortiz, Craig Shamwell, Rebecca Ortiz, Tracy McKee and Michele Pearce

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6. Melissa Gibson and John Barrett 7. Patty Turrell, Cindy Kasanda, Amy Gilmore, Debra Johnson and Geisie Sanders 8. Steve and Amanda Holland

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Rainbow Elementary holds carnival

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During the fall, Madison schools held fall carnivals. Rainbow Elementary School held its carnival Saturday, Oct. 29. Held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the kids enjoyed inflatables, games, prizes and food. 1. Alec Smith, Andrew Shultz, Geri Ewing and Sarah Ewing 2. Maelyn Senwo, Jordan Cunningham and Hannah Sheets

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3. Sydney and Eric Cunningham 4. Kristi and Johan Moro 5. Jan, Hannah, Dersy and Michael

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Lawley 6. Lija Abele and Lauren Lyons 7. Corinne, Lily and Laila Parsley 8. Neld Martin, Jan Heering, Anna Heering and Brice Heering

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Trunk or Treat The Madison Police Department hosted a Trunk or Treat event on Oct. 31 in front the City Hall/police station. Kids came out in their best costumes to celebrate the occasion. 1. Kamiya Faulk 2. Brandon and Darius Johnson 3. Kirsten Self, Kinsley Self and Sophie Lutes

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4. Moesha Sanderson, Angel Rice, Ijanay Johnson, Miracle Johnson and Deloris Clemons

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5. Baquawn Clemons, Titus Clemens and Tommie Rice 6. Joshua, James and Peter Kolb with Police Chief Larry Muncey 7. Caleb, Victoria and Regina Johnson 8. Jason Whitecotton, Stacy Haraway, Brandon Burgess and Christie Glover 9. Annie Hopkins, Tamara Hopkins, Stormy Burnette and Tempest Hopkins

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Senior Center Employee Appreciation Day

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Eight employees from the Madison Senior Center were recognized at a special employee appreciation day held Tuesday, Oct. 25 at the center. Visitors to the center collected money to purchase gifts for each employee. 1. Helen Payne and Manhua Ding 2. Norma Collum and Rita Cole 3. Minnie Gissendanner and Ernestine Flagg 4. Bertha Bester and Lucille Miller

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5. Helen Oliver

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Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

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Stem & Stein LLC grand opening

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Stem & Stein LLC, which is located between Madison and Limestone counties in Madison, provides a trendy, modernized wine cellar, bar and cafĂŠ. 1. Phil Shaw, Shawn Wheeler and Dennis Wheeler 2. Linda Levy, Steven Levy and Jeff Wilke 3. Donny and Mahan Shelley 4. Pam Williams and DeeDee Morgan 5. Tessy Cabrera and Felecia McInnish

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6. Jimmy, Jameson, Merrie Jo and Brogan Graham 7. Michelle Nesin and Mayor Paul Finley

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Pictures with Santa

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Posh Mommy and Baby Too held a photo session for children to take pictures with Santa Claus. The store was transformed into a Christmas wonderland. 1. Ethan, River and Courtney Horton 2. Benjamin Gurley 3. Madeline McLagen 4. Caydence McLain

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5. Annsley Elizabeth Thomas 6. Garrett Parvin 7. Bailey Adeleye 8. Lakelyn and Dawson Wilson 9. Camilla Wilbanks

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10. Madilyn West 11. Kaitlyn Grace and Arabella Jane 12. Camden Moultrie 13. Micah and Eli Greeson 14. Alyssa Mills 15. Tyler Laughlin 16. Sheridan girls 17. Scout Pauly 18. Kegan and Azlyn Gregory 19. Joshua Vannoy

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TO YOUR HEALTH

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Written by MICHAEL HANSBERRY Photographs By Sarah Brewer


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ou wouldn’t know it, but Josh Whitehead has been a runner only since 2007. His wife introduced him to the sport and he competed in the Liz Hurley Ribbon Run 5k. “We moved to Madison a few years earlier and my mom had just completed treatment following diagnosis with breast cancer, so I wanted to participate and help raise money for the cause,” Whitehead said. “With about a week of training for running, I finished the 5k with a time of 18:20, and was immediately hooked.””

Whitehead began running a few times a week. That increased his weekly mileage. In 2008, he met Mike Allen and the team at 1st Place Athletics, who provided tips, advice and a training regimen that would guide him for future races. Before all that, Whitehead had been a cyclist, competing until 2008. He has now made the full transition into running. Whitehead has competed twice in the Rocket City Marathon Madison Living 71


and the Mobile Marathon. He placed third and seventh in the 2009 and 2010 Rocket City Marathon, respectively and won the 2010 Mobile Marathon. He is registered for next year’s Boston Marathon in April and said he is looking forward to competing in the 2011 version of Huntsville’s Rocket City Marathon again this year. “I’ve always enjoyed activities that allow me to get outside and enjoy the outdoors, as well as pursuing improved fitness, health and opportunity for competition,” Whitehead said. “Running is a great way to do this. More importantly, my wife also enjoys running, so this is something that we can get out and enjoy together.” He said support from his family and friends are what keeps him motivated. “My normal week of running starts on Sunday with a long run of 20-24 miles,” he said. “During the week I usually log between 10-13 miles each day, with two of those days including ‘quality’ work (intervals or threshold/tempo pace) and one day of form drills and strides.” His Saturdays involve 9 to 15- mile runs. “This usually means a week of 80-104 miles, though right now I’m in the middle of training for the marathon and will log as much as 120130 miles a week including some days with two runs,” he said. Competing gives him a “great feeling” when he stands next to his fellow runners and reflects on the preparation it took to get to that point. “At the end, there’s the satisfaction of finishing and seeing the results of all the hard work that went into competing in each race,” he said. Whitehead works as an engineer in propulsion element design/development for NASA. He has an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Auburn University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. “Most people who know me outside of running would probably consider me a big nerd, but that’s OK,” he said. “My wife, twin sister and brother-in-law are also all engineers, so I’m in good company in the family.”

Josh Whitehead at the Bob Jones High School track. Whitehead has been a runner since 2007. Whitehead said to “start out easy” when one first begins to run.

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IN THE BIZ

Bedazzling Christmas Written by Gregg L. Parker Photographs By Sarah Brewer

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The Candyland Tree is one of many themed trees. Collegiate loyalties are evident in the University of Alabama and Auburn University trees.

he look and ambiance of Christmas radiates tree to tree, wreath to wreath and bow to bow at Design World in Madison. After months of staging, employees at Design World have created a Christmas wonderland in their Madison store. In September, owner Dow Canup and his staff started the transformation of Design World into a showcase of Christmas finery. Store manager Connie Campbell and staff have assembled a collection of 20 theme trees that send a kaleidoscope of color, cheer and charm for a spectacular setting on Christmas morning. The Candyland Tree is brimming with tempting cupcakes and pastry treats. Oversized pieces of hard candy glimmer in shiny, translucent wrapping. Puffs of cotton candy engender fun times of summer. At the tree base, candy canes boast stripes of teal and light purple and dots of multi-colored chewy kisses. Pudgy polar bears beckon the children for a visit. And what would Candyland be without gingerbread houses perched on the branches? “Most customers tell us they love our decorations because they are so unique and can’t be found anywhere else,” Campbell said. “We show them how they can get the same designer look at home — and how really easy it is for them to do.” In a Mardi Gras theme, another tree has purple-and-gold trinkets, strings of beads, garlands, streamers and flourishes. The emphasis here is on fun. For a break from the routine, the safari tree makes a statement with its black and white motif. Collegiate loyalties are evident in the University of Alabama and Auburn University trees. Game tickets, snowy wands with glass baubles in team colors, Teddy bears in university sweaters, bumper stickers and pennants shout “Roll Tide” and “War Eagle.” In addition, two other trees have actual branches of crimson and white or orange and blue. For a traditional look, red and gold with a touch of green are used in one design. Perfect for a family room, another tree evokes a woodsy lodge setting with its serene theme. Other decorations in blue and silver mesmerize the eye with hints of winter beauty and subtle elegance. The glowing tree has spiral silver ribbons, gorgeous bows and a burst of color and iceblue ornaments at the tree’s crest. The Peppermint Tree uses red and white and is saturated with fluffy bows, prancing reindeer, peppermint kisses and candy canes, icy-white fronds and shiny glass ornaments. In addition, Design World’s winter wonderland includes custom-made wreaths, garlands, multitudes of dazzling ornaments, unique tree-trimming accessories and hundreds of rolls of beautiful ribbon. Mantle stockings run the gamut from brocaded and tasseled Victorian opulence to red-and-white Santa socks with brass trim. If you can’t wait until December 25, take a visit at Design World. Old Saint Nick may be peeking around a tree. Design World: 8059 U.S. 72 West, Madison, Alabama. 7220086.

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Store manager Connie Campbell and staff have assembled a collection of 20 theme trees that send a kaleidoscope of color, cheer and charm for a spectacular setting on Christmas morning.

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Y’ALL COME BACK

Don’t cry. We’ll be back next month.

Photograph By Gallery Seven Photography 78 Madison Living


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December Madison Living