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The Lion 2017 - 2018


The Lion 2017-2018

SCHOOL pages 1-27

ARTS pages 28-54

TRIPS pages 55-82

SPORT pages 83-144 OLD HAMPTONIANS’ CHRONICLE pages 145-180

EDITOR Mike Baker DESIGN AND DTP Jiri Musil FRONT AND BACK COVER Joel Baker FRONT COVER ARTIST Gabriel Lewis

Team photos and some action sports photos can be ordered from kickphoto.com Drama photos: Big Image Photography Rugby action photos: Gerry McManus Photography

The Editor wishes to thank: Denis Fuller, Frank Keenan, Hayley Coll and Sarah Dearden


It is a great pleasure to have this opportunity to provide some introductory words for another engaging and evocative issue of The Lion. Our assiduous editor, Mike Baker, has achieved a truly impressive feat by compiling such a detailed record of an exciting and highly successful School year.

At Hampton, we pursue all-round excellence and carefully nurture an achievement culture, but everything is approached in a proportionate, caring and balanced way. Boys have a lot of fun here and I am certain that their many successes flow from their day-today enjoyment of School life.

Hamptonians continued to excel during 2017-18 across the full range of academic and co-curricular activities, as the pages of this magazine demonstrate fully. Our School remains distinctive in combining top echelon public examination results with being one of the UK’s finest sporting schools and offering a remarkably vibrant and varied cultural programme. Moreover, hundreds of boys have continued to show admirable commitment to the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme, the CCF, Chess, Adventure Society expeditions, Model United Nations conferences, entrepreneurship courses, and our flourishing Community Service programme and Form Charity fundraising events.

Our pupils are wonderfully talented and we encourage them to be personally ambitious, but they also understand that friendship, kindness and supporting one another generously are the real essence of Hampton. They treat others with respect and on their merits, inside and outside our gates. They will go on to contribute and lead with passion, empathy and cheerful resilience across a wide range of fields, as our alumni have done before them.

A personal highlight of last academic year took place on 24 March 2018, when we were thrilled to announce The Fitzwygram Foundation publicly at the annual Old Hamptonians’ Alumni Dinner. The Foundation’s single, transformative aim is to increase the number of completely free places available at Hampton for boys whose families cannot afford to pay fees. There can be no more important endeavour for our School over the years ahead than upholding our special ethos and socially inclusive heritage through providing boys of all backgrounds with fair access to a Hampton education. Colleagues, boys and parents know that I am deeply passionate about this cause and I am delighted that our Governors have placed it at the heart of the Hampton School Trust’s vision and future strategy. I hope that Hamptonians of all vintages will embrace its significance and engage actively in helping the Foundation to achieve our ambitious but realisable goals.

I am sure this edition of The Lion will leave the reader in no doubt why it is such a remarkable privilege to serve as Headmaster of our exceptional School. Thank you to everyone who makes spending time at Hampton so rewarding, fulfilling and inspiring!

Kevin Knibbs Headmaster


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Alex Fox

Alice Thornton

Amy Winstock

Starting at Hampton is quite a change from my previous post at the British School, Kathmandu. The leafy suburbs of SouthWest London may not have the snow-capped peaks of Nepal, but they are also proving to be slightly less chaotic so far!

When I finished my A Levels, my old form tutor handed me back a letter which I had written to myself during a PSHE period seven years previously – just one week into my first year of secondary school. In that letter, I had recounted how much I enjoyed Latin lessons, from learning strange grammar rules to finding the origins of Latin-derived words to exploring the ancient world. Since then, my love for Latin has taken me to the University of Oxford, where I studied Classics and Sanskrit (why learn two ancient languages when you can learn three?) and, now, to my first teaching post.

Prior to Kathmandu, I spent three years teaching Economics and Politics at Merchant Taylors’ School, Northwood, where I completed my teacher training. My degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and a subsequent masters in Russian and East European Studies at the same institution, allowed me to play an active role in UCAS, Oxbridge and Curriculum Enrichment at MTS, which I will continue at Hampton as a Sixth Form tutor. I am very much looking forward to working with motivated students in the higher years of the school. Having spent last year in the ‘roof of the world’, I am particularly looking forward to being involved in Hampton’s Adventure Society and Duke of Edinburgh programme. In recent years, I have become an increasingly keen rock-climber and mountaineer, summiting Island Peak in the Everest region last December. I am also excited to be playing hockey again for Teddington now that I am back in the UK.

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I am, of course, looking forward to imparting my knowledge of, and enthusiasm for, my favourite subject to a group of very talented and inquisitive boys; but the great thing about teaching is that I get to hear about – and learn from – their opinions, questions and ideas too. The fact that I get to teach at Hampton School of all places is the icing on the cake: my grandfather was a pupil here in 1933, so I am excited to be following in his footsteps 85 years later! Besides Classics, I like speaking French, playing the recorder, long walks, musical theatre and all things Harry Potter. I am no fitness fanatic, but I have been known to enjoy running, dancing and skiing. I ran my first 10km race earlier this year, and I am looking forward to helping out at the school’s running club soon.

Having recently completed my PGCE at UCL Institute of Education, I am absolutely thrilled to be joining the Music Department to take up my first teaching post. Before becoming a teacher, I worked for several years as a management consultant at IBM, but soon came to the realisation that I missed Music too much and decided to return to my first passion. Born south of the river in sunny Camberwell, I learnt piano from an early age. My piano teacher soon realised that although I had limited aptitude for the piano (!), I had great vocal potential. After successfully auditioning for the Westminster Abbey Choir School, I went on to board there for five years, firmly instilling within me a life-long appreciation for music. Joining Dulwich College on a Music and Choral scholarship in the Third Form, I went on to read Music at University College, Durham. I then stayed on for further year to complete a Masters in Acoustic and Electro-Acoustic Composition and to conduct the Durham University Chamber Orchestra. As a singer and multi-instrumentalist – bassoon being my first instrument – I am firmly of the belief that there should be as many opportunities to play and perform music at school as possible. I cannot wait to get fully involved in the extra-curricular musical activities at Hampton, and I am already avidly looking forward to the forthcoming production of Crazy for You. Outside music, as a proud south Londoner, I am Crystal Palace fan – someone has to be! As I now live in nearby Chiswick, I am a keen cricketer and member of Chiswick Cricket Club. In the summer months, I hope to manage a lower school cricket team, and demonstrate by example that at Hampton you can do both music and sport!

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school and I hope that my U14A Rugby team will be as ruthless and successful as the Hampton sides that I had the misfortune of facing. After attending Reigate Grammar School and RGS Guildford, I read Politics at Durham University, where I played as much Rugby as I could and became an enthusiastic pub quizzer. After graduating in 2015, I went to work at Uppingham School in Rutland, a blissfully peaceful county known only for being small. At Uppingham I coached the U16A Rugby and 2nd XI Cricket, as well as living in a boarding house alongside fifty delightful boys.

Mark Preston I am enjoying teaching at Hampton School as much as I did in Kent, Australia and China during the previous 26 years, when I was also the Centre Coordinator for The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award as well as the leader of many adventurous trips at home and abroad.

I am thoroughly looking forward to throwing myself into life at Hampton, and very grateful indeed to return to an area where people outnumber sheep!

The new A Level Design and Technology: Engineering course is a different and exciting opportunity for me to contribute my eleven years industrial experience when I practiced as a Chartered Mechanical Engineer in the food processing industry.

I am Italian, but have been educated in the UK since I was 11. After completing my schooling at Winchester College, I read philosophy at Cambridge, where I specialised in logic and the philosophy of mathematics and was supervised by Dr Carrier. Following this, I started the Teach First program as a Maths teacher; this involved completing a PGCE and NQT whilst teaching full time in an inner city comprehensive in Birmingham. Having completed this, I chose to return to my (academic) roots and join the Philosophy Department at Hampton, where I am looking forwards to sharing my enthusiasm for structured argumentation with my students.

Sarah Wilcox Having left the sunny South Coast of England where I grew up, I read American History at the University of Kent. As part of my degree, I spent a year at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts where I had the privilege of a female-only setting on a beautiful New England campus.

Robin Hardman

Carlo Lori

Away from work, I enjoy riding motorbikes – both on-road and off-road – cycling and rowing. Having moved back to London, I aim to resume playing the highland bagpipes in the near future.

My PGCE training took me to London and to the Institute of Education. I then gained my first teaching job at Holland Park School where I stayed for thirteen years.

I have spent much of my life attempting either to live up to, distance myself from, or deflect jokes about, my surname. I am sure that this will continue as I join the Politics and History Departments at Hampton.

I am thrilled to join Hampton School and look forward to participating in the rich academic and co-curricular activities here. The opportunities seem endless!

Having grown up in Surrey, I know Hampton well from various battles on the Rugby and Cricket field, most of which ended in defeat,

In my spare time, I enjoy walking in Richmond Park and along the river or visiting Kew Gardens with my daughter. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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school in both sports. After university, I played football for Old Hamptonians for over a decade, and still play cricket at East Molesey cricket club.

Toby Green

Gareth Bailey

Having spent nearly 20 years working in the advertising industry, helping to create advertising campaigns for the likes of Guinness, IKEA, The Economist and The Department of Health, I am incredibly excited to be starting a new career as an English teacher at Hampton.

Marie-Claire McGreevy

Having read Maths and Physics at Durham University, and taught at two selective London day schools beforehand, I am excited to be joining the large and very talented Mathematics Department at Hampton this year.

I grew up in Surrey and attended Coloma Girls School in Shirley, Croydon. I went on to study French and German at the University of Leeds. My passion for travel and languages then took me to Japan where I spent two years teaching in a school as part of the JET programme. I also very much enjoyed learning Japanese there.

I grew up in Suffolk and, slightly unusually, found myself working back in the countryside for a number of years as a Thatcher upon graduating. I cannot describe just how much fun it was to be outside in all weathers as the seasons changed and to be able to reflect upon your endeavours at the end of each day.

On my return, I attended Bath University where I undertook my MA in translation and interpreting. I then moved to Geneva where I worked as a translator at the World Intellectual Property Organisation. I later returned to London and used my languages working for a publishing company and eventually Dow Jones. Before settling down in South West London, I spent a year working and travelling in Australia.

Yet, my passion and interest in Mathematics eventually brought me to teaching and I have been fortunate to work with some very interesting, personable and able students in the past. Equally, I look forward to similar experiences at Hampton in the future.

While the career is new, I am not entirely new to Hampton, having been at the school myself, leaving in 1995. While much has changed, much has not. There is the same vibrant atmosphere that I remember, as well as the same, slightly odd, bobbly beige effect on the bottom half of the walls around the older parts of the place. Having left Hampton, I went on to study English at Southampton University, before starting my career in advertising as a Graduate Trainee. During my time working in advertising, one of the few benefits of spending a couple of hours a day commuting in and out of Central London was the amount of reading I was able to do. As time went on, it became more and more clear to me that a career teaching English was what I most wanted, and those hours every day with the chance to read only stoked those flames, until I was able to make the change this year. I am greatly looking forward to helping the boys of the school love the great works that they get to study, but just as important is understanding the fundamental role that the study of English can play as they move forward in to the world of work. My career was founded on my time in English classrooms and the communication and analytical skills I learnt there.

I trained as a teacher at St Mary’s, Twickenham and have spent the last six years teaching French and German at Notre Dame Senior School in Cobham. I am now very much looking forward to sharing my enthusiasm for languages with the boys here at Hampton.

Away from work, I am a keen skier and generally take any opportunity I can to be outdoors, whether it is running, climbing, cycling or travelling.

As well as Literature, the other interest throughout my life has been sport. I captained Hampton at both cricket and football, as well as playing for my University 4

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Tanya Scorer

Danielle Harris

Michele Costabile

Growing up as a child, I remember being fascinated by computers. The first one I remember being in my family home was a Commodore 64, but I remember having a lot more fun with the Sinclair Spectrum ZX+2 that arrived a bit later. My interest for computers and technology in general unsurprisingly led me to complete a BSc in Computing and IT.

I was born in North Wales and no doubt pleased the Welsh Assembly Government greatly by staying in Wales for my higher education and going to Cardiff University to study English Literature. I pursued my interests in 19th and 20th century literature during my degree: war fiction, women’s fiction and the works of Thomas Hardy were among my most loved subjects.

I enjoy spending time with my husband and two sons visiting foreign places, watching films, seeing shows and just generally lounging around. This year, having become bored with the confines of a swimming pool, I started open water swimming and enjoy entering events. As a qualified SCUBA diving instructor, I enjoying diving and exploring the underwater world – a highlight of which has been being followed around by two sea turtles! I have volunteered as a Community First Responder with London’s Ambulance Service, responding to lifethreatening 999 calls; I have always had a keen interest in medical issues, with the use of technology and computing in medicine currently being a particularly exciting topic.

Having gained my Literature degree and teaching qualification, I enjoyed teaching and pastoral leadership responsibilities at an independent girls’ school in North London for a number of years before coming to Hampton.

This is my first experience as teacher, and I am extremely proud to start my career in such a prestigious and exciting environment. Having graduated in Environmental Engineering, I worked as consultant in the field of waste management in my home country, Italy. In 2011, I moved to Australia, where I studied and successively worked at the University of Western Australia. Here, I developed research on environmental and social impacts of mining by supporting teachers and final year students in their final year projects.

Prior to starting life at Hampton School, I spent nine years working at Trinity School in Croydon, which – like Hampton – is an independent boys’ school, though it does have a co-educational Sixth Form. I am looking forward to my time at Hampton and hope to pass on my passion for computing and inspire some budding computer scientists.

Outside of school, I enjoy the outdoors – especially where a walk and a country pub are involved – and have been known to go camping at agreeable times of the year. Reading, film and theatre are also among my favourite things and I am currently on a mission to learn how to cable knit. I enjoy travelling and my most brightly burning ambition is to go to Alaska. I am delighted to be joining Hampton, a school with such a proud history and reputation; equally, I am thrilled to be joining such a talented English Department and to have the opportunity to pass on the joy of literature to the students.

I then had the opportunity to move to the Kimberleys, where I supported an Aboriginal Corporation on behalf of a big, English mining Company in the development of risk management plans related to their mining-related activities. In the last year of my experience ‘down-under’, I also got the opportunity to collaborate with the secondary schools in Broome, tutoring students in Maths, Physics and Chemistry. It has been thanks to the latter experience – and probably also due to the fact that my parents are both Maths teachers – that I realised how exciting it is to share my knowledge, providing students fundamental tools that will enable them to successfully develop their future careers. Accordingly, I decided to do my PGCE at Queen’s University in Belfast and then very happily moved to London, a city that I had already visited on many occasions. I love sports and I have been lucky enough to live in a region of Italy were rugby is quite popular. I also like football and cannot wait to visit Twickenham and Wembley Stadiums.

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Daniela Mingham Siân Smith

Dan Phillips

Dan Phillips joined Hampton School in April 2012 as Duke of Edinburgh Award Co-ordinator. Bringing youthful dynamism to the scheme, Dan has inspired and motivated hundreds of pupils, leading expeditions in the New Forest, Lake District and Snowdonia. His love of the outdoors and adventure has also been evident in his support for Adventure Society trips, accompanying boys to Malawi, Namibia and Borneo. In September 2014, Dan expanded his repertoire and joined the English Department. Delivering lessons with energy, enthusiasm and humour, Dan has been an asset to the team, and the boys will undoubtedly miss his informative and engaging lessons. In addition to his academic responsibilities, Dan has been an excellent Head of Tennis, organising a busy schedule of matches and coaching his protégés to an impressive standard. He has also been a superb Form Tutor, guiding his charges with compassion and patience through their challenging GCSE years. Dan leaves us to start a new life with his family in New Jersey, USA. His commitment, generosity and loyalty will be greatly missed, not to mention his infectious grin! We wish Dan and his family much happiness the other side of the pond.

Siân Smith joined the Hampton English Department in September 2015. A creative and innovative classroom practitioner, Siân has inspired the boys, introducing them to a wide range of challenging literature and encouraging them to respond to texts with independent and open minds. Her organisation of Shakespeare Day in her first year at the School, complete with a dining room flash mob rendition of an extract from Romeo and Juliet and an assembly interrupted by a Shakespearean dispute between Mr Payne and Miss Carmichael, was testament to Siân’s energy and enthusiasm.

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Alongside her teaching, she ran the Sixth Form Maths Mentoring Scheme and became heavily involved in the School cross-country. We are sorry to see her leave, but wish her all the best with her MBA. MCU

Ferdinand Doepel

Fully committed to school life beyond the classroom, Siân has been Co-Editor of The Lion and coach for the U13D football team. She has also invested a great deal of time as Assistant Head of Lower Sixth, fulfilling her role with characteristic tact and empathy. It goes without saying that Sian’s departure is felt as a loss to the School; boys and colleagues alike have thoroughly enjoyed sharing her cultural and literary knowledge, positivity and good humour. Whilst she may not have yet convinced the powers that be of the wisdom of getting a School dog, she will be pleased to know that a new pond is being constructed for the ducks! We wish Siân the best of luck in her new business venture. CER

CER

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Daniela joined the Maths Department in September 2017, staying for one academic year before deciding on a career change into the world of business. In that time, however, she was a notable presence in the office and a lively character amongst the Maths staff.

Ferdinand Doepel joined us in September 2016, after going through the ‘Teach First’ programme and working at Merchant Taylor’s School in London. Before that, he was born in Finland, raised for part of his childhood in the Far East and then returned to Finland for national service. We are

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school fortunate that he chose to attend university and work in the UK. He has been an enthusiastic, dynamic and charismatic classroom practitioner, respected and liked by his students. In general, pupils would probably describe his teaching as ‘fantastic’. His efforts in managing school soccer sides have also been greatly appreciated.

Matthew Chessum Matthew was part of the Maths Department from September 2017 to July 2018, before moving on to financial consultancy. He was always very punctual, polite and professional in his approach to teaching and planning.

We congratulate him and wish him well, as he moves to Trinity School in Croydon to take up the position as Head of Economics there at a comparatively young age.

Outside of the Maths Department, he would often be found helping out down at the climbing wall. We are sorry to see him go, but our best wishes are with him as his enters a new career path.

SP

MCU

Staff Obituary

Corrine Latulipe

David Grossel David joined Hampton in 2011 and worked at the School until his retirement in 2016. Prior to this, he had worked as a history teacher and as a senior manager at a number of London day schools including UCS, City of London, where he was acting headmaster for a year, and KCS Wimbledon.

Corrine worked in the Computing Department for two years and, in her final year, she also helped in the Mathematics Department by taking a First Year class. During her time here, she became fully immersed in school life; she most enjoyed working with her GCSE computing class where strived to share her passion for the subject with the boys. Whilst she expressed how sorry she was to be leaving Hampton, she found herself motivated to return to South Africa with the objective of setting up a charitable campaign to protect horses from escalating violence and an increasing number of attacks on farms. In addition to this, she continues to use her computing experience in her new work by flying drones with infrared cameras to provide additional security and a means of searching, counting and even herding cattle. 

Passionate about both education and history, David was a wonderful teacher and colleague whose knowledge and empathy were enormously appreciated by all who benefited from time spent with him. Despite being a serious and published historian who wrote perceptively about his subject, David was able to wear his intellect with an admirable lightness and this, combined with his warmth and dry wit, will have made their mark on the many students who benefited from his considerable wisdom across his 40-year career. Away from the classroom, David took enormous pleasure from the company of his family and time spent on his allotment; on Saturdays, he could regularly be found in the Hammersmith End at Fulham Football Club and he greatly enjoyed watching cricket at the Oval. David was a polymath in the truest sense of the word: as happy to talk about the changing face of South West London as he was the Holy Roman Empire. He was always engaging and perceptive: someone whose opinion was highly valued by those wise enough to seek it. Unassuming and never gregarious, David was a loyal and wise friend whom we shall all miss greatly. JP

MMB

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TALK!

High on the fascinating topic of fake news and questioned whether it should be included in the curriculum.

This year’s Talk! programme included six invited speakers in a mixture of lunchtime and evening events. The guests were:

•• Prof Sir Francis Jacobs KCMG QC (formerly Advocate General of the ECJ) •• Dr Emily Grossman (Science Broadcaster and Communicator) •• Grant Feller (Journalist and Media Consultant) •• Theodore Brun (Author) •• Michael Lynagh (Rugby Professional and Businessman) •• James Warner OH (Engineer) The year began with a fascinating talk from Prof Sir Francis Jacobs KCMG QC, who spoke to an audience of Hamptonians about the impact of Brexit on European Law, as well as discussing the need for a unified approach from Europe to refugees and migrants. Hampton then hosted Dr Emily Grossman, a leading Science communicator, broadcaster and educator, who talked to the boys on the subject of molecular biology and genetics, with particular emphasis on the role of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Our final speaker of the term was Grant Feller, renowned journalist and media consultant, who has worked for publications such as the Daily Telegraph, The Times and Evening Standard. Grant spoke to an audience of Hampton boys as well as students from Hampton

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In the Spring Term, Hampton welcomed Theodore Brun. Theodore worked as an arbitration lawyer in London, Moscow, Paris and finally Hong Kong. In 2010, he quit his job in Hong Kong to cycle 10,000 miles across Asia and Europe to his home in Norfolk and now works as an author. His inspirational talk on crossing Eurasia by bike challenged the boys to break through their fear barrier, and demonstrated the importance of patience, determination and having a vision. Rugby legend, sports broadcaster and successful businessman, Michael Lynagh, spoke to a packed Hammond Theatre one evening in February. The audience was treated to a plethora of entertaining stories from Michael’s 30 years in rugby – which ranged from his years in the amateur game, to the pinnacle of his career as Captain of Australia. Responding to audience questions, he shared many amusing anecdotes about some of the biggest names in the sport. Our final speaker of the year was James Warner (OH 2004) speaking on the topic of Engineering Supercars at McLaren. James studied engineering at Cambridge University, where he later specialised in Mechanics and Controls as part of his Master’s Degree. On graduating from Cambridge, he joined McLaren Automotive, where he now works as a Chassis Dynamics Engineering Manager. As well as discussing his engineering background and the challenges involved in working for a multinational company, he also brought a McLaren 570GT into School to the delight of boys and staff alike. Particular thanks must be given to Dr Colvine, whose assistance in putting together the programme was invaluable. We look forward to another busy programme in 2018-19! NKC and EC

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Careers In a society where the job market is rapidly changing and where degree apprenticeships are becoming a very appealing alternative to university, the importance of careers education cannot be underestimated. Hampton boys are clearly conscious of this, and in 2017-18 they embraced many opportunities to learn about a range of careers and interact with individuals working in different areas, to learn first-hand about jobs they might want to pursue in the future.

There will be many more exciting opportunities and events in 2018-19 and Hampton boys will have extensive chances to get ahead in involving themselves in understanding the future employment possibilities available to them; we hope they make the most of the careers provision at Hampton. LAT

Many year groups gain valuable insights into careers through their PHSE lessons, which offer them the chance to discuss highly relevant topics such as interview skills, CV writing and the effects of AI on employment, as well as supporting them in recognising how their choices now will affect their future paths. Pupils’ understanding of careers in the real world is frequently developed through talks by visiting speakers. In January, for instance, the Third Year listened keenly to the words of businessman Noman Khawaja, who trained in Dentistry but has subsequently co-founded his own international Halal food brand, Haloodies, exemplifying the diversity of career journeys which might be available to future Hamptonians. Noman delivered an outstanding talk to the boys, emphasising the importance of making your own choices, following your dreams, and recognising that a career path is flexible and changing. The Lower Sixth, meanwhile, heard words of wisdom from alumni about their career journeys since they left Hampton ten years ago. They spoke with honesty and frankness about their ups and downs, but emphasised important messages to the pupils, such as the usefulness of setbacks as learning experiences and the fact that Hampton gives them an essential foundation for later in life. Outside of PHSE lessons, various whole-school events at Hampton give students further understanding of careers. The annual gap year and employment opportunities fair in September helps students to consider what they might want to do between school and university, whilst the Careers Convention in February enables pupils from both Hampton and LEH to immerse themselves in valuable conversations with a wide range of individuals representing different careers. In 2018, the turnout from representatives, pupils and parents was excellent and it proved to be a highly successful and productive evening. A new initiative by the Careers Department this year, which has proved particularly popular, has been careers lunches and interviews. These happen at least once per half term and give Hampton boys the opportunity to formally interview individuals working in different fields, followed by more informal question and answer sessions over lunch. A wide range of careers have been explored in this context, including: finance, film, politics, law, marketing, journalism and medicine. Hampton pupils have been privileged to have the chance to question individuals who have worked in some very high-profile roles, such as Kanbar Hoseein Bor, a diplomat who has previously worked as a barrister before joining the Foreign Office, Adam Hunt, a versatile sports presenter and reporter for Sky Sports News, and Dr Akbar De Medici, who helps manage many of the elite sport contacts at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health. For those who were not able to take part in the interviews, they are available on the Careers Department Firefly page.

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The Library Hampton’s library aims to provide a wide range of books and magazines for students and staff. We want to provide support for the learning that goes on in the classroom, but just as importantly to promote a love of reading for its own sake. Many people help in this regard by recommending books for the library to buy. This might be a teacher who wants a subject-specific book, a student who is working on a project or anyone who simply thinks that a book, fiction or non-fiction, would make for a good read. These recommendations help the library to have a relevant and interesting collection, so please come along with your own ideas! The library continues to be busy, being used by students and staff before and after school and during breaks and lessons. Teachers often bring their classes and students of all ages find the library a good place to study or to relax and read. As well as providing computers, the library also gives access to a range of online resources, accessible anywhere a member of school is on the internet. These are excellent tools to help with school work. Please ask in the library if you need any help with access. A number of activities take place in the library. A team entered the Kingston Literary Quiz and performed admirably. This was due largely to the weekly lunchtime practices led by Dr Colvine which the team members continue to greatly enjoy. The reading group also meets weekly in the library and is led by Mrs Rigby. The group reads books shortlisted for a couple of literary prizes and other books chosen by members. Two very successful authors, Jon Robinson and Saci Lloyd, conducted workshops in the library when they visited Hampton on Character Day and for the Creative Writing Awards respectively. Each writer gave the participating students plenty to think about and lots of encouragement that they too are capable of highly creative work. KH

Form Charity Over the course of the last academic year, Form Charity raised money for a range of superb charities: SPEAR, a local charity supporting rough sleepers and vulnerable individuals by providing temporary shelter and housing support in the Richmond Borough; the national blood cancer charity, Anthony Nolan; and StreetInvest, a global charity that exists to create positive sustainable change for street children. We continued our annual joint events with Lady Eleanor Holles School, including the Lower School Christmas quiz organised by members of the Sixth Form from both schools. Hosted by Mr Hemsley, the quiz was once again a great success and was thoroughly enjoyed by all involved, raising an impressive £208 in the process. In November, Hampton’s 1st XI footballers played a netball match against LEH’s netball squad. Hampton played impressively well despite only a few training sessions, but unfortunately could not defeat LEH at their own game. The 1st XV rugby team lost 5-1 to national champions LEH in the annual lacrosse match. Both fixtures 10

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were played in an excellent spirit and raised extra funding towards our charity beneficiaries. Joining the old favourites – mufti days and cake sales – some new fundraising events and initiatives took place in 2018. Mr Hitchings and Mrs Watson-Evans hosted an enthralling University Challenge Quiz contest between a team of Sixth Form boys and a staff team. A packed Hammond Theatre cheered every point for the boys’ team, but could not quite get them over the line as experience won the day over youth and enthusiasm – only just! We raised nearly £500 by selling Anthony Nolan wristbands as part of their nationwide awareness campaign and, inspired by the World Cup, allowed boys to pay £2 each for the privilege of wearing their favourite sports team’s colours on Friday 22 June. As usual, the Lower School played a large part in this year’s fundraising for Form Charity. In addition to the Christmas Quiz, the First Year raised money via a Cookery Book compiled during Cookery week and a Fancy Dress Fun Run in the Summer

Term. The Second Year took part in the annual Character Day to coincide with World Book Day as well as a Record Breaker challenge. Thanks to Ben Lawson who organised a Lower Sixth inter-form table football competition and donated £36 as a result. Likewise, credit to Saeash Jeyarajan and his friends who sold homemade cakes over a couple of break times and raised nearly £200. Overall, it has been a very successful year for Form Charity. The final count is still to come in, but we expect to raise over £12,500 for the three worthy causes we have supported over the last academic year. In addition, as a School community we have made a contribution towards the Adventure Society safe haven in Malawi and donated over £1000 worth of ‘Good Gifts’ to worthy recipients as part of our annual Christmas appeal. Thank you for all your support throughout the year. TFR and AES the lion the magazine of hampton school

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It has been another great year for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award at Hampton, with over 200 boys in Fourth Year to Upper Sixth involved in completing their Silver or Gold award. As participation continues to grow at Hampton, the boys have shown a persistent commitment to the award, spending anywhere between six and eighteen months working towards their relevant sections. A significant amount of training and preparation goes into every expedition; for example, over the past year we have regularly had over 120 boys taking part in expedition training weekends! One of the wonderful by-products of the Award is the amount of time spent volunteering – an average of 20 hours was spent by each participant, contributing to a range of fantastic causes that included working with children in local primary schools, working in charity shops and providing support in local hospices. Many School and local sports teams have benefited from the physical section of the Award as boys have worked hard to improve in their chosen sport; this has included everything from team sports such as football and rugby, to individual pursuits such as cycling and running. As ever, there has been a wide array of interests and hobbies chosen by the boys for their skill section; this has included playing musical instruments, juggling, learning cooking skills – even ironing! A significant number of boys have also qualified as referees and now contribute their time by officiating sports matches on Saturdays at school – many of the sports staff have been thoroughly pleased by this too! Alongside the participants’ commitment to these sections, they all learnt and developed the skills required to conduct a self-supporting walking expedition. This year, the Silvers visited the New Forest and Dorset, whilst those completing their Gold Award had their skills tested even further with challenging expeditions in the mountain passes of Snowdonia and the Lake District. PWT

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Creative Futures Around 170 Hampton boys enjoyed the opportunity to listen and talk to some of the UK’s leading creatives at the 2018 Hampton School Creative Futures event on Monday 18 June 2018. Eleven experts led workshops offering an insight into their fields of work and the career paths they have followed. From cutting-edge journalism and video games design, to music video production, advertising and acting, speakers included James Helm, Communications chief for the Metropolitan Police; Sue Thearle, the first female presenter of Match of the Day; RSC actor Sam Marks; Grant Feller, former Daily Mail executive and war zone documentary-maker, Robin Barnwell. Among the guests was also George Pascoe-Watson, former Political Editor at The Sun who commented: ‘Working in a creative industry is incredibly energising. It allows freedom of thought, which is very engaging and exciting. The creative careers are about using your imagination and stamping your authority on things that did not previously exist.’ Mr Pascoe-Watson praised the Hampton boys for their attentiveness and engagement: ‘The boys all had a point of view, and an opinion. They wanted to ask questions about my industry in order to understand it better, and were genuinely knowledgeable about a number of prevalent current affairs.’ Pupils also had an opportunity to ask questions at a plenary Question and Answer session in the Hammond Theatre, where James Helm and George Pascoe-Watson opened the final stage of the afternoon event by summarising their advice for teenagers interested in creative industries.

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CONTRIBUTORS Robin Barnwell: a BAFTA Award-winning director and cinematographer, Robin has made over 50 documentaries, often in warzones, for BBC1, BBC2, ITV, and Channel 4. Marston Bloom: a TV writer best known for Rellik, Harley Street, Marcella and New Tricks. Marston is currently overseeing a new Netflix series. Grant Feller: a top media consultant, Grant has over 30 years journalistic experience, He was both a writer and executive at the Daily Mail and has also worked for the Daily Telegraph, The Times and Evening Standard, and has launched various websites. James Helm: Director of Communications for the Metropolitan Police, James spent 12 years at the BBC before joining the Department for International Development as Director of Comms.

for the BBC, ITV, Sky, Channel 5 and BT Sport. Currently one of the main football reporters for ITV and Channel 5, Sue also commentates for the WTA and ATP on tennis and IMG for golf. Momotaro Ushido OH (2012): a concept artist in a leading AAA videogame studio working on the ‘blockbuster’ releases in the games industry. George Pascoe-Watson: advisor on corporate communications and government relations strategies. George enjoyed a 22-year career on The Sun newspaper where he was Political Editor for five years, widely regarded as one of the most influential positions in the UK media. Lawrence Weber OH (1995): 19 years experience in digital, integrated and creative agencies. In 2012, he joined Karmarama working on global projects for BBC Worldwide, British Airways, Nokia, Range Rover, Marks and Spencer and Unilever

Sam Marks OH (2005): Sam is a renowned British actor of stage and screen. Performing with the RSC, his roles have included Aumerle in Richard II and Happy in Death of a Salesman. Sam has also appeared at Shakespeare’s Globe and in Doctor Who and Foyle’s War.

TBA

Huse Monfaradi OH (1992): A music video director who has worked with artists including Sam Smith, Snow Patrol, the Arctic Monkeys and Rag ‘n’ Bone Man. Huse is now freelance and has been kept busy shooting content for Apple Music. Cameron Harvey-Piper OH (2011): The Sunday Times Sport desk digital sub-editor. Cameron’s primary role is as a copyeditor, but he also takes on jobs that involve proofreading, article writing, interviewing and layout and design for various magazines and publications. Sue Thearle: one of TV and Radio’s most acclaimed broadcasters and the first female presenter on Match of the Day, Sue has worked the lion the magazine of hampton school

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CCF

The Hampton Combined Cadet Force continues to go from strength to strength. With 32 cadets in the RAF and 75 cadets in the Army, our overall intake has improved to a thoroughly healthy number. The longterm objective is to be able to parade 100 cadets each week. Our partnership with Lady Eleanor Holles and, more recently, Hampton High, has worked well, bringing in a variety of students with different backgrounds. Our Parachuting and flying has continued, although gliding has not been accessible to us – it is hoped that it will return this year! The Army section have had a good year shooting with summer camp and our field weekends are consistently drawing in good crowds. I have introduced Archery to the contingent this term and it has proved to be very popular; our intention is to make it a mainstream activity working in conjunction with the climbing wall as two back-to-back activities, adding a new discipline to our training package. We are always recruiting for staff, both commissioned and instructors, and would welcome anyone to call in and see us. Sqn Ldr Jeremy Schomberg VR(T)

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Creative Writing Competition Hamptonians from across all year groups immersed themselves in the world of creative thinking as they took part in our second annual Creative Writing Masterclasses and Awards Evening with teenage-fiction author Saci Lloyd on 15 March 2018. The Creative Writing Awards were launched in 2017 to encourage boys to write poetry and prose for publication, and this has become an annual event on the school calendar. The theme for the 2018 competition was ‘Memories’, or ‘My Life’, and pupils submitted a range of interesting and innovative writing based on their interpretation of the stimulus idea. Shortlisting the finalists’ entries proved to be a tough task! More than 30 finalists attended a series of age-group specific workshops hosted by Saci Lloyd, who challenged them to create characters in the contexts of Artificial Intelligence, technology and social media, using literary fiction and multi-media to engage them. The boys used prompts ranging from Elon Musk to robots of the future to create story openers and discuss character development. In the evening, the competition finalists and their parents joined Saci Lloyd for the Awards Ceremony, where the winners and runners-up were announced. English Teacher and organiser of the event, Mrs Bartholomew said: ‘We were delighted with the boys’ responses to Saci Lloyd’s creative thinking and writing challenges which formed part of the masterclasses during the day. The finalists each received a book whilst the winners and runners-up were presented with book vouchers at the Creative Writing Awards event during the evening.’ The winners and runners-up were: Junior Poetry Winner – Luke Trotman Runner-up – Thomas Escobar Junior Prose Winner – Giles Mowbray Runner-up – Ishaan Das Intermediate Winner – Theo Radicopolous Runners-up – Ben Holker, Alex Upshall Senior

Winner – Alex Fagan Runners-up – Joseph Helm, Charles Maddox TBA the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Creative Writing Competition Winners 2017-18 Junior Poetry Winner Luke Trotman (2nd Year)

Memories

I remember an early morning bird singing up high, To welcome the day. The soft breeze caressed my face, And rustled the leaves of the trees.

On the horizon, Deep blue of the sky, Met the shining sea, The sunlight dancing on the waves.

My steps made no noise beneath my feet. I remembered the wonderful feeling of being free. Hearing the faint sound of the waves on the unseen beach, The taste of salt on my tongue.

As I took off my shoes I remember the sharpness of the long, dry grass on the dunes, And the soft, smooth touch of sand on my legs, As step by step I sank slowly down.

The dew was untouched, Sparkled in the sunlight , The leaves raced each other down the path, As if alive.

Seagulls screamed up above, Disturbers of the peace, Soon drowned out, By the crash of the waves against the beach.

I was alone in the wood, Free, With the squirrels spiralling the trees, And the birds taking flight.

I remember the pull of the sea. Like a beautiful machine, As it sucked in the pebbles of the shore, The next wave rejecting the unchosen.

Blackbirds hopped cautiously around, Searching for unsuspecting worms. Beyond the wood, the open fields laid out like a new carpet, And now, just in view, the waiting water.

The beach was mine, As if I lived on earth alone. The sky, the sea, the wind and me, As one.

Junior Prose Winner Keep Fit for the Over Sixties

Giles Mowbray (1st Year)

It was during Half Term, when all my friends were at glamorous ski resorts among glittering alpine scenery, that I was left with my grandparents. It wasn’t a bad experience, and in fact quite entertaining. The previous day my parents had been having trouble putting up some curtains so I was left with my other grandparents, who took me to a brick museum. You may think that there is nothing to be learnt about bricks, but you are wrong. Anyway, that’s a story for another time. The next day my parents were still fiddling with (the same) curtains and there were some stern words and awkward glances over who was to blame for buying the wrong curtain pole. While things were fixed by two more trips to Ikea, I was left with my grandparents to be occupied. However my grandparents had already made plans for the day, which they fully intended to keep. We arrived at the village hall car park in time for the Over Sixties Keep Fit Group in my Grandma’s miniature Skoda while being told that I would be ‘banished’ to another room so that I would not disturb the session, or more importantly, not be able to laugh at the Over Sixties keeping fit. However, as soon as we arrived Sue, the instructor, instructed my Grandma that because I was there I might as well keep fit with them. At the village hall, the fitness fanatics were gathering. As soon as I stepped in, a thought hit me: only one of the over sixties appeared as if they were about to do any form of exercise. Most were dressed in shirts and dresses with handbags slung over their shoulders. I was very puzzled. 18

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One exercise involved using giant colourful elastic bands. It turned out that each colour of band had a slightly different resistance to them. The pink ones were the weakest so the over sixties scrummed for them. Sue, according to Grandma, was ‘fitter than it is healthy to be’. This week, as it happened, Sue had an injured arm from “over-fitness” – Grandma. Thereafter followed some serious training for the village pancake race (it was Shrove Tuesday and the event would take place immediately after the session). The pancake race is always taken very seriously but this year there was some competition in the over sixties category, so the keep fit teams had to train harder than last year. According to the gossip, the teams of chefs from a local restaurant, the estate agents, and grocers have been training for weeks. The chefs were the favourites to win (Grandad’s rotary team had won it the previous year). Each contender grabbed a balloon and did a few laps of the ‘gym’ while bopping it into the air and then they quickly declared that they were then better at pancake races. Twenty minutes into the session, still nobody had broken into a sweat, and various people were having conversations about the price of cat food and denture glue. We were creaking out bicep curls when it became apparent that the 84-year-old in front of me was approaching it enthusiastically in a rather lop-sided way, by only raising one arm instead of both. This was because Sue’s demonstration was limited by her injured arm, and the lady was deaf so she had missed the vital explanation. I thought I could help the

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school awkward situation by catching her attention with a grin and clearly demonstrating that the exercise could be done with both arms. “You’re doing it wrong young man,” she shouted “look at Sue.” Soon the non-puffing participants started to enquire about a tea break. A crescendo of support gathered pace, and Barbara sprinted through the back door. The whole hall sprang to life. The mysteriously large hatch in the wall swooshed open to reveal Barbara and friend already pouring steaming mugs of tea and revealing plates of chocolate hobnobs. Despite the irony of eating biscuits during a Keep Fit session, it certainly got us all moving.

Intermediate Winner Memories

Theo Radicopoulos (4th Year)

A crowd of fitness enthusiasts gathered in anticipation. Talking about being ironic, there was much enthusiasm about the annual Keep Fit fish and chip supper which had taken place the previous week. After the equipment was put away I had to be introduced to the whole room, one at a time. I had to listen to a variety of anecdotes on the topic of when they last saw me and how much I had grown since. During a conversation on the latter subject my phone pinged with a couple of texts from my mum. “Where are you? Can you bring pliers?”

Senior Winner Alex Fagan (5th Year)

The Riverbank

There is a time I can’t remember Before I started school, It’s like an emptiness inside my brain, A still and misty pool.

The leaves rustled, the lark sang, the river sauntered by, An image of wispy clouds painted on an azure sky mirrored on the water.

I cast a line and start to fish For the smallest recollection But nothing living seems to swim Towards my bait’s direction.

Last summer, under swaying willows, time slowed down. I lay on the verdant carpet of the riverbank, with a sprinkling of daisies and dandelions encircling me, calming me. My bare feet felt cool, as despite the warmth of the golden May sun sailing though the sky, an easing breeze smelling of elderflower wafted along the bank. The swifts and the swallows were soaring; their dance was silhouetted against the infinite sky. The silent rivulet flowed through this magical grove, a silver mirror sliding past the trees, and the bushes, and me. I knew, despite its serenity, that beneath the surface was a metropolis of life: dragonflies and mayflies who would emerge in a few weeks and spend the summer skimming along the glassy water. On the other bank, shaded beneath a great oak, was the heron, guarding the gateway to this paradise through which I must have stumbled: Perched on one leg, perfectly still, observing the wondrous beauty of this magical kingdom. It was bliss.

I know these memories exist inside me, So why can I not find A single star or ray of light Within the blackness of my mind. So many firsts I must have felt First step, first word, first friend And yet I cannot picture them It’s hard to comprehend. The sun shines in the photos The candles burn bright on the cake The smiles are wide and joyful But the memories still feel fake. Yet just because I can’t remember Does not make them less true They run right through the heart of me Shaping all I say and do. These memories are not mine alone They’re like rain on many faces Shared and never separate Leaving countless traces. So when I’m old and grey Digging for my past Mining for a memory As time has gone too fast. I’ll know life’s not a solitary pursuit It’s not just I or me But you and us and they and we Down every century.

Now everything has changed.

Now, though, the grove is in the grip of winter’s icy frost. The grass crunches under my feet as the frost has not thawed. The flowers have all withered and died, their paralysed corpses buried deep in the frozen earth. The trees are bare, skeletal, emaciated, stripped of their glorious emerald cloaks like noblemen stripped of their titles. The sky is a sheet of iron, void of any colour, of any life. The silence which is draped over the riverbank smothers and suffocates the few creatures which survive in this barren wasteland. Yet, despite the desolation, there is one who remains, and will always remain: standing on the other bank is the regal statue of the heron. He has seen the seasons ebb and flow like the river over which he reigns. He knows the sun will return, and from the frozen earth, there will be growth, and the riverbank will be transformed with an abundance of vibrant life. But for now, he waits. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Arts Award The academic year 2017-18 saw the successful continuation of the Silver Arts Award for boys in the Third and Fourth Years at Hampton. Over thirty boys completed this GCSE-level qualification, which is managed by Trinity College London in association with Arts Council England, and gives students the opportunity to complete creative projects in an area of their choosing and to pass on their skills to others. The process also requires students to work with practitioners in their chosen art form, learn about careers and attend arts events. Both photography and creative writing were popular art forms for projects at Hampton this year, sometimes in combination with each other, as in William Fryer’s book Nature by Lens and Pen. Many other boys also chose to focus on nature as a theme for their photographs; for instance, James Radford documented changes over the seasons and Rohan Vasudev opted to photograph the parks of London and beyond, whilst Thomas Norman stayed closer to home, producing a book of photographs entitled Views from Kew. Fedor Ivanov, in contrast, decided to photograph street art for his book, as well as printing some of his most successful photographs on canvas. Boys embarked on some extremely ambitious creative writing based projects in a variety of forms and genres, such as short stories by William Conyers and Callum Ruse, Pallav Bagchi’s fantasy novella Awakening the Dawn and Mission Animalia: Adventures of an Intergalactic Shapeshifter, a work written and illustrated by Ben Francis, Luke Jansen and Oliver Pulfrey-Baker. Publishing a book also provided an impressive entrepreneurial opportunity for Jai Saha, who not only designed an extremely professional looking art activity book for younger children, but also sold copies and donated the money to school charity – well done Jai! The books produced by Hampton boys, literary and photographic, are now available in the school library. The opportunity to work in three dimensions was also one which was well-received by Hampton boys in 2017-18, with many pursuing projects focused on model-making. Often the dioramas were war-themed, such as those made by Fred Darley, Jack East, James Clarke and Oliver Glenn, although the latter strayed from the norm somewhat by opting to build his in Lego – much to the delight of visitors who saw it at Third Year Prizegiving! Edward Finnett, in contrast, 20

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school used the Arts Award to develop his passion for set design, building a set for a production of West Side story. Perhaps the most unusual and memorable three dimensional project this year was completed by Toby Kerr, who designed and built a harmonograph – a machine which draws spiral patterns as a result of swinging pendulums. Miss Teunissen had no idea what a harmonograph was when Toby applied for the Arts Award, but she was very impressed with the result and hopes future Arts Award applicants will be inspired by Toby’s ambition! Unsurprisingly, musical projects were also popular for Hampton boys, who exemplified their talents in a variety of styles, such as classical compositions by Christopher McGlennan and modern rock songs produced by Joshua Jenner. Following in the footsteps of Tobias Droy last year, Finlo Cowley, Oscar Leonov and Oscar Barrell used their musical talents to record full albums. In a Hampton first, Jack Lucas opted not for music, but instead for dance, both ballet and contemporary, choreographing a series of dances and filming himself performing these. As well as producing outstanding work of their own, boys exemplified some excellent leadership skills in helping others to develop their abilities. Many chose to participate in the Leadership Days, which took place at Hampton on 20 and 21 June. Boys delivered workshops to prep school pupils from Broomfield House, Kew College, Westward School, Newland House, Tower House and The Mall School with excellent subject knowledge, contagious enthusiasm and outstanding maturity. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, for example one visiting teacher reported back that ‘your boys were so impressive at leading the group’ and that their visit was ‘a really lovely day and has certainly inspired some of our boys to do the Arts Award when they get to Hampton’. We look forward to welcoming the next generation of Arts Award applicants in the near future! Other Hampton pupils organised alternative leadership opportunities, such as Jai Saha’s art classes for younger boys and Jack Lucas’ dance classes for teachers. All the boys rose to the difficult challenge of planning workshops and leading others and they deserve many congratulations for their efforts. The moderators were extremely impressed with the variety and quality of work produced by the Hampton boys, and a 100% pass rate was achieved. Prizes for particular excellence were awarded to: Jack Lucas, Fedor Ivanov, Jai Saha, James Clarke, Ben Francis, William Fryer, Rohan Vasudev, Toby Kerr, James Radford and Pallav Bagchi. Well done to all the boys who completed the Arts Award, they have certainly maintained last year’s high standards and we look forward to more excellent projects in 2018-19. LAT the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Model United Nations Hampton took part in nine MUN conferences in 2017-18 – our greatest number so far in one academic year. This demonstrates just how popular this activity has become and we now have a regular ‘squad’ of 20-30 active MUN participants. The boys achieved great success last year, winning a grand total of 36 individual awards and 4 team awards. They can be very proud of their record, especially considering that many of our junior debaters are competing against Sixth Form students from other schools. Here are some thoughts from our MUN debaters about the 2017-2018 ‘season’. JAF and HA

BMUN December 2017 Benenden MUN was the second conference I went to and it was one of the biggest. Hampton represented the delegations of Guatemala, Bahrain and Germany. I was in the Special Committee, debating topics such as youth, unemployment and automisation in the workplace. There were strong resolutions and high-class debate, ending with Iraq deciding that Ireland were going to use international schools as a plan for world domination! For Hampton as a whole, it was a day of fruitful debate and much fun. At the closing ceremony, we received a pleasing number of awards and ended the day with a mandatory MUN photo. I am definitely looking forward to return next year for another great conference. Jack East

LEHMUN January 2018 LEHMUN, whilst only being a short walk from school, proved to be a truly unique experience and perhaps one of the most enjoyable MUNs that I have attended in my year of ‘MUN-ing’. Whilst there, I represented the delegation of Israel, in the Environment Committee. I particularly enjoyed the nature of the topics. The three days spent in committees allowed us to explore interesting and esoteric perspectives in detail. The extent of my education extended beyond the political confines of the topic. For example, during my research on antibiotic resistance, I delved a great deal into the science behind phage therapy, which uses small viruses to kill bacteria. I also appreciated the organisation of the committee. Some of the worst committees I have been involved in are 22

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school those where the Sixth Form chairperson, the person orchestrating the debate, is either unaware of MUN procedure or the topic itself, yet in LEH I found my chairs – one of whom was Hamptonian Henry De Oliveira – to be familiar with both the topics and procedure! Ultimately, LEH proved to be a truly enjoyable experience and I cannot wait to return in 2019 armed with my newfound knowledge picked up throughout the year.

Magdalen MUN conference took place between the 23rd and the 25th of February and was Hampton’s most successful conference this year. Friday began with the opening ceremony followed by lobbying in committees. We spent Saturday debating in committee all day, until the emergency topics were announced. The day was then finished with bowling. On Sunday, we debated our emergency topics before a final, very exciting and well-executed emergency topic about war on the Indian-Chinese border, complete with news bulletins and articles. This culminated with the announcement that a nuclear bomb had been detonated and the resultant crisis was debated in the General Assembly!

Magdalen MUN, in February, was the first weekend debating conference of the year for which we stayed overnight close to the venue; this 3-day competition took place at Magdalen College School, within walking distance of the centre of Oxford. Across the trip, 15 Hamptonians represented countries including Syria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in a variety of committees, debating topics such as rising sea levels, the treatment of the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and the 1959 Cuban Revolution. In the evenings, we participated in some highly competitive bowling games, went on a brief tour of Oxford, and enjoyed a visit to Burger King, all of which provided much entertainment. Altogether, a highly memorable trip was rounded off with a record number of awards won, ending a fantastic experience on a positive note, with many thanks due to Mr Agulian and Miss Field for organising this trip and for ensuring that we had such a worthwhile and thrilling time! MUN has been such a fantastic experience for me and everyone else who has been fortunate enough to participate in a conference. I have loved every motion, resolution and debate that I have taken part in. MUN has been instrumental in improving my knowledge of current affairs, developing my confidence in speaking to large groups of people, and being able to investigate events from a range of perspectives, and I would thoroughly recommend it to any politically interested future delegates. Thank you very much to Mr Agulian and Miss Field for all of their time, organisation and dedication in providing such amazing opportunities for us!

Fred Darley

Matthew Cresswell

Alex Mehta

MCSMUN February 2018

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Young Reporters Five Hampton boys reached the final of the Newsquest Young Reporter awards scheme this year, with two pupils winning their categories.

More than twenty Hamptonians from the Fourth Year and above participated in this year’s scheme along with hundreds of teenagers from other schools across the South East. They were required to produce eight articles with a local angle, in five different categories – breaking news, feature, interview, event and photo story – between September and March. Young Reporters’ stories were uploaded onto the Newsquest ‘This is Local London’ website, effectively creating an online journalism portfolio of work by those participating. The two Hampton winners this year were Toby Tolson in the Best Event category and Henry Sheen, who won the Best Interview category for his piece on Hampton Prep School Deputy Head, Mr Dean Richards.

Hampton also had three runners-up, Lower Sixth pupils James Dowden and Alfie Watkins in the Best Interview and Best Event categories respectively. Fourth Year Tom Holland was a runner-up in the Best Photograph category. Speaking about the scheme, Sixth Former Toby Tolson said: ‘Participating in the Young Reporter Awards was a great opportunity to explore the world of journalism, investigating stories, interviewing and producing the finished articles and photos to meet deadlines’. TBA 24

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Quiz Society In October 2016, four teachers nervously agreed to select a school quiz team for the national ‘Schools Challenge’ competition. From this inauspicious beginning, over the last two years we have developed a full programme of squad practices, inter-form quizzes and other events, helped enormously by the HSPA’s generous purchase of a set of electronic buzzers.

The first event of 2017-18 was the Lower Sixth inter-form quiz, which involved 89 boys – just under half the year group – competing across 21 matches. A thrilling final saw L6DSM vanquish L6ICD by the narrow margin of 300-250 to win the coveted Millie’s giant cookie trophy. In November, we sent two school teams to LEH for the Schools Challenge senior regional round. Hampton ‘A’ – Owain Bates, James Dowden, Rishi Chopra and Jack East – beat Bedales, but lost to last year’s regional champions Kingston Grammar to bow

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school out at the group stage. Hampton ‘B’ – Alfie Watkins, Joshua Lea, Giulio Reid-Thomas and Oliver Pulfrey Baker – beat Hurstpierpoint College and LEH before losing to RGS Guildford in the regional semi-final.

whether the sale of bottled water should be banned; and whether the French government should stop funding private schools with state money. Despite some initial nerves, James and Will’s final debate against St Paul’s Boys’ School scored them a perfect 10 and their aggregate score put them first overall, qualifying the pair for the national finals. The judges were most impressed by the pair’s teamwork, supporting and defending each other’s points in equal measure. Budding Lower Sixth linguists and debaters Toby Tolson and Samuel Peters put in a performance that bodes well for next year’s competition, while Upper Sixth reserve Jacopo Olivieri was invaluable during the competition preparations.

The highlight of the Spring Term was an entertaining charity quiz match between a team of teachers and a team of ‘Sixth Form AllStars’: Owain Bates, Sam Millward, Alfie Watkins and Fred Spence. Academic reputations were very much on the line, but experience proved stronger than youth as the teachers triumphed 430-360, and over £70 was raised for Form Charity. Attention in the Summer Term turned to the younger generation of Hampton ‘eggheads’. The Third Year inter-form quiz ended with a comfortable win in the final for 3C over 3G, 410-220. The Second Year competition successfully trialled a league format leading to a final between first and second place, which was won by 2J, dispatching 2H by 340-240. Finally, Hampton’s debut in the junior, First and Second Year, section of Schools Challenge was drawn out over a few months, but it was clear only after our victory over last year’s national champions RGS Guildford that we had a prodigiously capable team in the form of Nicholas Allen, Conor McNeany, William Colvine and Piers Marchant. Impressively, they made it to the last 16 teams in the country; sadly, Dragon, a school with vast experience and national titles in this competition, knocked them out. It has been most rewarding to see general knowledge quizzes win a place in the academic culture at Hampton, and we look forward to building further momentum next year. SCH

French debating competition It is perhaps uncommon to hear young men arguing that gallantry and seduction are no longer possible nowadays, but that is exactly what two Upper Sixth French students – James Hughes and Will Miller – did on their way to achieving 4th place at the National French Debating Finals. The qualifying regional round for the Central London schools took place on Tuesday 6 February at St Paul’s Girls’ School. All 34 schools competing debated on a range of interesting topics: whether New Caledonia should vote for independence in its referendum this year;

A few weeks before the finals, to be held on Tuesday 20 March at the British French Institute, the debating topics were sent out to the qualifying teams: ‘Voting should be obligatory,’ ‘Gallantry and seduction are no longer possible nowadays’ and ‘Multilinguism is a hindrance to the unity of the nation.’ Ten schools, all regional winners, debated on at least two of these topics each, randomly assigned roles as the ‘proposition’ or ‘opposition.’ Because the Finals coincided with the ‘Semaine de la Francophonie’ – a week of events promoting all French-speaking countries and their heritage – the debates were held in large, prominent rooms and were open to the public. With victories over All Saints, from York, and over Stephen Perse Senior School, from Cambridge, the Hampton duo qualified for the ‘Petite Finale,’ a direct third / fourth playoff. A randomised selection produced the topic ‘Surrogacy should not be allowed’ and the teams were allowed ten minutes of preparation time before an equally long debate. To the team’s excitement and initial trepidation, the debate took place in front of Francophone diplomats, university academics, and the general public, also being live-streamed. Unfortunately, having to argue in support of the motion, the Hampton duo lost narrowly. Nonetheless, they felt pleased that their confidence, spontaneity, and quick-thinking had improved dramatically thanks to the debating. James and Will gifted their prize – two tickets to the renowned Cirque du Soleil – to the school’s French assistants to thank them for their support and dedication, happy to take away their improved communication, teamwork and debating skills. James Hughes the lion the magazine of hampton school

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The Archives

In addition to the Archives’ day-to-day activities, such as routine catalogue work, dealing with requests (from Old Boys, local researchers, and so on) and helping the Alumnus Office with information and photographs, we have made a number of new accessions (including a 1930s school cap, donated by Mr Keith Allden, who has also been researching the names on the War memorials: a long term project) and a good deal of work has been done on computerising the early Admissions Records: thanks here to Dr Colvine, who also took several of the photographs below, and to Henry de Oliviera in the Lower Sixth.

but, in the meantime, readers of The Lion might enjoy the ten objects presented below:

‘Old Yellow Face’, the school clock

A piece of WWII shrapnel:

A Sixth Form volunteer in the Archives In 2019 it will be 150 years since the foundation of the Headmaster’s Conference or HMC. The first item on the HMC agenda was the adequacy of Kennedy’s The Public School Latin Primer and the matter was much discussed in the following years (the result was Kennedy’s Revised Latin Primer, which, in a further revision, is still in print and which many readers will know); and there was also a good deal of debate over Latin pronunciation. I suspect that these topics do not feature much in HMC discussions today. Hampton Grammar School’s Headmaster from 1950-1968, the Revd George Whitfield, was elected to HMC in his personal capacity in 1964, although the School itself was not then fee-paying and so did not qualify for inclusion in the list of ‘public schools’ (see The Lion, Summer 1964, p. 5). However, all the Headmasters since 1975, when the School went independent, have been members. One of the ideas proposed to mark the foundation of HMC is for School Archives to supply pictures of selected objects illustrating the history of their various Schools, to be part of a national database representing the history of HMC generally. Whether this will go ahead, and in what way is not yet known, 26

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Unlike many schools in Greater London, Hampton School was not evacuated during the Second World War: for an immensely readable account of these years, see Ken Rice, Hampton Grammar School in Wartime, 1939-1945, London 2009. The Archives possesses a small piece of shrapnel from one of the first bombs to fall on Hampton, in Tudor Avenue and Broad Lane. This was donated in 1939-40 by James Alan Pridham (OH 1938-42) when he was in 2A. Two further, and larger pieces were donated by John Fairman March (OH 1938-43), also of 2A, but these have since disappeared. One of them was part of a tail fin. March lived near where the bombs fell, in Tudor Road.

Indoor shoes; about 1940 The School moved to the current site in 1939, and into a building with parquet flooring throughout. Some of this remains, for instance in the Main Hall. In order to preserve it from boys’ hobnailed ‘outdoor’ boots, they were required to wear ‘indoor shoes’ – featured in a humorous poem in The Lion, Spring 1940, p. 10. A pair of these shoes is displayed in the cases near the Physics Department.

Although, like the indoor shoes, this clock is now in the display cases, for many years it hung outside the staffroom. It was originally given to Hampton Free Grammar School in 1831 by Mr William Jackson, Chairman of the Trustees (as the Governors were then called). The School was at first conducted in a wing adjacent to St Mary’s Church in Hampton, but the re-building of the church meant that it had to move. The new school building, completed in 1833, was on the site of the current Church Hall (built in the early 60s). Indeed, it was used as the Church Hall after the School moved yet again, some 50 years later, and when, until it was rescued by the Headmaster in 1931, the clock was consigned to a lumber room.

The School bell This bell was used to signal the start and end of lessons. Many will remember its being on the north side of the Tower of the current main building. According to a letter sent to the Headmaster in 1924, it was donated to the school by one of the governors, who had acquired it (legally!) from the ruins of a nearby house which was burnt to the ground in 1913 by ‘two lady (?) suffragettes

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school of the militant type’. It is perhaps worth remembering that 2018 marks the centenary of women’s suffrage.

will that they should ‘praye for my soull and all Cristen soulles’, something that probably does not happen often any more. No teaching material survives from the School’s foundation, but there were other, later elementary schools in Hampton and the School Archives possesses some material from these. The picture above shows the exercise book of a little girl called Sarah Miles, who was learning her letters in 1775.

by Harold Wilson’s Labour government, while in 1971 the Conservatives withdrew free school milk from children over seven, resulting in the playground taunt ‘Thatcher, Thatcher, milk snatcher’. (She was Secretary of State for Education at the time.) School milk for infants (aged below 7) was abolished by the Labour Government in 1977. The Archives possesses a 1/3 pint milk bottle from the 1940s, which, like the clock and indoor shoes, can be seen in the display cases.

The ‘crocodiles’ The School originally possessed two of these alligators (generally known as ‘the crocodiles’), which were kept on either side of the main school entrance. Before coming to the School, they had probably been similarly positioned at the entrance of a restaurant or hotel and held trays of matches and the like for visitors. Over the years, having been subjected to many schoolboy pranks, they became very damaged and eventually one of them was cannibalised to restore the other. This is now on display in a cabinet in the Biology Department.

A 1775 letter and spelling book

A short sword

One of the enduringly popular co-curricular activities in the School is playing chess, whether as a lunchtime recreation or in the various competitions open to us. In recent years the School has had considerable success in these. The Archives possesses a 19th century Cantonese ivory chess set, each piece taking the form of a figure mounted on a puzzle ball. The pieces for one side are natural ivory and those on the other have been stained cochineal red. The set was donated by an Old Boy in 1926. Unfortunately, the set is incomplete and many of the pieces are badly damaged.

Nothing is known about this short-sword, which was found by one of the School cleaners while clearing out some rubbish. It is made of iron, the blade is 360 mm long, there is just one cutting edge, and the handle might originally have been of wood. There is nothing on the label apart from the numbers 20E and 75. It is possible that the sword was originally part of the School Museum in the 1930s. If anyone has any knowledge concerning it, we would love to hear from him.

Chinese Chess Set

The School was originally founded in 1557 as an elementary institution, at which pupils would have learnt basic literacy and would have received some religious and moral instruction. They would also have been given some instruction in Church liturgy so that they could take part in the services held in the Parish Church. Indeed, the School’s Founder, Robert Hammond, wrote in his

Under the Education Act of 1944, it became the duty of local education authorities to provide school meals and milk, and the charge for this could be waived in cases of hardship. Then a separate piece of legislation, the 1946 School Milk Act, provided for free milk (a third of a pint a day) in schools to all children under the age of 18. Free milk for secondary schools was withdrawn in 1968

A school milk bottle

1946 detention slip Finally, this detention slip or ‘chit’ survives, along with three punishment essays, amongst the papers of D.M. Balmforth (OH 193845). One of these essays, dated 16/6/44, is on the School Rules and begins ‘The school rules are so large in number that they cannot be memorised’ and continues ‘Another says:- “Owing to the shortage of staff [it was, of course, during WWII] there are lady teachers as well as men. Therefore teachers will not only be addressed as Sir, but as Mrs X and Miss Y.” A second treats the British Commonwealth of Nations. The third, in both English and ‘Latin’, reads ‘When I curse Balmforth he gives me a detention and I curse him again. When I curse him again he gives me two detentions and I curse him again and again. When I curse him again and again, he gives the detentions again and again. So Balmforth runs out of chits.’ There are just a couple of chits left in the book we possess.

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Anything Goes!, the LEH and Hampton musical, took to the boards in spectacular fashion in October 2017. All of the time given up by cast, crew, staff and families was well worth the effort, as dancers, actors, singers and musicians all came together to deliver a really fun, energetic and comedic tour de force. Thank you to the staff at LEH for hosting this musical, producing a slick and impressive week of performances. From the moment of casting onwards, the students were involved in a fast-paced rehearsal regime that would not have been out of place in the West End. For many of the boys, it was the first time they had ever donned a pair of tap shoes and they were certainly put through their paces, producing awe-inspiring choreography that had the audience gasping. Meanwhile, the rest of the cast turned themselves convincingly into the crew and passengers of a 1930s-style ocean liner in this fastpaced comedy. Special mentions must go to Johnny Fryer who played Billie, Will Priddis who played Elisha Witney and Dylan EvansHutchison’s hilarious performance as Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. JPJ

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The hit musical Oliver! was the latest production to be brought to the stage of the Hammond Theatre by the younger boys of Hampton School and girls of Waldegrave School. Oliver! is a musical based on Dickens’ novel Oliver Twist which is about a young orphan navigating the streets of London in search of a home, a family and love. From the first beat of the overture, and the opening of the curtains to reveal a magnificent set, we knew we would be in for a treat. The show began with the chorus number, Food, Glorious Food, during which the hard work of the choreographer, Sophie Torrent, was displayed for the first of many times throughout the show. After the iconic moment of Oliver asking for more food, and the chorus number that followed, the audience were amused by the I Shall Scream! duet in which the Widow Corney (Theodora Thompson) is won over by Mr Bumble (Oscar Leonov). Oliver (Luke Michels) is then sold on to Mr and Mrs Sowerberry’s coffin shop – where he sang the particularly moving solo Where is Love?. After getting into a fight and eventually escaping, he is picked up on the street by the Artful Dodger (Theo Bailey) who welcomes him to Fagin’s gang in the musical’s most famous song: Consider Yourself. Here, Fagin (Jesper Hartikainen) teaches Oliver that, in order to get by, he has to learn to pick pockets. After being falsely accused of theft at the close of the first half, Oliver is saved by Mr Brownlow (Finlo Cowley) – a kind, wealthy gentleman. Meanwhile, at Fagin’s shelter, we are introduced to the villain, Bill Sikes, played by Luke Greenall, who had us trembling in fear! After the Artful Dodger announces that Oliver has been taken in, the gang plot a scheme to capture him as they fear that he will give away information. Nancy (Grace O’Brien) at first refuses to help with this scheme as she has come to care for Oliver; however, after being struck by Sikes, she brought us to tears with her strong rendition of As Long as He Needs Me, in which she explains her love for him, and falls into the plan. Yet, as she once more tries to help Oliver, it ends tragically for her – Bill Sikes kills her, believing that she is betraying him – and the narrative ends with Bill Sikes being killed and Oliver returning to Mr Brownlow, now finding out that he is in fact his grandfather. Finally, Fagin completes his character arc, in the reprise of Reviewing the Situation in which he decides to drop the life of crime! In review of the situation, it is safe to say that all involved did an excellent job. From the first to the last, the audience were tapping their feet to the songs, entranced by the whirlwind of colour before them. Congratulations to Mrs James, whose direction resulted in a fast-paced and energetic musical. Special mention must go to the band who, under the skillful direction of Daniel Roland, filled the show with energy and character. Special thanks must also go to the guest players from LEH and the staff of Hampton, LEH and Waldegrave! Finally – the show would not be the same without the incredible work of the backstage technical help led by Jenny Howes! ‘I’d do anything’ to see this show again... Edward Owens 32

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A VIEW arts

FROM THE

BRIDGE This year’s joint LEH and Hampton Sixth Form production of Arthur Miller’s 1956 domestic tragedy A View From the Bridge was a masterfully nuanced, yet sincerely faithful, rendering of a 20th century classic.

Under the directorship of Henry Bunney and Jonny Fryer, beautifully supplemented by Will Priddis’ supervision of lighting and sound, the production ensured fidelity to Miller’s elemental vision. Audience members, sat on both sides of the raised and starkly furnished stage, found themselves forced into, at times, a necessarily uncomfortable intimacy with the actors. Underpinned by Josh Lea’s sensitive performance of Miller’s protagonist Eddie Carbone, with his movingly rendered presentation of the character’s tragic moral dualism, and engrossingly narrated by Patrick Haworth, as Alfieri, Bunney and Fryer’s austere production carved the character’s passions into sharp relief, generating a genuinely outstanding show. Of course, this would not have been such an entertaining production were it not for the accomplished performances of Ethan Delaney-Smith (Rodolpho), Sam Ernest (Marco), Ellie Simner (Beatrice), Helena Hunt (Catherine), and the rest of the cast. Many thanks and congratulations to all involved. Gabriel Lewis 34

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The

Ramayana

This term’s Lower School production of The Ramayana was a colourful and vibrant production involving acting, dancing, music, poetry and puppetry, inspired by the ancient and epic narrative poem which formed the basis of Hinduism. There were 38 cast members, including boys from Hampton and girls from LEH. This was a collaborative project involving the Drama, English, Art, Music and RS Departments at Hampton school and really aided the younger students of the school to immerse themselves in the arts, in a variety of ways. Congratulations to the dedicated and enthusiastic ensemble with particular mention to Oscar White for his committed and helpful nature as Assistant Director. JPJ Hampton and LEH collaborated on an epic Indian classic story between Ram and Sita, The Ramayana. Our director, Mrs Moore, who also wrote this play, helped us to use plenty of physical theatre and be our own props which helped our audience engage with the storyline more. Over 6 weeks of rehearsals we blocked the play, changed it up and then polished it. The play starts with King Dasharatha intending to have his son Ram succeed him on the throne of Ayodhya. However, this takes a turn after the King’s third wife argues that her son Bharat should be king instead. Dasharatha finally gives in and Ram, his brothers and his wife are banished to the forest. Sita is kidnapped by Ravana and the three brothers, with the help of the monkeys, embark on a journey to prise Sita back from the clutches of Ravana. They succeed and at the end, Ram is crowned rightful ruler of Ayodhya. Our performances on the nights of 26 and 27 June were enthralling and the audience enjoyed the story immensely. Commendation should be given to Noah Wood, for his performance of Ravana, conveying the evil of the wicked demon king, and also for cycling round the Hammond stage on a golden BMX bike – something which required considerable skill! Plaudits must also go to Elysia Sanders of LEH for her performance of Surpanakha, Ravana’s sister. Even though she lost her voice on the second night, she kept going and produced a performance of considerable force. However, most thanks should be given to Mrs Moore, an incredible director, Miss Torrent for her exciting dance skills and, finally, Miss Barnes for her overall kindness and determination throughout the play. James Wiley the lion the magazine of hampton school

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New Boys’ Concert

As a new member of Hampton School, the New Boys’ Concert was as ‘new’ to me as it was to the many performers who took part. In the splendid surroundings of the Hammond Theatre, the audience was treated to a veritable feast of music – just what was needed on a cold November evening! The musicians were drawn from the First and Third Years, and the standard of music making was exceptionally high. The evening begun with Attitide, both by name and nature, as Aitor McConnell performed a jazzy piano piece with aplomb. Aitor was the first of many pianists to perform, with both halves of the concert ending on the piano. Daniel Morgan closed the first half with a sensitive and expressive interpretation of Chopin’s Nocturne in C Sharp Minor, and James Abrahart rounded off the evening transporting us to sunnier climes with Miguel Astor’s Adriana. For the most part, boys had chosen to perform classical repertoire, but the second half of the concert opened with 36

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two excellent electric guitar performances from Abhishekdev Ramesh and Zac Dowlatshahi. Zac ably demonstrated use of the loop pedal, much to the delight of the audience! It was great to hear so many boys playing the violin, particularly given that all the performances were so impressive! Thomas Bainbridge revealed his command of the instrument with a fluent and confident rendition of the 1 st Movement of Vivaldi’s Concerto in G Major. Each half of the concert featured a singer; Oliver Donald sung Brahms’ Dein Blaues Auge beautifully, and Theo Brixey-Williams gave a wonderful performance of Caro Mio Ben by Giordano. Overall, it was a fantastic evening that was filled with brilliant performances. The future of Music at Hampton School is undoubtedly in excellent hands! ELE

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Junior Musicians’ Workshop The annual Junior Schools Workshop, for primary school age musicians from the local area, took place on 29 April. Approximately 110 children came to the event, some as young as seven years old, all with the prospect of a great day ahead of them. The children were taken to the main hall, where a handful of Hampton’s senior musicians played for them, and then were assorted to their respective ensembles: the choir, a String Orchestra, a Wind Band or a Guitar Ensemble. The Children practised their pieces hard together and got on really well, playing enthusiastically and to a great standard for their ages – with only the odd note or two slightly out of place! By the time lunch came, we all felt like we had truly earned our break. During lunch, many flocked to the Sports Hall, where a selection of sports took place, including Volleyball, Basketball, Table Tennis and Badminton! With full stomachs, all headed for the Hammond Theatre, our venue for the concert, set for later that day. It was there that we knitted our morning’s work into a repertoire that the audience would no doubt enjoy, making sure that we revisited our pieces once more before the main event.

Parents and spectators alike flocked into the theatre, and the excited audience were reduced to a murmur as Mrs Esser gave the introduction to the concert. This was followed by a confident, yet thoughtful, rendition of Emily Barden’s Be the Change, performed by the choir. The Guitar Ensemble then gave a captivating performance of Pavane, by Gabriel Faure, arranged by Mr Akers. The Wind Band followed, with two pieces. The first, I Got Plenty Of Nothin, from Porgy & Bess by Gershwin, kept the upbeat, positive feels that the operatic equivalent held, putting a smile on all of our faces. The second was a Prelude and Scherzo by James Curnow. This piece was performed extremely well; a melancholy Prelude was contrasted with a metronomic march that was led by the brass. The String Orchestra played soon after, with a performance of ABBA’s Mamma Mia. This piece was played with the same uptempo enthusiasm as the real song, and it was enjoyable to listen to this well-known hit under such a different timbre. Our concert concluded with everyone playing another well-known theme from The Pirates of the Caribbean. Everyone enjoyed playing this piece in particular, and we ended the concert with a ‘bang’. As we started to pack away, we saw many very tired children disperse from the Hammond with smiles on their faces. Thomas Bainbridge

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Hampton Unplugged

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A fine array of Hampton’s rock musicians took part in the final rock concert of the year in June. In the Garrick Building, a smaller, more ‘club-like’ venue, the show had a definite intimacy to it. The traditionally excellent Junior Rock Band began the night with a brilliant performance of rock classics – Muse’s Feeling Good, and Sweet Child O’Mine by Guns N’ Roses. The young musicians coming through the school seem to improve year upon year, which was exemplified by a number of wonderful performances, including Burn’s Out of the Black, as well as Power, Power, Power, an impressive original song from First Year Felix von der Geest. Original numbers were a theme throughout the night, with Tom Wykes performing Keep on Going, while Children of the City features on What Happens Next’s eponymous first album. The plethora of song-writing talent was further shown by two more originals, Bee Zoo’s The Closest Thing and The Motive’s Blue Eyes, before the Senior Rock Band closed the concert with a powerful rendition of Oasis’ Champagne Supernova. Mr Willmott and Mr Pym have continually tutored the school’s rock bands brilliantly for many years now, and their invaluable support is greatly appreciated by all performers, as well as Mrs Esser’s help in organising the concert. Josh Bartholomew 38

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Voices of Lions at Edinburg Fringe Voices of Lions returned to the Edinburgh Fringe with a new and varied programme. This year’s set opened with an arrangement of Ave Maria by Franz Biebl – my personal favourite – which lead fittingly on to the spiritual Deep River, featuring a deeply moving solo from Tom Morrison. The audience was impressed by the multiple arrangements by members of the choir, with Max Elliott’s version of Earth Wind and Fire’s September, Owain Bates’s Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy by Freddie Mercury and, finally, Tom Duggans’s Celtic On Raglan Road by Luke Kelly. We were treated to Michael McGlynn’s One Last Song, performed by the barbershop quartet of Tom Morrison, Ed Owens, Tom Duggan and Angus Shennan – it is always particularly special when Voices of Lions alumni return to sing with the group. Since our performances were taking place during the centenary of the end of the First World War, Mr Donald arranged four popular songs of the time. These wove together melodies from the First World War to create a four-movement work. The section entitled Christmas Truce was particularly moving, and included a haunting solo from Nicholas Stoner. As ever, all members of the choir spent many hours of the day ‘flyer-ing’ along the Royal Mile, and even managed to break last year’s audience record, with a packed house of 166, despite (or perhaps because of!) it being a particularly miserable and rainy day! This trip would not have been possible without the help of the many staff members involved, and I am sure all 43 of us are very grateful! Oskar Jones

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Barcelona Choir Tour 2018 On 9 July 2018, the Hampton School Main Choir, Chamber Choir and Voices of Lions left for Barcelona. We landed in Barcelona early in the afternoon and spent the rest of the day touring a park which represented Spain. There were several replicas of famous Spanish buildings and sights, giving us a great overview of the country’s culture. On the way to the hotel, we were able to stop off at some extraordinary viewpoints, overlooking the City and its port. From here, we also got our first sight of some of the venues in which we would be performing later in the week. The following day began with a fascinating visit to Park Guell, where we saw some of the iconic Gaudi architecture. We then travelled to Barcelona Cathedral, where our first performance took place. A fair few tourists stopped to listen to the incredible sound of the choirs. The beautiful, sacred pieces that we performed were enhanced by the amazing acoustics and atmosphere. The day ended with everyone enjoying the sunset on the beach, while having a game of football. The third day of our trip was spent at ‘Port Aventura’, a theme park in Barcelona, famed for having one of the tallest rides in Europe. The theme park was split into different sections for different cultures and parts of the world. For example, there was a Chinese area, with a number of Chinese restaurants. The rides ranged from tea cups, to log flumes, to classic rollercoasters, and we all had a great time. Our final full day in Barcelona was my personal favorite. Our first performance took place in ‘La Sagrada Familia’. The construction of this amazing Cathedral began in 1882, and is still going on to this day. It is expected to be finished in 2026! Inside, the sheer detail was incredible, and performing there is an experience that I will never forget. It was lovely to see some Hampton School parents in the audience. Later in the afternoon, we arrived in Girona, to perform our final concert. The acoustics in Girona Cathedral were amazing, so much so that at the end of Faure’s Requiem the sound continued for a long while after we finished. The trip overall was phenomenal, and I look forward to taking part in more music tours in the future. Jamie Harrison the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Junior School Music – Oliver!

Having spent four months strenuously preparing twice a week at Hampton, a 64-strong cast of both Hampton and Waldegrave pupils saw their work culminate in two performances of Oliver! at the Hammond Theatre. The show was directed by Mrs James, with Mrs Moore’s help, while Mr Roland orchestrated the technically challenging musical side. With the help of choreographer Miss Torrent, we managed to eventually put together a combination of singing, dancing and acting to be proud of. Oliver! boasts a particularly challenging musical set, and an orchestra – consisting of numerous gifted musicians from Hampton and LEH – beautifully accompanied the memorably talented soloists and ensembles. A very difficult aspect of this musical is that the songs vary so much in tone and atmosphere – in one song, the chorus were bouncing around to the joyful beat, whereas minutes later they were gazing soulfully into the audience! Jesper Hartikainen’s rendition of Reviewing the Situation was particularly notable in capturing the mood of the show, while combining his singing with well thought out dance choreography. The rehearsals were challenging and tiring, and our time was split between the strenuous dancing practices, musical run-throughs and the dramatic side. There were a number of flowing, extensive chorus numbers, meaning that there were a number of instances where the whole cast was on stage at the same time, which I am sure was particularly difficult to direct, though it meant every member of the cast felt the ‘buzz’ of performing. The play itself was a wonderful thing to participate in, and the cast gradually became closer, which meant that the final performances were tinged with a hint of sadness at the culmination of a number of months’ work. Overall, Oliver! was a wonderful experience, and our thanks go out Mrs James, Mr Roland, Miss Torrent and Mrs Moore for their toil for our benefit over the course of the show. Josh Bartholomew

Chamber Concert The concert, held in the Riverhouse Barn in Walton, which offered a change from the usual venue of the Hammond Theatre, got off to an exciting start with the Wind Quintet’s performance of Divertimento in B Flat Major by Joseph Haydn. The quintet demonstrated their musicianship with their excellent ensemble and communication, held together by Anthony Wang. Following this, the String Quartet played Pachelbel’s Canon in D, a piece infamous for its cello ostinato. Repeated 28 times by Charlie Bishop, this was consistently played with aplomb and rhythmic assurance, creating a strong bass upon which the violinists could place the melody. Travelling from Germany in the 17th Century to Brazil at the turn of the 20th century, the Guitar Ensemble delivered a poised performance of Tico-Tico No Fubá by Zequinha de Abreu, which despite posing challenging tempo changes, was unfailingly synchronised and exciting. Concluding the first half of the concert were the Chamber Orchestra, who performed the first two movements of Britten’s Simple Symphony: Boisterous Bouree and Playful Pizzicato. The latter, in particular, blew the audience away, with the Chamber Orchestra demonstrating their technical mastery. The second half opened with the Piano Quintet’s realisation of the middle movement of Dvořák’s Piano Quintet in A Major, with excellent communication and interaction between one another – especially between Matt Mundy and Dylan Evans-Hutchison in the lyrical second subject! Following this was the Clarinet Ensemble who performed Variations on Paganini’s famous Caprice No. 24 by Kenneth Wilson. This piece is filled with fun and imaginative arrangements of the tune, including a tango-esque variation. Rounding off the concert were the Brass Quintet, who – without blowing my own trumpet – offered an alternative timbre to the previous ensembles as well as an exciting and dramatic conclusion to a wonderful evening of music. Nicholas Dibb-Fuller

Lawrence Power Masterclass After months of preparation from Hampton’s chamber groups, the big day arrived on Thursday 8 March with the arrival of Lawrence Power: the Jimi Hendrix of viola, the Keith Richards of string music. Just the mention of his name turns heads in the chamber community. His entrance was unostentatious, but his presence was undoubtedly felt throughout the Hammond theatre. His masterclass began with a performance from Hampton’s famed piano quintet, in which I played viola, with Matt Mundy and Dylan Evans-Hutchison on violin, Susie Eley on cello, and Joel Banerjee stealing the show on piano. We played Dvořák’s Dumka, and although pressure was running high, the performance went down well with not only the audience, but with Lawrence himself. The advice he gave us was encouraging and beneficial – it was obvious to see that he knew what he was talking about! His focus on the character behind your playing was distinctive, and in his performance later that evening, we saw the extent that it influenced his performance.

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arts The advice given on how best to make use of the bow in this music was fascinating – we will all remember his guidance on pizzicato playing! Next up was the junior school quartet, playing Pachelbel’s Canon, one of the greatest, and most well-known Baroque pieces of all time. Dylan Evans-Hutchison returned to stand in for Jamie Harrison, who was unfortunately unwell, and was joined by Luca Boucher, Freddie Liang, and Charlie Bishop on cello. Lawrence, once again, built on their performance with his expert direction. Following the quartet came solo performances from two of Hampton’s brightest young violin virtuosos: the joint leaders of the orchestra, Patrick Ardill and Joel Banerjee. Needless to say, they did

Rare Beasts Concert The standard of music-making from the four First Years and the one Second Year who took part in this concert was amazing, not least considering how new they were to their instruments: a tuba, a bassoon, two cellos and an oboe. All the performers – Tom Shtasel, Henry Hughes, Ishaan Das, Aryan Korpal and Rohan Crowe – had only been playing these various instruments since the October Half Term. The concert was held in the Music Hall in the Garrick Building and the audience consisted of the parents of the boys who performed, and various members of Hampton staff. There was a large variety in the music played, including The A-Team, When the Saints Go Marching In, and Pumpkin Dance. We all felt that we had been really well supported in the run-up

not disappoint. They impressed Lawrence, and his guidance helped improve their playing even further. After them came Catherine James from LEH, a young violist like Lawrence. Performing Tchaikovsky’s Nocturne for viola, she stunned the theatre, and the instruction given to her may well have produced a future viola star that day. The masterclass ended with the chamber orchestra performing Britten’s Simple Symphony, which was featured in the 2012 film, Moonrise Kingdom. The Playful Pizzicato especially blew away the audience in the Hammond Theatre, and Lawrence’s advice to the orchestra closed the day with a bang. Fred Spence to the concert by our various instrumental teachers, and of course our parents at home. Prior to the concert, however, there were quite a few nerves as, for some of us – it was our first concert with an instrument! All of the performances were brilliant, with a possible stand-out performance from Ishaan Das, on the cello, who played Pumpkin Dance with great energy, articulation and skill. The whole concert only lasted 15 to 20 minutes, but it was filled with some brilliant play and concentration from all performers. Overall, we managed to complete all of what we set out to do. In the end, although the music was brilliant, the atmosphere was even better! Henry Hughes

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Easter Concert On 23 April 2018, many of Hampton’s ensembles came together for the Spring Concert to perform a vast variety and breadth of music. The Chamber Orchestra opened the night’s magic with Britten’s Simple Symphony, serenading the audience with their close-knit and intimate playing. In contrast, the Brass Quintet followed with a selection of more modern movements, before the audience could not help but bob along to the Boys’ Choir’s renditions of songs including Ain’t No Mountain High Enough. Bringing the concert back into the realm of tranquillity and mystery, Concert Orchestra mastered Gershwin’s famous piece Summertime, reminding us of a distant time with clearer skies. Continuing with the more tranquil theme, the Dvořák Quintet performed the eponymous composer’s Quintet Op. 8 with their usual grace and musicality. The concert continued with Consort of Voices performing a selection of flowing and graceful nightingales – introducing the lute to the extensive list of instruments in the concert – followed by the Clarinet Ensemble’s fun, lively performance of Teddy Bears’ Picnic. Chamber Choir added to the evening by performing contrasting pieces with ease, switching seamlessly between Eric Whitacre and Albert Hammond. Brass Band featured their own legendary rendition of Home of Legends, both bedazzling and deafening audience members simultaneously, followed by Hampton Sinfonia drawing the audience back into the ancient days of looting with Pirates of the Caribbean. After a brief interval, the concert could not have finished with a better climax than with Joel Banerjee giving a truly thoughtful and mastered performance of Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2 and Thomas Knollys awing both students and audience members alike with Weber’s challenging Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F Minor. As the Spring concert drew to a close, both listeners and performers were left feeling a sense of sadness at the end of a great night of music, but also a sense of fulfilment after such an experience. Thomas Morrison 44

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Hampton School Art Department The Year In Art The past year has been an exceptionally busy one for Art! First Years worked hard to produce some outstanding linocuts of autumn leaves in September and October.  They used the ‘reduction-cutting’ technique and some created repeat patterns using a leaf motif. Findlay Barrand’s 1H print was entered in the ‘Richmond in Bloom’ Schools Art Competition and he was a Runner-up in the 11-14  age category. He received his prize of a selection of art materials at York House, Twickenham at the end of March, presented by the Deputy Mayor along with other Borough winners in different age categories.

Camilo Clarke 1P

Joseph Maudsley

Findlay Barrand, 1H

Matt Lyons 1P

Patrick Harvey 1H

Rohan Crowe 1B

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arts Second Years created some outstanding work on the theme ‘Still life’. Other highlights included some etchings inspired by the work of the American Pop Artist Jim Dine. An Andy Warhol influence was seen in some great lino-cuts of Coca-Cola bottles and the Mexican ‘Day of the Dead’ festival provided inspiration for some colourful lino-cuts of skulls.

George Garofalo

Second Year students also studied Islamic design and used traditional methods such as Geometry, Symmetry and Tessellation to design complex patterns. These were cut into lino and printed in several colours, with further cutting-away to make layers. The process involved students rolling and printing up to thirty-six times to create one large pattern.

William Nunn

Third Years created a great range of 3D work including some papier-mâché animals – mainly dogs and cats! – that were entered into the Mayor of London Fourth Plinth Competition as part of the Autumn Term’s Public Art project. Although no-one from Hampton won this year, the work produced was of a very high standard and has been on display in the Art Gallery and again for Third Year Prizegiving this year. Third Years enjoyed their visit to Roche Court New Art Centre in October and were inspired to create a range of work as a result, including some bee sculptures made from modelling wax – good for those involved in Bee-Keeping Club and a great cross-curricular link with Biology! In April, Sam Davidson (3D) discovered that he was a winner in the ‘Never Such Innocence’ Art Competition (11-14 years), with his etching of a soldier navigating the trenches

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arts by lamplight. Boys in the Third Year had produced work inspired by the First World War and many had created photographs where they dressed as soldiers in order to identify with the soldiers from over 100 years ago, who would have been not much older than themselves. Over the summer – the Never Such Innocence Charity used George Sanders’ (3B) ‘Dove of Peace’ to promote the ‘Together Project’, which commemorates the aftermath of the War and how we move on collectively. In recognition of this, George has been invited to Remembrance events in Berlin at the British Embassy in November, whilst a representative of the Art Department at Hampton has been invited to Buckingham Palace and Westminster Abbey as part of the Remembrance services for 2018!

George Sanders

Rohan Raj

Arton Shala

Matthew Le Moign

Jake Murray

Mac Crawford

Oliver Glenn

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arts Later in the same month, Fifth Years completed their GCSE Art examinations and created a wealth of artwork that has already been seen in the Lion Print magazine, and showcased in September with a special Private View for boys and their parents and friends.

Armaan Mittal

Max Matthews

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Ben Cowley

Max Elliott 50

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arts In May, Upper Sixth Art students completed their independent work, culminating in a studio session over two days. Work is now on show in the Art Gallery with a wide range of artworks on show. Gabriel Lewis’ work shows his great dedication to his art with the photo-realist approach he loves. His large-scale paintings of fellow students, family and

friends show a growing command of paint and what it can do. Henry Bunney’s towering ‘Crow’ sculpture is impossible to miss – dominating as it does the gallery space! His work was inspired by Max Porter’s book Grief is the thing with feathers and reflects his own dramatic interpretation of the theme as part of his Drama A Level.

Gabriel Lewis

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Architecture Club Students of the new Architecture Club enjoyed creating a kit of handmade Classical and Gothic Architectural features. These were shared and used to design and print large and elaborate buildings, observing formal rules about symmetry and proportion. There were some very grand results! JGM

Leanesh Sivakumar

Cigar Box Guitars For the Design Styles project, 3Y1 built and decorated their own three-string cigarbox guitars. They began by researching African patterns and vintage American license plates. The boys then designed the motif for the front of the guitars, carved the necks and assembled their instruments. In the final week of the project, they had a beginners lesson in playing slide guitar – the highlight was undoubtedly them learning to play the riff from Muddy Waters’ blues classic, Hoochie Choochie Man!

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We arrived in Walvis Bay Airport and met our tour guides Johnny and TK, who would stay with us for the whole three and a half weeks of our trip. We drove to Swakopmund, where we would spend the first three nights, our only three nights spent in beds – we would be using tents for the rest of our trip! Here, we explored the Namibian desert and took part in sandboarding, or sand-sledding for those less ambitious. We also went on Tommy’s Safari and saw all of the small, hidden secrets of the desert that he knew so well, such as, where chameleons like to roam and how to spot lizards from across a huge distance. This was also the same desert as the one used to film Mad Max – which perhaps goes some way in describing how isolated we felt out there! We then headed to Palmwag, where we would spend our next three nights. Interestingly, we were escorted by guides when it became dark as there was a wild bull elephant roaming nearby. Fortunately, we had the opportunity to visit the Save the Rhino Foundation here and met one of their chief rhino-poaching investigators who shared some wise words about the preservation of the wildlife in Namibia and how crucial it was to act. Next, we travelled to Africat North, where we were lucky enough to see our first lioness and her cubs. We were also given the opportunity to work alongside this big cat conservation charity; they aim to protect Africa’s big cats by educating local communities and farmers about how to solve human-wildlife conflicts. We contributed our time by building a kraal, which is a fenced area that keeps the livestock in and the big cats out, preventing future human-wildlife conflicts from occurring. The work was hard and tiring, but it was an extremely gratifying experience to know that what we made a real contribution to the future of these incredible beasts.

We then headed to the Kunene River Lodge, a campsite bordering Angola. Here, we were able to do activities such as white-water rafting and crocodile-spotting. We found ourselves constantly surrounded by monkeys who would steal anything they could from biscuits to toothpaste! We also had a chance to teach at the ‘local’ school. The first challenge of this part of the trip was actually getting to the school; the road had been destroyed by the floods, so we had to walk the last few kilometres. At the school, we were greeted by huge numbers of kids coming out to say hello – what a welcome! We would later be teaching about five lessons to them, including subjects such as agriculture studies. Considering we had all been born and bred in south west London, and that we had absolutely no clue what we were teaching, we did not do too badly – we thought so anyway! In the afternoon, we had the much-anticipated football match against the school. We had received loads of ‘trash-talk’ from the school children – and even the teachers – so we were getting ready for an annihilation. It was impossible to prepare for was the heat, rocky pitch, and the boisterous nature of the home crowd. Against all the odds, we went into half time 1-0 up as we found out that trying to pass the ball was a waste of time: sending it long was the best way to go. Second half, our inferior fitness started to show as we spent most the time camped in our own half. This did not matter, however, as we hit them on the break and went 2-0 up. The elation of scoring was short-lived as about 2 minutes later it was 2-1. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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trips Luckily, a rock-solid back 4 held strong and we won 2-1. The game was played in a wonderful spirit and, afterwards, there were smiles all round which was great. The highlight of the day, however, had to be watching the headmaster canter around the pitch on a donkey! The next day we had a morning of white-water rafting. It was quite a cold morning, but having a capsize drill first thing actually helped as the water was fairly warm. During the course of about three hours on the river, we went down about five or six rapids and, disappointingly, everyone handled the first couple with relative ease. On the third or fourth one, a couple of boats capsized which everyone was quite happy about! Our guide, who was in charge of safety, seemed happiest out of everyone that a group had capsized and he just started laughing. After our time at Kuene River Lodge, we travelled to Etosha National Park where we were fortunate enough to encounter an amazing variety of animals, from elephants to hyenas. We were even lucky enough to see three herds of elephants – each comprising about 40-60 elephants – at one watering hole: a once in a lifetime experience. It was a sight so magical that our tour guide, who was moved by the beauty of the scene even more than us, shed a tear. Finally, we went to Africat HQ in Okonjma – the place of the baboon – where we would spend our last four nights and learn about the human-wildlife conflict that still plagues Namibia. We learnt a great deal about the animals and had the opportunity to see them in very close proximity – cheetahs were a particular highlight. Some of us were even lucky enough to have our safari truck become stuck in a ditch just a few metres away from a leopardess and her cub! Overall, the trip was a remarkable experience which this report can barely do justice too. Hopefully all of the accompanying photographs help to provide an insight into just how phenomenal this trip was. Thank you also to all of the staff who made this possible. Ethan Delaney-Smith

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On 20 July 2018, a motley group of fifteen boys and four teachers assembled at Heathrow airport to embark on what would be a Hampton first: a group expedition to Mexico. After a brief airport encounter with the Crystal Palace football team we were off; after a ten-hour plane journey and some border control of slightly stricter standards than we were used to, we waltzed into Mexico City, ready to take it by storm. After meeting our tour guide Alan, an undisputed group favourite, we set up camp for the night in our ideally situated accommodation in the heart of the city’s capital to get some deserved rest. Breakfast the next morning gave our taste buds a spicy welcome to Mexican cuisine as we filled up on some tasty ‘huevos rancheros,’ and salsa ‘extrapicante,’ – always a treat at 7:30am on a Tuesday morning! From that point onward, we revelled in the richness of culture and history Mexico City had to offer. A trip to the ‘Basílica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe,’ still standing after the 2017 earthquake, gave us a bite-sized – yet vivid – insight into the sheer grandeur and religious devotion of a country with such strong tradition and belief. A trip to ‘La Casa Azul,’ the next day, gave us the chance to take in the incredible works of Frida Kahlo, whose art demonstrated her originality of thought and reflected the colossal obstacles she faced throughout her life. I think the night of the ‘Lucha Libre,’ will live long in our memories, where a two hour viewing of Mexico’s finest wrestlers  introduced us to a more niche side to Mexico’s culture. Finally, a stop at Teotihuacan allowed us to take in the innovation of a civilisation thousands of years before us. Next up was the historic village of San Cristóbal and, like the true Brits abroad we were, we had all purchased a traditional Mexican poncho within the hour. This bustling town tucked the lion the magazine of hampton school

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away in the highlands of Chiapas was a picturesque mixture of Spanish colonialism and indigenous influence, with its redroof tiles and cobblestone streets. Thus, we were able to explore the surrounding indigenous towns with great interest. Many on the trip may argue that San Juan Chamula was one of the more significant of these, with the more lion-hearted of the group daring to witness the sacrifice of a live chicken to the Gods in the town’s main church. Further carnage ensued after we found time to witness England’s crippling loss to Croatia, but luckily those threatening to catch the next flight back to England were calmed down and we got on with the trip. Back on the road, we visited an array of awe-inspiring sites. The world-renowned Chichen Itzá gave us further insight into the architectural prowess of the ancient Mayan civilisation. We were reminded of just how far across the globe we were upon visiting Bacalar, one of several famous sinkholes situated near Cancúitn.

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Rolling up to the dusty carpark, none of us were quite sure what was in store. However, after descending some dark stairs and turning a corner, we encountered a sight of perfection previously unbeknownst to any of us. It took a while to get used to the intense blue water and high walls of rock, carved out over many years, but, of course, we were soon engaging in some spirited Hampton fun. Luckily, no belly-flops caused any debilitating injuries! Our final stop was Playa del Carmen, where we got the chance for some truly well-earned relaxation after a whirlwind of a trip. Many thanks to Miss Field and Mrs Samuel and Mr Boardman for their relentless energy in keeping the boys in check. A special thanks must also go to Mr Blachford for his tireless enthusiasm, knowledge and organisation that enabled us to travel across the world and gave us the memories of an unforgettable trip. Eitan Orenstein

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In the February Half Term, a group of Fourth and Fifth Years set off for Iceland. After landing at Keflavik Airport, we travelled to our hotel and, after unpacking quickly, we went for an evening swim at the Laugardalslaug Geothermal Swimming Pool just next door to our hotel. This was a new experience for most of us – it was surreal being in hot water when the air was below zero and blizzarding above!

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Unfortunately, due to adverse weather conditions on the next day – with almost all major roads closed across Iceland – we had to postpone our trip to the Golden Circle until the last day. Instead, we visited the new LAVA centre, which was very interesting and enjoyable; it showed us just how seismically active Iceland is. From here, we visited the famous Seljalandsfoss waterfall, which given the weather was an impressive scene of icicles and crashing water that provided many photo opportunities. Next, we went to the largest power station in Iceland: the second largest geothermal power station in the world, called Hellisheidi, which is located on Hengill volcano in the south of the country. After a full day braving the weather, we arrived at our new hotel for the second night in Selfoss. That evening, Mr Saul and Mr Odling led a group of us on a memorable walk through the town. However, it was quite difficult to hear their interesting geographical knowledge when the icy winds were pummelling your body and snow was freezing over your glasses. After a now customary evening swim, this time at the Sundhöll Geothermal Swimming Pool, we returned to the hotel for a relaxing dinner and a relatively early night.

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trips On the third day, we visited the Skógafoss waterfall before the undoubted highlight of the trip: Sólheimajökull, a glacier tongue that lies south of the Mýrdalsjökull Glacier. We were kitted out head to toe with the appropriate attire. From axes to helmets and crampons for our sturdiest shoes, we were all ready to take part in this amazing glacier hike. During the hike, our guides explained to us the features of the glacier as we walked between the ice, everything from looking at volcanic ash sealed inside the ice to identifying ice that was safe for us to slide down. After an action-packed day, we returned to Reykjavik where we had our customary swim in the geothermal pools. We finished the evening with a quiz including all of the new Icelandic words we had learnt along the way. After packing and a good breakfast, we set out on the last day. Due to some effective rescheduling, we headed off for our tour round the Golden Circle. On our way we stopped to see the geothermal area at Strokkur. There was much excitement as everyone rushed to film and

photograph the geysir’s eruption, which has been said to be up to 50m high. Sadly, Mr Odling incorrectly predicted it, causing many to miss the all-important photo first time round... We also saw Lake Kleifarvatn and the rift valley Pingvellir, where many were excited to see an area where Game of Thrones was filmed – though, of course, we are all far too young to have watched any of it! Our final stop before the airport was at Reynishverfi. Here, we saw great examples of coastal erosional landforms, such as stacks and arches carved out of the dark volcanic rock. From our position at the top of the cliff, we could fully appreciate the power of the waves as the cliff had been eroded below us, forming part of Iceland’s impressive coastline. I would personally like to thank all the staff from the Geography Department that gave up their time to accompany us on this amazing trip and I would especially like to thank Mr Hill for leading the group! David Evans

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Washington DC trips

After a pleasantly comfortable flight, we arrived in Washington DC. A short coach journey led us to the Hotel Harrington, right in the hub of bureaucratic Washington. Tired after a long journey, a traditional American meal of spaghetti and meatballs at the hotel was served, before we took a stroll around the heart of the capital city to see one of its most iconic sights: the towering Washington monument. After the long day of travelling and jet lag beginning to take its toll, everyone collapsed into their beds to prepare for the next day. In the morning, we enjoyed a vast American breakfast before setting off for the Trump Hotel, which occupied part of what used to be the Old Federal Post-Office. Admittedly, it was a very impressive building, complete with marble floors and a gigantic American flag stretching the entire height of the lobby. We then took an elevator up to the top of the post-office tower where we were greeted with a spectacular panoramic view of Washington from a dizzying height. Next, it was on to the US Capitol for a genuinely interesting guided tour of the building and explanations of the incredible architecture, art and statues that represented America’s early history and key political figures who had shaped the country. After lunch in the trendy Eastern Market, we were given a choice of museums to visit, ranging from the Native Indian museum, to the National Archives where the original Bill of Rights and US Constitution could be seen. A busy first day left us all hungry for our dinner of half-smoke chilli dogs at the iconic Ben’s Chilli Bowl – previously visited by celebrity rock stars, sports stars and political icons. There is even a plaque 66

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trips marking the spot where President Obama tucked into a chilli hot dog for his lunch on a surprise visit. The next day, we went on a walking tour of the National Mall to see some of the monuments to conflict, previous Presidents and political icons, including Vietnam, WWII, Martin Luther King Jr, and Roosevelt. We were incredibly lucky with sunny weather and the tour was informative and engaging. We then walked to visit one of the most famous landmarks in the country: the White House. An amusing debate took place between a group of Hamptonians and a gentleman fiercely advocating looser gun laws, whilst other protestors held defamatory picket signs criticising their President. Then, after a brief rest at the hotel, we set off for a baseball game: Washington Nationals vs. New York Mets. It was a hugely entertaining evening, where we immersed ourselves in the atmosphere, joining in with chants and eating hot dogs. The next day we went to visit the US Supreme Court and received a talk about how it works and what it does, which proved very relevant and interesting. Then, after lunch and some free time, we went to Arlington Cemetery where small white graves in orderly rows marked the deaths of soldiers for as far as the eye could see. It was a deeply moving experience, as the extent of death caused by war was demonstrated in its most obvious form. Despite the sombre atmosphere of the afternoon, in the evening we had dinner in the buzzing university town of Georgetown, where had a choice of where to go and eat. On the last day, we packed our bags before setting off for an impromptu meeting with the BBC’s North America Editor, Jon Sopel. He had kindly offered to give an hour of his time, to talk to us about journalism, American politics and international relations and particularly Trump. He then treated us to a tour of the BBC’s office in Washington including the broadcasting rooms and sound desks. The time in Washington passed so quickly, as the schedule was packed with things to do and see. I would thoroughly recommend it to any politics student with an interest in American culture, history and of course politics. The trip, I am sure, will have given Lower Sixth students a contextual base of knowledge for the American section of the politics A Level course, and for the Upper Sixth it will have complemented their understanding so far. Many thanks go to the staff for making all of it possible! Oliver Kerr-D’Souza the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Classics Trip to Sorento and Rome Despite early forecasts of rain, the weather held for the majority of our stay in bella Italia! Also, against expectation, pizza was in rather limited supply on our gastronomic itinerary, being supplanted by generous – perhaps too generous – helpings of pork and pasta. Still, the boys managed to stay true to form, shedding belongings like a chthonic snake its unwanted scales! The first day was a rather bleary-eyed start to proceedings with a super-early morning at Gatwick. Once in Sorrento, our Grecophile tour guide took us for a regimentation (sic.) around Herculaneum. This site never gets tired. A once dreamy seaside resort destroyed and thus preserved by heaps of volcanic, hermetically-sealing mud, it now squats land-locked and towered-over by the decaying husks of modern day flats. We marvelled at the preserved wooden structures, while being moved by the plight of those who had tried to escape that eventful day as we were shown the boat huts where their countless hapless skeletons were found. En route to the first of our two hotels we were serenaded, however unwillingly, by the exuberant whistling of our coach driver, as we threaded our way along the Amalfi coast. Adequate Wi-Fi cheered the boys on arrival, though pasta and pork for dinner replicated our lunchtime cuisine and began a trend which stretched for the entire vacation. Next morning, following a carb-heavy breakfast – another trend – the lovely little site of Oplontis gave us much to consider and admire. This sumptuous Roman villa, associated with Poppaea, Nero’s second wife, also had the misfortune to be buried under a deep layer of ash that fateful August day in AD79. The wall paintings and mosaics were truly exquisite – their terrible loss definitely our vicarious gain. Next up the big one for all CLC-philes, Pompeii itself, in all its sprawling and evocative glory. Theatres, amphitheatre, shops, streets, stepping stones, forum, baths, water-towers. The only thing missing was Caecilius, in horto or elsewhere. Still, colourful postcards, fridge magnets, and other fertility-themed items best not named were in abundant supply. There was even time for some hastily-consumed gelato. This second day was lovingly drawn to a close – after some pasta of course – with a night of board and card games. No smart phones in sight. Result! Day three gave us a chance to scale the culprit behind all the ancient destruction we had so far seen, the mons iratus itself, majestic Vesuvius. An impromptu hailstorm at the summit as we gazed into the crater imbued the moment with real impact. Vesouvenires (sic.) aplenty were on offer as we made our way back down. After tracking down the coach, a pizzeria stop on the descent satiated our cheese and tomato cravings, despite a protracted and agonising wait. Once back down in the shadow of the great volcano, an ice-cream and sorbet making workshop in Sorrento proved very popular (and tasty) with students and staff alike. With full bellies, we finished the day in style, held in awe by our quizmaster general, Mr Lee. Questions such as, ‘How many bells are there in a normal school day?’ had us all scratching our heads. Following a long drive towards Rome on day four, the Hampton ‘massive’ enjoyed some lovely weather 68

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trips at Hadrian’s villa in Tivoli. This ancient pleasure palace cum architectural Disneyland proved as popular and intriguing as ever. The replica Canopus a personal highpoint, replete with obligatory statuary pics on the numerous scattered plinths. In Rome, and before another pasta-themed dinner – though there was pizza for the staff (shush!) – we brought the day to a close with a walk in the Vatican City. Tiring legs and heads, accompanied by intermittent wi-fi, were starting to take their toll as we returned to the hotel. The penultimate day of the holiday was spent with a long amble touring Rome. We saw the Arch of Constantine, best known for championing Christianity to the pagan Roman masses; Trajan’s column commemorating his quashing of the Dacians; the Colosseum, ancient theatre of dreams and slaughter; the Palatine hill, from where we get the word ‘palace’; the Arch of Titus built on the bones and tears of middle-eastern revolutionaries; the forum, heart of the ancient city; the race-course of the Circus Maximus; the picturesque Piazza Navona; the concretedomed Pantheon – even bumping into one director of studies here, Mr McBay – and finally the marble folly of the Trevi fountain. Along the way, ice cream and souvenirs were acquired, helping to ameliorate the mindset of our tired legionaries. On the final day, while avoiding some tastelessly shaped pasta, we plunged Indiana Jones style into the Basilica di San Clemente, exploring its multi-levelled passageways and deep-seated Mithraeum. A final stop beckoned before we left this beautiful country: Ostia, Rome’s ancient port. Here the much-threatened rain finally broke from the overcast sky. But not before we had sat in the theatre, looked at the shopfront mosaics advertising ancient shipping services, and wandered around the vast granaries, the source of one half of Rome’s much vaunted panem et circenses. Massive thanks must go to Ms Busby for organising, nay masterminding, this cracking Classical jaunt, as well as the accompanying staff: Mrs Ziegler, Ms Mimnagh, Ms Woodward, Mr Lee, and Mr Barber. But, as ever, the boys were the stars of the show: good company, well-behaved, endlessly enthusiastic and game, they did themselves proud, even encouraging yours truly to dance the ‘bungalow’ on our final night – no easy feat! This was especially impressive in the face of such a paucity of pizza. Until next time, dear reader, ave atque vale... JWB the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Lanzarote Scuba Diving Trip On Saturday 14 July, seven boys across five year groups and two teachers set off on a 7-day trip to Lanzarote, with Mr Woods at the helm, ably assisted by Mrs Moore. Mrs Woods, former Hampton teacher of Spanish, also joined the trip to assist with the Spanish element and find us excellent places to eat! After a leisurely meeting time at the School, we boarded the bus for the excitable trip to Gatwick airport with everyone discussing plans and organising the important business of who was sharing a room with whom! After a quick bite to eat at the airport, we boarded our flight and landed in Lanzarote 4 hours later. It was nearly 11:00pm by the time we had arrived at the hotel, having bought supplies for breakfast en route, so we settled for street food for dinner; this really set the trip off to a great start. We eventually made it to bed – getting sleep had quickly become a priority over rooming arrangements – in the hope of resting as much as possible for the big day ahead. A novelty of this trip was being in self-catered apartments and having to organise our own breakfasts. Some rooms managed this more successfully than others over the course of the week! After a late start and a casual breakfast, everyone was ready for a day of diving. There were big differences in experience and confidence between some of us – two boys were on the Advanced course with the rest of us on the Open Water and Mr Woods starting as a complete novice – but everyone joined in. Some of us even managed two or even three dives on the first day. The food standards had not dropped by any means as, for every lunchtime throughout the week, we went to ‘Bar Playa’ which was a very nice beachside restaurant, with amazing pulpo a la plancha for the more adventurous diner! After a welldeserved rest had been taken by every person on the trip, which included some time in the pool and a few games of pool, we got ready for dinner where we had the privilege of even more great food before once again, heading off to bed, excited about what the next days held in store for us. The second and third days followed a very similar schedule; the only difference was that some of us had finished our 12m and 18m PADI

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Qualifications by this point and therefore had pleasure dives to do for the rest of the week. Whilst everyone completed their certifications, the rest of us did some boat dives to add to our experiences. These were incredible and we saw everything from angel sharks to evilstaring octopuses. On the deeper dives, there were massive grouper to see and we even managed to spot a turtle! One of our instructors, who had been diving in the area for nearly 12 years had never seen one, so we were really lucky to observe a turtle in the wild! The final day of diving saw us exploring some lava flows a short boat ride away from the dive centre where there were thousands of sea urchins we had to avoid on the rocks! One of our group – who shall remain nameless – was more desperate than others to avoid them, having managed to stand on one earlier in the week. Massive schools of sardines could also be seen – until the barracuda came for a feed and caused them to scatter! Lanzarote, being a favourite worldwide tourist destination for many around the world, offered many more opportunities beyond scuba diving. In the latter stages of the week, we went to the local mall to discover some excellent ice cream and to play some mini golf on the 5th floor, which was next to the open-air cinema and 6D simulator. Our flight home was not until late in the evening – and it was late leaving – so we paid a visit to the Rancho Texas Water Park and Zoo. There was a great selection of slides and some interesting talks with the park rangers about just how many people could go in the rings at the same time… Sufficiently tired, it was time to head back to the airport and London – this time via Bordeaux after a quick stop to refuel the plane! We eventually made it back to school at around 5:00am – walking up the driveway at sunrise was a surreal experience! The trip was absolutely brilliant and a great opportunity for everyone going on it. Thank you to Mr Woods and Mrs Moore, together with the staff back at School who were involved in the organisation of the trip, for making it possible. Joshua Hood

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Ronda

Easter 2018 marked the 30th annual Hampton pilgrimage to Ronda, and a fifteenth for local celebrity and hispanophile Señor McBay, whose appetite for ham, walking and the banditry museum remains as strong now as it was back in 2003. He was joined by Señores Aucutt, Boardman and Thomas and Señorita Bedford to form a smaller-thanusual but nonetheless united group of teachers, ready to oversee the rite of passage of yet another group of Fourth Year Spanish students. The trip started back in the late 1980s when Dr Steve Alexander, Iain MacLean and Bob Corrigan took an adventurous group of Sixth Formers down to the heart of Andalusia. They had booked a hotel, but other than that, nothing was in place. They toured the local schools offering up the services of our students to help out in English lessons. Unbelievably, the trip worked and it has developed into one of the most popular ones that we run at Hampton. A little more organisation goes into it these days, mainly down to the modern culture of health and safety. A sense of adventure still prevails, however, and the boys still manage to immerse themselves fully into Spanish life and get a real taste for what it is like to live and go to school in Spain. Importantly, just as Dr Alexander and his merry men did, we prefer to stay under the radar and blend in as much as possible with the local community. Southern Spain can normally be relied upon for lovely warm weather at Easter time, and so we often look forward to the Ronda trip as a signal that summer is just around the corner. Sadly, this year did not quite meet expectations on that front as we endured a mixture of sunny spells and torrential downpours. While it was not a total wash out – something that my post-walk sunburn will attest to – boys did have to think carefully about how best to use their free time when the heavens had opened. Several made it over the famous gorge to the enchanting old town to visit the aforementioned Museo del Bandolero and the quite extraordinary hunting exhibition, which showpieces an inordinate number of stuffed animals from around the local sierra. A group of boys also took advantage of the opportunity to look around the oldest bullring in Spain, expertly guided by Mr McBay who offered the boys fantastic insight into this extremely controversial and most Spanish of traditions. The traditional football match against Colegio Juan de la Rosa went ahead as always at the stunning Estadio Municipal de Ronda. Despite a ropey start from referee Mr Thomas, if not by the team, Hampton overcame adversity to finish 1-3 winners, thus prolonging their unbeaten run in this fixture. Afternoon football continues to be an

important aspect of the trip and offers some welcome respite after the busy mornings in lessons. Despite having been hiring out a pitch at the local sports centre every year since the early 90s, we do still occasionally encounter an entertaining administrative hurdle that we have to negotiate. Having been unable to find our details on the system from previous years (Hampton School, Himpton School, Hompton Eschool) we had to start again from scratch. Name: Hampton School. Date of Birth: ... 1st September 1557. Computer said ‘yes’ and away we went. Spain. Another ever-present feature of the trip is the energising and picturesque hike through the hills from the local hamlet of Benaoján back to Ronda. Our shepherd, Mr McBay, had a shaky start despite his many years of experience, leading us up a dead end before herding us back along the road to a different starting point. Apart from that, it all went very smoothly. Other than for poor Tim Lamming who followed in the illustrious footsteps of Michael Barrett, losing one shoe to the quagmire underfoot as he squelched his way along the muddy path. Well done to Tim for taking the banter in his stride… Another key element of the Ronda trip is the day visit to Granada and the awe-inspiring Alhambra. It was a beautiful clear day and seeing the Alhambra with the snow-capped Sierra Nevada Mountains as its backdrop is one of the world’s great views. This year Mr Boardman added a very nice snippet of culture to the day by offering the boys the opportunity to take part in photography and poetry competitions, with the only brief being to try and capture the essence of this most wonderful of cities. Congratulations to both Jack Lucas and Hashim Al-Obaidi who won the poetry and photography prizes respectively. A huge thank you must be extended to all of those who make this wonderful trip possible. Our hosts at Instituto Martín Rivero, Colegio Juan de la Rosa and the Escuela Oficial de Idiomas receive heartfelt thanks for always being willing to accommodate us, as does the excellent team of staff who accompanied me and the boys, giving up ten days of their holidays in exchange for plenty of jamón and good company. All 41 places have already been snapped up for 2019, as we prepare for another group of Hampton boys to follow in the footsteps of Hemingway, Alexander, Passey, Peel, McBay and over 1000 other Hamptonians for whom Ronda will always be a special place. TRA the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Madrid

During the October Half Term in 2017, a mixture of just over 20 Fifth Year and Lower Sixth boys flew out to the busy and highly cultured capital of Madrid, a city of elegance, renowned for its vibrant plazas and its heritage in illustrious European art. The aim of the trip was ultimately to explore and experience Spanish culture, as well as gaining exposure to the Spanish language in day-to-day life, and helping us boost our proficiency and confidence, particularly in the speaking a listening aspects of the language. Having touched down in ‘Aeropuerto Barajas’ following a 2 and a half hour flight, we were all raring to see Madrid in the flesh, and to meet our families for the week. We were split up into chosen pairs or threes and allocated to incredibly hospitable families from all around the city, who would look after us for the duration of our visit. The first night was mainly time to get to know our home-stay families, and enjoy a traditional dinner while strenuously trying to articulate, with our half-broken Spanish, which unsurprisingly became much more fluid as the trip progressed. The next few days comprised of daily school sessions at ‘Don Quijote’ language school, followed by grouped tours of the city, guided by one of the Don Quijote teachers, Patricia, who provided us with intriguing information about the history that has shaped Madrid into the city it is today. This, as well as the opportunity to visit such elaborately designed palaces and cathedrals, such as ‘El Palacio Real de Madrid’, gave us great insight over historical affairs within Spain’s capital, accompanied by a general idea of Spanish historical architecture. We also had opportunities to explore the city independently in groups of ‘No fewer than 4 boys!’, and this for most of us was a real highlight of the trip, as we had the freedom to experience culture in a variety of ways of our choice. Whether it was riding rowing boats in ‘El Parque de Retiro’, or trying various dishes of tapas in Lavapiés, we felt truly immersed in the diverse culture, and this definitely contributed to the overall success of the visit. 72

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On the third day, we took a day trip to Segovia. Although the weather was not our friend on that day, it was nevertheless fascinating to be surrounded by such a vast display of ancient architecture – be it medieval walls or Roman Cathedrals and Churches – which all contributed to the architectural legacy which the city’s ancestors have created. Nearing the last few days of the trip, we still had the long awaited Santiago Bernabéu tour to take part in, as well as visits to the famous ‘Museo del Prado’ and a traditional flamenco show. Obviously, the Bernabéu was a captivating aspect of the trip; such a sheer array of trophies was a beauty to behold, particularly those 12 Champions League trophies which, as an Arsenal fan, I had not had the pleasure of seeing yet. The Museo del Prado showcased many of Diego Velázquez and Francisco Goya’s famous – and infamous – artworks, which were not only easy on the eye, but also quite moving, particularly when reading about the influences behind them. The trip was then memorably ended with an outstanding showcase of traditional flamenco dancing. This was a new experience for us all; the rapid and intricate footwork, accompanied by a fastpaced, rhythmic clapping, was a sight to behold. After a week of unforgettable events, the time to return had come, and I am sure that everyone left having learned a lot about Spanish culture as a whole, as well as having improved their language skills. I must definitely add, and I am sure I say this on behalf of everyone, that without Mr Malston’s flawless organisation of the trip, we would not have had the same experience. His, along with Mr Aucutt’s and Miss Bedford’s spirited and light-hearted companionship, enabled us all to feel comfortable throughout the visit, and we all truly had an incredible six days as a result. Faisal Jumaily

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Berlin History Trip The dramas on this summer’s Berlin History trip were very different from those of the previous year. On that occasion, an earth-shattering thunderstorm had entailed the diversion of the plane carrying the Headmaster from Tegel airport to Schoenefeld, giving his arrival the appearance of a latter-day Cold War soap-opera – as well as giving those of us already on the ground the unwanted appearance of entrants in a wet t-shirt competition! There were no such traumas this time, but the trip was as memorable as ever. We saw Treptower Park, where time and weather have softened the edges of the sculptures that remind East Berliners of fortunate they were to be saved from Nazi tyranny by Soviet liberators. Lucky them! But no passage of time can make a visit to Sachsenhausen concentration camp anything other than sobering. It does not take much imagination to piece together enough evidence from the sad remains of cell blocks, exercise yards and execution points to create a chilling picture of the grisly events that unfolded there day after day. Equally impressive, if for very different reasons, was the Olympic Stadium, notwithstanding the fact that our Monday afternoon visit coincided with the dismantling of all the paraphernalia associated with the previous weekend’s rock concert. Perhaps only the intrepid

few who made the extra journey to climb the bell-tower felt able to claim that they left with anything approaching an authentic smell of the 1930s in their nostrils. There were two undoubted highlights this year though. One was a first for the trip: a guided cycling tour of Cold War Berlin. Our host showed us ‘palaces for the workers’ in Karl Marx Allee, the remnants of watch towers from the Wall and drew maps in chalk on a park bench on the banks of the Spree in what had been the strip of no man’s land between East and West. Great stuff! The other was our visit to the ‘fan zone’ immediately to the west of the Brandenburg Gate, where we watched England defeat Sweden in the World Cup quarter-final. The sun shone, the English sang (neither tunefully nor tastefully, but who cared?) and Harry Maguire and Dele Alli headed their team into dreamland. There will be no football next year, but not to worry. It is always a great trip. Many thanks to Miss Smith for all the hard work she put into organising it again this time. AJC

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Konstanz Exchange

On Friday 6 July, the last day of the school year, it was an earlier start than usual for Fourth Year German students at Hampton and LEH, meeting sleepily at 4am for the flight to Konstanz. The tired troops nonetheless greeted their exchange partners warmly when they were reunited at our partner school in Konstanz, the Ellenrieder Gymnasium, following a tour of the town and a trip up the cathedral tower. After a weekend spent in the host families, the programme commenced on the Monday with an excursion into Switzerland to see the splendid Rheinfall, Europe’s highest waterfall, with free time to explore Schaffhausen before returning over the border to meet partners at the train station. On Tuesday, the party embarked on a longer journey to the city of Stuttgart, to learn about the history of the Mercedez-Benz and the automobile industry in the fascinating museum dedicated to the car manufacturer. A visual and commercial contrast to the small, beautiful, lakeside town of Konstanz, this was a great opportunity to see a very different side of German city life. The trip to Mainau Activity Centre, on the campus of Konstanz University, was a new addition to the programme this year, with a fantastic high ropes course set deep within surrounding woodland that challenged the whole party. On Thursday, the lucky students at Ellenrieder Gymnasium had a day off school, so the English partners spent some further time with their host families, with many treated to a day out at Europapark, Germany’s largest theme park. The twinning of Konstanz and Richmond Borough is a source of great pride to both regions, and our annual reception at the Town Hall, for all the English partners and staff, took place on the Friday morning. It was then time for some relaxation at the Therme, the luxurious outdoor thermal baths and swimming pools on the edge of Lake Constance: a sublime location to take in the views of this stunning city. This was a fabulous end to another successful week of being generously hosted by our friends in Konstanz. Frau Willett would like to thank all the boys who participated and made it such a fantastic experience! KEW 74

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Munich Sixth Form Exchange

Following a very successful week in early February hosting pupils from our partner school Ottobrunn Gymnasium, near Munich, the Hampton and LEH group made the return visit in April. Five Lower Sixth German students from Hampton, along with eight LEH Sixth Formers, their teacher Herr Russell, and Frau Willett, arrived in Ottobrunn on the Monday to a warm reception, and were given a tour of the modern school premises. We were met afterwards by the German exchange partners and the group departed to spend the afternoon and first evening with their host families. Bright and early on Tuesday morning, we took the regional train into Munich city centre for a fascinating and insightful Germanlanguage tour of the city. The tour guide gave out recipe cards for Obatzda, a Bavarian cream cheese-based delicacy, perfect for spreading on a Brez’n (pretzel) – one to try at home! After stopping for some lunch outside in the beautiful Hofgarten, we had a relaxing wander through the vast Englischer Garten, where we stopped to watch surfers competing to stay upright on a choppy section of the River Isar. After some time at the Weiße-Rose exhibition at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität – the resistance movement against the Nazis started by the Scholls, a brother and sister who were students there – we made our way back to Ottobrunn, where we were met by the German party. A tour of the recently-opened National-Socialism Documentation Centre was the focus for Wednesday. This exceptional exhibition, near the site of the ‘Braunes Haus’ – the Nazi Party’s first property acquisition, leading Munich to be seen as the ‘Capital of the Movement’ – was eye-opening and hugely informative, focusing on case studies and encouraging visitors to engage meaningfully with the troubling contemporary questions left by this period

of history. After a lunch on the grass at beautiful Kaiserplatz, we continued to the Olympiapark, site of the 1972 Munich Olympic Games, for a trip up the breathtakingly high Olympic Tower. The soaring temperatures and beautiful sunshine on Thursday were ideal for our day trip with the German party to the Herrenchiemsee, the largest of the Bavarian lakes. First came a boat trip to the largest island, the Herreninsel, for a tour of one of Emperor Ludwig’s magnificent palaces. After lunch we boarded a boat to the next island, the Fraueninsel, for some free time to enjoy the sun and, of course, Kaffee und Kuchen. The German train system let us down – quite uncharacteristically – on the return journey and we made it home several hours later than planned. Our students were a credit to Hampton, however, and remained cheerful and positive through the frustrated travel plans. On Friday, we headed to the Deutsches Museum, a massive science and engineering museum with exhibitions on everything from mining to pharmaceuticals, glass blowing to environmental protection. The group met up for a special live demonstration of a Faraday Cage and spectacular high voltage current displays – a particularly important phrase was ‘Ohren zu!’ or ‘Cover your ears!’ After a weekend spent with the host partners – two of the Hampton party were treated by their partners to see Bayern-Munich play at the Allianz Stadium! – the group reconvened on Monday and attended the first morning lesson at school before leaving for the airport. Frau Willett would like to thank all the boys again for everything they put into the Exchange. Vielen Dank, Jungs! KEW the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Senior French Trip – Nice On Sunday 15 October, a group of 10 Hampton boys flew to Nice for 5 days in order to immerse themselves in French culture and develop their language skills. Upon arrival in Nice, we were greeted by the various families that were to care for us all week. Staying with native French people allowed us to practise our French in a more practical and realist scenario – with varying degrees of success – and to gain a better understanding of the different aspects of French life. Each morning, we partook in intensive language lessons at the Alpha B school which not only enabled us to practise our grammar and writing but also expanded our vocabulary and improved our oral ability in an interactive way – although the highlight was being able to go to the local boulangerie during our break and buy as many croissants as we wanted!

On Thursday, we were taken out on an incredible boat ride where we enjoyed the scenic views and looked out over the vast outstretches of ocean. We followed this up by a visit to various sites of historical greats. The day before our departure, Miss Byrne and Miss Noble took us to a restaurant where we were spoilt for choice in our three-course meal. We were then treated to a great game of bowling which saw Olly Heyes win with a spectacular comeback. However sad we were to be leaving such a beautiful place, we could all agree that it was a thoroughly well-enjoyed experience that we would all do again in a heartbeat. Henry Evans and Makarious Naguib

Following morning lessons, we had the opportunity to experience Nice through a range of different activities. On Monday, we had a lovely tour of some of the sights within Nice as we familiarised ourselves with the area. Afterwards, we were treated to two scoops of ice cream, of whatever flavours, just as long as we ordered in French!  Tuesday saw us visit Monaco, an unbelievably wealthy city. After having gazed at the luxurious apartments and yachts, we visited the oceanographic museum where we could learn about the different species of sea life – although it was mostly the sharks that seemed to catch everyone’s attention. After the morning lessons on Wednesday, we were taken in for a tasting session of Nice’s local foods. After, we visited the famous Henry Matisse museum. Matisse specialised in cut-outs with vibrant colours during a time when he was very ill.

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Paris Exchange This year saw the tenth year anniversary of the Fourth Year exchange with Notre-Dame de Sion School in Paris, one of top leading schools in the country. Over 200 students have benefited from the exchange over the past decade and it was therefore very exciting to take the largest group of students ever to participate in ‘l’aventure parisienne’ in 2018. As the 30 boys and the three Hampton staff – Miss Byrne, Miss Lara and Mr Chaveneau – disembarked from the Eurostar with England far behind them, they knew the trip was going to be something to remember. Hampton boys and LEH girls were greeted by their exchange partners and families at the Gare du Nord. This provided the first opportunity for the Francophiles to speak French before leaving to spend the evening and the weekend with their exchange partners in Paris.

‘Paris is always a good idea’ saying was certainly something that many of last year’s participants would have expressed as we were returning to London. One of the highlights for a trip leader is to see that the links students build with their exchange partners are maintained months later. It is therefore wonderful to know that many of our students keep in touch regularly or were even able to meet up over the summer and are now planning other visits to France. The trip is a fantastic life experience, which has enriched our students both culturally and linguistically and we hope it will continue to do so for future generations of Hampton boys and LEH girls. FCC

In a city brimming with culture, style and romance, it was a relatively straightforward task for the families to organise something special from the hundreds of gems to visit in Paris. As the Eiffel Tower, Disneyland, Orsay Museum, boat trip on one of the famous bateaux Mouches, NotreDame Cathedral and Montmartre, to name but a few, were organised later in the week, families were still left with a plethora of options. Some students visited grand places such as le Palais de Versailles, l’Opéra Garnier, others were taken to enjoy a Paris Saint-Germain or Stade Français match, delicious traditional food was sampled at the top of la Tour Montparnasse, le Bouillon Chartier or le Procop. Others visited le Louvre and Grévin museums, the Catacombs and la Crypte Archeologique. These unforgettable first two days were spoken about with great excitement on the following Monday at school. As always, the school ensured that we were made to feel warmly welcome and Monsieur le Directeur himself invited all our students to a surprise anniversary celebration held at school on the Tuesday night. Friendships and, dare I say, a little romance were quickly noticed as the students’ French was beginning to improve remarkably. Students were extremely well behaved and made the most of the opportunity to improve their French. It is fair to say that the famous

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Second Year Sport and Culture Trip to Provence Last October the French Department ran its third trip to Gréouxles-Bains in Provence, France. In the latest edition of this successful, memorable and wholesome experience for Hampton boys, we enjoyed the same action-packed programme of cultural, sporting and linguistic activities in beautiful sunshine and remarkable scenery. The trip ran smoothly and all of the activities went according to plan, from zip-wiring to canoeing, sailing to stargazing. After an early start at Heathrow Airport on Sunday 15 October 2017, we flew to Marseille and began our voyage of discovery with a cultural visit of Aix-en-Provence, home to Paul Cézanne and the views that inspired him such as the impressive Sainte-Victoire. The next day allowed the boys to practise their French in an authentic Provençal market in the perched village of Forcalquier, before grappling with some challenging treetop activities and zip-wires under the supervision of their less buoyant, but surprisingly flexible, accompanying staff who followed them into the treetops. We spent Tuesday canoeing and sailing on the scenic Gorges du Verdon, where we had the lakes to ourselves, before visiting the iconic Calanques of Cassis and enjoying views of Marseille from the top of Notre Dame de la Garde on Wednesday.

spent interacting with the boys in authentic French surroundings; it is an opportunity for both teacher and student to share and learn a mutual appreciation of what might be termed ‘real’ France. As ever, I am particularly grateful to the outstanding accompanying staff for their sustained patience and willing contribution throughout this school trip: Mr Chaveneau, Mr Thomas and Mr Turner. MB

As ever, we allowed the boys plenty of free time at our accommodation, Le Pavillon d’Aurabelle, where they could play football, table tennis, volleyball and of course, pétanque, before enjoying delicious and authentic Provençal food, diligently prepared by our resident chef, Philippe. The last day saw us make further use of the facilities on site before visiting one of the most famous French zoological parks and returning to Heathrow on the last flight of the day. In the trip’s third year, it was reassuring to be welcomed by the same staff and tour guides who have become accustomed to our needs and expectations and who accommodate us with open arms and typical enthusiasm. The charm of this trip is the amount of time

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Day Trip to Northern France On Wednesday 27 June 2018, we met 1B and 1H at school at 4:45am in order to travel by coach through the Channel Tunnel. We first travelled back in time to St Joseph Village, a typical quirky replica of a French 1930s village. The boys were able to enjoy exploring the narrow streets of the village while carrying out a quiz and making good use of their French. We then headed to the seaside resort of Wimereux where we had activities on the beach and ate our picnic. We also played a game of crazy golf – with varying skill levels and degrees of success! We were blessed with good weather on the day, and everyone made sure they had sun cream on. We took an early-evening Channel Tunnel crossing back to the UK and arrived at School around 9pm. It was a very tiring day for both staff and boys, but the boys’ excellent behaviour made it much easier! SCY

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Drama visits the Fringe! The Drama Department took a group of Fifth Year boys to the Edinburgh Festival this summer to allow them to experience the vibrant, buzzing atmosphere of The Fringe, in preparation for their AS and A level Drama the following year. The group saw a vast amount of theatre and experienced a range of theatrical styles, from the quick-witted improvised Showstopper! musical to the immersive experience of David Rosenberg’s Flight; from the stunning physical theatre work of Tobacco Road to the thought-provoking and shocking realism in Chatroom. Mrs James had booked a variety of shows for the students to see, but the trip also allowed them to see shows of their own choosing, affording them the chance to manage their own itineraries, budgets and learning important life lessons about being on time! JJ Comments from the students: ‘It was great fun and I really enjoyed the variety of theatre that we had the opportunity to see and it will really benefit me in my understanding of theatre for next years’ AS Level course.’ Charles Maddox ‘The immersive theatre we saw really opened my eyes and made me realise how different Theatre can be and how it can engage its audience members in a such a strong way.’ Will Greenall

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Work Experience Week to Armentières

For the 12th anniversary of the trip, nine Lower Sixth students took part. Exceptionally, the trip took place during February Half Term and we were faced with very cold weather. However, the students were able to enjoy their placements and came back culturally and linguistically enriched. Everyone was nervous about starting their placement. But, when we visited most of them on Wednesday, everyone was delighted about their work placement and host family. This year we were fortunate to be able to have placements in primary schools and five students enjoyed experiencing teaching in a foreign language, assisting the teachers but also playing the role of the English assistants. Three other students worked in a bakery and discovered the hard work of this trade as well as having the pleasure of making their own breads and cakes. Finally, for the 3rd consecutive year, ‘Le Bon Coin’ restaurant welcomed our last student. This is possibly the hardest of the placements – though I am not saying that the others are easy – as the students has to take orders, serve orders and be on his feet all day! They all came back exhausted but delighted about the week and already realising the benefits of such a trip. They all commented on how their understanding of the language had improved and we did notice when speaking French to them that they were more fluent. On Friday evening, we all met up at the local ‘crêperie’ for the last meal and we made our way back to England the following morning.

Having heard a lot about the trip, I was excited by the opportunity to improve my French. However, as the time came closer to working in a school, I realised the challenge that I was going to face with the French children speaking at a pace that none of us could speak in English. When we arrived at the train station, I was greeted by my host family – the father turned out to be the Headmaster at the school! During the week, I quickly came to terms with having to explain everything in French despite my willingness to speak in English. However, the teachers and students were very understanding when it came to me sometimes taking my time to comprehend what they were saying or what I was trying to say. I think being able to work with different classes also helped as it meant that I could learn different things and experience different situations. Overall, the trip was incredibly valuable in terms of me being able to speak French more confidently, especially in front of a group of people and particularly those who I did not know. Ed Lord We arrived in Armentières on Sunday evening, and we were all nervous for what the week ahead would hold. I spent the evening with my host family, who were very kind and welcoming, although the speed of their speech was quite a shock at first. On Monday morning, I started my work experience at École Sainte Colombe. I spent the week with a class of thirty 6 and 7 year olds who seemed to talk non-stop. Throughout the week, I helped teaching French, Maths and English, which was quite challenging and tiring, particularly on the first day.

The host families were again very impressed with the boys’ behaviour and commented on their abilities to fit in so quickly and easily.

Over time, I could understand the children better and gained more confidence when speaking French. The trip was thoroughly enjoyable, even though there were many awkward moments when I could not understand the children!

CB and SCY

Arun Bhasin the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Córdoba – Spanish Work Experience Trip Over the October Half Term this year, several Upper Sixth Spanish students journeyed to the vibrant, yet also occasionally sleepy, streets of Córdoba in southern Spain. In an effort to improve our spoken Spanish and understanding of Iberian culture, we took up various work experience posts across the city – ranging from shop assistant to hostel receptionist, from office worker to childcare assistant in the lively guarderías! All of us on the trip saw our spoken language skills improve hugely. Being constantly exposed to the language and culture immersed us in Spanish, forcing us to, with only a little difficulty, converse comfortably with our hosts and colleagues. Working in the Córdoban heat did prove challenging on the hottest of days, but we found refuge in sampling the local food. Having to ensure we effectively communicated our orders for fear of ending up with an obscure Spanish dish we had never heard of, we were once again put on the linguistic hot-spot. By the end of the week, we were all particularly proud of the fact that we managed to decipher the rapid and distinctive Andalusian accent with much less effort. As well as our linguistic practice, many of us learnt some new skills on the trip. Jacopo Olivieri is now an expert bookbinder, whilst Will Miller’s janitorial capabilities improved greatly over the week – much to the delight of his parents on his return home! It was also great fun to celebrate Finn Battle’s 18th birthday during the trip at a typical restaurant complete with a Flamenco tablao and a rendition of Happy Birthday in true Flamenco style. Finally, we made our way to the airport, only realising the extent of our immersion in the culture and language upon our return to the UK. Despite feeling tired both physically and mentally, the week of work proved hugely beneficial ahead of oral exams, and gave a brilliant insight into the far more relaxed Spanish culture. Ms Buckley and Mr Blachford continued with their tradition of organising excellent trips for the department and it was a fittingly enjoyable end to our Spanish careers at Hampton. Sam Millward 82

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USA Senior Football Tour

The Hampton Senior Football Tour began with a dangerously early flight to Boston. With all the squad buzzing for the week ahead, the journey flew by and, before we knew it, we were being ushered away by our inspiring guide Jim Risher. Following a busy day of travel, it was a relief to finally settle down into our welcoming, two-man bedrooms at the Hyatt Place Hotel, Braintree. A much-needed rest held us in good stead for our first set of fixtures in the morning. Our first game was held between our U18s and Synergy Academy. A lack of warm-up for our Hampton side did not seem to hinder the performance, with some brilliant attacking football being displayed. A fantastic finish from Tim Sweeney helped us on the way to a convincing 3-0 win. The U17s, however, experienced a tougher affair against a physical Bridgton side. With an early injury to key midfielder James Hunter-Young, the game ended in a goalless draw. The mood within the squad was not to be dampened, however, due to a solid England performance in the quarter-finals of the World Cup! Our evening entertainment consisted of the first MLS game of the tour between New England Revolution and Seattle Sounders. The nail-biting game led the crowd through a plethora of emotion, only to be exhausted by another goalless draw. Day three was fuelled by an exciting day out in the heart of Boston. An insightful Old Town Trolley Tour allowed us to learn a bit about the culture and overall spirit of the city. After being let loose to explore more of the city as well as testing our British charm on the locals, it was time to focus on our next matchday. Our fixture for the day was a local side: Seacoast United. The U17s were up first and sealed an impressive comeback to win 3-2, with Tom Waring’s 40-yard knuckleball being the pick of the goals. The U18s were up next and raced into an early lead, eventually winning 3-1 – despite the sweltering heat! We returned to the hotel for rest and recovery. Legs aching from the previous day, we hopped on the coach and arrived at Boston College for a tour of the campus and the sports facilities. Next was Harvard, the iconic location proving too much to resist for Jim, who staged a mini photoshoot as we walked through the historic buildings. After circling the iconic Green Monster wall of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, we traipsed into a sports bar to watch France dispatch Belgium and cruise into the finals. With our anticipation peaked for the upcoming England match, we left Boston and set our sights onto Orlando, FL. Once we had arrived at the Grand Orlando Resort, we soothed our aching muscles in the Jacuzzi, and invaded the pool. Unfortunately, the ache soon returned, though to our hearts, as Croatia beat England 2-1 in the World Cup semi-final; the only remedy to a broken heart was determined to be a theme park! Having spent the rest of the day at Universal Studios, we all managed to forget the heartbreak and focus on our next game. The match was preceded by a visit to Stetson University, where we had a fascinating insight into the world of US Soccer – and our first vegetables of the tour! Fuelled up for 84

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the afternoon’s fixtures, we travelled to ESPN’s World of Sport Complex. The U17s won their match comfortably, captain Freddy Hodgson netting a hat-trick. Institute Academy’s U18 side would prove a tougher adversary. Resilient defending, hard-fought battles in the middle of the park, and an attacking masterclass from hat-trick hero Shaun-Chris Joash were the key components in the U18s 3-2 victory under the beautiful Florida sunset. What better way to recover from our fixtures than enjoying all that Orlando has to offer? With Harry Potter being a particular highlight for most, the day was well received. Our evening dinner at a nearby, lively Mexican restaurant seemed to help celebrate such a successful tour away, as well as Mr Grey’s supposed birthday, which was warmly welcomed by the mariachi band. Sadly, our tour was coming to a close, but not before one last set of fixtures against well-renowned Montverde Academy. Their athletic side seemed to prove too much for our exhausted squad, as we were struggling to keep up in the intense Florida heat, as well as suffering from injury. The game resulted in our first loss on tour, though outstanding and typical Hampton resilience was shown throughout. Yet, some retail therapy seemed to help lift spirits, as we were able to enjoy the local shopping mall. The final MLS game thankfully gave the spectators more to cheer about, as Orlando Magic were able to secure a 3-1 win against Toronto FC. Our final day opened with watching the World Cup Final in the Hotel bar – all soft drinks of course! Although disappointed to not see our England playing, the world-class football on show was much appreciated. It seemed a fitting end to such an amazing tour as we began to head back home. A special mention for our guide Jim and all the teams who hosted us over the ten days. A huge thank you is also due to the staff for their support and good company throughout the trip, and a very special thank you to Mr Mills for organizing and leading such a memorable Senior Football Tour. Finally, massive credit is due to the whole squad for being such a class act! Noah Hanley the lion the magazine of hampton school

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1st XI Football

The 1st XI football season was a tale of two halves. We started the season with our traditional pre-season trip to Colchester; we came away with a high level of fitness and desire for the season to start for real. By the end of the week, we had played two matches, winning them 11-0 and 5-0 against Woodbridge and Cambridge respectively. With these results and clean sheets under our belt, we went into the season confident we could achieve something. Our first ISFA action came in the National ISFA Sixes competition, hosted by Charterhouse School. Having progressed through the group stages, topping our group, we played Bede’s School in the quarter-finals, whose ‘park the bus’ style of play frustrated us. Ultimately, our frustration got the better of us and we conceded two quick goals from counter-attacks – our run was over, but not without playing some classy football along the way! The first half of the season had officially started and we went into our first game against Bede’s School looking for revenge. However, they had not changed their style of play and we lost 2-1 yet again. The only consolation was that Freddy Hodgson scored a spectacular header that lobbed the keeper. Our next competitive action came in a thrilling 6-1 win over St Peter’s school in the first round of the ESFA competition, in which George Maxwell dominated the midfield and provided a couple of assists and one goal to send us through to the next round. However, from this point onwards, form and belief dropped as results started to go against us. After a spell of three consecutive losses, we came up against Charterhouse School in the second round of ISFA. This was a thrilling encounter from which we came away with a 4-1 win, having initially gone 1-0 down. Top performances from the wide players, Alex Minshull and Louis Rhodes, spurred us on to play some exceptional football. Following the break, there was yet another win against Charterhouse, with Logan Cullen keeping us 86

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1-0 up thanks to some great saves; however, it was after this match that our confidence disappeared. Losing to Eton and Woodcote saw us go out of the ISFA and ESFA competitions, both in the third round. This was not a happy term for the 1st XI and we knew we needed something extraordinary to pull ourselves back. After Christmas and a well-needed break, we found our feet. Our resurgence started with an 8-2 thrashing of Glenthorne. Rohan Hobbs was the addition up front that we needed and Adam Lee solidified our defence, whilst Lucas Boyle and Sam Ernest formed a strong defensive partnership. From this moment on, we knew that we could and would achieve something from our season. In the London IS competition, our first game was against a well-structured Latimer side, who had been difficult to break down in the past. Our confidence had grown massively and with Shaun-Chris Joash scoring a hat-trick, including a wonder free kick and a goal from the half way line, we ran away as 6-2 victors. As a result of our exceptional turn around to the season, we made it to the London Independent School’s Cup Final, beating several traditionally challenging schools on the way, such as Royal Russell, City of London and Ardingly. In the final, we faced a determined Brentwood team that played with desire and organisation; however, a headed goal from Shaun and a thunderbolt from Louis Rhodes won us the match. At the heart of midfield, Stathis Kalathias was our Man of the Match and had a great performance, making sure the opposition could not get through. It was a fitting end to a remarkable season. A huge debt of gratitude is due to Mr Mills and Andy Ritchie for their support, patience, coaching and encouragement throughout the season, even when results were going very much against us: thank you for everything! Will Davis

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2nd XI Football

Led by Mr Doepel, the 2nd XI season has been an incredibly successful one. Jack Newton initially captained the team for the first game against Sutton. Despite defeat in our first match, the team began to gel soon after and this showed with a 4-4 classic, with Harry Short scoring a hat-trick. The team enjoyed an unbeaten run of five games in which forwards Guy Leman and Lucas Norfolk tore defences apart with their searing pace, whilst our main striker Rohan Hobbs led from the front with countless goals before joining the 1st XI. This was the same for the likes of Tim Sweeney – a midfield stalwart – and the aforementioned Harry, whose consistent performances led to call-ups. Despite the losses of personnel, the team remained as strong as ever, with Calogero Scannella slotting in as a like-for-like replacement of Rohan. The team had a magnificent run in the ESFA competition, managing to reach the semi-finals against all odds. Notable performances included Jack Newton’s dazzling close control to skip past three defenders and score a late winner in a 1-0 win in the second round – another true classic! In goal, Joe Wigoder and Tim Wallace rotated throughout the season as the number one – both producing stellar saves week in, week out. As the cup run continued, the squad’s Saturday matches became more and more prolific. This was epitomised by a 9-0 demolition of Whitgift, including a rare goal from our Marcos Alonso-esque left back George Johnston-Purvis on one of his many ventures up the pitch. The defence played out of the back at all times, with Noah Chong and Omri Nolan proving to be fantastic both on the ball and off it. This was exemplified by an incredible 40-yard assist over the top by Noah in the quarter-final of the cup. After Omri had produced a series of excellent performances, he too joined the 1st XI. This led to Lewis Chaplin joining the side; he solidified the team even further with his calmness on the ball. Our winning run came to an end in heated fashion in a 1-0 loss away to Chigwell, where Nick Grant was scythed down; yet, he showed the fight that was so present in the team all year to get up 88

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and produce another great performance, as he did throughout the season. Alex Carey along with Jack Munro anchored the centre of midfield down all year round with gritty performances. TJ Bayfield also recovered from a nasty concussion halfway through the season to re-join the side and put in some excellent displays. Late on in the season, following our cup exit in the semis against Glyn in a 2-1 loss, Upper Sixth players George Cory and Tom Flintham, who added to the fantastic atmosphere and play that had been so constant throughout our incredible season, also joined the team and made significant contributions. Although no trophies were won, there were many memorable moments, all of which were generated by a great group of players led by the constant positivity of Mr Doepel and Mr Burke. Jack Munro

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U16A Football

U16B Football

The U16As enjoyed an impressive start to the season, winning four out of their first five games and twice scoring 5 goals in a game. However, the team then had a difficult run, which was not helped when the team suffered a spate of concussions and exited the Surrey Cup. Despite dominating the game against Richard Challoner, Hampton failed to convert their dominance into goals and subsequently went on to lose on penalties. Yet, the team came through this challenging run under the guidance of Mr Chaveneau and a joint U16A and 2nd XI managed to reach the semi-finals of the London Cup. Furthermore, our best performance came in the last game of their season where we blew away Millfield, winning 7-1.

The U16Bs enjoyed a successful season which was only tainted by the occasional, rare and narrow defeat. We played a total of 12 games, winning the vast majority, 9, with 1 draw and 2 losses. Unfortunately, we did not get off to the optimal start when we were faced with the daunting prospect of facing the mighty Eton College. Despite a dominant performance, we struggled to provide an end product to our tantalizing play with our only goal coming from a potent header by Finlay Hamilton-Hunt, who later on in the season would end up being poached from us by the A team: a credit to his tremendous performances. After some decisions that we difficult to take, the game ended in a 3-1 loss, one which still leaves a sour taste in our mouths today.

Joel Booth was an ever-reliable keeper who pulled off numerous wonder saves throughout the season. Miles Patience and Will Greenstreet, when called upon, were also hugely impressive keepers and had exceptional games against Gordon’s School and Eton respectively. Hugo Raggett was a key member of the team at left back with his hard tackling, also breaking his four-year goal drought at Hampton. Tom Hudson, who played both right-back and in midfield rightly won player of the season and probably goal of the season for his powerful long shot against Millfield. Both Alex Fagan and Ben D’Souza maintained incredible work rates and passed superbly well out from the back. The ‘famous’ centre-back partnership of the U12B team that reached the ESFA final of Matt Cecil and Finlay Hamilton-Hunt were re-united and formed a solid partnership. Matt Tobin brought a sense of calmness to the defence with his calm distribution, though he and Matt Cecil also competed for own goal of the season. Henry Evans bossed the midfield throughout the season – although the follow up to his penalty against Ardingly cleared the rugby posts on the pitch behind! Seb Bokojnic, so impressive at the start of the season, was rightly called up to the 1st XI. Torin Umrigar and Tom Chandler were the best passers in the team and could play through any defence. Denil Manuel stood out on the pitch for his trickery and fast dribbles – though, he also stood out for wearing opposite coloured boots, leggings and a bright red snood while playing! Makarious Naguib had a dream debut for the U16As, scoring 2 goals from the bench. Joe Helm was Hampton’s top goal-scorer with 14, twice scoring 4 in a game. Finally, Tom Randall led the line extremely well and scored 13 goals in the season. Finally, a deserved thanks goes to our coaches, without whom none of this would have been possible! Well played all. Matt Cecil

However, in our following game, the duo of Finlay Duncan and Hamish Maccormick powered us to a 5-0 victory – in which even our ever-reliable goalkeeper, Will Greenstreet, even managed to get a pair of assists! Perhaps even more significant was the ability demonstrated by striker Tim Bird, as he managed to grab a hat-trick with a series of composed finishes. This game kicked off a six-match unbeaten run for our team which was built upon our stand-out back four. At right-back we had Alex Riley whose permanent attacking capabilities, accompanied by his ‘hard-man’ defensive mentality, made him irreplaceable at the back. On the left hand side, we had an equally aggressive figure in Alex Raeburn; whilst he gladly took on the role of being a defensive ‘enforcer’, his attacking play was just as vital to our team’s success. For the majority of the season, our centre-back partnership consisted of the complementary pairing of Cameron Fraser and Harry Lawrie. I cannot emphasise how critical these two have been for the team. The pace of Cameron Fraser, accompanied by the sheer defensive prowess of Harry Lawrie, meant that our goalmouth was rarely troubled. Our midfield three consisted of Ollie Wykes, Tomas Dwyer and Hamish. The tremendous work-rate of Ollie Wykes meant that our defence was rarely left exposed; the dogged dirty-work which he carried out did not go unnoticed as he was deservedly awarded the manager’s player of the year award. The pinpoint passing of Hamish Mccormick meant that our front three could never complain about a lack of chances. Throughout the season, our front three demonstrated an uncanny ability to – albeit inelegantly – find the back of the net with amazing consistency. Whilst, unfortunately, I cannot credit James Barnes for his clinical finishing, I must admire his knack for always being in the right place at the right time! The late additions of Makarious Naguib and Lucas Copplestone provided the touch of class and pace which our team had been lacking at times all year. On the right wing, we interchanged Agastya Jha and Rob Sapsford, both of whom provided tremendous speed and athleticism with their menacing runs behind the opposition back four. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Overall, we had an incredibly enjoyable season; despite multiple matches being frustratingly cancelled, I can wholeheartedly say we made the most of the games that we did play. Finally, I would like to give great thanks to Mr Odling whose relaxed, yet focused, attitude towards training and matches made us not only thoroughly enjoy playing for him but also allowed us to improve our game across the board. So from the whole team, ‘Thank you Sir, this season is as much yours as it is ours!’ Tomas Dwyer

Overall, it was a thoroughly successful season! Well done to all those involved and an enormous thank you to all of the staff who made it possible. Declan Connolly

U15B Football

U15A Football

The 2017-2018 U15B ESFA cup run was one of the best in the school’s history.

Overall, the U15As, coached by Mr Bolton and led brilliantly by captain Shahryar Rezvani, had a pleasing season. Out of a total 28 matches, 20 were won, 1 was drawn and 7 were lost. After a positive first half of the season, we had won ten games and were confident of going into the latter stages of the various cups. Then, we experienced a poor run of form mid-season that resulted in us crashing out of the ISFA cup last 16 and ESFA cup round 2, losing four games. During the October Half Term, the U15 squad were lucky enough to participate in a training camp in Porto. Here, the U15As produced one of their best performances of the season, beating an organised Porto Dragon Force.  After chasing the ball most of the first half, Alasdair Bolling gave Hampton the lead just before the first half whistle. In the second half, Hampton’s counter attacking football proved too much too handle for Porto Dragon Force: Declan Connolly, Josh Tatters and Milo Choudhry added to the tally to make it 4-0. The U15s regained their mojo, finishing the season strongly, with an unbeaten run of 9 games. The ever-dependable Oli Burke kept us ticking in midfield, whilst Alasdair Bolling won the race for the golden boot. Ali scored 20 goals throughout the season and played a big part to help us reach the Surrey Cup Final.  Second on the goal-scoring charts was vice-captain Declan Connolly, with 13 goals, whilst Milo Choudhry and Sami Omaar scored 12 – which included Sami scoring 7 goals in a single match! Sami was also a critical to our defensive work, at the heart of Hampton’s defence with Maxi Grindley and reassuringly backed up by Oscar Murphy between the posts.  To add celebration to end the season, the U15As won the Surrey Cup against a very strong Carshalton team 1-0: a tense encounter, with all of our U15s playing their part, won with a typical poacher’s goal from Ali.  90

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After cruising through the first few rounds without much trouble, Hampton found themselves away to Ivy Bridge College from Plymouth in the quarter-finals. After a long journey, the boys arrived at the grounds. Defeating the odds, they fought hard and were rewarded with a victory. Haris Williams was lightning on the wings, scoring two, and Jules Lockey worked excellently beside him, also netting two goals. Jules’ partnership with Dylan Dyson-Holland was one of the highlights of the season, as the latter also put one past the keeper in the 5-1 victory. The next round was at home against Hurstmere School from Kent. The conditions were abysmal, with multiple snow blizzards interrupting the match. However, the side’s resilience shined through once again as early goals gave the home side control of the match. Our defence was impeccable and tirelessly chased and repelled any attack. As more goals went in past the Hurstmere keeper, goalkeepers Callum Ruse and Sam Hussey never let their guard down. Both had great seasons with the gloves. Our defence was led by captain Josh Culshaw, a commanding and an incredibly solid centre-back. He was supported by right-backs Angus Whitworth and Amar Kotecha, both fantastic distributors of the ball and willing to chase down any winger. Albert Cloud was the most courageous player on the pitch in any game, frequently producing amazing clearances. Matt Lowe and Matt Wilson, both strong and calm on the ball, provided great assistance to the midfield. Hampton went on to win the semi-final 6-1. We carried on training hard, despite the final taking place in the summer season. When the big day arrived, we were ready. The final was held at The Bet365 Stadium, home of Stoke City: a once in a lifetime opportunity for the boys. In the warmup, the team looked in full flow, sharp and focused. Our midfield was a unit with great chemistry and skill, which they had shown throughout the season. It was led by the talented Jules, whilst Max Robinson contributed hugely to the team’s attacking dynamic. Danilo Delic,

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followed against Winchester College Bs, which resulted in a tightly contested 2-2 draw. An impressive 3-1 win followed against Lancing College B Team followed by two defeats against Wilson’s School and Bradfield College, despite a much-improved passing display. Two away games on 3G pitches followed: a 1-1 draw against St Paul’s and a comfortable 6-1 win against Brighton College. The season concluded with two thoroughly impressive performances: a 4-1 victory over City of London and then an outstanding 6-1 defeat of KCS Wimbledon. In goal, Harry Ray performed superbly well throughout the season, producing some excellent saves. In front of him, William Howard, Amar Kotecha and Milosz Sobczak were impressive performers at the back, whilst Alex Clinton, Cameron Hair, George Clark and Matt Avaunt-Smith performed well in the full-back positions.

The game began in our favour, with Matthew calmly slotting one home in the opening minutes. However, the elation was short-lived as, not long after, the opposition, Thomas Telford School, equalised with a scrappy header that trickled into the net. The game kept going back and forth, but no one had been lucky enough to score. Despite our gifted attack, comprising of Haris on the left wing, Mikey Ford, a sensational crosser and finisher, on the right, the quick and agile goal-scorer Dylan up top and Tanmay Thanawalla in support, Hampton just could not hit the back of the net. It was late in the second half when the opposition took the advantage, a rebound from a beautiful save fell in to the hands of the opposition striker and suddenly Hampton were behind. Despite a strong fight, we were unable to equalise on this occasion.

In midfield, captain Jamie Bird and brother Louis worked very effectively together, joined by Sam Power and Robin Little, whilst Alex Mason and Max Bailey worked well on the wings. Arjun Samra and Hashim Al-Obaidi worked tirelessly up front and combined effectively. Archie Thornton, although hampered by injury, always looked sharp when he played. Lucas Wallace, Dru Shori, Tanmay Thanawalla, Angus Whitworth and Jake Manketo also made strong contributions when they joined us from the B Team. Many thanks to Messrs Ritchie and Hurst for their coaching throughout the season. It has been a pleasure to manage the boys this year. All the best for next season! RDW

Although it was not to be for the U15Bs this season, such an amazing cup run – together with a regular season of wonderful highs and victories – means that the boys had the right to be proud of themselves for their achievement: one that will remain with them throughout their lives. Tanmay Thanawalla

U15C Football

This was a very pleasing year for the U15Cs with a final tally of six wins, two draw and three losses overall. The season began with our hardest fixture and a defeat against Eton College. The side bounced back with superb victories over Ardingly College and Charterhouse. An extremely close game the lion the magazine of hampton school

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U14A Football

The 2017-18 season was an encouraging season overall for the U14As; having played 23, 14 were won, 3 drawn and 6 lost. Up until Half Term, they were a formidable force: unbeaten for 8 games, with 6 goals conceded for an impressive 47 goals scored. One particularly impressive performance was in their 4-0 win against rivals Wilson’s school, with stunning goals from Jack Da Costa, Patrick Helm, and Xander Wright, along with a clean sheet for the defence. In ESFA they excelled, reaching the 6th round before being painfully beaten 4-1 by Oasis Academy. However, in the Surrey Cup they suffered a shock 2-1 defeat to Stanley Park in the early rounds. After recovering from a drop of form mid-season, the team ended their season in style with a 7-3 win against Millfield, in which the team had to battle hard all throughout the game. During the course of the season, the boys played their quick, attacking, passing game – even when conditions were tough – helping to break through any team’s defensive line. 92

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The attacking ability possessed by the U14As was impressive throughout the season. After a close start, it was eventually Louis Middleton that pulled away from the rest and topped the goal-scoring table with 22 goals. The midfield duo of Alex Dinan and Joe O’Prey provided crucial support to the attack – also contributing with some critical goals in some particularly challenging matches. Billy Hutchings also offered his superb range of passing, while screening the back four diligently. Ready to step in at any moment was the combination of attacking midfielder Ben Bird and the versatile Eddie McMillan; they contributed at crucial times whenever called up to do something special. Later on in the season, the side were able to call upon Nat Woolagan from the B squad, along with the late arrival of Antonio Polleri. The formidable defence, consisting of Jonah Blake, Sam Evans together with a combination of full-backs in Freddie Seddon, Marco Ferruci, Luke Paskin and Noah Wood, were able to keep 6 clean sheets with the help of Joe Gillespie, who pulled off a number of spectacular saves. A particular stand-out performance from the defensive unit was against The Forest School, helping the side to a convincing 4-0 victory and an important clean sheet. The boys were able to score in each consecutive game this season, achieving a target that was set back in September. Overall, the season was filled with various successes and exciting passing football, whilst all matches were played with superb desire and determination. Next season will undoubtedly be filled with even more successes on the pitch – and possibly some trophies! Jonah Blake and Sam Evans

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U14B Football

Played 22. Won 15. Drawn 3. Lost 4. With a goal difference of 55, this certainly was an outstanding season for the U14Bs. The season began on a promising note, with a comfortable 10-1 win over Sutton Grammar. The first real test of the season came three games in: Eton. After a close game, two late goals meant we struggled to the first defeat of our season. However, under the excellent tactical stewardship of Mr Burke, our playing style began to take shape. After several high-scoring victories, including another 10-1 win in the first round of ESFA, we came up against our rivals: Glyn School. Reversing a 7-1 defeat the previous year, we won a fiercely competitive game 4-3. Our ESFA run continued and took us to Wanstead Flats, and the coldest temperatures known to man. Bitter winds made the conditions even tougher, and so it went to extra time at 1-1. However, a late winner from star striker Rohan Sahota was all we needed. The Round of 16 Match was against Eastbrook School. After a tight 4-4 match, it went to penalties and a 4-3 defeat. Encouraged but disappointed, we focused on our regular Saturday fixtures and beat a feisty Wimbledon College 6-3.

They were lead by vocal captain and centre-back Sandy Mitchell, with rock-solid defensive midfielder Fergie Briston taking on the role of vice-captain. Arthur Bothamley was always making saves in goal, while Zak Dyer was ever reliable as his back-up in crucial situations. After spending many periods working on defensive structure, the defensive unit had improved greatly over the season. Tough centre-back Luca Parrish was always up for a challenge, while full-backs Olly Coles and Tom DeGruchy were resolute, strong in the air, and always keen to be an option off the ball. Finlo Cowley adapted quickly to his new defensive role, and provided great impetus bombing down the left-hand side. Nat Woolaghan and Billy Atkinson ran the show in midfield, dominating opposition. On the wings, Jude Glasson and Sam Walker were always keen to send crosses in, while Theo Back and James Kerr both provided good link-up play and directness in attack. Fergus MacEacharn was always a threat playing just off the striker, and his creative passes always led to chances. Sam Colvine always entertained, displaying great skill and vision to move the ball around the park. Rohan Sahota was a goal-machine, scoring nearly 50 goals by utilising his pace, physicality and excellent finishing technique. Overall, it was a very good season with the boys all working for each other in a great team spirit. They should be looking forward to developing even further next season! Sandy Mitchell

U14C Football

But, there was drama yet to come... An article had appeared on the ESFA website, unannounced, declaring that Eastbrook had been disqualified from the competition for fielding A team players. While it first looked as though we were still out, tenacious pestering of ESFA resulted in a second chance, and we were reinstated for a quarter-final away at Kingsdale Foundation School. On a last-minute replacement pitch, more akin to a mud bath, four goals from Rohan Sahota secured an easy 6-0 victory over last year’s finalists. Our reward? St. Luke’s Science and Sports College in Exeter. After an extremely early 7:45am meet for a 1:30pm kickoff, we set off on the journey of gargantuan proportions. After an early header from Sandy Mitchell, a goal for winger Sam Walker and yet another hat-trick for Rohan Sahota meant that the Hampton U14Bs were only the third team in Hampton history to qualify for an ESFA Final. So the date was set: Friday 11th May, at Stoke City’s Premier-League quality Bet365 Arena. After travelling up with the U15Bs, who also had an ESFA final, we were prepared to take on Sandbach School. After conceding two unlucky goals in the first half, Hampton had to dig deep and find something special. Spurred on by great support from the Hampton faithful, two goals from the tournament’s top scorer Rohan Sahota meant that the game went to another penalty shootout. After even pegging throughout the shootout, our final penalty was cruelly denied by the woodwork, and so we lost 4-3 on penalties. Despite a bittersweet runners-up medal, the boys should be immensely proud of what they have achieved over this long campaign.

Arsène Wenger once said of his Arsenal team, ‘We do not buy superstars. We make them’. The same can certainly be said of the U14Cs, which has produced its own superstars this year and has enjoyed an Arsenal-style winning streak of the glory years as well as some sublime football, especially in the middle of the field. From 13 games, 11 were won with only 2 defeats – both of which saw particularly difficult playing conditions from a boggy marshland to a winter wonderland! Remarkably, we scored 69 goals over the season and only conceded 16, leaving us with an impressive goal difference. This is a particularly strong group of footballers who played many of their games at a higher level against B teams, and won. Throughout the season, we concentrated on increasing our possession of the ball, and passing as a team; there can be no doubt that we dominated almost all of our games in possession, and more often than not converted this into a flurry of goals, the record being our 12-2 away victory over Ardingly College Bs in September. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Above all, I have been impressed by the attitude of the boys in this team: even when they were winning by eight or nine goals, they played like respectful sportsmen, shook hands with the opposition, and congratulated one another after each goal and each performance. They enjoyed their football and their unparalleled camaraderie was present both on and off the pitch. Although this was a large squad which counted 18 players in some home fixtures, the U14C players were always patient with one another and adapted each game to the strengths of their individual players. Although this is a team of superstars, some are worthy of particular mention: Sam Brewster led the team as a fearless captain from the back four, while James Wiley was our player of the season with some dangerous runs and curling crosses from the wings. Amar Midha made a name and reputation for himself with some strong tackles in defence, while Mustafa Hussain was clinical in front of goal. All of the U14C players can be proud of their individual contributions to the season. While the season may have ended with a defeat to Dulwich College at home, I am confident this team will return next season with the same confidence and consistency we saw this season. This is a very promising golden generation of Hampton footballers, and the best is still to come from this talented group of players. MB

U14D Football

This season has undoubtedly been as success for the U14D team. 11 Games were played, 7 were won, 2 drawn and 2 lost with a positive goal difference of 25. The team developed as a whole and gained confidence as the season progressed. During the season, the team showed remarkable versatility, adapting formations and playing in different positions. Goalkeepers  Xandy Slater  and  William Barnes  pulled off many incredible saves throughout the season. Samaksh Agarwal has made several goal-line clearances in order to keep us in contention. Jamie Lund,  Alessandro Russell  and  Leon Griffiths  were strong contributors to the team’s total of 47 goals with their calm and composed finishing.  Joel Arulpragasam  took up an attacking midfield role, scoring a handful of goals.  Luke Michels  provided many assists varying from corners, crosses and through passes as a prolific winger.  After being moved up to the Ds,  Rishab Lamba showcased his speed and power in the midfield. We have all enjoyed our football this year and we are looking forward to next season.    Joel Arulpragasam 94

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U13A Football

There were some notable performances throughout the season, the standout one being Joe Treacy’s five goals in the win against Whitgift. Alex Di Soccio is becoming a threatening and creative influence in midfield, whilst Ben Robinson was a workhorse for the team, providing the balance and grit that the side needed. At the back, Sam Brewster did an excellent job in the centre of defence and as captain, and Joe Moylan-Jones and Archie Kimble developed into dangerous midfield players. RRT

The U13As played 15, winning 8, drawing 0 and losing 7; along the way, they scored 49 goals, conceding only 26.

U13B Football

The team enjoyed a season of steady growth and improvement, and put on some excellent displays and results in the process. The season began with two very accomplished wins against Sutton Grammar, 3-1, and Bournemouth Collegiate School, 3-0. A tough run of fixtures followed where the team won only two of the next seven games – comprehensive wins over Newland House and Kingston Grammar School – but lessons were being learnt, and the team was becoming a more cohesive unit, despite the illusion of results. All this came to fruition with a marvellous run of four wins in six games, which included a memorable 5-1 victory over Whitgift, and perhaps the performance of the season in a 6-0 win against Wilson’s – against whom they had lost 4-2 against in the reverse fixture.

The U13B football team recorded an impressive season, achieving 10 victories out of the 14 games played and only 3 defeats. This was the result of the strong team performances interspersed with notable the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport individual performances. Only 23 goals were conceded this season, due to the tenacious tackles and spectacular saves. Yet it is a game of two halves, and credit also goes to the creative midfield and sharp forwards. We breached the opposition 63 times because of this. We started the season away at Sutton Grammar, where the team brushed off the cobwebs of summer to win convincingly 6-1. The biggest win of the season came just before the second round of the cup – an 11-0 victory over Newland House. We were drawn against Glyn for our second round of the cup, whom we had previously beaten 3-1 as part of the 4-game winning streak that we held at that stage. We conceded an early goal and faced an uphill struggle, as they held tight at the back. However, Zach Bartlett unlocked their defence with a through ball in the final minute to Euan Gallagher, who calmly slotted the ball into the back of the net. In a closely contested extra-time, with no outright winner, it went to the dreaded penalty shootout. If it was not nerve-wracking enough, there was the added pressure of Mr Knibbs watching! Like England in almost all penalty shootouts, we suffered the same fate as those greats before us, losing 4-5. Credit goes to Louis Simmonds-Gooding who managed to get his boy-sized hands to most shots despite the man-sized goal! The second half of the season got off to a promising start with a hard-fought draw at home to Chigwell, in which centre-backs Dominik Hagmann and Daniel Townend played very well to earn us a draw. We then travelled to Dulwich and won a close game 4-2, with striker, and occasional right-back, James Bristow and Kyan Soni providing the goals. The next game saw us convincingly beat

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Abingdon 6-1 with midfielders Louis Williams, Johnny EvansHutchison and Samay Gajree proving key in getting through the opposition’s defence. Two consecutive away trips saw us lose 3-2 at Abingdon, but we recovered well to beat Wilson’s 3-1 next time out. Wingers Jamie Hacking, Cameron Bara-Taylor and Albie Hyde excelled in the latter of these two games. We concluded the season with two clean sheets in impressive wins against Claremont, 2-0, and St John’s, 4-0. Defenders Matthew Sedgewick and Timothy Lee, a late recruit to the A team, were instrumental in keeping the opposition at bay. Unfortunately, our season petered out after this due to poor weather conditions, so it only remains for us to thank our coach Mr Schurch and to wish everyone in the team good luck for next season. Conor McNeany and Timothy Lee Special mentions also go to Kyan Soni for being relentlessly clinical as our striker – earning the team’s Golden Boot award – and to Jamie Hacking, Matthew Sedgewick and Samay Gajree for showing tenacious attitudes and being the most improved players in the squad for the season. Finally, Timothy Lee deserves great praise for his captaincy and for breaking into the A team. Well done to all though for the huge efforts put in this season and the great steps many have taken in developing their talents, well done and good luck next year! CMS

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U13C Football

The U13Cs played 8 matches this season, winning 6 and losing 2. Our best result was an outstanding 12-0 win against St John’s School, Leatherhead; but, unfortunately, we could not keep up our invincible record from the beginning of First Year, losing against Wilson’s School U13Bs and Abingdon School U13Bs – with 10 players sidelined due to illness! Our top scorer was Owain Humphrey; together with his strike partner, William Knowles, they scored many notable goals, including a fantastic free kick in a 7-0 win against Claremont school. Our midfield was comprised of Albie Hyde, who was involved in the most goals this season, Jack Farthing and Xavier Miklichansky-Maddocks. Our wide players included Oliver Drew, Oliver Rochard, Theo Joy-Page and Ben Fryer. Our defence was rock-solid, owing much to the hard work of Ben Hagan, Arya Lim Amiri, Charlie Murphy and James O’Donoghue. Our goalkeepers, Adam Dell and Henri Beauvilain, were incredible in saving us – though only on the rare occasion that an opposition player got a shot away!

Yiannis Markellos, Theo Gibson, Barnaby Byers, Daniel Edge, Freddie Blair, Paddy Quirke and Harry Spencer, all excelled up front, while Jasper Rankin, Theo Mantel-Cooper, Tayin Takhar – before he left us for the Cs – and James O’Brian worked well together in the midfield.

The defenders all proved to be very useful indeed, and credit goes to Tej Mosaku, Edwin Martin, Oliver Tang, Verduna Diyasena, Jamie Fry and Sebastien Abercrombie. James O’Donohue and Charlie Murphy were both outstanding in defence before they were also claimed for the C team. Last and by no means least, a special mention must got to Henri Beauvilain, who kept goal with great athleticism and panache throughout the season, making some exceptional saves. I wish the whole team the best of luck for next year! SES

Albie Hyde and Jack Farthing We were hugely impressed by the boys’ commitment throughout the season. There were some very early Saturday morning meet times and the lunch-time training sessions were always well attended. The boys were keen to learn new concepts and techniques and a big thanks must go to Mr Ritchie, Mr Burke and Mr Hurst who all assisted with Games and training sessions. Particular praise should go to those boys who played a number of different positions, including goalkeeper, when the team was in need. Good luck for next year!   GD, ND and VS

U12A Football

U13D Football The U13D team got off to an excellent start, with an outstanding 7-0 win over Thomas’s, Clapham, and this was followed by two more impressive victories over Newland House, 6-0, and Chigwell, 8-3. Unfortunately, the season went downhill after Christmas. We lost 1-4 to Dulwich in a match that was in fact closer than the score would suggest, and then 2-8 to Ewell Castle, although this game included what was certainly our Goal of the Season – a free kick taken from the half-way line by captain, Theo Mantel-Cooper, which looped beautifully over the keeper’s head and into the back of the net, raising team morale for the final match of the year!

What was most impressive about the U12A team was their ability to keep on competing until the final whistle: they never gave up. This phenomenal attitude was exemplified in two cup matches. The first was in the ESFA Cup against Trinity School, Croydon, where the team came back from going behind twice before scoring in the last minute to win the match and progress on to the next round. The second occasion was a County Cup match against Carshalton Boys’ College, in which the team were 2-1 down in extra-time, only to score an equaliser and go on to win on penalties – despite the drama of penalties, the boys did superbly well to hold their nerve under extreme pressure. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Special mentions are also due to the boys whose outstanding performances resulted in them representing the ISFA side, something of which they ought to be extremely proud: Chibby Nwoko, Toby North and Conrad Knight. Although these players in particular were rightly rewarded for their efforts, the various successes of the season were undoubtedly due to each and every player involved in the squad and their combined efforts, both as an attacking and defensive unit. Overall, the side had a superbly successful season, making it to the quarter-finals of the County Cup and Round 5 of the ESFA competition, winning 13 games, drawing 3 and only losing 4 all season – as well as scoring a staggering 70 goals along the way to give fans plenty of value for their money! CH

were Lucas Hermann Sosa and Francesco Olivieri, who kept their positions well and became harder to beat as the season developed. The centre of midfield was most often graced by the silk-and-steel combination of Obrad Kuzmanovic and Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid, with Ed Joyce making an excellent contribution after Christmas. On the left wing, Tom Short’s pace and determination became influential in the latter stages of the cup, while the mercurial Finn Gould could play anywhere in attack. By the end of the season Aaron Mills had featured in almost every position, showing an eye for goal and a wonderful early pass. Two strong candidates for Player of the Season were captain Hayden Christian and striker Alpha Barry. Hayden’s powerful bursts down the right caused endless headaches for opposition players, whilst Alpha comfortably outscored his teammates to end the season on 24 goals. With such hunger in attack and strength in defence, this is surely a team to inspire poetry for many years to come.

U12B Football

PDT

U12C Football

It is difficult to write a single haiku that encapsulates the U12B season, 2017-18. Assuming an imperfect understanding of Japanese phonetic units, the first obstacle is to restrict oneself to a syllable count of 5-75. Working within this narrow framework, there is then only enough room for one Aaron Mills if a Francesco Olivieri and a Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid are also part of the equation. Compounding this is the need for a kigo, or seasonal reference, and the puzzling insistence on a kireji: what exactly is a ‘cutting word’? In confusion, I submit the following to Mr Baker, who shakes his head in despair: In the grey drizzle Wet jumpers lie forgotten. When will it be spring? ‘Try writing something straightforward about the season,’ Mr Baker suggests. ‘Mention the boys. Make it less about you. And keep the word count down.’ I return, crushed, to my laptop. It seems that more than a haiku is required. This season, the boys progressed to within minutes of the U12B ESFA Cup final, scoring 82 goals across 23 fixtures. Success was built from the back, with goalkeeper Matthew Barkus one of the best distributors the 12Bs have had for several years. At the heart of defence, Zac Cacheux was the runaway winner of Players’ Player of the Season, timing his tackles with unerring accuracy. No less impressive 98

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What defines a great season? Excellent results? Notably improved levels of performance over the course of the season? Magnificent team spirit and a squad who enjoy their football every time they go out on the pitch? The U12C team had all of these attributes; but, personally, I would plump for the latter. We played opposition of vastly varying quality, we played in hail and heatwave, we played with full size goals and near five-a-side goals but no matter the variables, the constant was the impeccable manner in which the boys played and conducted themselves. Toby Harbour and Matt Lyons were a resolute last line of defence when each played in goal, shielded by the cultivated Ben Millington-Jones and the uncompromising Joe Earle – the latter scoring one of our goals of the season against Dr Challoner’s! The relentless dynamism of Felix von der Geest, the vision and movement of Rohan Crowe and Ben Rollason and the thrusting ball-carrying of Monty Robb helped us move the ball with real purpose and frequently made us a joy to watch. Up front, captain Dan Cubbon provided mature leadership, artful creativity and lots of goals, whilst the destructive Saganan Thuraisingam terrorised defences with his pace and power, setting a new U12C goal-scoring record and always playing with the broadest of smiles on his face. A special mention goes to players of the season Sam Spence, the fulcrum of the team, and Camilo Clarke, whose technical excellence on the left set us apart from many of our opposition. There

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sport were telling contributions also at various times from Evan Little, Felix Lyon, Harry McLusky and latterly James Derrick, who contributed a sackful of spring goals.

U12E Football

We frequently played B teams from other schools and defeated all of them, succumbing only twice – creditably – to the A teams of Berkhamsted and KCS Wimbledon. Thanks to all of the boys who played; they deserve all the credit for a fine season and I wish them well for the future where many of them will undoubtedly break into the B team. CAM

U12D Football

It was hugely pleasing to be able to field an U12E team at points throughout the season and the boys rose to each occasion; their conduct, enthusiasm and competitive attitude was always enormously uplifting – even on a Saturday morning when snow and frost left us as one of only two fixtures still standing! The highlight of the season was undoubtedly a thrilling 4-4 draw against Dulwich! The team raced into a 3-1 lead before half time, only to find themselves trailing 3-4 with less than a minute left on the watch. Incredibly, with less than ten seconds to go, they pulled themselves level with the final kick of the match – much to the jubilation of the sizeable crowd watching!

The 2017-18 season was fantastic for the U12Ds. Buoyed by a 5-1 victory in our opening game against King’s College School, the side went on to a string of convincing victories, remaining unbeaten throughout the whole of the first term. Bolstered by some new recruits, January 2018 started with an excellent victory against Dulwich College, but the match of the season turned out to be a nail-biting thriller at home to Ewell Castle School’s A-team that had Mr Knibbs cheering on the sidelines. Despite a winning goal for the away side in the final 30 seconds of the game, which saw Hampton lose 3-4, all agreed it had been the most exciting game of the year. Players’ Player of the Season, Milo Band, had a superb season in goal, stopping all kinds of seemingly impossible shots and saving several penalties. Leo Hartley’s hat trick in the opening game of the season got the momentum going, and James Derrick continued to rack up the goals all season, including an impressive five-goal haul against Dulwich College. Captain Jack Seddon put in some excellent attacking and defensive performances, while forwards Joe Fearnside and Tom Whitehill also contributed to the season’s goal tally. Vishal Saha and Findlay Barrand had some excellent games on the wing, scoring themselves and assisting the strikers, while Kristian Brookes, Cameron Jones, and Meher Baga were key players in the midfield. Naavya Sharma, Matthew Irvine and Theo Webb proved a formidable backline at the start of the season, and the arrival of Evan Little, Harry McLusky and Felix Lyon into the side in January led to some of the best matches that the team played all season.

Edward Karabelnikov-Bull was superb in goal throughout and rescued the team on multiple occasions. Ayoub Khan, Leo Sutherby and Ben Adigun were the players of the season, each of whom demonstrated superb skill and speed whilst also bringing others into the game. Oscar Madden’s partnership and the heart of defence with Tom Oliver developed well whilst Adam Jeffrey’s weaving runs frequently deceived opposition defences – and, at times, himself! Ed Gooze-Zijil, Krishan Singah, Thomas Perry, Mohamed-Ali Oweiss, Matthew Irvine, Theo Webb, Shayo Elufowoju, Tom Whitehall and Thomas Perry all played their role and, most importantly, contributed to the excellent fun that was had on the pitch in matches and in Games sessions all season. Well done to all you and I hope that you continue to enjoy your football as much as you move up the school! MMB

The team spirit and positive approach that the boys showed throughout was exemplary and I am sure they will be equally successful as they move up to the U13Ds. MBE the lion the magazine of hampton school

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1st XV Rugby It would be fair to say last season was a rollercoaster for the 1st XV. There were some great highs and difficult lows, but it was one that everyone learned a huge amount from in preparation for next season. We won our opening game against John Fisher, scoring six tries. We had only beaten this team narrowly the season before, so it was a significant improvement. That Saturday, however, we played the Leavers XV and lost, starting a difficult run for the team. George Tsitsis crossed twice, but we were beaten 36-28 and lost at Whitgift the following week. Nick Bitzakidis was among the scorers as we had a much improved performance against the 2015 and 2016 NatWest Cup Champions Bromsgrove, but we were narrow losers for the third game in a row. Our first win came the following week; we began our own cup run with a 10-try victory over Salesian, but we lost that Saturday against High Wycombe, despite Rory Carroll scoring his third try in four days. Defensive errors, rather than teams dominating us, was costing us games and contributed to both the High Wycombe defeat and a loss to Canford a week later, though Felix Boardman crossed for his first 1st XV try. We finished the first half of the term with a strong victory to progress in the NatWest Cup against local rivals Tiffin, where Alex Boag and Arthur Thomas were among the scorers in an eight-try win. This gave us momentum heading into St Joseph’s, a tournament where we had won the cup and plate in 2016 and 2017 respectively. In our opening game we lost to QEGS Wakefield, but overcame Hurtspierpoint College to set up a chance to reach the cup competition against Millfield. We fought back from 14-3 down to win 22-19 and qualified for the cup on tries scored – the same technicality that had cost us the year before. The following day was ultimately not the outcome we wanted, with narrow defeats to Brighton and Dulwich stopping us from progressing; but, we managed to finish the competition on a high with victory over Denstone. It was a tournament we learned a lot from and it was great to see Aidan Barry among others getting their chance at 1st team level. We won back-to-back games straight after the Half Term scoring 14 tries over wins against Seaford and Wimbledon Colleges in four days. Alec Lloyd-Seed contributed 40 of the points scored in the games as we advanced to the Fourth Round of the NatWest Cup. We lost to Wellington the following weekend, in spite of Jack Mulloy’s impressive score, but learned a lot from playing one of the top schools in the country. We led 14-0 at Bishops Wordsworth the week after, but injuries and mistakes cost us as they fought back to win in the rain. That did not set us up well for the crucial NatWest Cup match against Whitgift and, despite a spirited performance, it would prove to be the end of our run in the competition. A draw with Sherborne showed improvement on the previous year’s defeat, and whilst we lost to a very strong Brighton side the week after, it was clear we were improving. The injuries that had been an issue for us throughout the season were beginning to ease and we were getting better. Nick Van Der Merwe – our captain who had been unavailable since the start of the season – scored on his return in that game and put in a fantastic performance in our highlight of the season the following week. We had never beaten Dulwich away from home in a competitive game and went there less than a week after they had won Schools Rugby’s highest honour: the Champions Trophy. Trailing 19-12 at half-time after showing a lot of fight in the first half, it seemed that run would continue. However, some outstanding individual performances and a collective team spirit helped us battle to a 29-19 win. It was a great day and testament to how hard we had worked to improve as a team. On our return post-Christmas, Fergus McWilliams scored a brace and Finn Battle scored his first try as we beat Glyn 50-0. We started strongly against Warwick, leading 15-0, but the soon-to-be National Champions hit back for a 24-15 victory. 100

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Gwilym Bradley, who has had a special season playing rugby for Welsh Exiles and continuing to play for London Irish Academy, scored in a 41-17 win over St Benedict’s, where Fifth Year Tommy Nagle managed to grab a hat-trick. We would lose our last two games of the season against Trinity and Whitgift, but there were special moments in both games with longserving hooker Charlie Longford scoring a brace against Trinity and Shane Barry scoring an incredible try in our final 15s game of the season. Thanks to Mr Thomson, Mr Beattie and Mr Mobb-Smith for all their help this season. We learned a great deal from the season itself and have plenty of positives to take forward. Congratulations also have to go to Shane Barry and Rory Carroll, who had trials for Ireland 7s, Gwilym Bradley on his selection for Welsh Exiles and Captain Nick Van Der Merwe, who completed three years in the first team. Louis Lynagh

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2nd XV Rugby

Our season started earlier than other teams’ as we returned from a tour to North America unbeaten. Even if we did only play three matches, the bonds between the Upper and Lower Sixth were already firmly in place. This was clearly reflected in the opening game of the season against Croydon-based rivals John Fisher. Firsthalf finishes from James Lancaster took Hampton into the break in a dominant position. James proved on tour, and throughout the season, that nothing can stop him playing his game. Despite a late revival, Hampton held on to win 24-12. However, our next opponents were the formidable Whitgift, who proved to be too much of a force for a brave Hampton team. Despite two tries from pacey winger Jack Mulloy, we travelled back to London without the victory. This coupled with a subsequent loss to Bromsgrove only served to dampen spirits. The makeshift 10/12 axis of Alex Thornbury and Will Miller did not quite prove to be the winning solution! The rot continued as, despite one of the most spirited second half efforts in memory and a delightful second half try resulting from a cross-field kick into the arms of Dan John, Hampton ran out losers 12-27 to RGS High Wycombe. However, Hampton were soon back to winning ways against Canford, where first half tries from Zak Wort, fresh back from injury, meant we won 20-17. Particular mention must also go to Dan John for one of the most peculiar cross-field kicks of the season! Despite this, he would make up for this as he played an integral role in a resilient defence which refused to let a determined Canford side over in the final minutes. Fergus McWilliams or ‘Fergie’ to his mates, showed nerves of steel to kick a match-winning penalty in windy conditions. Our season continued with a last-play defeat to Seaford College, despite a well taken first half try from Felix Boardman. This setback was followed by a spirited forward performance against a superior

Wellington side where Felix made the scorers list again. Jamie Dunbar showed great awareness to put in Adam Loweth for an unorthodox try. Yet, despite an early penalty from Alex Thornbury and the return of Harry Wright, Bishop Wandsworth made it another defeat. It was at this point that, due to long-term injury and illness, Mr Baker was forced into making a couple of personnel changes: Zak Wort stepped in at fly-half and showed confidence and intelligence, whilst Will Miller was appointed captain. A fantastic kicking performance from Joe Wheeler against a gutsy Sherborne side meant Hampton snuck a 25-22 victory – social secretary Max Murphy lead the post-match celebrations! Our upturn in form came just in time for our encounter with bitter rivals Brighton College. Hampton dug deep; Bruce Gilbert in particular terrorised the 12/13 channel all game, helping us to a 21-20 win. You should always be gracious in victory, especially as a coach, yet Mr Baker’s broad grin was present for everyone to see at the post match meal. We then faced potentially our biggest challenge in Dulwich College who raced into a convincing lead. However, individual brilliance from players such as Ed Lord, whose quick tap, meant that at half time we were well and truly in the game. However, in the second half we were on the end of some unlucky decisions and ended up losing a close game 36-29. We would then go onto face Warwick in dire conditions who proved to be too strong for us, despite Finn Battle running in a free-flowing backs move. The highly anticipated local derby against St Benedict’s awaited. Our opposition took an early 14-0 lead, but found themselves with only 14 men at half-time. Reme Edetanlen took full advantage, touching down just before the break. Hampton emerged in the second half, full of vigour, crashing over early on, to bring the game the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport to 14-10. Hooker Max Murphy then ignored the backs outside him to run around their 12 and 13, handing off the winger, and crashing over for a remarkable try in the corner. Mr Baker and fellow spectators were speechless as we came out victors at 20-14. We finished our season almost how we began, with a match against Whitgift. However, once again, their talent showed, and a 51-0 loss reinforced that they currently are one of the best teams on the circuit. It was a disappointing, but not sad, end for a team which shows a lot of promise going into next season, who I am sure will be confidently led by characters such as Zak Wort, Joe Wheeler and Jamie Dunbar.

The Upper Sixth deserve specific praise and thanks; having played alongside them throughout our Hampton careers, it has been an absolute pleasure. The greatest thanks must go to our coach, Mr Baker or ‘Bakes’. He successfully orchestrated a team week in, week out and unfailingly gave up his Saturdays – if not his Wednesday afternoons too – for us and, without him, we would have no idea of what we were doing! I wish the current Lower Sixth all the best for next season and you can expect to see the leavers cheering you on from the touchline. Will Miller

3rd XV Rugby

This season has been great for the 3rd XV, with a marked increase in both commitment and team spirit over last year. This year’s team were a particularly special group, and I could not have been more proud to captain the side. We got off to a slow start with a 7-29 loss to Whitgift, despite strong runs from the likes of Ethan Delaney-Smith and Miles Powell, and good direction from scrum-half Jack Grady. Sadly, we also lost our feisty hooker, Oscar Stiff, in the final play of the match to a broken collarbone. The subsequent change in attitude and commitment from the whole team was amazing, and we went on to win five consecutive matches. Of these, two games really stand out. The first was a closely fought battle against Bromsgrove, ending 32-31 – though they did lend us two very talented players, one of whom scored a stonking try for which he was suitably praised and heckled! Maxwell Murphy also played a great game at fly-half, which made a rather drastic change from his usual front-row position. The other was, in my opinion, the highlight of the season: the match against Wellington College. From the first play we knew it would be a tough one, owing to both the opposition’s skill and size. It was fabulous to see the whole team fully commit and support each other, with every player putting their body on the line for the win, resulting in a 27-19 victory for the boys. Unfortunately, a slight drop in form later in the season owing 104

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to injuries sustained by a number of players. Vice-captain Rowan Neil did a sterling job skippering the side through these hard times, and he played fantastically at fly-half all season. Special mentions must go to stalwart forwards Sam Park, Reme Edetanlen, Matthew Mundy, Joel Fogarty, Archie Pink and Elias Petrenko for a fantastic scrum and lineout, not to mention some dominating work at the breakdown and big carries all season. There was also some great skill and footwork from our backs with strong runs from James Horner, Patrick Haworth, Ollie McMillan, Ethan and Miles. I also feel the commitment of every player on the side this year should be recognized, but especially that of Leo Currie, James Dowden, Alan Blackman-Rogers, Ben Foreman and Archie for hardly missing a single training session or match all season. Overall, it has been a pleasure playing with this side this year, and an honour to captain them. I hope that next year’s season bring even more success for this team and I hope they will all carry on supporting their teammates as if they were brothers. Good luck for next year, it has been a pleasure! Gareth Littlewood

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U16A Rugby

Our season began on a sunny afternoon against John Fisher. After a long pre-season, we were undoubtedly prepared and ready. After a slow start, we began to open up: Theo Johnson smashed through to score a try. The game finished 52-5, a great start. Next up we played Whitgift, one of the strongest team in the country. With 5 minutes to go, we were one point behind thanks to a brace from Aidan Barry and a dummy-and-go that fooled all of the defenders by Jack Berg. Unfortunately, as we were pressing their line, an intercept was taken and a game which could have easily been won finished 21-29; despite this, there were promising signs for the season ahead. Following this was arguably our most important game of the season: the Middlesex Cup quarter-final. After previously losing to Harrow twice in two years, we knew we had to beat them this year. In extremely windy conditions with a relatively large crowd, the game was tense from the outset. A crisp move sent Patrick Silcox clean through, allowing him to set up Edmund Kenny to go in under the posts. Following this, Rory Carr finished off after some slick hands to dive over in the corner. The tries kept on coming and the game finished 34-14, sending us to the semi-final. In between our cup games, we played RGS High Wycombe, a renowned tough opponent. From the outset, everyone was ready for this game and it was won 31-12. Next up was Seaford. After a long journey, we did not perform to our maximum potential; however, a memorable tackle from George Price – who carried their number 8 back almost 10m – was a highlight. In the semi-finals, we faced Mill Hill, whom we had previously never played. After a shaky start, the game began to open up and a speedy break from Dan Finlay led to a 60m try. Finishing 4119, we were going to Allianz for the final! After our semi-final, we narrowly lost to a greatly improved Bishop Wordsworth’s School and an always-strong Sherborne School. However, we bounced back for our Middlesex Cup Final at Allianz Park. We beat University College School 13-5, thanks to a powerful pick-and-go try by Theo Johnson and Aidan Barry’s incredible footwork. This was a great moment for the team as it was one of our goals at the beginning of the season to win the Middlesex Cup. We took our momentum into our match against Brighton College. Jake Robinson stood up to the task, filling Louis Goodwin’s role with some excellent distribution. Matt Wilson carried well, resulting in him scoring a couple good tries. Next up was intense rivals Dulwich. We were unlucky to lose, despite finishing the game with 12 men due to a host of injuries. Tommy Nagle marked his return from injury with two tries. We then had a comfortable 55-5 win over Glyn with some great performances from Paddy Wheeler

and Joe Park, both of whom had deservedly been promoted to the A team. The next weekend we played Warwick, where we put in arguably our best performance of the season against a Natwest Cup finalist team. Through the freezing cold rain and snow, we gave our all to beat them 17-5. Credit must be given to the back row of Archer Chilcott, George Price and Nick Richards, who racked up a frightening number of tackles and turnovers. In attack, Patrick Silcox was on fire at full back, beating any defender who crossed his path. Additionally, Louis Goodwin commanded the backline into scoring some perfectly executed backs moves, especially considering the appalling conditions. We carried on this winning mentality into our following game against St Benedict’s. Some critical finishing from Tom Hayward and powerful carrying from Max Goldin helped seal the win. Our final 15s game was another fixture against Whitgift. We started the game well, winning at half time. This was due to some incredible tackling and an impressive work rate from James Poole. Will Howting also scored twice, including one that involved a 15-man maul at the end of the first half – undoubtedly our try of the season! Our 15s season was a series of ups and downs and one wrought with injury, but we can hold our heads up high for how we performed and can be hugely proud of our accomplishments. Our 7s seasons was very limited due to the weather and our only tournament was the Rosslyn Park National Sevens. We played some excellent sevens and got through to the second day. Although we lost to an impressive Tonbridge side, we can be proud to be one of the top sixteen sevens schools in the country. Thanks must go to Mr Stebbings for organising all our training sessions and coaching us well. Archer Chilcott and Louis Goodwin

U16B Rugby

The 2017-18 season provided a mix bag of results for the U16B team. Despite losing 9 out of the 12 games in the year, this record does little justice to the season enjoyed by the team. The season began with narrow losses to John Fisher, RGS High Wycombe and a one point loss to Seaford College 5-6. These results were very disheartening for many, but in the losses there were some outstanding individual performances. Superb individual carrying performances from Edmund Kenny and Nic Richards against John Fisher very nearly got us over the line and ultimately solidified their positions in the U16As for the rest of the season. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Our first win came against Bishop Wordsworth’s School at home with the ever-persistent ball carrying of Rylan Gavino and defensive prowess of Magnus Bell allowing for a comfortable win. Furthermore, a close draw against Sherborne School the week following provided the platform for a stellar return for Jake Robinson from injury, as well as highlighting the dominant breakdown specialities of Cameron Barclay in his first season of rugby for Hampton. The upward progress of the team throughout the season was further reflected in a 4-point loss away to Warwick, which included 4 tries for Patrick Dargan. However, the culmination of the season was a 27-24 win against Whitgift, which clearly outlined the team’s progress throughout the season. Pass of the season has to go to Oscar Boardman for his swift, out-the-back pass to Joe Park setting up a try. With only 12-men on the field, Jonah Brennan’s penalty kick confirmed the win for Hampton, who had lost to the same team 58-0 earlier in the season. Special thanks must go to Mr Keenan for his organisation of the team during the season and to Paul Wilkinson, Henry Sheen and Cosmo Liefting-Moore for providing a solid leadership group throughout the season. I look forward to playing with many of my teammates in senior rugby next year. Patrick Wheeler

U15A Rugby

one end to the other; further tries from Thomas Tomlin, having found a good line off Alex Taylor, and Jesper Hartikainen meant we took a 25-12 lead into the last 15 minutes. However, problems started when a yellow card was shown after repeated team offences. The team showed great spirit to score another try with 14 men – a double cross field kick for Henry van Spall to score one of the tries of the season – but, as fatigue began to creep in, Wellington snuck a few tries in and were suddenly within touching distance, 30-29. With the clock running down, we defended with everything we had left. Following a turnover from relentless open-side flanker Toby Robinson, the final whistle blew and we had thoroughly earned our spot in the third round. More convincing performances and victories led up to our Middlesex Cup Final at Allianz Park – a particularly significant game as we had fallen short to St Benedict’s at this stage the previous year. An exciting afternoon ended in a 27-7 victory for Hampton, meaning the U15 trophy came to Hampton for the first time. Particular congratulations must go to Luke Greenall, for his man-of-thematch worthy performance. Having seen off Sherborne College – a moment of magic from Dylan Straker-Grimes and a Jamie Benson cross-field kick to Jack Wells were particular highlights – and King Edward, Southampton in the cup, we faced Marlborough College in round 5. A strong performance meant we progressed 36-5 to the quarter-finals. Particular credit should go to Matt le Moign and David Ellis for their never-ending work-rate at the breakdown and maul. Another win against fellow quarter-finalists Warwick School in our Saturday block fixture, meant we went into our quarter final against Millfield, having won all of our last 16 matches. A nervy first 25 minutes was ended by our first try when inside centre Tim Lamming found some space to crash the ball over line. A brace of well earned tries from Lucas Mangham either side of a penalty, allied to some tireless work by Jack Slaney, meant we advanced to the semi-final, 22-5. Our hugely anticipated date in early March was soon upon us, we returned to Allianz Park to play Whitgift School; it would take an immense performance to be victorious over the team that beat us 24-0 just six months earlier.

The U15s started their season disappointingly, especially off the back of some good successes together the previous season and an excellent pre-season training camp in Biarritz. Despite a comfortable win against John Fisher to kick the season off, two consecutive losses against typically strong opponents, Whitgift School and Bromsgrove School, 24-0 and 17-0 respectively, meant we had to clear our minds before our National Cup first round match against The Forrest School. The long journey to the Forrest school did not affect the performance, and we progressed to the second round 48-7. There were a few notable achievements in that game, particularly Jack Wells and Jesper Hartikainen, both of whom scored 3 tries. Following this, two comfortable away wins against RGS High Wycombe and Canford School, meant that we were well prepared for our unfortunate second-round tie with Wellington College, typically one of the favourites to win the competition. A first half try from winger Charlie Masters and two penalties meant we led at half time 13-12. In the second half, the game went from

An early yellow card for foul play for Whitgift meant that we were able to apply a vast amount of early pressure – Rupert Reddish doing some particularly destructive working in the loose – resulting in an early try for Tim Lamming, breaking the deadlock once again. However, a lack of territory and poor discipline meant that we struggled to maintain this pressure later on in the game. We conceded just before the half and, despite winning a penalty which was converted into 3 points, a yellow card meant we came under huge pressure in the final 10 minutes down to 14 men. Despite holding the ball up over the line three times, two late tries for Whitgift meant we lost 21-10, and were knocked out of the cup. Although we were disappointed not to make the final, credit and thanks must go to our coach, Mr Kothakota, after working tirelessly over the past two years to give us the best opportunity to achieve as much as we did. Huge thanks also to Johnny Powell, Joe Watton, Joel Luckman, Joe Sykes, Alex McMillan, Nairn Herries and Iestyn Humphreys who were instrumental in providing the strength in depth for us to be competitive over this long season. Jamie Benson the lion the magazine of hampton school

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U15B Rugby

result, losing 14-7. This loss encouraged us to develop and work hard over the season as we knew we would play them again. We progressed with every game, winning the next 11 games convincingly. Both our attitude and work-rate had evolved, underpinning the immense change in results. For example, last year we lost 33-20 against Brighton College and this year we won 68-7. Our final game was the rematch against Whitgift, in which we knew we could put our hard work and development on display. It immediately showed, as we scored a quick and fluid team try. Although they managed to score back we managed to produce a solid team performance to win 27-7.

The U15Bs came into the season hoping to improve on what we knew was a disappointing previous year. With the help of a new coach and a pre-season tour, we felt good going in to our first game. We played well and drastically improved on our previous result, winning the match and feeling that we had the ability to realise our true potential. However, we were set back as our captain Dhru Dattani was on the receiving end of a nasty knee injury, which ended up ending his season early. We then played what we knew would be our toughest game against Whitgift. Unfortunately, we were on the receiving end of a difficult 108

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Overall, we won 13, lost 1 and scored 479 points, averaging 34 points a game. Some good performances came from Joe Watton against Bromsgrove, scoring a ‘luscious’ winning try. Others include Rafe Bletso against Wellington and Samuel Axford against Sherbourne showing his devastating pace. Rishi Chopra deserves a mention for playing in every single game, proving he is the driving force of the team and embodiment of our attitude. For U15B teams, we placed first in the country for our record and points difference, reflecting the hard work we put in. We would like to thank the coaching staff, especially Mr Ellsworth for motivating us and helping us become more than a standard B team. Alexander McMillan and Joe Watton

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U14A Rugby

From the very start, we benefited from having a forward pack who could use their size and strength effectively, and a back line blessed with accurate hands and the vision to see and attack space. Yet, the boys showed impressive development in other areas too, especially their defence: in the second match against a clearly superior Whitgift side, we shut down their attack for long periods of the game and showed ferocious intensity in defensive line speed until the final whistle. Such determination to succeed was instrumental in ensuring that we never lost a close match, best exemplified by three consecutive tough wins against Sherborne, Brighton College and Dulwich College, the last a 25-24 thriller secured by two tries in the last five minutes.

As the new boys arrived in Third Year, we were excited to see our squad develop and become stronger. We had a tough start to the season, despite some strong performances, losing our first couple of games – including a very exciting game against RGS High Wycombe. After a slow start, we managed an incredible win against Latymer winning 44-5 and continued this success by beating Canford School 40-24. Unluckily, we lost our next few games, with injury and illness plaguing the team. However, we broke this deficit by playing incredibly well and beating Brighton College 7-5. The last part of the season was definitely stronger; we won three out of the five matches played, beating Dulwich, Glynn and St Benedict’s. As the XVs came to a close, we had the much anticipated sevens season to look forward to. The start of the sevens season kicked off with a warm-up style tournament at Wellington College. We recorded wins against Abingdon, Epsom and John Fisher before losing to the hosts in the final game. Unfortunately, the Surrey 7s tournament was cancelled due to bad weather. The next tournament we had to look forward to was at Orleans Park. We started with a convincing win against the hosts before a much tougher game against Gunnersbury. Down 21-7 in the first half, we salvaged a victory with Max Leman scoring in the final play of the game, winning 26-21. We then beat Grey Court before an equally tough game against Halliford, again being down at half time, with the score 14-0. Yet again, we managed a win in the last play with Ollie Verny-White going the length and scoring. Two more victories saw us winning the tournament, setting us up well for the Rosslyn Park National 7s. 

Captain and scrum-half Isaac Mann provided vocal and intelligent leadership and directed the forwards with skilful urgency. Our top scorer was utility back Fraser Dunlop, with nine tries and nine conversions in only 11 games. Player of the season was outside centre Luke McNamara, whose consistent hard work in attack and defence did much to carry the team through their biggest challenges. Special mention must also be made of hooker Ben Wix and second row Eduardo Crespo-MacLennan, who played in all 17 games and typified the commitment and good humour which characterised the season. SCH

U13A Rugby

Day one of the Nationals saw us qualify through to the second day, after winning our group convincingly, including a 14-0 win against earlier rivals Halliford. We came against Eton in the elimination game, winning 24-7 sending us to the Cup competition. Unfortunately, we were not able to progress further, losing to Wellington and Millfield in the Cup group, finishing 8th in the country. Overall, I think we can look back on the season with success and hopefully we can do even better come September. HSM

U14B Rugby

It was another tough season against strong rugby opposition. There were hard-fought wins and matches where the scoreline did not always reflect the competitive spirit of our team. We learned from our mistakes, against teams such as John Fisher and High Wycombe, and, by the end of the season, we had recorded a 50% win rate. 

This was a most satisfying season for a strong U14B squad, who finished with nine wins, three draws and five losses to their name.

Throughout the year, a number of players stepped up to the challenge. In the Whitgift fixture, Edward Clarke stood out from the squad for the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport his fighting spirit. He chased down every tackle and loose ball and never gave up quoted by many supporters as ‘fighting like a lion’. As ever, the team relied on the lightning speed of our wingers, Rory Finn and Gus Carter. Gus this season has added to his repertoire a strength in tackling and belief he can run through, not just round the opposition. Nick Allen is the unsung hero as hooker, aspiring to secure the ruck no matter the size of the opposition.  He got ‘stuck in’, and the team relied on him to win the ball back in the scrum. Congratulations to Ollie Tynan who stepped up from the Bs this year. He slotted perfectly into the squad with positivity and set the bar high for his play. In February, we moved to 7s. Our ball-handling skills combined with our wingers’ speed gave us a great advantage over many teams. We were runners up in Orleans Park 7s Tournament and, in the snow and ice at the Rosslyn Park 7s, undoubtedly learned some characterbuilding lessons. It was also our first outing to the Berkhamstead 7s, where we won our group and then met formidable opposition in the form of Solihull. At the close of the rugby season, our 7s matches had improved our win stats to 65%. During the Easter holidays, players from the First and Second Year went on rugby tour to the Netherlands. The team played well against tough opposition winning one of three fixtures. Pleasingly, members of the team felt it was their best performance of the year.

away at their try line for the last ten minutes despite being 50-0 down; a team with less determination would have long given up by then. It was great to see the forwards, Tom Banks, Ryan Carey, Kristian Wells, Oscar White, Callum Howarth, Marcus Bob, Jacob Iqbal and Hal Lewis develop into a formidable unit. James Clark, who captained most weeks, and Rory Gilheaney were the 9-10 axis; the backline formed of Toby Gwynne, Seb Lear, Kai Kelly, Alex Cresswell and Joshua Maisuria-Hull looked increasingly dangerous with the ball in hand towards the end of the season. I have really enjoyed coaching these boys and am looking forward to seeing them progress up through the school. PST

U12A Rugby

We now look forward to the 2018-19 season and to welcoming many new players into the squad. We are all working on our fitness over the summer months and will continue to work on our line speed in defence. I would like to thank Mr Gray on behalf of the team for coaching us and managing our fixtures. We have all really enjoyed playing rugby for the school this season. Cameron Hill

U13B Rugby

The U13Bs had a very tough season. Often understrength due to the low number of players in the Year Group, we regularly fielded less than the required 13 players despite the generous support of football lads, such as Daniel Townend, who played whenever they could, and boys volunteering to play out of position where required. There was many a time when we were at the receiving end of a rather large scoreline, but I was hugely impressed with the character shown by the team. One of the best examples for this was the game against Emanuel School, when we were battering 110

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The U12As got off to a promising start when we played Caldicott Prep Bs and won convincingly 45-0 – a brilliant start to the season! We then played a tough High Wycombe side and managed to draw with the team, showing a lot of aggression during a physical game. Our first real test was against St Paul’s and, unfortunately, we lost by a considerable margin, realising that we had a lot to learn. A win a week later boosted our spirits for two difficult games ahead against Emmanuel and Whitgift. Although these we both lost, there was an amazing try from Josh Freer against Whitgift and a moment of individual brilliance from Finley Wiseman against Emanuel which kept the teams spirit high. We were determined to do our best when we entered the Middlesex Cup and we went on to win all of our group games convincingly, meaning we were through to the finals. After a dramatic 15-10 win against London Oratory in the quarter-final, we then played Orleans Park in the semi, beating them 20-5. We lost the final against St Benedict’s 20-0 due to tiredness, but had a brilliant day nonetheless. After two amazing wins, we then played Warwick school; Max Cardosi had a great game scoring a w, but it still was not enough as we came up just short at 25-20. We then came back strongly and beat St Bennedict’s which put a smile on a lot of people’s faces. Our last game was a return fixture against a tough Whitgift side, but a vastly improved defensive display kept the score to 20-25. Our finals stats for the regular season games was played 17, won 10 drew 1, and lost 6. The 7s season was next and we had a strong side for the upcoming tournament at St John’s.

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sport We won all our group games against Reigate, Reeds and St John’s B. In the semi-final, we stormed past Cedars school and into the final against St John’s. We won that game 25-5 and were crowned winners of the St John’s festival at our first attempt at 7s. It was a brilliant day with amazing performances, particularly from Rory Paterson. Unfortunately, we did not manage to play any more tournaments due to the harsh weather conditions. We then finished our year with a fantastic tour to Holland in which we played many games, winning most – more importantly, we made many new friends and had a great deal of fun. A huge thank you to Mr Beattie and the other staff for their coaching this year and for organising the successful Holland tour. We hope to start strong next year! Max Cardosi

U12B Rugby

The new First Year boys who played rugby for the U12Bs enjoyed a very respectable first season at the school, with five wins, one draw and six defeats. It began away at Caldicott; captained by Aneesh Bhandari, the side won 35-20, helped by four tries from Guru Nadarajah. We were beaten away at RGS High Wycombe in week two, but James Greenfield managed to go over for a fantastic late, solo try to give the boys something out of the game. Despite Josh Tewkesbury’s terrific work-rate and Ethan Flack’s organisation, we were also beaten by St Paul’s the following week – but, most importantly, it was a muchimproved performance.

Straight after Half Term, there was a big game against Halliford; the boys won 35-25 after four tries from the unstoppable Ben Jansen and some typically valiant defence from Matthew Taylor. Although we lost to Emanuel and Whitgift in the following weeks, we were learning from our mistakes and showing real desire to improve. That desire came through in a 15-5 win over Caterham in our last game of the term. Felix Droy managed to make several important turnovers in the game and William Greenfield organised and led a great defensive performance. We won back-to-back games for the first time in the season as we beat Glyn 25-15, with Sam Berresford a constant threat on the ball. Injuries meant that Warwick defeated us the week after, but we came close to an amazing fightback win at St Benedict’s, fighting back from 15-0 down and ultimately being beaten 20-15. Tries from Conrad Knight and Jamie Wilson, both borrowed from football, kept us in touch, but it we could not quite pull off the comeback. Benjamin Walker and Josh Freer scored as we avenged Whitgift’s earlier win with a great performance to win away. Kenneth Lau, as he had done all season, tackled everything as we only conceded one try – an incredible performance against such a side! Henry Hughes, who had been in the As most of the season also put in an excellent performance, helping us get the quick ball that enabled the back to run their game superbly. We finished the season against Ibstock Place’s As. With the country in the midst of the ‘Beast from the East’, it was a cold morning, and we were expecting a very tough game. Many people already mentioned put in brilliant performances and Nick Lewis played with great aggression in defence, alongside Finlay Fowler who came off the bench and got stuck in well. We were also fortunate to have Joe Maheswaran playing, who usually played in the As and had a big impact. The game finished in a 0-0 draw, but the performance epitomised the spirit of the team. We had conceded 13 tries in one of our first games of the season and despite having a lot of defending to do, the boys did brilliantly. It was a shame we did not score, but the boys would agree that the performance felt better even than some of our victories. It has been a great pleasure to coach the U12Bs this season and the boys have huge potential going forward. They should be congratulated on the way they have all improved this season, especially those that did not play rugby until this year – many of whom proved to be some of our best players by the end of the season! Well done to everyone involved. Nick Powell

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1st XI Cricket After a great pre-season, our fresh-faced team for 2018 was ready to hit the ground running. Unfortunately, our first two scheduled games against Worth School and the MCC, succumbed to the weather: two, typically wet, English, April days. As a result, our first challengers were The Oratory School, Reading, a new addition to the fixture list. We were eager to put down an early benchmark for the rest of the season and it is safe to say that that is exactly what we did. After winning the toss and opting to bat, we racked up a hefty total of 304-5 off just 40 overs, courtesy of a spectacular Blake Cullen century, and felt confident that our bowling attack could defend it. It was not long after the start of Oratory’s innings that our bowlers started to get into a rhythm. Wickets seemed to fall at regular intervals and opening batsmen, Cole Campbell decided to try his hand at right-arm orthodox. To everyone’s surprise, his consistent flight and guile managed to clean up the tail in no time at all, bowling Oratory out in the 32nd over for 126. It was the dream start to the season, but a performance that would be hard to replicate. The very next day we were off to hosts and historic rivals, Dulwich to compete in the annual National T20 cup opening rounds. Over the course of the day, and in the glorious sunshine, we played both Dulwich and Langley Park in two tough games of fast paced 20-over cricket. In Game 1 versus Dulwich, batting first, Cole quickly reached his 50 and finished on 62 off just 42 balls, helping the team to a total of 188. Blake’s speedy 32 also aiding the score. Our bowlers managed to limit Dulwich to 125-7, Arun Bhasin picking up 3 wickets and Tom Miller 2, both being rewarded for their efforts. Confidence was high and going into the game against Langley Park we were determined to bat first again. It seemed to be our lucky day as we did just that, making a considerable 143 in our 20, once again Cole and Blake were in the runs, both making 30s. However, this time, it was keeper Denil Manuel who steadied the ship with a much-needed 21 after a middle-order collapse. We knew that we would have to field and bowl to the best of our ability if we were going to prevent the chase; thankfully, we did just that. Even though the opposition got off to a good start, we managed to bring it back, eventually bowling them out for 116 in the 19th. Cole’s 5-16 off 4 was vital in the victory and his first 1st XI 5-fer had come at a great time. We were excited after our first three games of the season, and rightly so, as we had already shown what we were capable of, believing that we could beat anyone if we could keep up the level of cricket that we were playing. Harrow was our next opponent, and we knew that we would have to play out of our skins to beat a team who was always one of the best in the country. We took to the field first, confident in our ability. Max Cooper used the overcast conditions to full advantage and seemed to be swinging it round corners. Unfortunately, despite our bowlers’ best efforts, we could not find an early break-through. We did, however, eventually begin to put their batsmen under pressure and take wickets as a result. Although, each of them was walking back over the boundary with 20s and 30s to their name. This allowed them to keep the runs ticking over at a healthy rate, our job also being made a lot harder due to sporadic weather conditions. Lunch was a welcome break and a typical Harrow spread of delicious salads, cold meats, pasta and chocolate possibly went down too quickly. After the interval, Harrow finished on 221-7, our fielders showing their class with 4 run-outs. When our batsmen returned to the field, they had a tough challenge ahead of them and reaching Harrow’s total would require some outstanding performances. Despite our best efforts, we never seemed to get going and wickets fell in quick succession as a result of a fine Harrow bowling attack. Our first defeat of the season was a tough pill to swallow; however, we knew that we could play better. Up next was a timed game against Tiffin, where we exhibited our full potential. After batting first and making 260/1 after 45 overs, thanks to a fantastic partnership between Cole and Guy Leman, 114 and 78 respectively, we had the task of bowling them out to win the match. With some brilliant efforts we got desperately close, Tiffin finishing on 130/9. One particular period of play saw Max Cooper bowl 5 maidens in a row – no mean feat! Even though we had not come away with a win, we had once again proved to ourselves just how good we could be if everything fell into place, and how a strong start up top could provide us with a significant head start. 112

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Even with the loss to Harrow, our first few games had given us the confidence that we needed moving forwards into the heart of the season, and with some superb individual performances many of our players felt that they were in form. However, what followed was somewhat of a disaster. A rollercoaster ride throughout the rest of the season saw us lose a disappointing 9 out of our 11 fixtures. Although it ended up not being the season that we had hoped for, we did manage to pull off two quality wins versus KCS and the touring Australians, Brighton Grammar School, towards the end. Against KCS, spinners Dru Shori and Tom Miller picked up wickets, 4 and 3 respectively, which allowed our batsmen, particularly openers Pravin Kiritharan and Rahul Desai to knock off the target of 160 with ease. Once again, these victories had showed us how good we could be on our day and it was a shame that we could not replicate more of them.

Overall, although the 2018 season had has its challenges, it was great to have started and finished with wins, which eased the disappointment. A great deal was learnt by the team over the course of the season and being able to give many of the younger players an opportunity to perform was also fantastic and a huge positive looking forward as nearly our entire squad for the 2019 season will have already played matches in the 1st XI. Finally, a massive thanks must to Mr Banerjee and Mr Parrish who stuck with us throughout the season, acting not only as brilliant coaches but also amazing mentors who made the season extremely enjoyable and managed to keep spirits high even at the toughest of times. 2019, here we come! Joe Wheeler

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2nd XI Cricket The side played 11 matches, winning 6 and losing 5. All of our matches were played at home where we benefited from some pacey pitches, allowing for an even contest between bat and ball. Our team was largely made up of Lower Sixth and Fifth Years. Unfortunately, however, availability suffered during the long GCSE exam season and, as a consequence, we fielded a number of inexperienced teams against strong opposition. Predictably, we suffered heavy defeats during this period against Harrow and Eton College, but we then rallied towards the end of the season playing some attractive cricket. Amongst the batsmen, Will Greenall resumed playing this summer and showed an array of elegant strokes. Mayank Dasannacharya also displayed elegance and poise at the crease which, together with his improving wicket-keeping, makes him a valuable player. Tim Sweeney, Cameron Rose and Max Knowles each showed attacking intent and played influential innings. Guy Leman, on his rare outings, lent the top order solidity and the benefit of a good cricketing brain. The bowling resources comprised a number of reliable right-arm seamers and three very promising leg-spinners. Amongst the seamers,

Dhillon Tharumanayagam, Miles Patience, Tim Sweeney, Max Knowles all bowled with control and beat the bat regularly. George Smith bowled and batted aggressively at the end of the season and we look forward to him playing more regularly in the future. The highlight, however, was against Whitgift as Will Greenall sabotaged a seemingly straightforward run-chase with a devastating spell of 5-19. Sadly, Whitgift recovered, in a blaze of hard-hitting, from 51 for 8 to overhaul a target of 108 without further loss. Wrist-spin bowling and a welcome element of mystery were provided by Tim Wallace, Gurmehar Sumra and Cameron Bhasin. The cricket was always absorbing when the ball was tossed up and they beat the bat consistently. The fielding was invariably enthusiastic, yet lacked the reliability and flair at times that only comes from intense practice. Finally, my thanks go to Tim Sweeney and Guy Leman for captaining the team. Each displayed tactical acumen and good humour at all times. Further sincere thanks go to Rabah and Alastair who generously provided us with ample sustenance between innings. PGT

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UAE Cricket Tour

On a wet Thursday during the Easter holidays, fifteen U14 and U15 cricketers turned up at Heathrow Airport. Our destination: the sun and arid heat of the United Arab Emirates. We were travelling for the ARCH Cup, a pre-season cricket tournament featuring Emerati and English schools teams. Prior to this, we had two warm-weather training sessions at the ICC Cricket Academy. After some acclimatisation, we cooled off at the stunning Jumeirah beach. Later that evening, we visited the largest shopping mall in the world, and experienced the Burj Khalifa’s light and sound show. Thoroughly entertained by the local attractions, we started our campaign off with a win against Elizabeth College Guernsey. The pitch we played on was so pristine that the wearing of any form of spikes was prohibited. Great fifties from Arjun Bhat and Ollie Stokes secured a comfortable victory. Next, we travelled to the Dubai Rugby Sevens Complex to play the Emerati Zayed Cricket Academy. After being undone by superior spin bowling, we were unable to defend our total. This left us with an important final match against Epsom College – the winner would have the chance to play in the international Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium, with a capacity of 20,000! We crossed the border into Abu Dhabi to play Epsom at the Sheikh Zayed Nursery Ground – this is where the loser would finish their competition. Tight bowling saw us restrict Epsom to just 200 in 40 overs. It was to be a close contest, however. Thankfully, several composed innings saw us home with two overs to go. No trip to the UAE would be complete without some sightseeing and understanding of the local culture and this provided us with a welcome break from the cricket. A guided tour of the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, the largest mosque in the area, provided impressive stats including the largest single piece of carpet in the world, and the third largest chandelier. Our final match, a third-place playoff, was against Dubai College. After dominant bowling, we were in a commanding position in the innings break. Despite the loss of some early wickets, we comfortably closed out the game. Our team spirit was undoubtedly one of the greatest reasons behind our success, and this was in no small part down to the role of Mr Trivedi, Mr Malston and Mr Banerjee, who were exceptional in every department during the tour – something that undoubtedly set the tone for this season. Sandy Mitchell 116

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U15A Cricket

Arjan Samra – He undoubtedly has a T20 contract on the way with his ability to open the bowling with spin. He did not bowl a bad spell all year and is a good fielder who is not shy of the odd enormous 6! Highlight of his season: A couple of massive 6s. Matt Wilson – He started in the Bs, but performed like an A teamer from the minute he arrived in the team. He ended up with a brilliant strike rate and demonstrated his strength in the field. Highlight of his season: two wickets in two balls versus Whitgift to send panic through the opposition lower order!

If the purpose of the U15As is to make progress and prepare for Senior Cricket, then the season was a great success. The boys played cricket in a more mature fashion with each game and many of the players made significant progress with their understanding and skill level. In terms of results, Hampton U15As are similar to a North London football club in the Premier League: the big teams will have to at their best to beat us – Whitgift, Eton and Harrow, for example – but anyone around us in the table will find us very hard to beat. Many opposing coaches commented on how they look forward to playing Hampton due to the guarantee of a competitive match. The team were very consistent in their commitment to every game, with only one notable under par performance – against KCS Wimbledon having already beaten them in the cup! The highlights of the season came against Reeds, St Paul’s, KCS Wimbledon and RGS Guildford, who would be considered ‘equals’ in terms of numbers, where excellent all round performance led to impressive and comprehensive wins. Thank you to all the boys for a hugely enjoyable year and our loyal group of parents who watched the majority of the games. The Class of 2018: Dru Shori – Captained six matches before his excellent bowling got him promoted to the 1st XI. Highlight of his season: Promotion to the 1st XI. Pravin Kiritharan – Opened the batting and bowling with great consistency. Mr Reliable with the ball. Highlight of his season: hitting a future county cricketer for a massive 6 and giving the team a chance in a big run chase versus Trinity. Matt Avaunt-Smith – Started with a huge 131* and put together some stylish innings which are always pleasing on the eye. Highlight of his season: anytime he moves onto the back foot and punches it through the covers! Tanmay Thanawalla – Our captain for 3 matches, our highest run-scorer and our most consistent batsman who learnt the need to get into his stride quicker as the season progresses. An impressive 8 stumpings in the final 2 games – 14 this season! Highlight of his season: a beautifully constructed match-winning innings versus St Paul’s and any time the batsman left the crease when the spinners were on! Alex Clinton – A hugely progressive year where he made himself a vital member of the team with both bat and ball. Highlight of his season: a wonderfully high quality 50 versus Reeds. 118

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Mikey Ford – Our captain for 4 matches, he is an energetic cricketer who has a habit of taking some excellent catches. He also runs teams ragged with his running between the wickets when batting and he found some great form with the ball through June. Highlight of his season: a stunning one-handed catch versus Whitgift and making opposition teams argue with frustration at not being able to stop his singles! Jack Slaney – Sadly, he was struggling with an ‘old man’ back injury, which denied the team an excellent opening bowler. He is full of funny comments and ability in the field despite having the worst long-barrier in world cricket! He often batted with the interests of the team, so did not score the weight of runs he would have liked to, but made some good contributions. Highlight of his season: 50 versus KGS and turning up to a match in a Tuxedo. Tom Tomlin – Although he struggled to put together a long spell of consistent bowling, despite excellent overs early in the season, he undoubtedly learnt the value of working hard in the nets and pre match. Highlight of his season: a fantastic spell of match winning bowling in the final match. Pranav Pandy – Bursting full of leg spin talent and enthusiasm! No batsman on the circuit could deal with the spin and accuracy. Greater success will come with the ability to bowl longer spells in senior cricket. Highlight of his season: being caught at deep fine leg from an enormous hit! Rupert Reddish – He forced his way into the A team after a winter of working extremely hard to improve his game. All the signs were there that he has the potential to progress even further next year, despite not getting the full rewards this season. Highlight of the season: He took a big pressure catch in the deep at Harrow. The following also popped in for a short stay and added a great deal to the team over the course of the season: Ollie Coles, Ollie Stokes, Kyle Seth, Tim Lamming, Alfie Onslow, Kieran Downer and Alfie Simmins-Gooding. Chris Harrison

U15B Cricket A clean sweep of victories happens very rarely and is a fantastic achievement: played 9, won 9. The 2018 U15B cricket team fully deserved their success, winning all their matches thanks to high levels of both individual and collective skill, allied to a consistently impressive attitude.

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U15C Cricket

The opening victory, away against Harrow – always strong opposition – by 7 wickets, gave an indication of what was to come. After a decisive defeat of Tiffin, Eton proved to be the closest match of the season, with the victory by 16 runs largely owing to a typically hard-hitting 93 from Tim Lamming, while the win over Reeds featured 103* by Keiran Downer. The Whitgift fixture, on the first Saturday of Half Term stretched resources, but gave a useful opportunity to players who usually represented the C team; the match was duly won by 80 runs. A strong St Paul’s side were beaten by 6 wickets, as were Trinity (9 wickets) and KCS (10 wickets, featuring 105* by Oscar Murphy and 58 by Lamming). In the final fixture against RGS Guildford, the batting (other than an excellent fifty by Will McLoughlin) was below its usual standards as Hampton were bowled out for 128, but the bowlers were magnificent as RGS were reduced to 39 all out. The two century-makers, Downer and Murphy, had fine personal seasons, as did Lamming. Alfie Onslow was an accomplished opening batsman, McLoughlin played some very important innings, Toby Robinson’s fierce hitting frequently gathered quick runs, while Freddie Rees always batted impressively. Both Lamming and Alex McMillan were accomplished wicketkeepers, with the latter having rather fewer opportunities with the bat than his talent deserved – although his innings against Whitgift proved crucial. Harry Ray – as well as frequently batting well – and Rhys Calder formed a very potent new-ball attack, while Jonny Powell bowled consistently and incisively, with several match-defining spells. Farhan Hussain’s leg-spin always seemed to take wickets, while many of those mentioned for their batting, such as Downer, Onslow, Rees and McLoughlin, were all more than capable with the ball. The fielding was of a very high standard, while Murphy was an excellent captain – and when he was unavailable, Lamming filled in admirably. I must also thank those that played mainly in the C team but who stepped up and made positive contributions, such as Josh Bartholomew, Will Howard and Iestyn Humphrey: in any other year, they would have played regularly for the B team. Overall, this was a thoroughly enjoyable season: the boys were always positive and supportive of each other and I hope they continue to have fun playing cricket as this did so successfully this year. As ever, thanks to the other members of staff who worked so hard with this age group, Messrs Banerjee, Harrison and Smith. JOM

This was a very strong C team that played engaging, dynamic cricket even if they did not always get the results they deserved. They were well-served by a group of batsmen capable of playing big innings: Josh Bartholomew, Joel Luckman, Will Howard and Will McLoughlin were outstanding, routinely ensuring that the team had plenty of runs to play with or, batting second, remained competitive over a challenging run chase. Highlights included a partnership of 115 between Bartholomew and Luckman against KCS and one of 112 between the same pair against Trinity, Croydon. The standout innings of the season, however, was played by Amar Kotecha against St Paul’s, where his faultless 74* was ably supported by a typically explosive innings of 66 by Howard. There was equal strength in depth among the bowlers. Iestyn Humphrey was a powerful force with the new ball, while Jake Amor bowled cunning out-swingers that were never less than a challenge for opposing batsmen and a pleasure to watch from the umpire’s perspective. Rayyaan Kazi, the captain, was a consistent performer with his off-breaks, and Ruairi Kavanagh, Luckman and Toby Robinson were good value for some probing, accurate bowling. A word too for Rohith Ratnam, who was invariably enthusiastic and encouraging to others: a model team player whose contribution was more than just a matter of runs and wickets. Overall, this team played some excellent attacking cricket and made many friends over the course of their ten matches. PS

U14A Cricket

The under 14A team have enjoyed a successful season, winning 6 out of their 12 fixtures. The season began with a comfortable victory over The Oratory School, with Alfie Simonds-Gooding announcing his arrival to the Hampton cricket scene with a maiden 5-wicket haul. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Chastening defeats to Harrow and Eton were punctuated by a 149 run win over Tiffin, with Ollie Stokes scoring a half century, and Kyle Seth taking 7 wickets for the cost of just 4 runs. The team then took part in an excellent draw with Reeds school, where captain Sandy Mitchell scored a half century in a first innings total of 225 from just 33 overs. A defeat to Whitgift taught the boys that excellent bowling performances need to be supported by the batsmen, and they duly responded with scores of 153 in a 14 run win against Trinity (Kyle Seth 40 runs), 178 in a victory over St Paul’s (Sandy Mitchell 47, Arjun Bhat 38), and 147 in a nail-biting 1-run win over KCS (Arjun Bhat 57). Defeat to RGS Guildford on the last day of the season took some gloss away from what was otherwise a promising campaign. Overall, the team has made some good progress towards their goal of being a top side able to compete with the ‘Tier 1’ cricketing schools. There is still work to do – particularly in terms of batting – but they are developing at a good rate, and should they continue to grow next year; exciting times await them! RRT

to Jamie Hacking who bowled the over of the season in our closest victory away at Trinity. With all three results possible in the final over, Jamie held his nerve to restrict Trinity below our total and took two wickets clean bowled to seal the win. Theo Joy-Page developed his action nicely this year as a new opening bowler and Jack Hardy won the award for most improve player for his all-round performances. Ali Jennings deserves great credit for the way he captained the side this season and for leading the pace attack, always taking the fight to the opposition. Four matches won out of ten completed is a record the boys can be pleased with. This group is growing in confidence and learning what it takes to be a winning side. I look forward to watching these players develop their skills as they move up the school. TFR

U13B Cricket

U13A Cricket

The U13Bs have had a challenging season, winning two games and losing six, with three games lost due to bad weather or cancellations. This has been an encouraging season for the U13A cricket team. Having struggled at times last season to make big scores with the bat in hand, the focus throughout winter training was technique and application at the crease. The aim was clear: make the bowler work hard to get you out. Several players made good use of this new approach and, particularly in the early season matches, made some substantial individual scores. Kyan Soni made an impressive 78 not out in the season opener against Fulham Boys and followed this up with 60 against Reeds School. Leanesh Sivakumar joined Kyan at the crease against Fulham Boys, scoring 68 not out and helping us to a first innings total of 199-1 and an emphatic victory followed. The innings of the season was played by Louis Simonds-Gooding in our Middlesex Cup fixture at Rokeby Prep. His 67 not out against a strong bowling attack set up an excellent match. Unfortunately, the opposition star batsman also scored heavily and knocked us out of the cup with a successful run chase. The bowling unit had a good season with wickets being shared around evenly. William Knowles bowled with particular skill and control all season and was one of five bowlers to pick up a 3-fer. Louis Simmonds-Gooding, Daniel Edge, Jamie Hacking and Ali Jennings all achieved the same milestone this season. Special mention 120

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The season began with close losses against Tiffin, RGS High Wycombe and Reed’s, where the team were unable to turn solid bowling and fielding performance into wins when failing to chase opposition targets of approximately 120 runs, falling short by scoring 101, 113 and 106. It was, therefore, perhaps unsurprising that the next two fixtures against Whitgift and Trinity were more one-side affairs, but again the team maintained its positive approach throughout. Pleasingly, team deservedly break its duck and record two consecutive wins by posting much more competitive scores against their next two opponents, Dr Challoner’s and Ibstock Place, including a fine 66 from Steve Lamming. The final match of the season saw an exciting tie against RGS Guildford with both sides scoring 117 runs. Enthusiastically captained by William Aust, the team performed with commitment and energy, with some strong batting performances from Steve Lamming and Oliver Rochard, who largely played for the A Team. With the ball, there were several good performers: Dhruv Duggal looked a genuine threat at all times, and he was ably assisted by Nathan Kent, Freddie Blair, Sam Wooldridge, Cameron Gosal, Praveen Kumarasinghe, William Aust and Aidan Painting. Charlie Murphy also came in from the Cs and impressed with his enthusiasm and commitment. Arjun Sian also bowled well

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sport and made the most of his opportunity to move up a team. Behind the stumps, Owain Humphrey demonstrated genuine potential and confidence as he took on the wicket-keeping duties and looked comfortable from the first game. The boys were a committed and enthusiastic group of cricketers and a pleasure to coach. All the best for next season! RDW

and we were well on track with good batting performances from our opener Aran Taheri Murphy and later from Naavya Sharma with an excellent 63 runs. Unfortunately, it was not enough and we lost, agonisingly, by 2 runs! A week later we hosted RGS High Wycombe, we posed a competitive 112/2, with Findlay Barrand anchoring the innings with 43 not out. We bowled well in their chase and it turned out that they needed 7 off the last over. Sam Spencer, who was a fantastic captain throughout the season, gave Naavya Sharma the ball, and with quick and accurate bowling, the RGS number 7 only managed 2, meaning we won the nerve-wracking match by 4 runs.

U13C Cricket

This year the U13Cs enjoyed a 60% win rate. They won 3 out of their 5 played matches, only losing by a small margin on one of the lost games. Akshat Mathur was our top run-scorer, a highlight being his excellent 34. Amazingly, he also managed to stay in for the majority of every game, defying even the best of opposition bowlers! The team improved massively on their fielding and catching throughout the year, going from standing around dazing at the sky to interested and aware cricket players. This showed in their increasingly accomplished performances; in one memorable match, for example, half of the opposition were caught, leaving the rest of them to be finished off by the bowlers. Overall, it was a thoroughly enjoyable season and everyone is looking forward to seeing what the team can accomplish the following year. Many thanks also to the staff who made everything possible and for spending so much time to help us improve. Arjan Sian

U12A Cricket The season started on a high with early victories versus Fulham Boys and St George’s Weybridge. Having contained Fulham to 123/3 from their 20 overs, our top order batted incredibly well, chasing the total in the 18th over, with Naavya Sharma top scoring with 67 not out. With everyone chipping in, we made our way to 120/5 against St George’s, and with exceptionally economical bowling from everyone, we restricted them to just 85/5. Our next game was against Tiffin School. Our only 25 over game of the season, it was a slightly different experience. They reached 137/5,

The following match was arguably our best of the season against a traditionally strong Reed’s school side. Having kept them to just 63 runs in their innings, including notable 3-fers from Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid and Naavya Sharma, plus the usual excellence in the field from Max Cardosi. Our top order made short work of the target winning by 9 wickets in the 8th over. Despite a flying start from Whitgift in the next match, we learnt that determination pays off. Whitgift were on course for a 200 plus total, but spinner Faizan Faraz took a phenomenal 6 wickets for 8 runs, bowling them out for 123. Although we could not chase the total, Finlay Wiseman made an excellent 43, and Faizan’s performance inspired us all. In the chase versus Trinity the next week, despite a relatively slow start we got within very close range of their 141. We continued to perform well over the next few weeks, until suddenly it was the last two games of the season. Aaron Mills and Hal Leman had now joined the team and thoroughly deserved their promotions and both made significant contributions. After winning the toss and fielding against Dr Challoner’s in the penultimate game of the season, we were soon chasing 104 runs to win. We did so for the loss of just two wickets; the highlight of the match was a magnificent and well-deserved fifty from Finlay Wiseman, who reached the milestone with an enormous six when only two runs were required to win the match. The last game of the season was against rivals RGS Guildford. Leo Hartley and Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid started the bowling brilliantly, with Kieran taking yet another 3 wickets, and just the one wicket not doing justice to Leo’s excellent spell. Then came a fiery 4 overs with 3 wickets from Findlay Barrand and, although they had a rather large last wicket stand, we bowled them out for 91. Other notable mentions go to Ben Rollason, Joe Earle and Rory Patterson who were great team players and had some excellent spells with the bat and ball throughout the season. Overall, it was an excellent season, where everyone performed superbly. Naavya Sharma the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Boat Club Review The 2017-18 season saw an ever-increasing number of boys take up rowing, reflecting the sport’s ever-increasingly popularity at Hampton. With the guidance of Ross Hanbury in the gym, and a fantastic set of coaches who set aside their time to help the boys improve their technique, the boat club started the season with its usual enthusiasm and motivation. After a long winter of hard training, and a training camp to Temple Sur Lot for the seniors, the boys were ready to take on the season’s main races, notably School’s Head and National Schools. At School’s Head, Hampton won two silvers, and managed to field a record number of crews, with five J15 eights, three J16 eights and three senior eights racing. At National Schools, the boys took home one gold, one silver and two bronze medals, a strong performance across the boat club. Overall, the season has been a tough one, and I know all the boys across all age groups are keen to better their performances in the year to come, as we go into the new season fresh, ready to take on some new challenges. On behalf of the whole boat club, I would like to thank Colin Greenaway for the colossal amount of time he has spent ensuring that the boat club runs smoothly and, of course, all the coaches who have helped the boys so selflessly throughout the year. Oliver Bridge

1st VIII The start of the 2017-2018 season saw six returning members of the 2017 VIII, and a competitive cohort of rowers moving into the Lower Sixth; it was clear from the start of the season that there would be a tough battle for first VIII selection. After a hard block of winter training and a successful camp in Temple sur Lot, France, the boys picked up some good results in small boats. Notably, Tom Cross and Matthew Hamilton won J18.2-, and a coxed four consisting of Tom Davis, Oli Woodall, Matthew Hamilton, Piero Ladhur and Charlie Marcus won J18.4+ at Hampton Head. This set up a good training base for the road to School’s Head and selection for the regatta season to come. As a result of Tom Cross’ injury, Schools Head saw a 1st VIII of Tom Davis, Piero Ladhur, Oli Bridge, Oli Woodall, Matthew Hamilton, Matthew Turner, Bill Downey and Ed Butler race in a competitive field, placing 5th, finishing 0.4 seconds behind Abingdon – a promising result for the upcoming summer of regatta racing! The preparation for regatta season culminated in a week’s training camp in Seville, Spain. Tom Cross returned from injury, only to immediately catch a boat-stopping crab that nearly snapped his carbon backstay, and Ed Butler moved to the stroke seat of the 2nd VIII. The VIII experimented with a number of different orders, including an infamous triple bucket, attracting a large amount of attention on Twitter. Overall, it was a very successful trip with a lot of good training in the VIII. In the build-up to National Schools, the VIII raced at Wallingford regatta and got a few more weeks of training in the lead up to the big weekend. On the Saturday of National Schools, the VIII of Bill Downey, Tom Cross, Tom Davis, Matthew Turner, Matthew Hamilton, Oli Woodall, Oli Bridge and Piero Ladhur raced hard in a massively competitive Championship VIII category. However, we were put on the back foot after finishing 10th in a very close time-trial. Despite their best efforts in the semi-final, the VIII were unable to keep up with the field and did not qualify for the A-Final. Nevertheless, the boys were able to pick themselves up and went into the B-Final with a positive mentality, finishing second. Sunday gave an opportunity for redemption, as the VIII split into two fours, one racing in Championship Coxless Fours, and the other in Championship Coxed Fours. The boys in the coxed four had a much more successful day of racing, qualifying for the A-Final after a nail-biting semi. The coxed four of Tom Davis, Tom Cross, Matthew Hamilton, Oli Woodall and Charlie Marcus, remained composed in the final to take the bronze medal: a great achievement in a Championship event. 122

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sport Following National Schools, the focus shifted towards the final race of the season: Henley Royal Regatta. This meant another trip to Dorney for an opportunity for members of the 2nd VIII and J16 1st VIII to contest for a seat in the VIII for Henley; this day of trialling saw Harry O’Loughlin gain a seat in the VIII and it was a great few days of training for the whole group. The VIII raced at the Metropolitan Regatta, and having made some good changes since National Schools, they competed well and qualified for the Championship VIII final – a particularly positive result due to there being a number of University VIIIs competing in the same category! Leading into the final preparation for Henley, a last set of seat trialling was completed; with the VIII remaining unchanged following this, Tom Davis, Oli Woodall, Matthew Hamilton, Tom Cross, Bill Downey, Matthew Turner, Harry O’Loughlin and Piero Ladhur moved into the Hampton Henley house. The VIII’s performance at National Schools was unfortunately not enough to be seeded in the draw for the Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup, so they were unlucky to be paired with Eton on the first day of racing. Eton, as one of the race favourites, were going to be a very tough opponent to overturn. Due to an illness faced by stroke man Tom Davis, there was the possibility of a last-minute crew change before the race on Wednesday. Fortunately, Tom was fit to race, and the VIII were cheered out of the boat tents as they went off to face Eton. The VIII raced hard and were unable to beat Eton, who set the fastest time of the day, and did not move on to Thursday’s racing. Eton went on to the final, losing to St Paul’s on the Sunday for the cup. Overall, the 1st VIII may not have had the season that they wanted, but they all thoroughly enjoyed it and the Lower Sixth came away with a desire for more in the year to come. They would like to thank Mr Double for his excellent coaching throughout the year, and the time he has invested as Hampton 1st VIII coach. We wish him well as he moves on to coach the J15s next year. Oliver Bridge

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2nd VIII

rewarded with a 5th place overall behind Eton College’s 2nd VIII and Bath university’s 1st VIII, amongst others.

The 2017-18 season proved very rewarding for the Hampton 2nd VIII. After a strong start to the season and a gruelling training camp to Temple-Sur-Lot in France, we first split into boats towards March for the Schools Head of the River Race. With several crewmembers having only recently returned from injury and few results with which we could weigh up our opponents, a strong boat of Bobby Nur, Ardan Suphi, Harry O’Loughlin, Henry McLeod, George Wright, Ben Andrews, Harry Fieldhouse and Henry Cockett, coxed by Joe Gellett pushed off with our only goal being to race our best race. However, after a powerful first half of the race, disaster struck. An encounter with a poorly placed buoy threw off our rhythm and speed, stealing our momentum from the remainder of the race. Despite this, the 2nd VIII secured a solid 5th place and left us determined not to let it define our year. Subsequently, we departed for our Easter training camp in Seville, where National Schools crews were to be confirmed. Within half an hour of arriving, we discovered that a mistake with the hotel’s booking had led to the 2nd VIII being relocated to a five-star hotel – a very pleasant start and fitting welcome to the newest member of the 2nd VIII, Ed Butler! This good spirit persisted throughout the week and, despite a semi-serious injury and some emotional seat racing, we finished the camp feeling like a major threat. Our newfound speed was soon put to the test at Wallingford Regatta. In the Schools B category, we laid the foundations with a strong win in our heat and progression to the A final, where another dominating performance was only tainted by a tidy Abingdon crew who crossed the line merely 2 seconds earlier. Soon after, the most important event of the year arrived: the National Schools Regatta. The day was off to a quick start with an early time trial and after a painfully long wait, we were declared the second fastest eight of the event. The draw for the semi-final saw us pitted against St Paul’s, who were only an agonising 7 milliseconds behind us in the time-trial, for our first showdown of the year. Both crews dug deep in their bid for a favoured lane in the final and showed incredible determination and motivation, leaving the entire remainder of the semi-final over half a minute behind. Unfortunately for St Paul’s though, their efforts were in vain. A semi-final win for Hampton guaranteed a favoured lane for the A final. As the day drew to a conclusion, the 9 members of the Hampton 2nd VIII ‘boated’ for the last time. An immaculate start saw us chasing Eton College, on their home water, by the end of the first 500m. However, the depth of the Eton squad proved impressive and we crossed the line a very proud second place after yet another demonstration of the determination and grit of the Hampton senior squad. An NSR silver medal became a school highlight for many of the 7 leavers within the crew and was a rewarding end to an eventful season. Still searching for that elusive gold medal, the eight returned to Eton for the Metropolitan regatta in early June, ambitiously entering the Academic Tier 2 event category. A nail-biting heat and absolute commitment from the crew saw the Hampton colours row through Imperial College London to steal a place in the A final by exactly a quarter of a second. Faced against talented university crews, Hampton recorded a heroic performance; 124

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However, the infinite expertise of our coach, Colin Greenaway, did not end there. With the Henley Royal Regatta now in our sights, we rapidly jumped into quads to confirm crews. With little preparation time and faced against crews with a full year of training, both Hampton boats performed admirably; the crew consisting of Ed Butler, Henry Cockett, Ardan Suphi and Harry Fieldhouse recorded a qualifying time, and the crew of Bobby Nur, George Wright, Oli Bridge and Will Baker – the latter two joining us from the 1st and 3rd VIIIs respectively – only very narrowly missed out. The qualifying quad then prepared for the one-on-one showdown against York City where another nailbiting race took place. With nerves at an all time high and on an international stage, the quad was narrowly beaten by a wellversed, tidier crew. Overall, it was a momentous year for all members of the Hampton 2nd VIII and thanks go to all of the staff who made it possible. Ardan Suphi

3rd VIII The 3rd VIII began to come together in earnest with the annual training camp in Temple. With our new leader Mr Thornton, we improved not only in terms of technique, but also in terms of cohesion. Upon our return, our racing season got off to an excellent start with a win in the IM3 4+ category at Kingston Small Boats Head for Will Baker, Ed Campbell, Max Carter and Josh Lea, coxed by 1st VIII cox Charlie Marcus. This success was shortly followed by the Hampton Small Boats Head; the highlight was undoubtedly the stellar performance of Josh Lea who claimed 28th place in the school singles! The build-up to Schools’ Head of the River was a period of gruelling training – for all who attended – punctuated by the cancellation of Hammersmith Head. The conditions on the day of School’s Head itself were equally poor, and the crew, comprised of Tom Reilly, Ed Campbell, James Forster, Tom Morrison, Max Carter, Conor Diver, Josh Lea, Will Baker and Chris Hamilton, finished fourth in the 3rd VIII category. Fuelled by a newfound determination to beat the competition, we headed for Seville to allow Josh to recover from his injuries in the Spanish sun – not that it made much of an appearance! All seemed to be going to plan when, with new recruits Henry McLeod and Henry Warrington churning out the Watts, we placed first in the 3rd VIII category at the BASHER Regatta. Heading into National Schools with our confidence buoyed by Mr Thornton’s wise words, we faced a tough time-trial that set us up to clinch 5th place in the final, rounding off another exciting year of racing. Thank you to the coaches for all the time and effort put in to allow us to enjoy the sport over the year. Will Baker

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J16 – Overview Our year as a squad sadly started with reduced numbers, with only the most committed deciding to continue with the sport into the Fifth Year. The amount of training we were doing increased yet again, but we were now under the guidance of an enthusiastic Mr Neville and the relentlessly humorous Mr Woods. This time, though, we were training alongside the Sixth Form rowers. On the water, we worked in smaller boats, trying to refine our technique for the coming season. On Saturdays, we covered larger distances in eights down on the Kingston stretch of the river, before jogging up to the School for a weights session. While the training was initially arduous, we knew the benefits would become apparent later in the season. For the October Half Term, the J16 and senior rowers travelled down to the south of France for a week long training camp. The stretch of water was incredible – mirror flat each day for 25 kilometres – we were in a perfect place to hone our technique and get some serious mileage covered. The mornings were tough, filled with long, gruelling pieces of work before the generally more ‘interesting’ afternoon sessions. On the final day, two VIIIs and a coxless IV completed a 30 kilometre endurance paddle, which certainly gave the coaches a quiet return journey back to London later that evening! Training continued as normal upon our return to Hampton, and after a couple of weeks we headed to our first race of the season: Pangbourne Junior Sculls. The squad achieved the top four positions in the doubles event, an impressive feat for sure as we are not a sculling school. Unfortunately, our quads seemed to familiarise themselves with the trees on the banks as a number of steering errors were

made – of four quads, only Theo Knight managed to steer without crashing! A few weeks later, we entered a large number of crews into Hampton Small Boats Head, hoping to find as much success on our home stretch. Disappointingly, facing strong competition, we left without any medals. As we progressed into winter, the conditions we were training in became harsher and colder. Fortunately, winter also has a very special event on the calendar: the Christmas Pudding races. This year we raced in mixed eights with senior and LEH rowers, making for fast, if somewhat disjointed races down the extremely short course. Soon enough, it was time for the Christmas holiday and much needed time to recover, see family and friends and, of course, revise for the upcoming mock exams. After the mocks, it was straight back to training and we set our attention to the coming races. Our first race was BASHER head, and while we had planned to enter three eights, illness among the squad reduced us to just two crews. Regardless, we placed first and second in our age group, although we also knew the other boats likely weren’t the best our competitor schools had to offer. We managed to enter Quintin Head a week later with all three eights, having recovered enough rowers to do so. The race provided us with some useful Tideway experience before Schools’ Head of the River Race, and our 1st VIII managed to place fifth in an IM3 category, which for the most part consists of crews from universities. With the advent of Hampton Fours and Eights Head, the squad was plagued by illness, cutting the number of eights down from three to two once again. Those not in their sick-beds powered down the familiar course, but we were again met by stronger, healthier competition, and did not take any silverware home. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Following Hampton Head, illness continued to follow the squad, but many still got in some crucial training at Half Term as we set our sights on Schools’ Head of the River. It finally came, one chilly morning in March. With some still recovering on the day of the race, we still managed to field an eight in the Champ VIIIs category and two eights in the 2nd VIIIs category. Our 1st VIII placed seventh, and our 2nd and 3rd VIIIs came second and fourth respectively in the J16 2nd VIII category. The challenge facing Mr Woods and the 2nd VIII crew, however, was just how far they were behind first place – a KCS Wimbledon crew came out in front of them by about 50 seconds. At this point, winning National Schools’ Regatta later in the year seemed out of sight.

conditions were not going to be fair across the course and everyone was racing for the sheltered lanes. Next up was the semi-final and a fairly straightforward race as Eton and KCS had been drawn in the other semi. The nerves were beginning to hit now as semi-final times put us just under a second faster than Eton, with KCS in third place on time. The final was a cracking race and coming off the start we managed to hold just a few seats over Eton; we were in a dangerous position and racing hard to move away. Then, about 50 metres before the 1K marker, our cox, Tom Hettiaratchy, put in an excellent call – it was now or never for the crew of Edward Allen, Ben Cowley, Matthew Randall, Ollie Hottinger, Euan Miller, David Brealey, Nic Green and Indy Barnes and the move saw us push clear of Eton and the rest of the field. We dominated the second half, finishing 6.7 seconds clear of Eton and ensuring the Eton Vikings trophy would return to Hampton for another year! We have had a great year of J16 rowing, despite some of our initial concerns about balancing the sport with our exam revision and life more generally! None of this would have been possible without the support of the team of coaches in the Boat Club, but in particular we would like to thank Mr Neville and Mr Woods for everything they have helped us achieve this year. Hopefully the Eton Vikings trophy will stay with us for a few years to come! Euan Miller

With the head season over, the Easter holidays soon came and with it the process of seat racing for regatta season. As usual, the J16 squad travelled down to the warmer waters of Seville for a seven day intensive training camp, which began with yet more seat racing! Unfortunately, due to a burst eardrum preventing him from flying, Ben Cowley could not join us and so boats were not set in stone. Edward Metcalfe had also stepped into the coxing seat for the 3rd VIII, while Henry O’Sullivan started to row instead. It was a tough camp, but we were provided with plenty of food and free time – mostly spent revising for upcoming GCSEs – and even one afternoon free to go into Seville!

J15 Overview

After the camp, it was back to the Thames and the 2nd VIII settled as a crew with Ben winning his seat in the boat for the season. With a little over a month to prepare for National Schools’ Regatta, which meant training and racing around exams and revision, we knew we were in for a tough few weeks.

All excited about our first sweep race in mixed Eights, the whole squad kept grinding out all the sessions led by the lead tactician and Head Coach Mr Liversage, who consistently motivated everyone. We first attended Reading Small Boat’s Head, where the squad put down a high benchmark early in the season. Notably, Eliot Patient won the J15 single sculls category, beating the Star and Arrow Club’s sculler who regularly spent time in a single, whilst the double of Tom Shepherd and Samuel Schomberg placed a respectable 3rd. Less notably, single sculler Ben Martis-Jones capsized 50m from the finish of the 3.7km course, providing plenty of opportunities for good-humoured jokes from both rowers and coaches alike!

Finishing the J14 season with over 70 summer rowers, the J15 season looked promising with a large squad size of 56 attending the first games session on a Tuesday afternoon. Being one year older meant the training schedule was more intense, time-consuming and challenging. As we started sweep rowing, we started from the back end and countless sessions were done on nailing this strong position at the back of the stroke.

The squad all entered BASHER regatta where the 2nd VIII also finally had the chance to gauge the Eton College crew we would be competing against at National Schools’ – for some reason, we had not seen them for the entire year and had no idea what they could produce! Annoyingly, given the structure of the regatta, we didn’t actually get to race them, but times showed we were separated by the smallest of margins and it could easily go either way when we were back at Dorney Lake for National Schools’. That was without factoring in KCS Wimbledon. A week later and over the Bank Holiday weekend, the J16 2nd VIIII raced at Wallingford regatta, which was a great confidence boost for the crew – we narrowly lost to the Bedford School J16 1st VIII – and, most importantly, provided us with the opportunity to overturn the KCS J16 2nd VIII that had been so dominant at the Schools’ Head.

On to Teddington Eights Head, the squad was split into 5 mixed eights, accounting for half of the entries in the category. Over the 5.2km course, Hampton came 3rd, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 9th, which was a remarkable squad achievement considering most of the other schools had raced only one eight in the category. As the term went on, the standard 20-minute ergometer test caused more competition among the squad and the ‘leg-endary’ rowing sessions with Mr Hill were memorable for all that had one of those famous sessions.

Soon came National Schools’ Regatta. A time trial early in the morning placed the J16 2nd VIII first in their category; we needed this result as a typically strong Dorney crosswind meant that

27 October saw many schools come to our stretch of water to compete at Hampton Small Boat’s Head, where the squad performed extremely well across all the categories coming 3rd in the Coxed

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sport Quadruple Sculls category. As the Autumn term drew to a close, training continued and we tapered for a Boat-club 2km test day on the morning of Christmas Pudding Races. The fancy-dress themed Christmas Pudding races were supposed to be fun and relaxed, but given Jasper Lyon’s dress and Charlie Close’s dinosaur outfit, it was clear that some people were taking it very earnestly. Training continued throughout the holidays, with the Christmas challenges in conjunction with the LEH J15 squad – something that undoubtedly provided motivation for the boys to keep training throughout the holidays! As the ‘Sprint Term’ commenced, it was clear that School’s Head would be the event which we would primarily train for. The Friday runs, the ergs, the circuits and weights with Mr Hanbury in the gym all intensified as we looked to put the mileage in preparation for the 6km course at Schools Head. Basher Head, at the end of January, saw two top mixed eights form two weeks before Basher. The intersquad rivalry continued to grow and the internal-competition between both boats, ensured each boat was pushing the other one. Mr Hill lead one of the eights while Mr Liversage led the other one. At Basher, Hampton came 1st and 2nd, with Mr Liversage’s eight winning out by a mere 4 seconds over a 3.6km course. We then split into our boats for the remainder of Head Season before we headed to Hazelwinkel, Belgium for out pre-regatta season training camp. As a squad, we would like to thank everyone who has worked with us this season for their time, effort and dedication throughout the season. Special plaudits must go to Mr Liversage, Mr Hill, Miss Kugele, Miss Bradbury and Mr Barnett. Ben Martis-Jones

J15 1st VIII

Wallingford Regatta kicked off the regatta season for the crew. Hampton finished 5 seconds ahead of St. George’s College, winning the heat. The VIII also beat King’s College School by 11 seconds, which was a big improvement after losing to them at Hampton Head at the start of the year. Unfortunately, in the final, the crew finished 3rd, 4 seconds behind TSS, with Westminster finishing 5 seconds ahead of that in 1st. The next race was Bedford Regatta, a one-versus-one race with 2 crews side-by-side down a 1200m course. Hampton had been drawn a bye into the second round, facing St. Paul’s. Sadly, St Paul’s won by 1 ½ lengths, knocking out Hampton, though they also went on to win the whole regatta, beating Abingdon School by 2 ¼ lengths. National Schools Regatta was next, it was the race the squad had been building up to the whole year. It started with the time trial, 1900m of the 2000m course at Dorney Lake. The results came in and Hampton had come 10th, just qualifying into the A/B semifinals as they were in the top 12. The boys were drawn into a semi with Abingdon School and Westminster School, as well as Shiplake College and Royal Shrewsbury School; they knew it would be tough to get into the top 3 and qualify into the A final. After an amazing race, rowing through Shiplake College from a length down, the team finished a creditable 4th. The final race for the VIII was the B final, they knew they had nothing to lose and they were up to make the best of the situation. Pleasingly, they won the B final in great fashion, beating Shiplake Collge, who finished second, by over 8 seconds – nearly 3 boat lengths! After winning Marlow Regatta last year as J14s, the crew persuaded Mr Liversage to enter them into the race this year as some redemption. However, this year they had new competition, last year it was St Paul’s, this year it would be Westminster. Due to D of E commitments, Eliot and Charlie could not make the race. Johnny Dinan and Charlie Sutton were brought into the crew to replace them. Yet again it started with the time trial; the boys had learnt after NSR and threw everything into the time trial, finishing just 4 seconds slower than the favourites Westminster. However, the final did not go to plan. Going through the 1000m mark, Hampton thought they could do what they had wanted to do all year and beat Westminster, they were only half a length down. Westminster started to move so the boys went with them. 500m to go and Westminster started to wind, but VIII was staying with them. But then with around 300m to go the boat came to a complete stop: Sam Schomberg’s blade had snapped! Despite that, the boys regrouped and still managed finish second in front of King’s College School.

The first proper race for the VIII was Hampton 4s and 8s Head. With Will Mcloughlin transferring to rugby a week before the race, Nick Thomas was called up from the second VIII and did a brilliant job subbing in into the 3 seat behind Tom Shepherd. The crew finished second just behind King’s College School Wimbledon in a race that left the boys ready to hunt down the KCS crew at School’s Head of the River in a few weeks’ time. With about a month’s training going quicker than expected, the boys were raring to go on the rather miserable, soggy day. The crew had a bit of a reshuffle, with Jacob O’loughlin setting the rhythm from the stroke seat and Josh Breadmore moving back a seat to sit at 7. Matt Morrow moved from 7 to 4, sitting behind Sam Schomberg who had moved from 6 to 5. Jasper Lyon replaced him in the 6 seat, Tom Shepherd replaced Nick Thomas at 3 with James Bradley and Eliot Patient staying at 2 and bow respectively. The race was a slight learning curve for the boys, finishing in 8th position after Aberdeen Schools Rowing Association surprised everyone by winning the category 17 seconds quicker than the runners-up Westminster Schools Boat Club.

J15 2nd VIII

The eight then moved onto camp in Hazewinkel with a newfound determination to make their way up the ranks. The gruelling six days of camp gave the boys some hope moving into regatta season, with the final eight being decided for the rest of the term. Charlie Close won his seat races, moving him into the 5 seat of the A boat.

The first draft of the 2nd VIII was determined a week prior to Hampton 8s and 4s Head where the crew consisted of Xavier Tinsley Roy (Coxswain), Johnny Dinan (Stroke), Alex Crisan, Keiran Downer, Charlie Close, Thomas Cross, Jacob O’Loughlin and Ben Martis-Jones.

Although the season was challenging, it was an amazing learning experience, and some of the improvements made will provide them with confidence going into their J16 year. Jasper Lyon

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sport At the Hampton Head, the crew finished only 13 seconds behind the J15 1st VIII, proving that many of the crew could be pushing for seats in the top boat later in the year. As training and competitive rivalry intensified, Jacob O’Loughlin moved to stroke for the J15 1st VIII, while Nick Thomas joined and sat at stroke. At the Schools Head, we went off second in our division behind St Paul’s, who we expected to work off during the race. Inner-crew motivation was high and we got to Hammersmith Bridge where we wanted to put a push in as we heard the cheers of parents and spectators on the bridge. As we got closer to the finish, we maintained a higher rate of striking which enabled us to catch up with a crew in a previous division. We ended up coming 2nd to KCS Wimbledon by 7 seconds, and beating our main rivals Abingdon and Westminster, making KCS our new targets. As the term ended, we prepared to make the trip to Hazelwinkel, Belgium for seat racing, crew formation and regatta season preparation. On training camp, all potential members of the 2nd VIII were subjected to 3 days of solid seat-racing, with each one finishing with Mr Hill cycling over to the landing stages and asking for one person from each boat to swap over. Nick Thomas had moved to 7 to cater for newly founded strokeman Ben Martis-Jones, and Charlie Close had worked enormously hard to earn himself a seat in the 1st VIII, which in turn welcomed Jacob O’Loughlin to the 2 seat, and Jay Kim moved up providing a lot of wattage to the boat. The tiring week culminated with a 2km race down the Hazewinkel lake, where we put into place our extremely organised race plan helped put together by Mr Hill. We set ourselves three goals: win Bedford, win National School’s Regatta and have the best catches in the category. With those in our minds, we created a mentality among the crew about doing it for each other. Wallingford approached quickly and we had just one race: the final. Saul Morrison was chosen to fill the final spot over Tom Cross who had been very unlucky with injury, and the eight was ready for the challenge. Although we were taken by Monmouth and Westminster at the start, we kept taking another seat on KCS every 3 strokes. By the 500m mark, we were 3 seconds ahead of them but found ourselves half a length down on Westminster. The crew’s inner-belief was intensified when Xavier Tinsley-Roy called ‘7 seconds’, and we walked on Westminster and found ourselves half a length up at the 1km marker. We still had Monmouth’s 1st VIII in contact, but their speed in the 2nd kilometre meant that they were winners. As a crew we happy, as we had performed and were ‘consistent’ throughout our 250m splits, which enabled us to row through Westminster. Moving on to Bedford, in the semi-finals we were up against St Paul’s, whom we had overtaken surprisingly early at School’s Head. Both crews had rapid starts and at the bridge both crews were pretty much level, but after the bridge Paul’s could not keep up with our quick mid-race pace and we won the race with a verdict of 1 length. The Quad, featuring elite sculler Johnny Dinan in the engine room, had a respectable start but were beaten by Windsor Boys A. In the final, we met King’s School Chester, who we knew would be a tough opposition. The start was ferocious and thanks to middle four we were able to rate at 47spm off the start with the rate never going below 38. Going into the enclosures, we heard all the Hampton cheers and this gave us the extra boost to finish the race with a 2 ½ length verdict. 128

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Extremely pleased with our first goal completed, we returned to training focusing on that front end and making it the best in our category. The night before we had our final outing, the crew consisted Xavier Tinsley-Roy at cox, with Ben Martis-Jones setting the rhythm at stroke, backed up by Nick Thomas at 7. Middle four consisting of Johhny Dinan (6), Alex Crisan (5), Jay Kim (4), Charlie Sutton (3) provided power, mental grit and determination, while Bow pair of Jacob O’Loughlin and Saul Morrison provided the technique required to set the boat up nicely. We raced our time-trial at 8am which provided its own challenges, and we found ourselves 2nd to Westminster. The semi-final saw us in our desired lane next to Abingdon. We found ourselves down by a few seats after 10 or so strokes, which was mentally demoralising, but the inner-crew belief meant that although we were down still we could treat the second half as a new race. As we came past the HHBCA tent, the screams greeted our ears and we converted it into free-speed resulting in the boat getting clear water on Abingdon. We then went into the final as the 2nd seeded crew meaning we had a good lane. Unfortunately for us, after a long delay, Westminster attached and the marshals quick started us while we were off course. Saul Morrison and Charlie Sutton displayed great oarsmanship by straightening us up, but our necessary use of the rudder preventing us from exiting our lane off the start meant that we were at the back of the field at 350m. Mentally, the whole crew was hurting so much inside because we had worked so hard for this one race and we were at the back far from a medal place. Tinsley-Roy showed his experience and ability to orchestrate the boat magnificently under pressure and guided us to 3rd place at the 1km marker. In the second kilometre, we paid for the extra effort expended, and Westminster and Abingdon both pushed off us and finished in 1st and 2nd respectively. We crossed the line in 3rd place, meaning that we had failed to complete our 3rd goal of winning National School’s, though our recovery from the cruellest of starts was something to be proud of. Looking back at last year’s 2nd VIII campaign, we recognised that we had such high standards, and that failing to meet them once in the season should not determine how we perceived the whole year. It was such an enjoyable season for all, and one, which no one will forget for a very long time. One man who was crucial to our success, drive and passion was Mr Hill. Although he says that we worked hard for our own successes, without his guidance, wisdom and excellent coaching, we know we would not have been able to achieve what we did. His passion for the sport was evident to parents and rowers, while his enthusiasm, energy and wise-words has motivated the whole crew to constantly work harder and smarter. We are extremely thankful for all he has done for us both on and off the water, and are looking forward to working with him again during the J16 campaign! Ben Martis-Jones

J15 3rd VIII Having trained hard all winter, we began the year with high hopes. Our first race was Hampton Head, where we were the fastest 3rd VIII. But, after that, it was straight into tideway training for the fast approaching School’s Head.

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sport At School’s Head, the race did not quite go according to plan. We began well, but after 500m, we hit a large buoy, losing us a few precious seconds. Not discouraged, we kept rowing hard all the way to the finish and ended up coming first in the J15 3rd VIII category. Training camp was hard, but we pushed through and did some great pieces. The crew was also finalised after a few people had left to do cricket in the Summer term. Not that long after camp and with high spirits, we went to the first regatta of the year: Bedford. We made it to the final where we were supposed to face the Hampton D-boat, but they had to forfeit due to an injured rower, leaving us as winners. At the National Schools Regatta, we did not do quite as well as we hoped to do, coming 14th in the time trials and just missing the cut for the semi-finals. We made the most of it and came 2nd in our final, narrowly losing to Eton’s C-boat. Overall, we had a successful year and we would like to thank Mrs Kugele for her coaching and support. Ben Smith

J15 4th VIII The J15 4th VIII at Hampton was a fun boat to be a part of. Nobody was too serious about rowing when we started, and the attitude was a fun and relaxed one, but we still had a goal we were pushing towards: to be the fastest 4th VIII in the country. The first step towards achieving our goal began at Hampton head, which began as we were nearing the end of the winter season. We were looking forward to our first race of the season, and ended up coming 2nd in the 3rd VIII’s category, only a few seconds behind our own 3rd VIII. The race was a good experience, and went well, which was a good start to the racing season. After our success at Hampton head, we began setting our sights on schools head, and training, so we could perform as best as we could at this event. We were entered into the same category as our 2nd and 3rd VIIIs, so we were not expecting to win, but went in with high hopes, to see how many boats we could beat. After racing through the windy conditions, we ended up placing in the top half of the category, which we were pleased about. Having finished our last big race in the head season, we prepared ourselves for regatta season, and had our rowing camp at Hazelwinkel in Belgium. It was hard work, but after seat racing, and ensuring we had the fastest crew possible, we found ourselves racing at Bedford regatta. We reached the finals of the 3rd VIII category, beating Eton and Abingdon’s 3rd VIIIS. An injury prevented us from facing our own Hampton 3rd VIII, but at least the cup returned to Hampton regardless! Our next race was at Thames Ditton regatta where we also made the finals. Unfortunately, one our of crew members lost his blade at the start of the race; by the time we had recovered, our opposition were long gone. We were still pleased we made it to the finals of a regatta in the second eight category however, and kept our heads held high. Disappointed, but determined as ever, we approached our final race of the year, where we raced against the most prominent 3rd

and 4th eights in the country, at Eton, a few days before national schools regatta. We won, beating Eton’s 3rd VIII in the process. This was our first win, we had finally won after being so close so many times. This was our last race together as a crew, so it was a special experience for all of us, which we will not be forgetting any time soon. Overall, we had an excellent and fun year, and owe our thanks to all of the coaches at Hampton that have made this possible for us, particularly to Mrs Bradbury for all of her support and coaching. Harry Prabhu

J14 Overview The year started with ‘taster afternoons’ at the Boathouse, in the late summer sunshine. Taking to the water in small boats with experienced J15 helpers, the boys seemed to get the hang of things quickly, and we felt set for another terrific year. The boys’ rapid progress continued as term got underway; we were rarely off the water as the good conditions held, and the improvements in their technique came thick and fast. The boys were desperate to race when the opportunity finally came at the annual ‘Christmas Pudding Races’, competing in mixed crews with boys and girls from Kingston Grammar and Lady Eleanor Holles Schools. As ever, their efforts on the water were much more impressive than their commitment to the fancy dress code, but a great deal of fun was had by everyone who took part. With their first race under their belt, the boys could now consider themselves ‘boaties’, and went home talking of ‘catching crabs’ and their last-minute pushes for the line! A big part of rowing at Hampton are the two annual ‘Hampton Head’ races, and the J14 boys were involved at both. At the ‘small boats’ event, the boys were enlisted as an army of helpers, but their first chance to race on our home stretch came at the second Hampton Head in February. Unfortunately, the event was struck by apocalyptic rain – the mud bath that was Hurst Park in the ‘aftermath’ had to be seen to be believed – but despite this, the boys who raced were fortunate to benefit from an incredible team spirit in the boathouse; the senior crews acted as brilliant role-models, and showed just what Hampton Rowing is all about. The boys took to the water determined to put in a fantastic performance, achieving just that with every single one of our crews coming away with a medal! Next came the Junior Sculling Head, which is one of the key events in our season and the equivalent of the Schools’ Head for the senior crews. The A Octuple raced with unbelievable grit and determination, coming away with a fantastic silver medal despite stiff competition from some crews comprising some much heftier athletes. The going was rather tougher for the B crew on the day, but they still placed well in their category and ahead of the C crew, who came away with an excellent silver medal in their category. As ever, we were delighted to have the largest entry of any of the schools competing; it was fantastic to see our D and E crews come away with wins and retain our reputation as the school with the greatest strength in depth at J14 level. The Easter Holiday saw an unprecedented 37 boys depart for our training camp at Wimbleball Lake. It would be fair to say that we experienced every single possible kind of precipitation – we had no the lion the magazine of hampton school

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fewer than three members of the Geography Department with us to confirm this – but the boys rose to the challenge admirably and we were able to complete an excellent week of training without missing a single session. On training camp, we always work on the principle that the more calories the boys are taking on board, the harder they must have been working out on the water – so we were delighted to once again break our record for the sheer quantity of cereal bars, snacks and sandwiches consumed! A huge ‘thank you’ to Miss Brown and Mr Taylor who came along on the trip at relatively short notice, and played an instrumental part in making it such a successful week. Special mention should also go to Miss Brown for making it up the never-ending hill on the way to the lake on her bike! After so much exertion in the rain on training camp, we were hungry for the summer race season to get underway with the Junior Sculling Regatta at Dorney Lake. We only entered one crew to this highly competitive event, but they put in an excellent performance to come away as silver medallists – a great start to the season. Next up came the boys’ first experience of a more traditional regatta, held on the Great Ouse at Bedford. Once again, the A Octuple had a fantastic day, winning comfortably in the first round before prevailing in a very tight race against Abingdon School in round two. Another fiendishly close race in the semi-final finished in defeat to Royal Shrewsbury School by a matter of inches! The B Octuple were unfortunate to draw the eventual winners from Norwich School in the first round, but once again the C Octuple rallied hard and made it to the final before eventually losing to a very powerful crew from Radley College. All of the boys raced in quads as well as octuples, which made for a very long day – not helped by the fact that Mr Saul’s chequered relationship with the ‘Pathfinder’, our towing vehicle, continued, with the second callout from the recovery services in as many years! We were sad to return home without any silverware, but the boys all experienced some really closely fought racing, and came away intensely motivated for more competition over the coming weeks! 130

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The summer race season continued with two of our quads winning plate events Thames Ditton Regatta the following weekend, but the focus was now firmly on National Schools’ Regatta. When the time came, the A Octuple did not quite find the form they had shown earlier in the season, narrowly missing out on their target of a place in the prestigious A final at the end of the day. Fortunately, after the Half Term break, they were able to return to Eton Dorney for Marlow Regatta and set the record straight, beating a number of crews which had made the A Final at National Schools’ Regatta, and maintaining overlap with the silver medal winning crew from Radley College. The B Octuple were unfortunate to not quite fire on all cylinders at National Schools’ Regatta, but Mr Jenkins’ C crew put in a phenomenal performance to smash their way into the A final and were in the hunt for the bronze medal right up until the finish line! The year came to a close with trips to BASHER and Reading Town Regattas. In these final races of the year, the boys competed in mixed boats, so we were not necessarily expecting results against other schools’ top crews – unchanged from the National Schools’ Regatta. Nonetheless, the boys were able to gain valuable experience that should stand them in good stead for their J15 year. The boys were also able to enjoy an afternoon trip to the famous Henley Regatta Course to see the most prestigious event in the rowing calendar. It has been such a pleasure to work with the J14 squad again this year. The boys have applied themselves with real dedication and showed great camaraderie, enthusiasm and team spirit. I am enormously grateful to all of the other coaches for their gargantuan efforts with the boys. I wish the boys all the very best of luck for their future in the sport and hope to see them donning their club blazers when they step up to the First VIII down the line. A huge personal thank you to all of the other J14 Coaches: Mr Saul, Mr Jenkins, Miss Slator, Miss Field and Mrs Ziegler. Good luck to Mr Jenkins who are taking up coaching roles in the J15 and J16 squads respectively next year! CPA

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Majorca Tennis Tour

Sun, fun and tennis! During the October Half Term, 23 Hampton tennis players set off for Majorca and the Hampton Tennis training camp organised by Mr Langton.   After an early Monday morning meet-up at Gatwick, we took off for Palma De Majorca, half-asleep but excited at the prospect of what lay ahead. When we arrived in the 25-degree heat, some people began to regret their t-shirts and jeans. After a short journey to Paguera, followed by a swift check-in at our hotel, we were on court for our first session at the Tennis Academy Majorca before you could blink. Clay court tennis here we come!

The next morning, it was the first of our four three-hour sessions, with Ali Yenilmez, a former Turkish #1, Davis Cup player and coach of Rafael Nadal. No-one was quite prepared for the intense Spanish-style half an hour warmup, which involved plenty of ladder work, hurdles and lots of running. Our morning coaching sessions consisted of drills focused on a variety of skills: sliding, hitting open stance, using lots of spin and encouraging each other in Spanish. Our afternoon sessions concentrated on implementing the skills we had learnt each morning in match practice, in the form of the Hampton Davis Cup, with four teams: Billy’s Fringe, @TTsportography, Sun versus Jamie and Team Buzz. Over the course of the week, we battled it out to the very end. In addition to the training element of the trip, several of the boys were given the opportunity to play against some very skilful local club members. It was a learning experience, and a masterclass of how to play on clay; unfortunately, the locals had that little bit more experience than us! the lion the magazine of hampton school

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sport Billy’s Fringe were victorious on games night, but Sunny Pops (formerly Sun versus Jamie) won the quiz, which contained questions on Spain, football, tennis, anagrams and teachers’ dubious music choices. The participation award went to @TTsportography for getting one mark out of forty: the name of one of their team members – though they could not even spell that right! The pool at the hotel was unheated – much to the shock of everyone who jumped straight in it – though the sea was a lot warmer, and we were able to spend some time relaxing at the beach: swimming, sunbathing and enjoying the local attractions. Who knew you could have so much fun on a pedalo? We returned to Gatwick on Friday night, thoroughly  exhausted, but ultimately exhilarated. That is simply what happens when you play 22 hours of tennis! Thank you to Mr Langton for organising the trip, and Miss Byrne, Miss Bedford and Mr Baker for accompanying us. Vamos! Sandy Mitchell 

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Tennis

the future came from Freddy Liang, Marcus Bob, James Clark and Alex Richford; hopefully each of them will take their experience and look to build upon it in the upcoming season.

U12 U12 team, consisting of Rohan Crowe, Tom Williams, Vishal Saha, Josh Hood, Ed Gooze-Ziji, Giles Mowbray and Rory Patterson had a thoroughly successful season. Despite losing their first match to a particularly strong team from Whitgift, they went on to reach the semi-final of the Surrey league against St George’s College. In a tense encounter played on grass, the team triumphed 4-2; in doing so, all pairs demonstrated exceptional resilience and determination to overcome a well-drilled and experienced opposition. Although the team came up just short at the finals – encountering some incredibly classy opposition on the sweltering courts of St George’s on Surrey League Finals day, they can undoubtedly reflect on their efforts with their heads held high and with many importance experiences under their belts. The team grew in confidence as the season progress and hold great potential for the future. I look forward to seeing how the team progresses up the school and I hope that many will be out working hard at lunchtime training sessions from September. Well done boys! BSB

U13 For the second season in a row, the U13 tennis team was seeking to defend their Surrey League Tennis title. In what turned out to be a magnificent season, one of the most pleasing features of this year was the number of boys who represented the team in competitive fixtures – eleven in all! Debuts and performances that are encouraging for

In addition to the Surrey League, the Team Tennis Schools competition is always an exceptionally tough challenge. Having not quite been able to match the singles fire-power of St George’s in the first group match, the second against Reeds offered our less experienced members of the team their first taste of competitive tennis. Despite ending up on the wrong side of the result – only one point from toppling the Reeds first pair – the boys played admirably. The route to the finals was far from easy, with the boys having to battle for every game and every set against opposition that were also a year older and a year wiser. Despite succumbing to a technical Reeds side in their first match, subsequent wins against Kings College Wimbledon, Guildford, Amesbury and Trinity – in a thumping 9-0 quarter-final win – saw the boys returning to the finals day. However, had the final point of the final set in the final match against Amesbury gone the other way, it might all have been a different story to report! Playing in the extreme heat and sunshine appropriate for Wimbledon’s famous strawberries and cream, Dominik Hagmann, Theo Mantel-Cooper, Henri Beauvilain, Ollie Drew, Will Heyes, Nizar Al-Milli and Conor McNeany set about overcoming Grey Court School in the semis. Despite some bizarre tactical play from the opposition that had the boys on the backfoot, a 7-2 victory rightly had St George’s, Weybridge in the team’s sights. In what the team – allegedly and subsequently – referred to as a ‘decision of tactical genius’, controversial pairings for the final resulted in the very best tennis of the day. Team high-fives, crushing smashes, deft volleys and crushing forehands ended up as a 5-4 win. Whilst the archive is scoured for the statistics, this is perhaps Hampton’s first and only ever team to have won multiple Surrey League titles – let alone back-to-back ones – and the whole squad deserves great credit for their attitude and efforts over the course of a long and physically demanding season. The question is, ‘can they do it yet again next year?’ MMB

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U14

Seniors

The U14 team, consisting of Manu Prasad, Billy Atkinson, Rohan Vasudev, Jai Saha, Ben Bird, Raff Lucking and Luke Bland, did not have a lot of match-time; despite this, they won two of their three matches comfortably – particularly pleasing was the victory over a strong Whitgift team. The team was also incredibly unfortunate to find themselves on the wrong side of a tight 5-4 scoreline against Trinity in the quarter-finals of the Surrey League; despite this, I have no doubt that the boys will learn from this experience and, in the future, turn some of those tight matches into victories.

As per usual, the tennis season has been full-on and thoroughly enjoyable for the senior squad, with several notable successes in a range of tournaments. Many thanks go to the principal squad of James Hughes, Joss Connell, Gustav Durlind, Fraser Barclay, Heath Whittington and Hamish Maccormick, as well as to the up-and-coming players who have helped the team out, notably including Jamie Harris of the Fifth Year.

Fortunately, many of the players had the chance to play in higher age groups. There is a lot of potential within the squad, so there is a good likelihood of success next year. The enthusiasm and dedication of the boys does them credit and I look forward to seeing them develop into an exceptionally strong senior side LOR

U15 The U15 tennis team made fantastic progress this season. The squad of Josh Culshaw, Tanmay Thanawalla, Theo Radicopoulos, Sam Sparrow, Haris Williams, Sam Power, Roshan Ali, Joe Strong, Callum Graimes, Ollie Burke and Hugo Hamilton produced some outstanding performances in a very challenging set of fixtures. Highlights included scintillating victories over competitive teams from both Whitgift and Kingston Grammar. In both instances, the squad triumphed in sudden-death doubles against highly ranked and talented opposition. The team’s ability to work well together and maintain an attacking approach in their doubles play looks very promising for the future of tennis at Hampton and many of these boys will already be pushing the senior squad hard in the coming year! ODE 134

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The crowning achievement of the team’s season was its result as runners-up in the LTA National Schools U18 tournament. Reaching the finals, which hosted 8 schools from across the country, required several group-stage wins and two victories in knockout matches, which the team came through with much tenacity. Wins against all three other schools in their group at the national finals saw Hampton play for the title against Magdalen College School, although unfortunate injuries saw Hampton just edged out 2-4 overall. For the team, the loss is bittersweet – many of the players will still be eligible to play next year, and will hope to go that one step further to claim the trophy. At the Surrey Festival of Tennis, an annual event hosted at St George’s on their grass courts, Fraser Barclay and Joss Connell won their group without dropping a set, advancing to play Whitgift in the quarter-finals. A strong performance by the duo propelled them past Whitgift and into the semi-finals. Although the Hampton pair lost here to eventual winners Reed’s School, this was once again an admirable display from the senior squad. Another event hosted at St George’s, their annual Pairs competition, was also successful for the Hampton team of Fraser Barclay, Joss Connell, Gustav Durlind and Heath Whittington, who recovered from an early loss in the main draw to eventually bow out in the semi-finals of the plate competition. Hampton’s historically strong performance in the Surrey League was also extended by this year’s seniors. Qualification for the semi-finals came after two group stage wins and a hotly contested quarterfinal against Ewell Castle in which Gustav Durlind and Heath Whittington won all three of their matches to put the team

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through to the semifinals with a 5-4 win. However, Hampton suffered the reverse, a 4-5 loss, against Reed’s School in the semi-finals; despite this, the squad should feel pleased with their performances and should take much heart from their ability to take their opponents right down to the line, with many chances to snatch the match as well. In the Surrey LTA Winter Tournament, the combined efforts of Harry Vincent, Joss Connell and Heath Whittington, saw Hampton reach the semi-finals. This was a particularly impressive feat as the matches were played not only against local schools, but also local clubs, which provided a different style and level for the squad to overcome. Overall, the senior squad has put in a very credible performance this year, which they should be proud of. They should also be encouraged by their results and the lessons learnt from consistently competing at the top level of school tennis. The next few years seem full of possibilities and this year’s tennis captain, James Hughes, hopes that the squad can realise its potential to the fullest extent in the years to come. James Hughes

ISTA The finale of the school tennis season, the ISTA competition, attracts the most competitive and eager schools from around the country to participate in up to four days of tennis matches.

challenging matches against outstanding opposition should prove a great experience as the boys look forward to returning to the competition in the future as part of the senior team.

U13s Success in the Surrey League was followed up by a superb display at the National Independent Schools tournament. Placed in a particularly difficult group, Ollie Drew and Henri Beauvilain did very well to make the Plate competition quarter-finals, winning all of their plate group matches along the way. Dominik Hagmann and Theo Mantel-Cooper continued to grow in confidence over the two days of play and soon enough found themselves in the National Finals; having overcome Forrest School in a tense quarterfinal tie-break, they also overcame a talented Whitgift pair in a match that again went right down to the end of a tie-break. Facing local rivals St George’s in the finals, the boys came agonisingly close, though ultimately did themselves proud in coming second in this prestigious competition.

U15s Josh Culshaw and Haris Williams led the line for the U15s and found themselves pitted in a ‘group of death’ on Sunday morning. Despite playing some aggressive tennis, they were ultimately undone on a few occasions, leaving them to fight on in the Plate competition. Despite facing Millfield first up, Joe Strong and Theo Radicopoulos played some superb tennis to win the rest of their group matches to progress into the main draw of the competition. Josh and Haris dominated their Plate group and rampaged through their opponents until they were undone in a tight battle with Radley. Beaten in the first round of the main competition, Joe and Theo found themselves in another plate competition, admirably battling their way through two more rounds before coming up just short against Sevenoaks. Some moments of brilliance and the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Seniors For the senior team, comprising James Hughes, Joss Connell, Fraser Barclay, and Heath Whittington, which reached the quarter-finals of this prestigious tournament, this year’s draw provided a great, but rewarding challenge. Having come through against Framlingham School to play on the second day of the tournament, the next opponents in the form of King’s Taunton provided much stiffer resistance. With James Hughes and Joss Connell coming agonisingly close to a comeback against the opposing first pair from King’s, even having set points in to equalise in the second set, they eventually succumbed 6-2 7-6. Fortunately for the team, the stellar performance of Fraser Barclay and Heath Whittington, who convincingly defeated the opponents’ second pair 6-3 6-4, took the match to a deciding game. This was won thanks to a clinical performance from Fraser Barclay and Joss Connell, who secured Hampton’s place in the quarter-finals of this national tournament. Day three of the tournament saw Hampton play the number one seeds, Culford School, who succeeded in bringing the team’s run to an end. Nonetheless, Joss Connell’s powerful serving and James Hughes’ deft hands at the net ensured that the team did not go quietly, leading the Culford first pair in the second set and producing a performance that received apt applause from the gathered spectators. The seniors should be proud of their run in this renowned and fiercely contested tournament and they look forward to challenging for this title again next year! MMB and James Hughes

British Schools Senior Championships – National Finals Hampton competed at the National Finals of the British Schools Senior Championships at Bolton arena last week. The team of Fraser Barclay, Gustav Durlind, Hamish Maccormick, James Hughes and Jamie Harris produced some superb displays to win their group, beating Colston’s 12-0, Watford Grammar 8-4 and Sevenoaks 7-6; the latter being an exceptionally tight match which Hampton won in a tiebreak shootout 11-9, after the pairing of Gustav Durlind and James Hughes saved one match point before sealing the victory. In the final against Magdalen College, Fraser Barclay produced a resilient performance at number one singles to keep Hampton alive going into the doubles matches, and with a further victory alongside Gustav in the doubles, the tie went all the way to the last match. Jamie and Hamish pushed the Magdalen team hard but eventually lost the set 6-4 after some gripping rallies and momentum swings.

At the first major tournament of the year, Hampton’s tennis players acquitted themselves admirably. Making their debuts at the festival were U12 pairing Rohan Crowe and Tom Williamson. Despite playing some promising tennis with moments of flair, they did not qualify from their group for the latter stages of the competition. The U13 pairing of Dominik Hagmann and Ollie Drew performed tenaciously and ground out hard-fought victories against stubborn opposition to reach the final against hosts St. George’s; despite being pipped to the title, they can be particularly pleased with their efforts. Rohan Vasudev and Manu Prasad represented the U14s and swept all before them in their group before coming up just short against Reigate in the quarter-finals. Tanmay Thanawalla and Billy Atkinson fought hard in the U15 section to progress from a tough group only to find themselves up against one of the favourites in the quarter-finals. Finally, in the Open competition, Joss Connell and Gustav Durlind played some superb tennis on grass – an early Wimbledon precursor – to win their group against some excellent opposition. With a bye into the semi-finals, they found themselves up against perennial winners Reeds and, despite playing some truly superb shots that included a particularly memorable and thumping return winner, bowed out with much to be proud of. MMB

The boys finished as runners-up and came desperately close to winning the national title for Hampton for the first time since 2013. While there were a number of impressive individual performances, notably Gustav Durlind’s 87% win ratio, this cup run will be remembered for the strength of character shown by the whole team, and some outstanding doubles performances. Well done to the boys – a huge achievement. DCP 136

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Athletics Harrow Meet

The first meet of the season at Harrow always provides for a tough early season competition – something that our juniors became aware of incredibly quickly! Last year’s U13 100m national champion amazed everyone, ‘disappearing’ and speeding through the line in only 11.5 secs! However, Hampton athletes are no slouches and School Records soon followed for Sam Southall in the inter 800m (2.01.69 mins) and Lucas Norfolk in the senior 400m (52.48 secs). Matt Cecil and Jamie Chapman also broke the school inter boys and senior boys long and triple jump records respectively with 5.50m and 13.14m jumps. The everimpressive Mattie Collingridge set a new discus record and sent the shot out over the English Schools’ qualifying standard, with a throw of 13.31m. This was not a bad afternoon’s work for what is effectively a pre-season fixture!

Achilles Relays

Pride of place at the Achilles Relays event must go to our hurdling and 800m quartets. The senior 110m hurdles relay trophy is now back in the Hampton cabinet, whilst our inter team were neck and neck with Eton, before an unfortunate disqualification. An amazing end to the meet first saw a classy final leg from Sam Southall that helped Hampton take the inter 4x800m title – they also set a new school record of 8 minutes 45 seconds in the process! However, our juniors were not to be outshone, leading their 800m relay from start to finish!

John Fisher

Will the doomed John Fisher meet ever take place again? Cancelled due to rain for the third successive season, many Hampton athletes have never had the opportunity to compete in this event! We look forward to a rain-free – hopefully – meeting there next year!

English Schools’ Cup 1st Round

The success of Hampton’s football teams – qualifying through to County and National finals – resulted in a difficult task for Hampton to try to reach the regional finals of the ESAA Cup. The junior team had a large number of First Year athletes, competing and enjoying their first competition for Hampton. This was a first glimpse for the athletics staff of a bright future for this year group. The intermediate team managed to grab the final spot in the Regional A Final, thanks to exceptional performances from Milo Choudhry, Jesper Hartikainen and James McMullin.

Sevenoaks

The usual clash with club county championships meant a reduced team at the Sevenoaks meet. Those in attendance performed particularly well. In the junior team Antonio Polleri, Neo Sukhraj-Hammerl and Emad Khan demonstrated their all-round potential, whilst Louis Middleton dominated in the hurdles and high jump. It was also great to see seniors Hiruna Diyasena and Joe Burns back from injury and Joel Malam impressing, in his first individual meet.

London, Middlesex and Kent Schools’ Combined Events

A good number of Hampton athletes have demonstrated potential across a number of disciplines for some time now. Therefore, the decision was made to enter combined events championships this year, for the first time. In the junior pentathlon, Louis Middleton finished 2nd overall – the 1st placed Middlesex athlete – with 2336 pts. In doing so, Louis also broke the School record for the 80m hurdles running 12.2 secs. Louis, Neo Sukhraj-Hammerl (5th overall and 2nd Middlesex) and Antonio Polleri (12th overall and 4th Middlesex) were then selected for Middlesex. In the intermediate age group, Jesper Hartikainen amassed 2170 pts, finishing 2nd overall, also gaining Middlesex team selection.

U15 / U17 Middlesex Schools’ Championships

22 Hampton athletes competed for Richmond at the Middlesex Championships, with an impressive number hopeful of a coveted Middlesex team place, at the National Track and the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Field Championships. In the junior age group, Louis Middleton improved his own School record, running 12.11 secs, winning the 80m Hurdles. Antonio Polleri (10.99m) and Neo Sukhraj-Hammerl (5.27m) won the shot put and long jump events, whilst Luke Walsh finished 3rd in the triple jump. Intermediates Matthew Collingridge (38.17m) and Sam Southall (4.12.18 secs) won the discus and 1500m events, whilst Ted Buckle took bronze in the high jump. Pavit Kullar and Declan Connolly had the ‘pleasure’ of finishing 2nd and 3rd to Middlesex and England athlete Mo Ali, who beat Mo Farah’s 3km Middlesex record – and later in the season ran the world lead 3km time for his age group! A number of Hampton athletes then had a nervous wait, over the next few days, to – hopefully – hear positive news about Middlesex team selection!

English Schools’ Cup, Regional A Final

Hampton athletes again acquitted themselves well, against a number of the best schools athletics teams in the country. Milo Choudhry and James McMullin again scored excellent points in the sprints and long jump, as did Louis Middleton and Jesper Hartikainen in hurdles, high jump and javelin. In the field, Ted Buckle improved his personal best to 1.68m in the high jump, whilst Neo Sukhraj-Hammerl demonstrated potential in the javelin (36.01m).

South England Combined Events Championships

Fantastic for Hampton to have four athletes selected to compete for Middlesex at these championships. Juniors Louis Middleton, Neo Sukhraj-Hammerl and Antonio Polleri, along with intermediate Jesper Hartikainen enjoyed discovering how to manage a full day of high-level competition. We hope to have them and other Hampton athletes back at the championships next year.

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Y7/8 Middlesex Schools’ Championships

Hampton’s First and Second Year athletes had a fantastic day competing at the Middlesex Championships, for a very successful Richmond team. Second Year athlete Daniel Clarke set a new personal best of 2.28mins, finishing strong in the 800m, whilst Daniel Townend won the high jump. School and County records were then sent tumbling by our First Year athletes! Sagan Thuraisingham won the Y7 200m in 27.4 secs and Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid won the high jump competition with an amazing 1.49m. Athlete of the day award went to Hayden Christian, who jumped a huge 4.77m in the long jump, before a near-perfect 75m hurdles in a blistering 12.5 secs!

Richmond Schools’ Championships

Individual success continued at the Richmond Championships. In the Y7 competition, Saganan Thuraisingham again took the 200m title, whilst Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid increased his School record to 1.53m, also breaking the borough record in the high jump. Hayden Christian won the long jump (4.83m) and again beat School and borough records in the 75m hurdles (12.46 secs). The Y7 relay team also broke the borough record, with a fantastic time of 54.16 secs. Gus Carter again demonstrated the athlete he is developing into, with victory in the Y8 200m (26.13 secs) and second place in the long jump. Louis Middleton won the Y9 80m hurdles (12.27 secs) and was second in the high jump, where unfortunately a telling factor in the overall results, was a disqualification of our very talented relay team. Our Y10/11 team finished second overall by one point, in a fantastic competition! Milo Choudhry took gold in the 100m (12.06 secs) and second place in the long jump (5.86m), Jesper Hartikainen won the javelin (39.36m) and was second in a great hurdles race, with a tenth of a second between him and the winner. Sam Southall

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and Pavit Kullar ran in great fashion, taking the middle distance titles and Alasdair Bolling also won gold in the triple jump. Mattie Collingridge smashed School and borough records in the discus, with a huge throw of 41.75m.

English Schools’ Track and Field Championships

Congratulations must go first of all to junior Louis Middleton (80m hurdles), along with intermediates Sam Southall (1500m) and Matthew Collingridge (shot put) on their Middlesex team selection for the National Championships. Unfortunately for Mattie this year, a very strong shot put field, meant his fantastic first round throw of 13.21m, did not see him go on to get three further throws in the final. Louis broke his own School hurdles record – for the third time in the season – running 12.01 secs in his heat. Unfortunately, Louis caught the final hurdle, which

perhaps cost him a place in the final. Sam Southall had an almost unbelievable weekend of middle distance running! On the Friday in his heat, Sam smashed his own personal best and The School 1500m record, in a rapid time of 4.01.08 mins! The following day, Sam was equally as impressive, in a tactical final. Sam ran patiently in the pack, until the wind-up came 150m from the finish – he demonstrated that he is no slouch over the shorter distances, outkicking a number of quality middle distance athletes to take 5th place! A massive amount of credit and thanks from the athletes and myself must go to Mr Clarke, Mr Mills and Mr Sims, alongside athletics coaches Mr Lucas and Mr Hall, for all of their effort, advice and support throughout a particularly enjoyable and successful season. PDB the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Senior Basketball The 2017-18 basketball season for Hampton was a turbulent one. Hampton has experienced varying levels of basketball success in the past and this season was similar, although we can now report a greater degree of success, in very competitive Surrey competitions. The season did not get off to the best start, with the team losing to St John the Baptist in a hard, physical contest – one which was meant to be a ‘friendly’! The team bounced back to win the first league game of the year against Epsom College in a dramatic fashion. Ethan Delaney-Smith put in a stellar performance, recording a double-double with 15 points and 10 rebounds. However, the star of the show was Firth Year Tim Bird, who put in a solid defensive performance throughout the game and drew a vital charge at the end of the game to secure the first win of the season 36-33. The following fixtures saw Hampton losing to a strong Tiffin team despite strong performances from Lower Sixth players Prem Sodhi and Nick Brittin and a cup match versus Harris Academy, Crystal Palace. This side had caused Hampton all sorts of problems in previous years, so it was fantastic to make a statement, producing a 44-34 win in the first round of the county cup. On a personal note, it was very pleasing to help the team with a string of three pointers, whilst Fifth Year Denil Manuel took control of the game with a handful of assists. Centre Ethan Delaney-Smith continued his spell of great performances and was a tower of strength throughout the game. The remainder of the season did not go Hampton’s way resultwise as they lost the last three games of the season in close encounters; but, it was nonetheless very promising with regards

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to the fact that clear progress was shown by all the players in the team. Fifth Years Denil Manuel, James Smith and Tim Bird shone throughout the season and look to be mainstays in the future of Hampton basketball. Late addition to the team Arda Kabatepe was instrumental at the back end of last season and looks continue his good form this coming year. Hampton basketball is in great hands with the new captain Ethan Delaney-Smith who excelled in the 2017-18 season and hopes to shine again in this coming year. Coached by Mr Bolton, with the support of the Richmond Knights, the 2018-19 season appears to be very promising for Hampton! Adam Khan

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Golf

Having reached the National Finals of a competition in 2017-2018, the boys were keen to try to emulate their predecessors and duplicate last year’s success. An ISGA National Final at St Mellion was on offer and the boys faced Reeds – a particularly sporting school – in the 1st Round at Fulwell Golf Club. Harry Bathurst captained the side in an exemplary fashion and, having halved the first eight holes, edged a very tight match on the final green. Robbie Davies had a less than auspicious start, going four down within the first five holes, but battled back, only succumbing 4&3 by the end of the match. In the final game, Evan Edwards fought a dingdong battle with his opponent, winning on the third extra hole in semi-darkness, surrounded by team-mates and teachers holding his nerve to sink the all-important putt. The next round saw us, somewhat strangely, face another team from Reeds at Burhill GC, and they proved a completely different proposition. Despite a battling effort by Matt Avant-Smith to walk off the 18th with half a point, neither Robbie nor Evan could prevent defeat and the opposition left as worthy winners with a score-line of 2.5 to 0.5. The other competition we entered was the HMC Foursomes; here, we faced Westminster School at Royal Mid-Surrey GC. Our leading pair of Evan and Robbie fought back brilliantly to all square after 11, having been three down after six, only to suffer from the effort they had put in, going down 4&3 overall. The second pairing of Jack Humpish and Matt played extremely well, winning a rather one-sided match 5&4 having gone ahead early in their round, whilst the last pairing of Robbie Cox and Ollie Maskell sealed the victory, gradually getting the better of their opponents and running out 4&3 winners. The next round put us up against Wellington, a very strong golfing school, and on a freezing day in February – and despite the fabulous surroundings of The Berkshire Golf Club – we were well beaten 3-0 to exit the competition. The school hosted the Richmond Schools Golf Competition again and despite some terrific individual scores – special credit should be given to Max Leman, who managed a very creditable 41 Stableford points – were edged out of the top positions by St Paul’s in the Intermediate age group and by Greycourt in the Juniors. The summer also saw another staging of the annual Old Hamptonian’s golf match between the Old Boys and the current students, with the latter group managing to regain the Loakes trophy. It was a fabulous day, enjoyed by all, but was especially notable for Mr T Rigby, who played very consistently to earn his first GJI title in the staff competition. AWK the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Badminton Badminton at Hampton has enjoyed a prosperous year and the boys’ enthusiasm, grace and mutual support make them a pleasure to work with. Friendly matches were contested against long-standing competitors Isleworth & Syon School and Wilson’s School, and against Epsom College, a new addition to the fixtures list. The pool will widen further during the upcoming season, with matches across the age groups lined up with KCS, Wimbledon and RGS, Guildford. As usual, the boys entered the London Youth Badminton Games, and both the U14 and U16 teams won their borough rounds, thereby progressing to the regional rounds. The U14s were delighted to earn a place in the London finals, courtesy of winning all their matches in that regional heat. As far as I am aware, this is the first time a Hampton team has accomplished this feat, and to then earn 4th place out of the eight teams contending the finals made it even more splendid. Luke Michels merits a special mention for holding his nerve at 12-14 down to win a place-changing game 15-14 on sudden death! Luke’s attitude is never anything but determined and his fitness and speed around the court are excellent. He can read opposition tactics very well and is improving in all aspects of the game. Jai Saha’s smash action is particularly noteworthy and over the year his doubles playing became more and more useful. First Year Naavya Sharma was undaunted in competing against older boys. His smash is also good and we look forward to seeing him develop his defensive skills and mature into an ever more accomplished player. We were in the fortunate position of having strength and depth at U14 level this year, and were able to draw upon Alex Bush’s steady strokes, Luke Paskin’s good movement around the court and Kyan Soni’s speed to provide able support. Thank you to Kyan for displaying a generous and supportive attitude when so little separated the boys and he sometimes had to give way to the older boys in the strictly limited team places available. As for the U16 Team, top seed Nick Stoner owns every badminton stroke required, thereby achieving a very high level of play indeed. An increasingly powerful smash will allow him to vie more and more with county boys in his age group. Rohith Ratnam’s stroke production is excellent and his short backhand serve can be very deceptive with the occasional flick. We will be relying on him to deliver a Federer-esque cool as he moves into the top U16 spot next year! Himanish Joshi never fails to take enjoyment in his badminton and his smash in particular has improved this year. We look forward to seeing him gain more confidence in the short serve to enhance his game even further. All-round talented sportsman Rahul Desai willingly and usefully supported the team and last but by no means least, Sixth Former Jacob Abel’s clever low backhand serve and unorthodox backhand clearance were very effective in his singles game. Thank you to all the younger boys who attend Badminton Club, some of whom have played in our friendly matches and who will be vying for places in the U14 side next year. Their eagerness and friendly competition add to the keen atmosphere at our training sessions. Thank you also to Mr Hope for his time, effort and valuable coaching at our Monday after-school sessions and to Mr Wildman, for his analysis of the team players incorporated in this report, and for his commitment to, and sense of fun with, the boys – will he ever satisfy Luke’s curiosity concerning his age? KEM 142

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U16 Table Tennis The U16 Table Tennis team enjoyed some reasonable success this season and performed creditably to finish mid-table in the top ‘A’ league of the London South Schools Competition. This league of eight schools was highly competitive, and included some very talented teams from the three ‘W’s’: Whitgift, Wilson’s and Wallington Schools. The Hampton U16 team was represented by Thomas Banks, Jules Lockey, Anthony Wang, Rohan Raj and Jack Hawkins. All of the boys played with enthusiasm over the season, with their best performance in the league being a solid 6-4 victory away at Bishop Thomas Grant School. The most memorable occasion this year was winning the Richmond Schools Championships – against a Hampton B team! – to qualify for the London Schools Knockout competition held at Wallington School. The U16A team did very well to make the semi-final of the main cup competition by beating arch nemesis Wilson’s School 5-3, though they then lost convincingly to a very talented team, and eventual winners, from Wallington. We can undoubtedly be optimistic about the future as there are some very talented U13 players coming up to the U16s next year, so there could well be competition for places! Well done boys. DJF

U13 Table Tennis Our U13s had an impressive season, both in their various achievements and in terms of the number of boys playing table tennis. After winning the Richmond Championships, Hampton went on to play in the London South Finals. Hampton finished second in their group to Tiffin – the eventual winners of the cup competition – which resulted in playing in the plate. Convincing wins against Whitgift and Oasis Coulsdon, saw Hampton win the plate competition. Congratulations to Ed Gooze-Zijl, Arya Lim-Amiri, Tim Lee and Pranav Santhosh for their performances on the day and for their well-earned plate victory. These players were frequently joined by Daniel Edge, Arjan Sian, Francesco Olivieri and Ishaan Das, in the London South League, where we were able to field two strong teams. Hampton won four out of the seven matches in the league. This has been a particularly promising start to Hampton table tennis from our First Year players and it bodes well for the

upcoming season. Best of luck to all of our Second Year players who are moving into the U16 sides next year where I have no doubt that they will rise to the challenge. PDB the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Swimming Hampton’s Second Year swimmers finished 2nd and our First Years 3rd at a very competitive Richmond Schools’ Championships. Rex Booth took gold in the Y7 individual medley and the freestyle relay, along with Josh Hood, Ethan Flack and Kieran Bouwmeester-Reid. In the Y8 competition, Raffy Froud won the individual freestyle, with Daniel Clarke (individual medley), Xavier MikilchanskyMaddocks (butterfly) and Daniel Townend (backstroke) all taking individual silver. It was another strong year for our senior swimmers at the prestigious HMC Bath Cup. Hampton qualified 9th fastest in the freestyle relay, with a time of 3.51.13mins. Our time of 1.59.07mins in the medley relay meant a reserve spot for the final and a nervous wait to see if a qualifying team withdrew! We wish all the best to leavers Oscar Jameson and Oskar Jones, two outstanding Hampton swimmers, who had extremely successful club seasons outside of School. We also look forward immensely to the upcoming season to see whether we can build on our excellent achievements in the pool this year. PDB

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OLD HAMPTONIAN’S CHRONICLE

OHC

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Old Hamptonians’ Calendar of Events 2018-19 Wednesday 19 December 2018

Recent Leavers Christmas Drinks No.1 Kew Road, Richmond

Saturday 23 March 2019

Old Hamptonians Alumni Dinner the School

Saturday 30 March 2019

Walter Bailey Memorial Matches (Alumni Football Matches) the School

Thursday 23 May 2019

Joint London Networking Event for Hampton and LEH Alumni The Refinery, Bankside

Friday 28 June 2019

Cricket 50 Years On Lunch and OHCC vs. The School the School

Saturday 7 July 2019

HLRA Henley Hog Roast Henley Cricket Club

Correspondence Please send all correspondence to: Alumni Office, Hampton School, Hanworth Road, Hampton, Middlesex, TW12 3HD

Frank Keenan Director of Development and Alumni Relations f.keenan@hamptonschool.org.uk 0208 783 4428 Hayley Coll Alumni Relations Officer h.coll@hamptonschool.org.uk 0208 783 4088

CONTENTS A Message from the OHA President ............................................................................147 Association / Club & Society Officers ......................................................................... 148 A Message from the Alumni Office ..............................................................................149 The Chairman’s Message ................................................................................................... 150 From the Editor ........................................................................................................................ 150 Old Hamptonians’ Alumni Dinner .................................................................................152 100 Lines of Your Passion – Antion Meredith OH (1962) ............................... 154 My Life Story – Peter Webberley OH (1947) ........................................................... 155 Q&A – The Rt Revd Bishop Christopher Chessun OH (1975) ..................... 156 A Life in the Day – John Orr (Member of Staff, 1976-2015) ......................... 158

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Brian Littlejohn OH (1961).................................................................................................. 159 Three Generations of Hampton School Football ................................................159 ISFA Cup Finals Memories ..................................................................................................160 Bernard Jackson OH (1951) ...............................................................................................161 Keith Clements OH (1960) ................................................................................................ 162 Portuguese Camino – John Smith .............................................................................. 163 Snippets ........................................................................................................................................165 Sports Reports .......................................................................................................................... 169 Obituaries .................................................................................................................................... 178 In Memoriam ............................................................................................................................ 180

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A Message from the OHA President It is a great pleasure to contribute once again some introductory words to the Old Hamptonians’ Chronicle. The first mention of Old Hamptonians exists in the very first edition of The Lion magazine 1908 via a report on the activities of the Old Boys’ Football Club, formed in 1905. The entry ends thus: ‘If those who are about to leave school will consider that that the Old Boys’ Club has the first claim upon them when they are thinking of their future football career, there is no reason why we should not have three or four elevens, and in time rank as one of the foremost Old Boy teams around London.’ How prophetic these words have proved, as 110 years later many of our alumni continue to play sport in Old Hamptonian teams. Over the past twelve months, they have been able to celebrate a remarkable hat-trick of league titles for Old Hamptonians’ Football, Cricket and Rugby in their respective leagues. I am delighted to report that the excellent current School squads in these three sports – and others – should guarantee a production line of equivalent talent for our alumni sides over future seasons! The pages of the Old Hamptonians’ Chronicle demonstrate fully the remarkably strong links between the present-day School and our worldwide network of Hampton alumni. This connection is something that is now available digitally through ‘Hampton School Connect’, which provides a flourishing online community for Hamptonians to (re)connect with one another. Please visit www. hamptonschoolconnnect.org.uk to register if you have not already done so. We are delighted by the response from Hamptonians to the establishment of the Alumni Office, which exists to support OHs at every stage of their lives and to organise a range of events. I warmly encourage you to contact Frank Keenan OH (2004), our Director of Development and Alumni Relations, if you would like to visit the School or share your post-Hampton news. Frank and his team will be very pleased indeed to hear from you. Over recent months, you should have received copies of the first two editions of The Hamptonian, a biannual newsletter providing latest news from the Alumni Office. Please send your postal address to alumni@hamptonschool.org.uk if you are yet to benefit and would like us to send future editions.

We are always very grateful to the Hamptonians who return to School to share inspiring advice and life experiences with current boys. These inter-generational conversations are invaluable and alumni have joined us for careers lunches, to speak in assemblies and to participate in panel discussions at our annual Life after Hampton and Creative Futures events. At the end of Spring Term 2018, we were delighted to announce the establishment of The Fitzwygram Foundation at the annual Old Hamptonians’ Alumni Dinner. TV scientist and presenter, Patrick Aryee OH (2004), treated us to a most entertaining speech, supported by video clips of his close encounters with skunks and baboons. Patrick also expressed his profound gratitude for his assisted place at Hampton and pledged his support for our new charity’s aim. The Fitzwygram Foundation is our dedicated new charity to provide funds to offer transformative, completely free places to boys whose families could not otherwise afford a Hampton education. Our School has a long tradition of providing an exceptional academic and all-round education, with financial support given to boys whose families could not otherwise afford fees. We are grateful for the support and commitment that we have already received, and we are thrilled that the first two Fitzwygram Scholars joined us in September 2018. These boys would not be coming to Hampton without our benefactors’ generosity and I cannot tell you how grateful the School is. This campaign is an essential element of our School’s future, so please can we encourage you to visit the website link below if you would like to find out more about our Fitzwygram Foundation plans: www. hamptonschool.org.uk/alumni/fitzwygramfoundation Thank you for your continuing support for our School and I hope to have the opportunity to meet as many as possible of you in person over the years ahead. With kind regards and best wishes

Kevin Knibbs Headmaster the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Association / Club & Society Officers The Old Hamptonians’ Association

The Old Hamptonians’ Association Club and Society Officers

Correspondence Old Hamptonians’ Pavilion and Sports Ground, Dean Road, Hampton, Middlesex, TW12 1AQ 0208 979 2784 OHA Office, Hampton School, Hanworth Road, Hampton, Middlesex, TW12 3HD

Bridge Club Geoff Wickes (1965-1972) 07917 621 503 geoff.wickes@shlegal.com

Association Officers: Honorary President Kevin Knibbs, The Headmaster

Cricket Club 1st XI Captain: Richard Brown (2000-2005) Flat 1, 125 Waldegrave Road, Teddington, TW11 8LL 07832 105 393 rbrownsw14@gmail.com

Honorary Vice Presidents Barry R. Martin, Headmaster (1996-2013) Graham G. Able, Headmaster (1988-1996) Jack D. Wells OH (1946)

2nd XI Captain: Jacob Doherty 07841 151 701 jacobdoherty7@icloud.com

Chairman Martin Sands (1960-1967) 37 St Winifred’s Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 9JS 0208 977 0428 martinsands2@hotmail.com

4th XI Captain: Michael Godsmark OH (2017) Dramatic Society Andy Smith 26 Cambridge Road, Hampton, Middlesex TW12 2JL

Editor of the Old Hamptonians’ Chronicle Denis J S. Fuller (1954-1961) Inglenook, 11b Kings Ride, Camberley, Surrey, GU15 4HU 01276 22454 denis@denis-fuller.co.uk

Football Club Club Captain: Alex Kennewell (2003-2008) 07923 384 716 alex.kennewell@uk.pwc.com

3rd XI Captain: Sufyan Khan

Secretary/ Annual Dinner Secretary John Orr Staff (1976-2015) orr.hampton@tiscali.co.uk

2nd XI Captain: Dave Mackie 07955052470 dave.mackie827@googlemail.com

Treasurer Lee A J. Gallant (1983-1988) 07939 265 951 lee@kybertcarroll.co.uk

3rd XI Captain: Chris McNab 07940 504416 C.McNab@dittonparkacademy.co.uk

Minutes Secretary James Comber (1993-2000) 78 Highdown, Worcester Park, Surrey, KT4 7JB 07814 039 441 jamesrcomber@aol.com

Golf Society Secretary: Martin Read (1965-1972) 07811 351 107 martinread@blueyonder.co.uk HSPA Tom Smith tom.smith@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk

OHSGL Representative Robert A. Glyn-Jones (1979-1984) 1 Ormond Drive, Hampton, Middlesex, TW12 1TP 079845 708 410 agj1@hotmail.co.uk

OH Lodge Secretary: James Lawson (2004 -2009) Flat 9, 37 Lennox Gardens, SW1X 0DF 07880 262 980

General Committee Members Alan W. Hunter OH (1965) Calypso, Temple Gardens, Staines, TW18 3NQ 01784 455 547 hunter.aw@gmail.com

Rugby Club Secretary: Pete Dendy 07831 134 412 peter.dendy@heineken.co.uk

Brian Littlejohn OH (1961) 07759 733 844 ohabrian15@gmail.com

Treasurer: Lee Gallant (1983-1988) 07939 265 951 lee@kybertcarroll.co.uk

John S. Perry OH (1971) john.perry@palmerssolicitors.co.uk

Recruitment: Mark A. Fox (1982-1989) 154 Colne Road, Twickenham, Middlesex TW2 6QS mfox@bellmicro.eu

Paul Smith OH (1969) 07836 218 058 pehs1@btinternet.com

Fly Fishing Lee Gallant (1983-1988) lee.gallant@kybertcarroll.co.uk

Michael F. Savage OH (1949) 101 Park Road, Hampton Hill, TW12 1HU 0208 979 6930 mikesav@btinternet.com

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1st XI Captain: Jonathan Meldram (2002-2009) 07834 064 375 jonnymeldram@hotmail.co.uk

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The Alumni Office Hampton School Connect was launched over a year ago and continues to grow from strength to strength, with over 1,200 Old Hamptonians taking advantage of the network. It is a modern form of directory, which Hamptonians can use to catch up with old friends and access for career and business purposes. If you have not already signed up, please do so today by visiting www. hamptonschoolconnect.org.uk As you are no doubt aware, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect in May 2018. Thank you to those who have already made your preferences known to the School. These will be acted upon once all the data has been entered and stored on the Old Hamptonian database. Please contact the Alumni Office if you would like to update your communication preferences.

Old Hamptonians are always welcome to visit the School and on the first day of the Autumn Term 2018 we were delighted to welcome back five Hamptonians, who fifty years ago had walked up the school drive for their first day at Hampton. Tim Kerss OH (1975), Jeremy Bird OH (1975), Peter Jordan OH (1975), Philip Tutton OH (1975) and Alan Wilson OH (1975) travelled from across the country to reunite at Hampton. Please do get in touch if you would like to visit the School; we look forward to welcoming you. Frank Keenan OH (2004) f.keenan@hamptonschool.org.uk 0208 783 4428

As well as updating our contact details, we are also keen to hear your memories of Hampton, and of course, to hear about what you have been up to since you left. Thank you as always to those Hamptonians who have come back to share their post-Hampton experiences this year; a key function of the Alumni Office is to enable more of these inspiring links between School generations. If you would be willing to speak at a Careers Lunch or assist at the Annual Careers Convention, please do contact the Alumni Office. We are looking forward to hosting a number of events and reunions over the next year, in particular the Old Hamptonians’ Alumni Dinner on Saturday 23 March 2019. It has been 106 years since the first Old Hamptonians’ Dinner was held on 22 February 1913 at the Greyhound hotel in Richmond and we hope that you will be able to join us in March in the Main Hall for this year’s dinner.

Denis Fuller

Richard Brown

Mick Savage

Martin Read

Brian Littlejohn

Alan Hunter

James Comber

Lee Gallant

Paul Smith

Andrew Glyn-Jones

John Perry

John Orr

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Chairman’s Message Welcome to another excellent edition of the Old Hamptonians Chronicle and many thanks to the editorial team of Denis Fuller and Rose Brown together with Frank Keenan and the Alumni Office for all their hard work in putting this together. I hope you will enjoy the Chronicle and the wide range of subjects covered.

The 2017-18 season again saw many successes for OH teams. This was the first season for the rugby team in the Surrey League having moved from Middlesex and they won the title. With over 70 players turning out during the season, this was a very encouraging sign of the growing strength of the club. In football, the 1st XI were top of their League for the fourth time in five years and there were also strong performances by the 2nd and 3rd XIs. Cricket had another fine season with all 3 teams champions of their respective divisions, whilst they even managed to field a 4th XI for a number of games. Golf continues to thrive and the side finished a creditable fourth in the Surrey Schools Golf Festival. In August, we had the sad news of the death of Bernard Wigginton who had been the Hon. Secretary and inspiration of the Dramatic Society for many years. He was a key link between the Society and the OHA and we will need to see how best to maintain this connection in the future. In the spring, Brian Littlejohn retired as OH pavilion manager, thus marking the end of an era. Brian made a tremendous contribution to the OHA in that role and we have greatly benefited from his support and advice. Brian’s position as bar manager has been taken on by Tressa Wright who has been assisting Brian for many years. Brian, Richard Brown and Andrew Glyn-Jones have worked hard along with Tressa to put the new arrangements in place and their contributions to date have been very much appreciated. Finally, I would like to mention the new Fitzwygram Foundation whose aim is to provide additional free scholarship places at the School. I do hope many Old Hamptonians will wish to contribute to the Foundation. Particulars are available from the Alumni Office. Martin Sands (OH 1967)

In my Chairman’s Message last year, I reported on progress in the discussions with the School to develop a new and closer relationship between us. At the beginning of 2018, we agreed in principle the text of two key documents concerning the terms of the Transfer of the OH pavilion and sports ground to the School and the consequent Licence to Occupy to ensure that the OHA can continue to use the facilities on a similar basis as we do now. The documents contain suitable safeguards to protect the position of the OHA should there be any material change in the School’s status, in which case ownership would revert to the OHA. The School cannot dispose of the facilities without the consent of the OHA. However, the School will be far better placed in the long term to maintain and develop the facilities. We are therefore, now, in the final stage of discussions that focus on the provision of catering at the pavilion that, under the proposed arrangements, will largely be provided by the School. To this end, there was a useful trial of the proposed catering arrangements at the start of the cricket season. We are now considering, in the light of the trial, the various financial and practical issues that need to be worked out. It is vital to achieve a mutually beneficial outcome for both the OHA and the School, not least in terms of affordability and flexibility of approach. As can be seen from the section reports, the benefits of the enhanced relationship with the School are already evident in the growing numbers of recent leavers playing for OH teams together with the work of the Alumni Office more generally in developing wider connections with Hamptonians. Any new arrangements with the School should strengthen the OHA in the future while maintaining our heritage and ethos. 150

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From the Editor My wife Carol and I have lived in our present house since 1980. Our son and daughter moved out long ago, and Carol’s mother – my most efficient secretary until she was almost 90 – had her own space within the house for some 20 years until just a couple of weeks before she passed away. Unfortunately, many of the belongings of those dear members of our family have remained in the house and garage, along with our own clutter, and Carol and I have been trying to sort it / sell it / recycle it / donate it to charity shops for the last 10 years or so. ‘Operation declutter’ continues and, a few days ago, I found my HGS school cap! Hamptonians of my generation were obliged to wear our caps when travelling to and from school – even when we became young men of 17 or 18, except for prefects who were permitted to wear ‘Trilby’ hats! As I cycled past the tennis courts and out of the school gate after my final day at HGS in July 1971, I removed my cap, stuffed it in my pocket, and vowed never to wear it again. I confess that I have broken that vow! However, I do have a good home for the aforementioned cap. My good friend, the late W A (Bill) Watson OH (1955-60), who included sculpturing amongst his many talents, once surprised me by presenting me with a bronze bust of myself. Said bust now glares out of our study window to deter would-be burglars. Sometimes

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it wears a fez – I used to attempt Tommy Cooper impressions in select company. At Christmas, it wears a Santa Claus hat. Of course, it has a (non-HGS) Trilby, and now it will be wearing my old school cap. Soon after leaving Hampton, I offered my – rather limited – talents to the OHACC and OHARFC. Some good friends of ours seem to have just one cassette or CD of old ‘pop’ songs which they play invariably during dinner parties; one of those songs is ‘I love to love’, by Tina Charles, a No.1 hit in 1976. Hearing this always takes my mind back to a cricket match between OHACC 3rd XI and a team from Kew. One of the benefits of being a lower order batsman was that one had time to chat to the ‘WAGS’ of the opposition players, who were safely ensconced on the pitch out of harm’s way. On this particular occasion, it transpired that the pretty, young lady I was chatting to was Tina Charles, dating one of the fortunate Kew cricketers.

their April 1st prank. Despite the best efforts of the ground staff, the Giant had a habit of reappearing at Springtime for several years. I am pleased to be soon welcoming John Orr (Member of Staff, 1976 – 2015) to the editorial team, and I know that already his head is buzzing with ideas and suggestions. John has been a muchvalued and respected member of the OH Committee for many years, and as the father of an Old Hamptonian, has a wealth of knowledge and experience of Hampton over many years. Finally, I would like to express my sincere thanks to all contributors to the 2017-18 Old Hamptonians Chronicle and everyone who has assisted in an way, large or small, with this production, not least the ever-valuable Rose – part of the interview team with Bishop Christopher – and the excellent Hampton Alumni Office team: Frank and Hayley.

I often mean to enquire what, if anything, happens at Hampton on April 1st. It was with high expectations that I as a younger Hamptonian approached the school on the mornings of April Fools’ day, and rarely was I disappointed! I vividly remember seeing the two fairly substantial alligator statues, which, openjawed, teeth bared, glared at visitors entering the school through the main reception door, had been relocated to prominent positions high over the stage in the main hall – quite a distraction from the Headmaster, Mr Whitfield, who would expect 100% attention whilst conducting assembly!

Denis Fuller

Perhaps OHs might submit their favourite recollections of events on April Fools’ days for inclusion in the next edition of The Lion. In the meantime, I will recount three of my all-time favourite April 1st stories as shared with me by Carol who, prior to ending her teaching career at LEH, was Head of Science at another eminent school for girls, where one of the Headmistress was very ‘old school’ – I confess I experienced some trepidation whenever I met her and felt I should be confessing some misdemeanour or other. Outside her study door was a ‘traffic light’ entry system: red (go-away); amber (wait); and green (enter). Some girls had tampered with the coloured light covers: suffice to say that confusion ensued! Another time the girls left a skeleton outside the Head’s study with a notice round its neck proclaiming that it was still waiting to see the Headmistress. During a subsequent Headmistress’s time, the Cerne Abbas Giant ‘appeared’ on the school lawn, the girls having strategically scattered fertilizer for the lion the magazine of hampton school

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Old Hamptonian’s Alumni Dinner 2018 Saturday 24 March saw a very special double occasion in the Main Hall at School. The annual Old Hamptonians’ Alumni Dinner was as convivial as ever and was attended by alumni from the 1940s to the current decade. We were delighted to welcome two Hamptonians from further afield to the dinner as Dick Newman OH (1965) joined us from Maryland, USA and Tony Gibbs OH (1963) joined us from Melbourne, Australia. The dinner was also the perfect setting for the formal announcement by The Headmaster, Kevin Knibbs, of a new endeavour to help future Hamptonians. A dedicated charity, The Fitzwygram Foundation, will provide funds to offer completely free places at Hampton School to local boys of academic and all-round potential from all backgrounds. Our main speaker, the TV Scientist and Presenter, Patrick Aryee OH (2004), treated us to a most entertaining speech, supported by video clips of his encounters with skunks and baboons. Patrick also expressed his gratitude for his assisted place at Hampton and his support for The Fitzwygram Foundation. Extracts from Patrick’s wonderful speech are below: “I found myself reflecting on how I got to this point and where my journey had taken me. Sometimes, it is easy for us to keep striving for the next achievement, the next bigger and better dream, and not pause to give thanks for what we’ve achieved so far.

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So today, I want to give thanks, thanks, to the teachers that taught me, and nurtured my passions. But also, to Hampton School itself, for proving me with what I feel this entire evening is about, which is opportunity. Hampton provided me with the opportunity to be the best version of myself. Today, that person is someone who has free dived with sperm whales, has come eye-to-eye with huge ferocious lions and has also come into contact with one of the most infamous members of the animal kingdom… So, the question still stands, what on earth were you doing Patrick? What compelled you to put yourself through such turmoil? Well along with my interest in biology, and the sciences as a whole I’m extremely passionate about drama and theatre studies – and what more of a dramatic way is there to demonstrate the power of animals than to get sprayed in the face by a skunk? That was the first TV I recorded and I was so excited, I could not wait, because this opportunity was going to transform my life. Now today, I get messages all the time from people telling me that I’ve inspired them or I’ve brighten up their day or they’re just blown away by the unexpected stories we tell them. I also get asked by many, “How did you become a presenter? I want to be one as well!” And there’s no straight answer to that other than you’ve just got to trail blaze. I went a very through a highly unconventional path. But what many do not realise is what the very beginning of my journey looked like. I came from a broken home, my father left, when I was very young, about 10 – mum was a single mother who was trying to raise three

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kids and finances were always tight, but that was the norm, there’s no money. I remember we used look for 10p, 20p, from the car, down the side of the sofa, just to put into the electricity / gas meter… or to help get dinner. You could get a five pack of noodles for £1. That is what we ate, all whilst I was going to Hampton School. So, with this in mind, the only way I was able to attend this school was through a bursary programme. I still had to pay a fee but of a reduced amount. Without that bursary, without that charitable donation, I would not be standing here as the person I am today. That is why I believe the ‘Fitzwygram Foundation’ is such a fantastic endeavour. It is going to bring people (students) from a variety of different backgrounds and cultures to Hampton. But, more importantly, it is going to play a major part in breaking down the socio-economic barriers that prevent some students, some very talented students, student with promise, from coming to this school. This will ultimately help Hampton to become far more well-rounded in its outlook, its culture and galvanise its future. We could ask, why do this? Why change the status quo? Well, I came up with an analogy that the biologist in here might appreciate… When you are growing a crop, it is relatively easy to grow a monoculture. Prepare and plough the land, sow the same seed everywhere, water it, the sunshine falls and you watch your crop grow. But, the thing about monoculture is that all it takes is for one bacterium or fungus to completely decimate all that hard work. Now, I do not want people going away from tonight’s dinner saying, “Oh that Patrick Aryee, was talking about wiping out students with virulent strains of bacteria,” but I do think that in a sense, a similar thing can happen in our schools. Having a greater diversity, a mixture of different people in our schools means that we have the chance to share new ideas and new ways of thinking. Just like water, when it is still it can easily go stagnant, but if it is moving, changing, flowing, dynamic…it remains fresh.” Frank Keenan OH (2004) the lion the magazine of hampton school

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100 Lines of Your Passion

Antion Vikram Singh Meredith (Birth name: Vic Briggs) Born 1945, Attended Hampton 1956-1962 had no problems learning a few chords and knocking out some skiffle tunes. Initially, my time at Hampton was reasonably happy. I made a lot of friends and enthusiastically participated in Rugby and CCF. At home, though, I was dealing with a widowed and alcoholic mother who was constantly at odds with my grandparents, with whom we lived.

I was actually born in Hampton – at a nursing home just on the other side of the Longford River, close to the back of the school playing fields. My family, however, lived in Feltham, and it was there that I grew up. My father, Capt. Victor H. Briggs Jr., was commander of Company C, 1st Infantry Division of the US Army, the ‘Big Red One’. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his heroic actions at Omaha beach on D-Day and was later killed in Northern France just three months before I was born. Hampton was not my first choice, that was Latymer Upper. Thus, I was informed that I had passed the dreaded 11-plus much earlier than most, when I was notified to go to Hammersmith for an interview and a further exam which, fortunately, I failed. I started at Hampton in September of 1956, very much looking forward to playing rugby, and making my debut for the Under 12 XV against Wimbledon on the first Saturday in December in a torrential rainstorm. I believe we lost 0-3. It was extremely muddy and great fun. It was at Hampton that music came to define my life. The skiffle craze was in full swing and I had already heard Bill Haley’s ‘Rock Around the Clock’ before I arrived at my new school. I was intrigued and excited by its sound, but never imagined I could play that kind of music. For Christmas of 1957, my mother bought me a guitar and I immediately took to it. I 154

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I began to spend my evenings with my guitar, instead of doing my homework. I was starting to feel pressured at school and equally pressured at home; my schoolwork started to suffer. I was going into depression, although neither my family nor I knew what that meant. No matter how hard I tried, I could rarely complete my homework – of which there was a considerable and everincreasing quantity. There was no support at home and none at school. There were only ‘good’ boys and ‘bad’ boys. It did not take long before I was known as one of the ‘bad’ boys at Hampton and I was branded as ‘lazy’.

Upon – unwillingly – returning to Hampton, I developed a severe case of what is today called ‘attitude’. At the end of the school year, in July of 1962, I was asked not to return to school. Returning to the music business, I played with a number of bands doing what is called ‘paying my dues’ until, at the beginning of 1965, I was asked to rejoin The Echoes. By then they were backing the great chanteuse, Dusty Springfield. I joined her on my 20th birthday, 14 February 1965. It was an exciting and challenging experience working with Dusty and I would have stayed longer, except I was asked to join Brian Auger and The Trinity who were just about to become part of what was called Steam Packet, backing singers Long John Baldry, Julie Driscoll and Rod Stewart.

When I was 15, I began to play in semipro bands around Ashford, Feltham and Staines. I remember having a friendly – and sometimes not-so-friendly – rivalry with Paul Samwell-Smith, Jim McCarty and their band, all of whom were Hamptonians. In February of 1961, I met my mentor, famed studio guitarist the late Big Jim Sullivan. He was also mentor to Ritchie Blackmore. In August of 1961, after sitting for my O-Levels – I got six – I was asked to join a pro band called The Echoes. We went for a week to play a theatre in Chester and made forays to the Cavern Club in Liverpool, where we met Ringo Starr, Gerry and the Pacemakers and The Beatles, with Pete Best, all before they achieved recognition. At the end of the week, the other members of The Echoes took me to the NME Poll Winners Concert at Wembley, where they introduced me to Cliff Richard and the Shadows and just about anybody who was anybody in the music business of the time. I was hooked; I wanted to be a professional musician more than anything I had ever wanted in my young life. However, my mother had other ideas and made me return to school.

On 18 October 1966, I was with Brian and Julie – Rod and Long John having departed – at L’Olympia Music Hall in Paris on a show headlined by the late Johnny Halliday and featuring a brandnew singer / guitarist who had just arrived from the US, named Jimi Hendrix. Just before the show, Michael Jeffrey, Jimi’s manager, asked me if I would like to join The Animals, whom he also managed. Within a month, I was touring the UK and Europe with Eric Burdon and The Animals. In February of 1967, I began my first tour of the USA, Australia and New Zealand. In 1967, we appeared at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival and observed and

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old hamptonians’ chronicle participated in the ‘Summer of Love’, in London, Los Angeles and San Francisco. These were heady times. I departed The Animals in July of 1968 and went to work in the recording studios of Hollywood as an independent arranger and producer. Later, I went to work for Capitol Records. Musically, this was a fantastic experience. I was working with the greatest musicians in the world, including the legendary ‘Wrecking Crew’. But, I was turning sour on the whole hype and backstabbing nature of the music business. At the end of 1969, I quit the music business and decided I wanted my life to be about spirituality. I quit drugs, alcohol and became a vegetarian and began to study yoga. I came back to London for a while to teach yoga and it was there I met my wife Elandra, who was being featured in various TV shows and Hammer horror movies. I found, though, that my American blood had taken over. I had become American and did not feel comfortable in the UK anymore. So, we returned to California.

My Life Story

Peter Webberley OH (1947) I served my student apprenticeship with D Napier & Son in Acton. I stayed on after finishing my time and, after my two-years of National Service, I returned to the Deltic Design Office for six years. For my National Service, I was a parachutist and that doubled my pay to 8 shillings a week. After I finished my trade training, I served in an airborne REME unit guarding the Suez Canal in Egypt. Before going abroad, I had completed a nine-month course on radio. Later, this left me able to be both a mechanical and electrical engineer and it led to a career with diesel generators. I became Service Manager for a diesel generator manufacturer and, unofficially, their troubleshooter. I had to travel extensively about the world, but not to Asia nor to Australia. On one project in 1965, I lived for a year in Caracas Venezuela. At that time in England, salaries were around £1,000 a year, but I was on £7,000 per annum. In 1956, I married Valerie, a girl from Ewell, Surrey and we lived (like royalty) in Caracas. I had bought a detached semi-bungalow in French Street Sunbury, just up from the swimming baths, and we were able to pay off the mortgage on our return. I went to work for a company owned by Ken Wood – of food mixer fame – and he moved the company down to Havant on the south coast. I bought a detached house not far from Chichester, overlooking Chichester Harbour, a perfect place for children to play and swim. It was here that we raised our two children, Matthew (1966) and Emma (1968). Matthew was the first windsurfer on Chichester Harbour.

I discovered the Sikh way of life and enthusiastically embraced it, especially its sacred music known as Gurbani Kirtan. I have since traveled all over the world singing in different gurdwaras (Sikh Temples). In October of 1979, I became the first non-Asian to sing in the Golden Temple of Amritsar, India, the most sacred shrine of the Sikhs. Living in San Diego, in the midst of a construction boom, I started my own plumbing company, specializing in restaurants. As a vegetarian, I have worked on four McDonalds, seven Burger Kings and around forty other restaurants. In 1989, I discovered the island of Kauai in Hawaii. Later I became enamored with Hawaiian music and culture. We moved to Kauai in 1993. The Hawaiian islands are incredibly beautiful and we found ourselves happily enjoying its glorious climate as well as the Native Hawaiian culture of music, chant and hula dance. Now we divide our time between New Zealand (my wife is a Kiwi), Kauai and Thailand.

My wife Valerie died suddenly of a brain tumor in 1987, whilst I was on a trip to the Oman; this was just as Emma was about to take her A levels. She failed her exams because she could think of nothing but her mother and could not write a word. She has had difficulties with exams ever since as a blank exam paper always reminds her of her A-Level experience. Despite this, she is now a leading chartered accountant with a most respected firm of accountants in Guildford. They deal with major companies and organisations such as county councils. Matthew is a doctor of chemistry and works for an American firm that supplies special chemicals to the big drugs companies. He is their European representative and lives in Galway. I am now married to Judith, a Hungarian woman, who lived in Budapest during the war. Her family owned a teacake manufacturing company supplying all the coffee houses in Budapest. Afternoon tea is an institution in Budapest, so that is a major reason behind the company’s success. Budapest was liberated from the Germans by the Russians and, after the war, Judith’s family were no longer wealthy because what the Germans did not take, the Russians did; but, at least they survived. The Russians drove out the Nazis and then occupied Budapest, leaving it behind the Iron Curtain. The Russians encouraged university education and they decided that engineering students would study ship design. Judith met her boyfriend at university and, afterwards, they both qualified as naval architects. They escaped from the Russians in 1956 by walking across a minefield into Austria and then they came immediately to England. As both Judith and her exhusband were naval architects by profession, it was natural that they stayed in Britain, which was then the world’s leading shipbuilding country. Kalman was very talented and became a millionaire in a business that he started in Singapore. When Judith divorced and returned to England, we married in 1990. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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old hamptonians’ chronicle After retiring, I took up studying. Firstly, I studied French, which had been the bane of my life at school and I got my O and A-level. I then passed A-level Spanish, but then realised that I did not really enjoy studying languages. Instead, I went to Portsmouth University as a mature student I decided to study what I do like and took a bachelor’s degree and then an MA in maritime history. With my historical knowledge, I was a volunteer guide for four years on HMS Warrior.

Victorian forts, known as Palmerstou’s follies, the north side of the hill was kept clear to prevent bushes from obscuring the fire of the forts guns and the resulting grassland is now preserved as being an area of outstanding natural beauty. Consequently, it cannot be built upon, so our view is sacrosanct. This location and our love of the sea and ships, has provided my main interest of writing and presenting historical stories. I have a great store of these and I can bore people for hours.

We live 15 miles north of Portsmouth, in an isolated house on the downs – just on the South Downs National Park – with a wonderful southern view of the north side of Portsdown Hill, which is just north of Portsmouth. On the top of Portsdown Hill are a line of

I thought you might like to read my life story, which is, to my mind, perhaps more interesting than most. I may not be rich, but I have enough money to last for the rest of my life and I keep busy and contented; what else is necessary?

Q&A interview with The Bishop of Southwark, The Rt Revd Bishop Christopher Chessun OH (1975) What is a favourite memory of your time at Hampton School? Well, it includes the quality of the teaching and great characters as teachers who played a formative part, through their encouragement and wisdom, in my own development. It includes the depths of friendship and the spirit in the school, doing things together with others, which I think has marked a path through following from that. However, my particular favourite memory is, whenever I could, getting into the music practice rooms with a small group of likeminded friends; we would do that in the lunch hours. As soon as we finished Games, we would go into the music practice rooms. I think just the quality of that being amidst all the learning and teaching and the others things going on in the school in the hectic days. I think that was, sort of, a source of personal space and pleasure and part of a lifelong interest in music. I played the piano and the violin; I no longer play the violin in public. I do play the piano, although I am out of practice. Then there was the Choir, which was then led by Alan Jones, and that really set very high standards. There was not a school orchestra in those days, but often students from the Guildhall School of Music would come for concerts as there was a link between the School and Guildhall School of Music. For instance, I played a piano concerto by Mozart; the orchestra was formed by the students from Guildhall School of Music, so that was quite stretching because it took you beyond yourself. The irony was that my father (OH) was not a musician, but he was a very accomplished soccer player. That was his chief sport. In the year he left, in 1947, there was an international team in which he played for England, an ATC international in Scotland, so the memory 156

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of my father was that I too would be a very accomplished player and nothing could have been further from reality! My gifts were entirely confined to the keyboard. Do you feel that your experience at Hampton School has been valuable to you as you moved on in life? Yes, I think that I am very grateful to the school for treating me as an individual and encouraging me to develop my gifts and abilities and to strive hard and go the extra mile and also to give something back. I am also very grateful for being at the School at the transition from being a grammar school to an independent school because the School did not become independent for elitist reasons; it became an independent school because of the threat of losing the Sixth Form. I remember the debates that happened around that because the Borough was removing sixth forms from its secondary schools and, for Hampton, that would have been a massive loss of infrastructure, ethos and school identity. It was one-step too far. So I am one of those that is very committed, not to grammar school ethos because that is a thing of the past, but to maintaining the widest possible access and for it genuinely being a place where pupils can be helped to flourish and to make a contribution to society rather than merely for themselves. I see very good evidence that that is at the core and the heart of Hampton; I think that is very pleasing to Old Hamptonians who had the privilege of grammar school education – and we will soon be a dying breed! In five words, how would you describe your personality? Reflective, purposeful, dutiful, attentive and regarding a sense of humour as redemptive. It was hard to come up with five words!

Who or what has been your biggest inspiration? Not to make this about me, but I went from school to read History and I have a great love of the subject. I think that understanding the historical development of the Christian faith in this country and more widely is necessary for understanding the role of faith in public life. For the last four years when I have been one of the Bishops sitting in the House of Lords, I sit on the Bishops’ bench and look up in the chamber where there are the statues of those who attended the sealing of Magna Carta. That includes two Archbishops, Canterbury and Dublin, and a number of others, mostly Barons. I think that the biggest inspiration for me is that sense of continuity and the things that are formed are essential ethos and values; that is one of the things that stirs me most and which I can see I have a very small part to play in encouraging the values of faith, hope and love and what they mean today in public life in the life of this Diocese in my role as Bishop. What was the worst mistake in your career? What was your best career move? I think the word ‘career’ I cannot easily apply. I have made some terrible errors of judgement and they remain on my conscious and I have made some bad decisions, but I think ‘career’ does not quite describe the path that I have been on. I think it links more back to how do you use your gift for the benefit of others and I actually think a narrow understanding of career today can take away that broader sense that our education is something about the wider good, and the personal development related to the wider good. I think I would like to put career in the broadest possible sense of ‘what is it that helps you to flourish’ and I thank Hampton for helping many individual pupils to flourish and to give something back.

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old hamptonians’ chronicle I will give a wonderful example of how the word ‘career’ does not apply. One of my contemporaries at school, who like me went onto college in Oxford, went into the Metropolitan Police. After his brilliant rugby playing at school, when he played at national level, he went into the Met and, during that time, he became very committed to wanting to give something back. When he left the Met, he joined the prison service as a chaplain and is still committed to rehabilitation of exoffenders and still working with the prison service and helping the Chaplain General nationally. He was until very recently the lead chaplain at Wandsworth prison. Now I would like people to see that as a brilliant career, but it is not quite how the world sees it and I would not like Hampton to start becoming like the rest of the world. I think we can do rather better. When are you or were you happiest? We have a great sense as an extended family, which we have done since we were very young and all through my time at Hampton, of going down to just enjoy being together in the country, in Cornwall and getting together with farming friends down there. So, I think being with the family, my brother and their children in Cornwall as the space where one can recharge batteries and just enjoy another pace of life. It is a great joy really, and it is a good counter-balance too, to having to be very driven in my role as a bishop. So, I like to balance Southwark by going away to places with more sheep then people! What is your favourite book?

If you could be invisible for a day, what would you do?

What would you choose for your ‘last supper’?

The slight variation on that, having been a parish priest in East London, I would love to spend one day when the docks were at the peak of their activity. I think my life has gone up and down the River Thames including Hampton and my time at university, as well as the parishes and places I have been, apart from one or two exceptions. I would like to have seen the river when the dock community was at its height and all the wharfs and spices coming in would be a wonderful privilege. One day would be enough, but I have completely missed that because the river is now largely underutilised.

As long as I had the company of good friends, I think I would not be too bothered about what I ate.

What is your most treasured possession?

A year ago in June, we had the London Bridge terror attack. We had 8 minutes of terror and then there was a wonderful sense of people coming together in the community across different faiths and different parts of the community and that spirit of common purpose has come to the fore and help put into context the trauma of those terrible 8 minutes. I think there is a lot of very good work to be done, as there is a big problem of violence and knife crime in London now, various people are taking initiatives and I think that work of building social cohesion is something which I would like to commit my remaining years as bishop to. It is again being outward focused and being concerned for the wellbeing of the whole and playing whatever small part individually one might have the opportunity so to do.

I have a piano, which was bought by my grandfather as a peace offering to my grandmother for £75 from Harrods in the 1930s, under which I sat as a little infant when my mother was playing it. I now have and treasure it, and recently had it put back into good working condition. Apart from the family story, at the age of three I wanted to learn the piano. My mother took me down the road to a piano teacher who looked me up and down and said come back when your feet can reach the pedals! It is a great privilege to have this piano. What is your pet hate? Hymns that nobody can sing! Particularly when they are chosen for the start of the services; when I am walking in processions, I like to know the words, as I like a good sing at that point with a good hymn.

How would you advise a Hamptonian who wanted to follow your career path? Think of life as gift and blessing and consider what is the person you want to be and, indeed, if you have faith, have been created to be. Then, follow that path with conviction. What personal ambitions do you still have?

There are some very good things happening, many small signs that this is part of a wider recognition.

I think that I am going choose something that goes back to my time at school and the teaching of Alan T Jones, Head of English – a love of poetry with a real economy of words, managing to get a profound depth of meaning and literary association. I am going to choose T S Elliot’s Collected Poems. I think they bring together the wisdom of our inheritance, the literary genre and profound things about the journey through life and draw on lots of historical sources. It was on the syllabus and Alan Jones’ depth of knowledge and personal enthusiasm made it attractive. Learning needs to be made attractive. What is your guiltiest pleasure? Well, of the ones that I am willing to admit to, chocolate!

Owen Delaney OH (1995) produced the hand-drawn map accompanying this interview. Inspired by the cartographers of years gone by, Owen creates traditional hand drawn maps of journeys and memories. You can view his work at https://www.owendelaney.art/ the lion the magazine of hampton school

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‘A Life in the Day’ of John Orr (Member of Staff, 1976-2015) Can days after 39 years at Hampton School be interesting? Is there life after Hampton? Musings on the Hampton School of 1976 and memories of former colleagues.

After so long becoming institutionalised by a life spent almost entirely within various parts of the education system since 1956, in September 2015 I was to discover that life is not actually summoned by bells. Whether it was the alarm to start the day or the numerous school bells, time was to be more my own, or so I thought. No sooner had the relentless demands of lesson preparation, marking and report writing been carefully consigned to history than I found myself doing a small amount of Oxbridge tutoring, followed a year later when some sort of loyalty to Mathematics resulted in a most enjoyable year part-time teaching at local independent school. As my life seems to have revolved round trivial facts – and numbers, perhaps too many hours spent at the end of railway platforms – it was good to accumulate another of these by joining Richard Smallman-Smith (Mathematics teaching colleague at Hampton 1992-2003), in that we had both had teaching careers involving exactly the same three schools – but not in the same order. It is left as an exercise to the reader to find the probability that, given we had been at the same schools, that those schools were in a different order. Before a brief visit to ‘a life in the day’ of an ageing ex-Mathematics teacher and the step to life after Hampton, I would like to try to put 39 years at Hampton into some sort of context. In early 1976, I was visiting my parents in Staines for a weekend. As a family, we had lived in the Sunbury, Staines, Hampton areas. My younger sister had gone to LEH, my father was working at Teddington Studios and my mother was working at a secondary modern school in Staines – this area was home for sure. During that weekend, my mother told 158

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me that what we had known as Hampton Grammar school was now independent, and she had seen an advertisement for a Mathematics teaching post there. With some gung-ho, I looked up the home phone number of the then Headmaster, Gavin Alexander, during a Sunday afternoon. It was a rather less formal application for a job than protocol would dictate now, but a pleasant, if in parts disarming, telephone conversation ensured. Actually not meeting Gavin faceto-face probably made it easier, but, ‘in retrospect’, that conversation was actually Gavin interviewing me. To be more formal about things, he asked me to meet him at school the next day and he offered me the job. I remember borrowing father’s car – a Rover 3.5, P6, white, vinyl roof, automatic and too powerful for me to be trusted with, but needs must – and parking somewhere in the middle of the grass which was to become the Garrick Building in due course. The Hampton School I joined in 1976 was very basic compared to today’s lavishly appointed school, having been only independent for one year. Would it survive? Was there demand for such a school which parents had to pay for? Was it a leap of faith? History has the answers to these questions, but the changes from 1976 would need a full encyclopedic wiki entry to get near to doing them justice. That day in early 1976 was not my first attempt to join Hampton (Grammar) School. The first one was in 1964 when on sitting the 11+ exam – then required for entry to grammar schools – I managed to fail, so a pupil career at Hampton never started. This was to go full circle in 1976 when I was paid for the privilege of walking in off the Hanworth Road and later I got my own back by having the responsibility for setting the Mathematics section of the then Hampton School entrance exam. Those early days at Hampton were very carefree in many ways – certainly massively less accountable than now. However, the teaching was challenging, with large classes – up to 30 – and not always the best of pupil discipline. There was minimal support or induction for new staff and it was rather a matter of ‘sink or swim’. Most of us swum rather well and learnt a lot in the process. Initiative and resolve was needed in what could be a harsh teaching environment, an environment that saw the school grow and evolve with input from all the common room. In a largely flat structure, even newbies such a I was in 1976, had a voice. It was a real privilege to be a colleague of the such distinguished teachers

as Alan Jones (Head of English and Choirmaster, 1965-1993), Alan Waltham (Head of Maths, 1960-1983), Nigel Francis (Head of Mathematics dates 1983-2010) and the first of six Headmasters (two ‘acting’) in my time at Hampton, Gavin Alexander. We were all just slightly in fear of Ernie (Badman). All, at times, were both frustrating and inspirational – genuine ‘legends’ of Hampton. It was oh so very different in 1976 with no computers or photocopiers, and often inadequate books. Being without all that did mean we had to be adaptable and imaginative – skills that served us all very well over the years. The team of 1976, the full-time new staff that September, are all still thriving and enjoying the slower pace of life in retirement. Roger Woodward (Chemistry, 1976-1985) has recently retired from Sevenoaks School, Pat Talbot (Careers / Geography) retired from Hampton with me in 2015 and is still involved in Careers advice and David Swarbrigg (RS and School Chaplain, 19761997) is still involved with the Church of England. After such a diverse career at Hampton, seeing such wholesale change, what are days like now, post-Hampton? Well relaxed is more the way of life, but with key areas unchanged: Rugby (not on the field, but now behind the scenes in County administration); railways (a home near the preserved railway in Swanage means the sounds and smell of steam trains keep the nostalgia going); and, of course, music (now largely listening to my son in various ensembles). I do frequently meet Andrew Blyth (Pupil 1964-1971; Member of Staff: 2013 and 2016 ). We do coffee in Hampton Hill cafes – not the national chain versions, of course – where we exchange favourite Mathematics problems (worrying!) or plan a visit to watch Harlequins. There is of course plenty of time to put the world to right in a Meldrew-esque way as well! My memories of Hampton are from the majority of a lifetime. With time, many details are sadly fading fast. I am very keen to see the role of former staff at Hampton Grammar School and Hampton School grow as part of OHA. Currently, a group of about twenty former colleagues enjoy regular meetings at leisurely midweek lunches at local hostelries. As former staff, we are keen to see our position as Old Hamptonians become more a part of the ever closer contacts that alumni are now having with the school. Former pupils often want news of their teachers. It will be good to be able to reacquaint them at school functions and via this Chronicle.

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Brian Littlejohn OH (1961) It was an end of an era at the OHA Pavillion this year as Brian Littlejohn retired after many years of service. Brian has provided invaluable support to the sport sections and the OHA as a whole over the years for which we are truly grateful.

Pictured left is Brian at his retirement celebration in April and below Brian as a schoolboy in the Rugby 1st XV 1959-1960.

Back row: (left to right): John Taylor, Derek Clark, Brian Littlejohn, Dave Brown, Dave Plant Middle row: Graham Buckley, Richard Royce, Jim Lees, Stephen Daniels, Mick Abbott, Mick Hannan Front row: Julian Stretch, John Duerden, Anthony Nicholls, Jim Finch, Brian Ford, Roy Hammond, Michael Hunt

Three Generations of Hampton School Football These photographs show three Hampton football teams spread over more than 50 years and contain three generations of the same family.

making a successful career for himself in the City. He played for OH and was Secretary of the OH football club for several years.

In the 1935-36 picture, W C Hill stands third from the right in the back row. In the 1956-57 team, son-in-law Robert Sainsbury is the goalkeeper, also standing third from the right. Finally, in the 1988-89 photo, grandson Neil Sainsbury is amazingly also standing third from the right. Altogether a somewhat spooky coincidence. William Hill OH (1936) went on to serve in the RAF during the war, followed by a successful career in Aircraft engineering and design. Robert OH (1962) went on to play for OH for many years and had a successful career in Local Government finance. Finally, Neil OH (1994) went on to graduate from Birmingham University and is now the lion the magazine of hampton school

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James Dowden, current Hamptonian, takes a trip down memory lane as he tracks down past scorers for Hampton in ISFA Cup Finals. ISFA Cup Finals and Hampton School – an iconic duo. As a bastion of schoolboy football over recent years, Hampton have reached seven ISFA Finals since 1999. From Stadium MK to Filbert Street, from Howard Webb to Mark Clattenberg, Hampton ISFA Cup Finals have seen it all. The Hampton Sports Chronicle attempted to track down previous scorers via the wonders of the internet and the Alumni Office, to record their memories of the final. 1998-99 Hampton 2 Wolverhampton 1 Alex Nasrallah OH (1999) It is hard to believe it was almost twenty years ago! Nevertheless, I recall us all heading up to Leicester in the minibus driven by our coach, Iain Maclean. On longer away trips, he would always ensure we had a good prematch meal; this time, we also made an extra stop to do a few exercises with Steve Timbs encouraging us to run faster! No doubt, it helped us start the game on the front foot. On arriving at Leicester City’s stadium, we did our initial walk around the pitch and that is when you could feel this was a special moment. The team was well represented by all three years and we were all looking forward to the kick-off, with David Elleray, a former Premier League official, as the referee. We knew a few coaches were bringing pupils, even from LEH, as well as staff and parents, but coming out of the changing room it felt like the entire School had turned up. Our support dwarfed the opposition’s, which gave us a boost. Under the floodlights, we started quicker than Wolverhampton. Within minutes, I found myself with just a couple of defenders ahead of me; somehow, I found a way through and, with a low strike across the keeper, we were ahead! We did not have any nerves, but the early goal gave us even more confidence. Soon after, Dan Sims curled a delightful cross into the box from which Andrew Stone glanced a delicate header into the far corner. 160

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We were two-up inside twenty minutes and in complete control. Wolverhampton managed to get one back, but our central defenders, Matthew Waldron OH (1999) and Chun yip Chow OH (1999) kept things tight in the second half. Everyone defended well from Andy Flemming OH (2001) and Mike Sexton OH (2000) upfront, to Kevin Waren OH (2000), Ben Naidu OH (2000) and Rob Dixon OH (2001) running relentlessly; James Comber OH (2000) a safe pair of hands and Tom Jackson OH (1999) as an energetic sub.

My goal opened the scoring and came slightly against the run of play; a cross came in from the right and, although largely unsighted, I managed to guide a header towards goal that struck the post and rebounded to my strike partner, Richard Allen OH (2007). Richard fired the rebound across goal and I managed to divert it into the roof of the net; in all honesty, I felt offside, but I managed a quick glance to the far side and saw the linesman Mark Clattenburg – thanks, Mark – running back to halfway.

Winning the cup, whilst keeping to our passing tradition and being the first team to bring the cup back to Hampton, was a great experience.

2011-12 Hampton 2 Millfield 1 Charlie Gerson OH (2012)

2004-05 Hampton 1 Millfield 3 Frank Paxton OH (2006) After scraping through a nervy home semifinal on penalties, we could all start dreaming of the final. A newspaper cutting of the Walkers Stadium, as it was then, was pinned up in the changing room, and my mind was focused on little else in the build-up.

Unfortunately, we could not build on that goal and Millfield deservedly came back to win 3-1, but I still look back on the day with great fondness

The build-up to the game was agonising. I remember being sat in my lessons unable to concentrate on anything my teachers were telling me. The only teacher I listened to that day was Mr Mills instructing me to ‘load up on carbs before the game’. The journey to the game was a mix of emotions. We were all describing the best possible outcome for the evening ahead, but with a hint of pessimism in our words.

Our opponents in the final were Millfield School; I already knew a few of their players from ISFA representative teams and was expecting a tough match, but we had a talented group and would travel with confidence.

I remember very little of the day itself, mainly just the agonising wait to get to the ground and focus on the match itself. As we walked out onto the pitch for the first time, it was hard not to be taken in by the occasion and the fantastic opportunity we had to play at such a venue. The crowd started to filter in as we went through our warm-ups and it became clear what a great turnout it was from both schools; I think there were over 1500 in attendance which was a brilliant effort all things considered. We had a young team, comprised mainly of Lower Sixth players, and started the match cagily.

It was only after arriving at The New Den that the momentous occasion finally set in and we realised it was destined to be our evening. The moment as we emerged from the tunnel only confirmed that belief, as our fans had come out in force and they truly were the 12th man. The game began frantically. Millfield dominated possession – I do not think we touched the ball for the first 15 minutes. I remember very little after that, aside from my goal. One of the centre midfielders picked the ball up on the edge of the box and decided to have an attempt at goal. Normally, his shooting was not the best, but I thought I would take a gamble. The ball rebounded off the goalkeeper and, thankfully, I managed to sort my feet out and score one of the simpler goals ever witnessed in The New Den.

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old hamptonians’ chronicle We went on to win the game on what must have been the lowest possession percentage of any ISFA finalist. It is a memory that I will never forget. 2014-15 Hampton 1 Ardingly 4 Harry Heywood OH (2015) It has been a few years now since the final, but the main memory that sticks was the excitement around the whole school; every teacher I saw that day mentioned their support, as did the majority of students I passed in the hallways. The journey itself was quite quiet; the occasion of the day was all the boys could think about, until we arrived at Stadium MK. Upon arrival, we passed Howard Webb, our official for the game, in the entrance and walked out onto the pitch, which let the whole experience sink in for the boys and settle some nerves.

Bernard Jackson OH (1951) returned to the School and quipped, ‘Things change but stay the same.’ Bernard was the 1st XI Football Captain in 1951 and shared some wonderful images from his time at Hampton.

1951 Prefects

Hampton School 1950

Harry Crocker – Physics

The Main Hall 1950

As the crowd piled in, there were a lot more Hampton supporters than Ardingly and they were in full voice throughout the entire game – a trait I know the Hampton supporters pride themselves on! The game started slowly, with Hampton struggling to establish themselves; Ardingly dominated the first-half, scoring three goals. In the second half, we came out much stronger; I managed to get myself on the scoresheet quickly after the break, striking a corner into the bottom left of the goal. We continued to be on top for large parts of the second period, and had a strong penalty claim turned down, to which Howard waved away all our ‘strong’ protestations. However, despite a much stronger second half, the game ran away from us and Ardingly scored late on as we pushed men forward and deservedly ended the game as victors. Although the result did not go our way, the support was incredible and the day is still one of my fondest memories from my time at Hampton.

Bernard Jackson captaining Hampton Football 1st XI

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Hampton Grammar School, Memories of Keith Clements (1953-1960)

out bullying and ‘fagging’ – running errands for prefects – before we arrived. He took us for Divinity and later became a vicar, serving on the C of E Council. I saw a lot of him during the debacle over my university placement and did have the cane from him for welldeserved misdemeanours: ‘six of the best’ – his run-up and delivery were truly impressive! Saying “thank you, Sir!” afterwards was a trifle hard. His Deputy was Sid Barton, who would undoubtedly have been Head in any other School; firm but fair again, his job was to root out troublemakers and in this he was mainly successful. I was never any good at Science, but Chemistry was fun with Mr Mettinger, who tested the dilution of acid by swilling it around in his mouth. He looked like a cadaver with sulphur-yellow skin and it was reliably reported he was building a monster in his garden shed: work that had only been interrupted by his part in the war. I cannot now recall the Physics man, except that he was tiny and rightly sent me to the Head for organising a very impressive swordfight utilising the lab’s pulleys and winches. Similarly, my French tutor I have forgotten, but I did surprise him by scraping an O level pass when all looked lost. Mr Hodge, the man whose job it was to get me through Maths, was dismayed that I only managed half the pass marks in the ‘mocks’, banishing me to a desk placed in the corridor outside of the class so that I could not ‘infect’ his other students – and so that he would not have to feel truly sick when he saw me! This ensured a great deal of mirth from passers-by and that I worked so hard to prove him wrong that I got a respectable pass in the final exam.

I must have done pretty well in the exams because, not only did I get a place at what was commonly accepted as the best grammar in the area (founded in the reign of Elizabeth 1), but was also put in the 2nd highest intake in the class. This was a lofty position that was not to last. It was certainly a bewildering and frightening place on arrival, with over 600 boys including Fifth and Sixth Formers who looked like giants. There were four forms per year and also eight Houses – names after famous forbearers – for whom you were encouraged to earn points through sporting and other competitions. Mine was Walpole after Sir Robert W., the 18th century statesman. The School was a two-storey red brick building with a central four-storey tower and cloisters; the buildings also included huts for the scouts, CCF, Old Boys Pavilion, cycle sheds and Fives Courts – a hand-ball game similar to the Spanish pelotte. Large playing fields ran down to and on the other side the rectory Secondary Modern with whom contact was also discouraged. So, in this stretch of the Hanworth Road, we had a complete cross-section of British society and its attitudes. It was an hour or so journey from home on the No. 267 trolley bus and then about a 2 mile walk. In later years, I made the journey by bike. My particular friends – apart from John Ansell – were Roger Start, Clive Wren, Derek Marks, John Prangkey and later Barry Comber who, although a year younger, had a delightful sister, Lynn, which ensured him a place in our circle. We were a diverse group from across the social spectrum but we were all arts students, none of us excelled at games and none of us were natural joiners. This was enough to ensure a life-long connection extending to holidays together in the early years. Only Clive became a prefect and went on to University. Memories of our masters are fading. The Head was George Whitfield, a very stern and serious man who was nevertheless the epitome of fairness and who, luckily for us, had practically stamped 162

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Music was always enjoyable with Mr Smith – ‘Goathead’ – and we were lucky to hear classical music on top of the range stereo equipment built by the man himself. I always thought his nickname derived from an incredible shock of unruly hair. But I heard only a few years ago – on the late lamented John Peel’s Saturday morning radio 4 show and from an Old Hamptonian listener – that it derived from the poor man’s inability to control the class when he would shriek – and he often did – ‘Go to the Head!’ It was probably a bit of both. Geography was always interesting with red-faced, but pleasant, Jack Hodges, who taught from texts that he himself had written and were standard School works. The only time I saw him get upset was when the A level mock results were published and he saw that we had higher marks in English and History. He said he would have to be stricter, but he never was. I always loved Art and Mr McKenzie was a brilliant and relaxed teacher. One of my few memories of fame stands out in particular; I won the School O Level Art prize with my watercolour of a skiffle group. Not that good I thought, but it was topical and exhibited at London University that summer and for some years after in the School Art Room. I collected my prize – a self-chosen dictionary – from nonother than Sir Edmund Hillary of Everest fame. But, there was a slip up, and he handed me a Bible intended for the top Divinity student. I tried to point out the error, but the Headmaster hissed barely sotto voce, ‘Get off the stage Clements, and we will sort this out later!’ History O level was Bernard Garside – I remember he cried on his final day – and A level with the much-feared Ernie Badman, one of whose claims to fame had been as Commandant of a Prisoner of War Camp in Italy during the war. He was loud, short-tempered and something of a bully. However, I got on with him well enough and he got me to a good A level pass. Finally, and best of all, was English Literature with kindly Bill Yarrow, who looked to be about

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old hamptonians’ chronicle 100, but was probably half that. When it became clear that I was excelling, it was mooted that I should be put forward for a State Scholarship to read English at Cambridge. Dad was not happy with this at all and said I should think about a job. He was asked to see the Head and I had the embarrassment of listening to the verbal fisticuffs from outside Whitfield’s study. That, I am afraid, was that. I often wonder what shape my life would have taken had I gone to Cambridge. However, it never destroyed my love of books. On mature reflection, Dad may have done me a favour; at that time, Cambridge was somewhat elitist and hard for a working class lad.

John Smith Walks the Portuguese Camino

Rugby was impossible with glasses, but I preserved with soccer usually playing in goal without specs. I quite enjoyed cricket and my only injury there was a set of badly bruised testicles from an exceptional fast-ball when standing at the crease. I could not swim when I went to Hampton, but I did eventually manage at one of the weekly school sessions at Hampton Pool. In athletics, I did actually manage to win House colours in the 100 yards sprint and in the shot-putt! As I said earlier, I opted for cross-country running as an alternative to soccer, but it was pretty boring doing circuits of the School field and I always finished well down the field in the annual run through Bushy park. The School started a rowing club in about my Fourth Year – becoming one of the foremost rowing Schools in the country – but I never fancied it, both for not being a swimmer and given that it was expensive. I did take up tennis when the School built tennis courts while I was in the Sixth Form. The School day started with the class register taken by our Form master, then it was off to Assembly, which I always enjoyed: the Head and senior masters on stage, in their gowns, and 600 boys seated in the main body of the hall and in the gallery. A couple of hymns accompanied by ‘Goathead’ on the magnificent hand-built organ, occasionally the School song, a prayer or two, any notices and news and an occasional pep talk. After assembly, there were two class sessions, followed by a break, with a small bottle of milk and a currant bun provided free and then back for two more classes. Then came the lunch break, with lunch in the dining room taken in 2 sessions, juniors first on tables of 9 or 10, each headed by a more senior boy who would ensure fair portions for all. I enjoyed School dinners with their stew and stodge, fish and chips, treacle tart, jam roly-poly and so on; I did try sandwiches for a while – and even bunking off with others to a nearby shop to spend our dinner money on cigarettes – but dinners were my favourite. There was also the school tuck-shop where you could buy chocolate bars, fizzy drinks and other delights at ridiculous prices. We played fives, impromptu soccer and generally fooled around on the School field, in the cloisters and quadrangles until it was time for the three afternoon sessions until 4:00pm when we could leave for home if you were not in the evening detention – there was also Saturday morning detention, to be avoided if you had a Saturday job, and given the associated caning. I do not recall the routines changing, probably because I was not in any clubs or activities. At Christmas and on Founders’ Day we were marched down to St Marys Church, and in 1956, we were bussed to St Paul’s Cathedral for a memorable and awe-inspiring service of Commemoration for the School’s 400th anniversary. There were of course changes in the class routines and timetables once we entered the Sixth Form. We were allowed a bit more latitude and even if we were not prefects, with their grey trilby’s and short gowns, we were given the odd responsibility. On arrival at home, there was the evening meal and 2 or 3 hours homework. The rest of the day was our own!

In the Autumn of 2017, my friend Peter, who had walked the French Camino the previous January, asked me if I would like to accompany him walking from Lisbon to Santiago de Compostela in January 2018. I usually agree to such suggestions, unless illegal or stupid, as it makes life more interesting. I had not considered then that it might be a bit stupid for someone with no great walking experience to take on a 400-mile hike! Peter published my image on a flyer to collect money for charities: a local hospice and a donkey sanctuary. We arrived in Lisbon separately – I went via Bilbao, where I visited Noel Hargood’s Aunt Peggy with whom Noel and I stayed over the summer holidays in 1958. I wrote Noel’s obituary for this magazine four years ago, but Peggy is still going strong and in her ninetieth year. We set off together from outside the cathedral in Lisbon were we had obtained our Credencial del Peregrino – ‘Pilgrim’s Passport’ – which enables travellers to stay in the discounted albergues (Pilgrim’s Hostels) where they endorse the document with their stamp as proof of having done the pilgrimage. We followed the Tejo (Tagus) riverbank for several miles and, for a few days, were walking its floodplain which provided ideal soil for the great wines of the region. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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old hamptonians’ chronicle The weather was mostly sunny and, apart from an occasional cold wind, as hot as our summers in England. One day I scanned the sky from horizon to horizon without seeing a single cloud. I only experienced one day of heavy rain, but Peter, who had taken an alternative route via the coast, messaged me to say he had had days of rain like stair rods and had even fallen in a river – unsurprisingly, he was not a particularly happy bunny.

We crossed the bridge into Spain and, as we neared our destination, we met more delightful pilgrims from many countries such as Argentina, Mexico, Germany, Poland, Australia, USA and Taiwan.

As we were walking in January, many albergues were closed which meant we walked exceptionally long distances for the first three days. Day Three was nearly 40km.

I had been wearing stout leather walking boots, which I discovered to be a mistake. I suffered severe tendon pain in my heels and back of my calves caused, I believe, by these boots. Each day I would use ibuprofen gel and it would take an hour or so to walk through the initial pain-barrier. By the end, I was hobbling. But, I made it to Santiago with the assistance of a few rides in taxis or trains to avoid trudging through the concrete environs of major conurbations. Although not religious, I found it to be quite emotional to stand, with fellow pilgrims, outside the vast cathedral in Santiago.

The upshot was a very bad blister on my left heel and I had to lie up for three days. Peter had carried on so from there I was on my own.

Don and Martine have invited me to do the Camino from Seville to Santiago next February, so I am testing out lightweight running shoes, which I read are perfect for what I have in mind.

As I progressed, I met some lovely people also walking the Camino, and we often walked together. I made friends with two in particular, Don and Martine, and from then we kept together all the way. Don is a retired professor of statistics from Chicago, whilst Martine is a young Dutch woman who spends most of her time walking. They had met the previous year on the French Camino and enjoyed walking together so teamed up for the Portuguese one. Don’s wife and daughter met up with us in Oporto, where he had rented a large apartment for three days for them, Martine and mutual friends from the previous year. I was urged to join them with Oliver, a splendid walking companion from the Canaries who I had bumped into and walked with for some time. Oporto is a splendid city with spectacular bridges designed by Eiffel of Tower fame. We partied every night before continuing with Don’s daughter Kate and Martine’s friend Claire. We stayed mainly in the albergues, many of which only charged 5 Euros when your Pilgrim Passport was presented. It usually comprised a mixed dormitory, but sometimes it was a private room – albeit one paid extra for this luxury. Often the Camino took us through vast Eucalyptus forests, some not far from where there had been devastating and deadly fires the previous year. 164

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DR AKBAR DE MEDICI ENCOURAGES HAMPTONIANS TO THINK BIG Dr Akbar De Medici OH (1992) qualified from the Guys and St Thomas’ MBBS/PhD programme in 2002. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, presented at numerous international conferences and written a best-selling medical textbook. Nowadays, you can find Dr De Medici working from his private practice just off Harley Street or at the ISEH – Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health – that is if he is not pitch-side as a specialist Doctor for the RFU or visiting NFL.

Dr Ben Lindsey FRCS OH (1987) is a consultant vascular and renal transplant surgeon who trained in London, Southwest England and Cape Town. His specific areas of interest include surgical training, medical management and research into small calibre bypass grafts using principles of nanotechnology. Meeting with a group of young Hamptonians interested in a career in medicine, Dr Lindsey spoke of the path he took into medicine and what continues to drive him. He explained that surgeons are no longer the  stereotypical academics with little bedside manner. The importance of dexterity as well as making decisions under pressure, working as a team, making ethical choices and showing empathy are amongst many things to consider.

FROM HAMPTON SPORTS CHRONICLE TO SKY NEWS

Dr De Medici spoke to the current pupils about his career path and his determination to follow his passion. Ingrained from his days at Hampton, sport ran deep through his veins, and after 9 years at university and qualifying as a surgeon, he decided to take the brave step to leave the NHS and embarked on an alternative path. It was difficult for Dr De Medici to describe his average day as his schedule is so varied, from lecturing to running his own practice and being the elite sports contact at the ISEH amongst a plethora of other commitments.

Taking time out of his very busy schedule, Adam Hunt OH (2008)  came back to Hampton to inspire some budding journalists. As part of the Careers Lunch series, Adam answered questions and offered guidance to those who wish to pursue a career in journalism. After leaving Hampton in 2008, Adam went on to study Journalism and Political Science at Flagler College in Florida. Adam currently presents a range of output for Sky in the UK, from sports bulletins on Sky Sports News and Sky News to feature interviews for SkySports.com.

TRANSPLANT SURGEON TALKS MEDICINE WITH YOUNG HAMPTONIANS

In recent years, Adam has covered Premier League, Champions League and FA Cup football for Fox Sports, reaching millions of homes across North America and Asia. He hosted Absolute Radio’s NFL coverage every Sunday night, covered cycling at the London Olympics in 2012 and has reported live from Wimbledon and The Open for IMG Media. Adam has also covered several other major sporting events including The Masters, Ryder Cup, Super Bowl, US Open, NBA Finals and PGA Tour for TV networks around the world. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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DR NOMAN KHAWAJA OH (1998) RETURNS TO HAMPTON

He spoke of the fulfilment that he took from the role which enabled him to become an expert in certain fields, including housing and patents.

Hampton Third Years enjoyed an inspirational careers talk from Dr Noman Khawaja OH (1998), Co-founder of Halal food company, Haloodies.

LIFE AFTER HAMPTON – 10 YEARS ON Six alumni returned to Hampton to share their experiences with today’s current pupils. The returning Hamptonians took part in the annual ‘Life After Hampton’ event. All have pursued a variety of career paths, ranging from management consultancy to cancer research, and structural engineering to banking.

Norman talked to current Hamptonians about his own careerpath and how, after working as a dentist for five years, he decided to follow a long-held ambition and establish his own food company. The brand, Haloodies, now in operation for four years, is being embraced by modern-day Muslims who want to combine convenience foods without compromising their faith. Whilst speaking to the boys, he stressed the importance of making sure that the decisions they make should be for themselves and not too heavily influenced by others. He also encouraged the boys to never stop learning and to take pride in their work.

HAMPTON RADIO INTERVIEWS BEN SOUTHWOOD OH (2009) Ben Southwood OH (2009), former Head of Research at leading international think-tank, the Adam Smith Institute, was the latest guest on Hampton Radio. Quizzed by a group of pupil reporters, Ben tackled topics ranging from the Single Market to US politics, tariffs and liberalism. Ben, who studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) at the University of Oxford, was impressed with the boys’ questions.

Speaking about their lives after leaving Hampton, the Old Boys, who all left the School in the past 12 years, encouraged the Sixth Former’s to take advantage of everything Hampton has to offer and to pursue a path they know that they will enjoy. One of the key messages of the day was for pupils to get involved and not to give up too easily! Visiting Alumni: Dr Thivyan Thayaparan OH (2006) Han-ley Tang OH (2006) Harry Graham OH (2009) James Lawson OH (2009) James Guthrie OH (2009) Danny Choueiri OH (2009)

SAM ELLIS OH (2000) ENCOURAGES HAMPTONIANS TO LOOK TO THE FUTURE Returning Hamptonian Sam Ellis OH (2000) gave an engaging presentation on the future of the working world to today’s Hamptonians.

He recalled a Talk! he had attended whilst a pupil at Hampton in 2009 by Dr Madsen Pirie, President of the Adam Smith Institute. The Talk! left a lasting impact on Ben, who, after a period working as the economics reporter for City A.M., joined the Adam Smith Institute himself. 166

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Sam, who was recently Head of Innovation at a leading global advertising agency and who now currently works with a number of start-up companies, spoke about the need to embrace technology and harness the value of artificial intelligence. He also highlighted the rapid expansion of the Chinese economy and urged Hamptonians to be conscious of this as they entered the working world. With an increasing number of roles becoming automated, the alumnus also encouraged the boys to contemplate how they will stay ahead in the future and reminded them of the need to innovate constantly.

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old hamptonians’ chronicle Shortly after qualifying as a barrister, James moved into public relations. He combines his career with a passion for politics and is a board member of the Tory Reform Group. James participated on the last election campaign trail – everything from knocking on doors to writing press releases – and he shared his experiences with current Hamptonians.

In closing, Sam left current pupils with a word of advice that was handed to him on his last day at Hampton: ‘It is nice to be important. But it is important to be nice.’

BARRISTER: JAMES ST VILLE OH (1985) Joining us for an assembly, James St Ville OH (1985) spoke about his time at Hampton and the opportunities that led him to studying engineering at Cambridge and ultimately becoming a barrister. Recalling fondly his memories of the School, James commented that without the counsel given to him by teachers and the Headmaster at the time, Mr Alexander, he would not have been presented with the chances, which have positively influenced the rest of his life.

Over a Careers Lunch, he encouraged the boys to find interests and build experiences, whether that be joining the debating society or writing a review of the School play. He advised today’s pupils that developing opinions and not flinching away from controversy at times is part of growing up. His parting advice was to be flexible and prepared for a career path that may change several times.

JAMES WARNER OH (2004) DELIVERS A POWERFUL TALK! James Warner OH (2004), Chassis Dynamics Engineering Manager for McLaren, roared back to Hampton in a McLaren 570GT and wowed our aspiring Hamptonian engineers and car enthusiasts alike in his Talk! presentation: ‘Engineering Supercars at McLaren’.

He is now able to call upon his background as a chartered engineer specialising in electronics and optical communications, when practicing as a leading barrister in Intellectual Property. He urged the boys to follow their dreams and aspirations, reminding them all that their paths are not set in stone and that they are the masters of their own destiny.

JAMES BAKER OH (2006) INTERVIEWED ON HAMPTON RADIO Twelve years after leaving Hampton, James Baker OH (2006) returned to answer some hard-hitting questions on Hampton Politics Radio.

After studying engineering at Cambridge University, James joined McLaren Automotive. He now manages the design and build of the physical components, including the suspension, steering, brakes and tyre development. He explained that there are many aspects to becoming an engineer of any kind; the key attributes are to have a creative mind, a practical the lion the magazine of hampton school

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old hamptonians’ chronicle approach to solving problems and being a team player. In return, working as an engineer can offer a dynamic working environment that allows you to solve real-world problems.

‘It has been a genuine pleasure to return to the School and offer the boys some guidance and career advice. I was thoroughly taken aback by their level of maturity and thought provoking questions.’

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION WITH ED RATCLIFFE OH (2012) Assistant Cameraman, Ed Ratcliffe OH (2012), provided a fascinating insight into the film industry at a Careers Lunch, where he shared his top tips about how to get into the industry.

Sam Marks OH (2005): Sam is a renowned British actor of stage and screen. Performing with the RSC, his roles have included Aumerle in Richard II and Happy in Death of a Salesman. He has also appeared at Shakespeare’s Globe and in Doctor Who and Foyle’s War. Huse Monfaradi OH (1992): Huse is music video director who has worked with artists including Sam Smith, Snow Patrol, the Arctic Monkeys and Rag ‘n’ Bone Man. He is now freelance and has been kept busy shooting content for Apple Music. After leaving in 2012, Ed took a junior role as a camera trainee on commercials and TV drama.  It was not long before his skills and ‘can-do’ attitude were noticed and, through sheer hard work and determination, opportunities and doors began to open. Today, he is  working on  commercials for high-end brands and huge blockbuster films, including  Star Wars, James Bond: Spectre, Kingsman and Jason Bourne. His calm and affable manner is paying dividends in this competitive sector. When he is not busy filming, you can find him running his engineering business, Ratworks Engineering, which designs and manufactures  bespoke equipment and parts, as well as Ratworks designed and manufactured products.  Starting with a lathe in his dad’s garage, he quickly progressed to a CNC milling machine, designing and manufacturing products in house for customers all over the world.

Cameron Harvey-Piper OH (2011): As The Sunday Times Sport desk digital sub-editor, Cameron’s primary role is as a copyeditor, but he also takes on jobs that involve proofreading, article writing, interviewing and layout and design for various magazines and publications. Momotaro Ushido  OH (2012): Momotaro is a concept artist in a leading AAA videogame studio, working on the ‘blockbuster’ releases in the games industry. Lawrence Weber  OH (1995): Lawerence has amassed 19 years experience in digital, integrated and creative agencies. In 2012, he joined Karmarama working on global projects for BBC Worldwide, British Airways, Nokia, Range Rover, Marks and Spencer and Unilever.

CREATIVE FUTURES 2018 Eleven experts, including five Old Hamptonians, led workshops at the 2018 Creative Futures event,  offering an insight into their fields of work and the career paths they have followed: from cutting edge journalism and video games design, to music video production, advertising and acting. The alumni speakers included Momotaro Ushido OH (2012),  Cameron Harvey-Piper  OH (2011), Sam Marks  OH (2005),  Huse Monfaradi  OH (1992)  and  Lawrence Weber  OH (1995) who commented: 168

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SPORTS REPORTS OHCC 1st XI Cricket

It was a busy OH bunker during the off season; new signings, training methods and a greater intensity set the standard through the spring so that quality practice could transfer to performances in May and beyond. After three league fixtures, we had one won, lost one and suffered at the hands of the rain. It looked to be another season of frustration in Division Four, like so many that had come before it. Then a nine-game winning streak took place through the midst of the season, setting the standard higher than ever and showing a team that is ready to chase totals and take responsibility. Several players stepped forward, including starlet, and young player of the season winner, Adam Lee (2019), turning his talents into runs at first team level and showing an ability to bat the situation in the final stages of an innings. Opener and new signing Bilal Chohan (2010) went hard at the ball and, whilst he lost his wicket on occasion, he put the bowling side on the back foot and went big against Cobham and Egham. Another new face in Adam Scher, signed as part of a swap deal that sent Simon Morris (2002) to Cape Town in the opposite direction, had a huge impact with both bat and ball, in particular with a dominant 129* in a chase against Trinity MidWhitgiftians. Seasoned campaigner Raza Mughal again terrorised top orders with the new ball and then dismantled tails at the death, scooping 33 wickets in the process. Closely following him in the wickets column was the captain, Richard Brown (2005), who led admirably from the front by taking 28 wickets – he even managed to win a few tosses this year! Player of the season though comfortably went to run-machine Shahjeel Butt. The epitome of calmness and consistency, ‘Jeelay’ racked up 721 league runs with an average over

50. The combination of Butt and Scher in the middle order provided a real platform that others could launch from. Despite the many impressive individual performances, it was the team ethic and environment that ensured so many Saturdays were not only successful, but also thoroughly enjoyable. The side will certainly be working hard over the off season in preparation for 2019, it has taken seven years to escape from Division Four and Rich Brown and his team will be keen to show that there is more to come.

Player of the Year: Shajeel Butt the lion the magazine of hampton school

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OHCC 2nd XI Cricket The 2nd XI embarked on their ninth consecutive season in Division 5 with a squad that had high hopes for finally winning the league. Bolstered by batsmen Oliver George (2017), Max Vyvyan (2017), George Gregory (2017), Chris Madoc-Jones (2010), Poulter (1979), Reid (1994), new recruit Tim Walker (2010) and stalwarts Baker (2001 and Head of Fourth Year), Crowe and captain Doherty, the side would finally realise their potential as they amassed record totals from the start, including a club-record partnership of 212* between George, who finished on another club record of 174*, and the captain, against Guildford. Crucial contributions throughout the season came from all of the aforementioned, and their efforts were superbly capitalised on by the opening bowling duo of Elliott Morley (2013) and Sam Osborn, who took over 60 league wickets between them. Further bowling strength came in the form of James Scowen (1994), Tom Hunter (2004), Zac Goodwill (2017), Kavi Bhasin (2015) and the spin twins Madoc-Jones and Walker. Rarely did an opposition survive their full allocation of overs, and only once did a team chase down a score against the 2nd XI all year. George reached unprecedented levels by becoming the first player to win the Young Player and Players’ Player

award for the team in the same season. His 543 runs at an average of 55 were instrumental in the team’s success and he will only be kept out of the 1st XI next season by some almighty winter recruitment! The team have benefitted greatly from the 1st XI’s strength, which in turn has come from the wonderful recruitment we have done in getting the best recent school leavers playing and enjoying their cricket. Winning 14 out of their 18 games the side finished on 333 points, a new record, and secured their place in Division 4 for next year, where they will hope to continue their momentum, winning form and look to challenge for promotion again. Such aims will only be possible by the continued presence of talented Hamptonians, past and present.

OHCC 3rd XI Cricket 2018 posed a new challenge for the 3rd XI; after years of just operating as a friendly side, we entered league cricket for the first time in the modern era as the team joined the Surrey Championship 3rd XI Central Division. There were mixed expectations of how the season would go, but everyone agreed that it was a great step forward for the club and would provide big challenges especially in the early season. Our side was bolstered by the Afghan Refugee Project, a brilliant scheme that, through club stalwart Anoop Jaijee, we were enough to get involved in with two extremely talented young lads coming into the ranks. This along with an ever-increasing number of recent leavers playing their cricket at the OH left our squad in the best place it has arguably ever been for the season ahead. We had a mixed start to the season, a rain-off and two wins left us unbeaten in the first three games, with stand-in captain James Osborne taking 4-27 in week one to allow Rich Searle to see the boys home. James Wilson and Anoop Jaijee stood up with the bat in week 3 as we brilliantly chased down an imposing 235. Weeks four and five were disappointing as we went down by three runs and then one run despite some great fight by the lower order on both occasions. 170

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We were back on track in week six as new captain Sufyan Khan set an example with a superb 62 to give us a needed win and get the season back on track. After that point, we were able to gain a charge of winning every game up until the half-way point of the season, with many standout performances along the way. Namely, a first league 50 for Ieuan Fraley in another chase, this time at Chessington, a brilliant all-round performance (31 and 3-26) from Raja Adeel at 2nd place Sinjun and, when hosting top team Dorking, big runs for Wilson (76) and Farridon (64) backed up by 5-32 from, home-for-the-weekend, Ali Robinson. Our momentum continued in the second half of the season as Julian Poulter rolled back the years at Hampton Hill away and Zainullah

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old hamptonians’ chronicle secured a win with 5-23, including a match winning hat-trick. Wickets for Will Christophers, Zainullah and James Osborne accompanied by runs from captain Khan, ex-skipper Nick Evans and some brilliant hitting in week 13 from Farridon and Harry Fuller gave us another three wins, we headed into the last month of the season with a genuine promotion chance. An excellent bowling performance, led by Gus Branston and Patrick Ardill, and comfortable chase, set us up for the last three weeks, with two wins needed for the title. The first of these was claimed easily as more runs for Zainullah and Sufyan gave us a defendable score that Gabriel Humphrey and club legend Neil Meadows brought home. We travelled to Dorking with a win guaranteed to secure promotion

Surrey Slam T20 This summer, the OHCC entered a new competition, both to us and the rest of Surrey, in the form of the Surrey Slam T20. We were placed in one of the Northwest of Surrey Groups alongside Hampton Hill, Staines and Laleham and Ashford, with the top two teams after the four group rounds progressing to the regional quarter-finals. Our first game saw us host Hampton Hill, the OH side boasting 10 Hampton Alumni. The OH team put on 158-8, with 30s for both Max Vyvyan and Adam Lee, a score that proved enough as four wickets up top from Chris Cecil was backed up by some great death bowling from Bilal Chohan, leading the OH team to an 11-run win and two points on the board. Our second group game saw us travel to Staines and Laleham. Bowling first, we restricted Staines to 145-6, with two wickets a piece for captain and vice-captain James Osborne and Elliott Morley. In reply, having been given a good platform by Cole Campbell, we suffered a wobble in the middle, before brother Devon Campbell’s brilliant 52* saw us home with three balls to spare. Next, we hosted Ashford at Dean Road. Batting first, runs for opening pair Jacob Doherty and George Gregory and a brisk finish from Adam gave us 162-5 off our allocation. In response, Ashford’s openers got them off to a flyer and they sat at 107-0, looking at ease. However, some terrible batting combined with some fantastic

in our debut season! Put in on a dubious wicket, Player of the Season, James Wilson hit a majestic 88 to lead us to a well above par 241-4. Wickets up top and brilliant spin bowling for Meadows and Farridon gave us a convincing win, a league title and a promotion to Division 2. Despite being a dead rubber, we were able to secure 12 wins on the bounce in the final game with 76 for Adeel and wickets shared around gave us a 6-run win in a thrilling end to the season. Massive thanks to everyone who represented us this season and even bigger thanks to Sufyan Khan who captained brilliantly throughout. A promotion that was unprecedented at the start of the year. A brilliant season for the 3rd XI and the club as a whole. Bring on 2019! bowling from Adam – 5 wickets for four runs – and a good fielding effort – catches a plenty and three runouts – saw Ashford capitulate to 126 all out to see the Hampton Lions qualify with a game to spare. The less said about our final group game the better; coming up against a Hampton Hill side in their own conditions, our 156-7 proved to be well short as we lost by 8 wickets with 5 overs to spare. A classy 49 from Denil Manuel was the only real highlight. We came second in our group and faced Walton in the regional quarter-final. Batting first, we got to 164-7, with an 80-run partnership between Vyvyan and Aaron Goss the mainstay of our innings. In reply, Walton never really got close, as three wickets for Kavi Bhasin stunted their top order and Osborne claimed four wickets at the death, including a hat-trick, to give the Lions a 27-run win and a place in the regional semi-finals. We faced a very strong Valley End side, and a partnership of 96 for their 4th wicket propelled them to an imperious 168-6 – despite two great spells from Sam Osborn at the top and Will Christophers at the death. In reply, sadly we never really got going and, despite some strong tail-wagging from men of the day Osborn and Christophers, we were reduced to 114 all out and, therefore, our tournament was done. It was a great campaign and a pleasing number of club members played their part, especially the young members, including recent leavers and current schoolboys. It has been brilliant to captain the pals this summer and I look forward to 2019!

Bilal Chohan smart in defence versus Maori Oxshott

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Two tantalising ties the outcome of a flurry of runs and wickets – OHCC Tour of 2018 The 2018 Tour saw us return to the lively seaside town of Brighton to play four games in three days. The touring party was a diverse ensemble of characters, with notable old boys including Richard Brown (00-05), Matthew Bendelow (97-04) and Neil Lizieri (97-04), accompanied by more recent leavers Elliot Morley (06-13), Bilal Chohan and Tim Walker (both 03-10), alongside a swathe of 2017 leavers who have been pivotal to the Club’s wider successes this season: Toby Dogfray, Adam Lee, Michael Dogsmark, Ben Dowse, Nick Powell, Max Vyvyan and Chris Cecil. We were also well represented by players who were not old boys, but make significant contributions to the Club. This includes Jacob Doherty, 2nd XI Captain and extraordinary club man, Rob Unterhalter, who currently lives in the Midlands but gets a free pass to join the Tour each year, and Sam Osborn, a robust Kiwi who takes no prisoners when the ball is in his hand. The first game took place at the picturesque Steyning CC for an evening T20. OH batted first and scored an imposing 159 which proved too much for the opposition, who were bowled out for 144 in reply. Highlights: Walker 59, Dogfray 30, Dowse 4-0-21-2, Lee 3-0-15-2, M Dogsmark 4-0-22-3.

U21 Lion Cubs In only our second year as an outfit, the U21 Lions Cubs endured a similarly successful season to their debut one, even against much sterner opposition. Having been promoted straight to the Top Tier by the Surrey Board after recording a clean sweep of Tier 3 in 2017, the Lion Cubs more than held their own in the company of the better sides in the county. Overall, we came second in our group of eight, falling just short of Old Ruts. Finishing second meant we faced East Molesey in the semi-final, whose 319 runs on the board in the first innings was just too big a target to reach. There is no doubt that next our target must be to go one better and make it to the county final. This campaign has been a highly promising one, and showed we are more than capable of playing a beating a lot of big-name clubs at this age-group level. The losses we incurred, however, highlighted that when playing at such a level, teams will punish you when you are even slightly below par. From a player perspective, there were some standout performances during the group stage.

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Sussex Premier League titans Brighton & Hove CC hosted the second match of 40 overs per side. OH batted first again and, following some ruthless stroke play from Lizieri and important contributions from the other batsmen, scored a competitive 219. Despite Brighton’s strong batting order, an impressive early spell from Dowse bowling both openers which was complemented by economical bowling from others meant that the game ended in a remarkable tie – a fair result with very good cricket played by both sides. Highlights: Lizieri 50, Walker 48*, Dowse 6-1-21-2. The third and fourth games involved back-to-back T20s at Portslade CC, where ludicrously short square boundaries encouraged some rather entertaining cricket. OH was not at its best in the first game, with Portslade chasing down 129 to win by 6 wickets. In the second game, Portslade amassed 150 batting first; however, OH batted confidently in reply, with Doherty plundering the short boundaries to steer us to the second spectacular tie of the Tour. Highlights for the day: Doherty 50*, Osborn 4-0-16-2, Cecil 4-0-18-3. Overall, the club and its tourists gave a very good account of themselves, playing exciting cricket whilst maintaining the right spirit throughout. We look forward eagerly to 2019’s Tour! Tim Walker With the bat, a 139-run partnership against Dorking in the opening game between Harry Mayes (64) and Pléfil Ota (81) was bettered only by a 147-run partnership between Chris Searle (51) and Bilal Chohan (106*) against Sanderstead. Bilal was joined by Toby Godfray in the hundred club (111 vs Sutton), whilst George Gregory and overseas (!) Todd Ryan and chipped in with valuable 70s. With the ball, Will Christophers bowled 4-0-1-7 in a T20 loss at Spencer, whilst Kavi Bhasin’s similar spell of 4-0-0-8 underpinned a victory away at Dulwich. Jamie Lashley’s 3-0-3-16 at the death against Sutton was even more noteworthy, given the standard of opposition and context of the game. It was, however Ben Dowse’s consistency with the ball that won him player of the season; Ben’s bowling against Banstead and Sutton single-handedly swayed the result in our favour on both occasions, whilst his 2-17 against Sunbury on a day where there was little else to cheer about was of high class. Well done to all involved for an excellent season!

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OHAFC Season Summary 1st XI

Well, what a difference a year makes. The 1st XI ended the year returning to the winners’ circle last season by being crowned Amateur Football Combination Premier Division champions for the fourth time in five seasons, as well as reaching the finals of both the AFA Middlesex and Essex Cup and the London Old Boys Cup, unfortunately suffering defeat in both. In terms of points, the league was close, with OH finishing on top by two points. However, the 1st XI scored twenty more goals than anyone else in the league – 65 goals scored in 20 games – as well as boasting the meanest defence in the league. The uptick in form from the previous season was in part due to players coming back from injury, combined with an influx of young talent from recent university leavers. The remarkably consistent back line included new 2017-18 season recruit from university Will Legg (2007-2012) between the sticks and OH stalwart defenders Alex Kennewell (2003-2008), Patrick Odling (2001-2008), Jack Parker (2004-2011), Oliver Gill, Cameron McGovern, Mike Rossiter and Mark Bird. Manager’s player of the season, Tristan Michel (2004-2011) – another fresh recruit for the 17-18 season – added a real energy and goal-scoring prowess to the centre of the midfield, which I certainly found very useful to play alongside! After recovering from a pre-season foot injury, vice-captain Craig Ashby, using his many years of experience, marshalled the middle of midfield with his range of passing and aggression in the tackle – only picking up one yellow card for dissent in the process! As shown from the season’s goal tally, the 1st XI had plenty of firepower going forward, making up the ‘galactico’ front four. We welcomed back Chris Heritage (2001-2006) from his season-long injury last year

to devastating effect on the right wing. Combined with the electric pace of Cosimo Codacci on the left wing, we stretched teams at will all season. This allowed the creative players Charles Gerson (2005-2012) and Dave Green the space and time to pull the strings, cutting opposition defences to shreds. Ploughing a lone furrow up top as the lone striker for another season, Tom Larcombe (19962003) again provided the driving force from the front, working tirelessly as ever and contributing with his best goal-tally for a good few years. Most notably, a last minute volley from a full 30 yards out in the semi-final of the AFA Middlesex and Essex Cup to avoid extra time and send the 1st XI through to the final. Will Doyle again, when available, provided a constant threat, finishing as the AFC Premier Division top scorer with 18 goals. We also had important cameo appearances across the season from recent school leavers Adam Lee, Max Matchett, Will Christophers and George Gregory, keeping the link with the school as strong as ever. The fresh faces around the squad helps keep the winning mentality each season – and the average age down! Obviously, we played some fantastic football as a first team this year, with our highlight being the 9-0 thumping of the previous Premier Division champions Old Meadonians in our last game before Christmas. However, I think the most pleasing about the season was the close-knit environment developed within the 1st XI and the club. It was a pleasure to be a part of it. The challenge for next season is to retain our Premier Division title, whilst getting our hands on at least one of the cup trophies that has managed to elude us over the past few seasons. I am expecting big things from the lads in the 2018-19 season, so watch this space! Jonny Meldram (2002-2009), Captain the lion the magazine of hampton school

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2nd XI It was a fairly mixed season for the 2nd XI by our high standards. After back-to-back promotions, our first taste of the Senior 2 South division was not going to be easy. Saying that, we started well after going into the season with our reliable spine of Alex Williams (2005-2010), Adam Calvert (19942001), Dan Tilley, Dave Mackie, Luke Gunn and Mike Timbs.  Add to this some great new players in Jamie Williams, Dimal Luta, Will Phillips and James Odling, it was no surprise to see us in the top half of the table by Christmas.  During the festive period, goals from Magnus Assmundson (20032010) and Dave Mackie were crucial in us registering some fantastic results, most notably our 7-0 away win against London Lawyers followed up by a 5-0 home win against them. Our best performances, though, came in the second half of the season. We dug in to finish 4th in the league, with our form perhaps best summed up in our fantastic 2-1 win away at Old Tenisonians thanks to brilliant defending from Alex Williams,  George Odling, Dan Tilley, Adam Calvert and Phil Caughter, as well as an unbelievable goal from Will Phillips. The main thing to take from this season is the progress of the club as a whole. Hopefully, next year, the 2s can replicate the achievements that the 1st and 3rd teams enjoyed this season. Michael Timbs (2005-2010), Captain

3rd XI Having finished 3rd last season, and therefore missing out on promotion, this year’s target at the start of the season was clear: ideally champions and a minimum of second place to ensure promotion this season. We had lost a number of key players who

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had decided to ‘hang up their boots’ following distinguished careers, many of which began at Hampton School. We therefore needed to recruit new players and, as a result, we turned to recent leavers of the school. Oliver Warren (OH 2008-2013) and Daniel Walker (OH 2006-2013) quickly became regular starters and James Gibson and Andy White, both Old Hamptonians, made the transition from the 2nd XI which meant, alongside the key influx of recent leavers that joined the side last season, we were in a strong position to achieve our objective. The season began with a heavy loss to Clapham, the eventual champions, which highlighted the lack of pre-season preparation perhaps indicative of a 3rd XI team. However, as a team, we quickly made the necessary improvements and managed to lose only one further league fixture before the Christmas break. The success continued in January winning all our fixtures until deep into March. Weather proved a constant threat over the course of the season and resulted in us experiencing an unwelcome, six-week break at one stage that threatened our seemingly relentless progress towards our key target. Once the weather improved, the team was dedicated to ensure we built on our early season success and, as such, the team managed to lose only one more fixture before second place in the league had been secured with one game to spare! The squad took immense pride in managing to achieve the season target. However, the real achievement, which was a fundamental reason in achieving this success, was the availability and dedication of all squad members, which ensured we were consistently able to field strong and competitive teams which are often a rarity at this level. A huge thanks must go to Jonathan Meldram and Michael Timbs for all the support they have given throughout the season in ensuring we have full and competitive squads come match day. An additional thank you must go to the committee, without whom none of the above would be possible. The hope of a new injection of recent leavers from the school will help us make the successful step up to Division 3 South next season. Chris McNab, Captain

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OH Rugby Season Review

The 2017-18 season saw the OH Rugby move to Surrey, having been in Middlesex since the club reformed in 2014. Some of our biggest achievements this season actually happened before the season began. Our U21s team won the Cronk Cunis National Old Boys Festival for a second consecutive year – a third title in four seasons – before the Leavers XV, captained by Will Verdan OH (2017), earned a shock 36-28 win against this year’s first team to retain the Chris Mapletoft Trophy that had been won by the 2016 leavers the year before. But there was still plenty of rugby to be played, and the regular season began in our new League, The Surrey Merit Tables West Conference, with victory against KCS Old Boys IIs, with a brace from Hugh Browne OH (2013) and notable performances from Lee Gallant OH (1988) and Paddy Oswell OH (2008) as the OH opened up with a 36-26 win. The following away fixture was notable for including eight Hampton staff, a record, as a superb attacking performance saw a comfortable

away win at Old Haileyburians IIs. Max Coltart OH (2010) and Frank Keenan OH (2004) were excellent at 9 and 10 and Centres Mr Thomson and Mr Ellsworth created lots of space for wingers Nick Welsh OH (2010) and Alex Witt OH (2017) to score some well finished tries. Even Mr Baker OH (2002) managed to get on the scoresheet as the OH romped to a 14-47 win. The run of comfortable wins continued at Teddington IIs and Old Tiffinians IIs, as the playing numbers for the season went over 40. A tight victory against Old Cranleighans followed, where the Coltart brothers and flanker Nick Powell OH (2017), described as having a ‘Studt-like game’ stood out, a win made all the more satisfying as it saw us top the table ahead of Battersea Ironsides. The win against Mayfair Occasionals proved to be a frustrating afternoon after a very promising start, but it was great to see recent leavers Verdan and Jacob Turley OH (2017) get a run out, and debutant Elliot Morley OH (2013) having a superb game. Mr Kothakota OH (1997) was amongst the scorers to make him the seventh member of staff to cross for the OH. It is said that a winning team should not be judged until it has its first blip. Unlike England, we responded incredibly well to our first defeat. Mr Studt and James Gidlow stood out in a superb backrow performance, as we came back from 31-3 down before just being beaten 43-31 at Reed’s IIs in a superb game with a side that ultimately proved to be the oldest we fielded in terms of average age. This would be great practice for our vets, however, who romped to a 74-22 win over Bank of England Vets in early December. The regular side bounced back from that disappointment with a 30-19 win over Old Emmanuel IIs where Chris Painter OH (2013) put in a big shift along with soon-to-be-50 Nick Cooke OH (1986) and we entered the winter break with another win against Battersea Ironsides IIIs. Our closest rivals for the title could not deal with our greatest ever centre partnership of former England age-group internationals Richard Coskie OH (2008) and Roman Malin-Hiscock OH (2016). The latter’s school teammate Conor Gilligan OH (2016) also had a fine game that day along with Greg King OH (2013) stepping in and controlling things at fly-half. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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After Christmas, we returned with a 60-15 mauling of Old Haileyburians before a 33-0 win in dreadful conditions against Teddington. This was driven by a superb performance from the pack with James Mann OH (2013) and Sam Evans OH (2012) the pick of the players in this area and Keenan controlling the game at fly-half. Arguably, the most thrilling game of the season, which put us in the driving seat in the title race, came away at bottom side Old Cranleighans. Having already beaten this team twice this season, in the League and in an U21s fixture in January, we expected an easy win; we got something very different… Trailing 17-5, with Club Captain Peter Dendy flinging all sorts of abuse our way, a stunning ten minutes saw 30 points scored as Charlie Coltart OH (2013) led from the front superbly. However, it was not over, as Cranleighans scored two late tries, and threatened to score a winner. The OH held on for an exhausting 29-35 win, and crucially, kept that buffer at the top. This also saw the impressive debut of Billy Zander, son of Steve, who was the captain in our biggest ever game back in the 1994 Pilkington Cup Final. But the title race still had plenty of drama. A postponement away at Mayfair followed by our failure to scrape a side together for the away fixture against Old Emmanuel meant we had been dragged back into the title race. With two rounds remaining, we were level with Battersea but crucially had a game in hand. Nevertheless, they would be our opponents in the next round. A young team which had just one non-OH (our Director of Rugby) romped to a 55-24 win to secure the title. The youth of Matt Stamp

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OH (2017), Angus OH (2017) and Michael Shennan OH (2014), Nick Van der Merwe OH (2018), Will Hall OH (2017), Ollie Lack OH (2017), Tom Duggan OH (2017), Zac Goodwill OH (2017) and Rowan Grundy OH (2017) all had a huge impact, but none more so than George Tsitsis OH (2018) who scored with his first two touches in an OH shirt. We ended the season with a 12-24 win at KCS, a game in which Sean Taylor and Zack Santos shined, to win the League by ten points. Our League performances meant an invite to the Surrey Chairman’s Barrel Game against London Irish Nomads. We were ultimately beaten 34-19, having to play a large part of the game with 14 due to injuries, but it was a great performance against a strong, physical side. Thanks have to go to Charlie Coltart and James ‘Glam’ Gidlow, who were instrumental in ensuring we got teams together and put in fantastic performances on the pitch – they could have been mentioned for their various feats in every game they played in! Thanks from me go to all the students that were persuaded to play and to Mr Thomson for making an effort to get the staff, so important in the first half of the season, to play. Finally, thanks are due to Peter Dendy, whose commitment to the OH has been vital in keeping the club going in recent seasons. The next few years are set to be extremely exciting, as the club looks to develop massively and capitalise on the 70 different players that turned out for us this season. Nick Powell

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Old Hamptonians Golfing Society Camberley Heath Golf Club was the venue for our June fixture. It is rated in the top 100 golf courses in the country – justifiably so given the quality of the golf holes and general ambience of the club. In total, 15 golfers turned out for the match. We enjoyed dry but cool weather, and the difficulty of the course was reflected in the scoring – which was definitely below average! The winner on the day with 31 points was guest Danny Hudson (son of Bob). In second place, with a very commendable 30 points, was Mike Pegram. Best front 9 was scored by Berin Boyce with 17 points, and best back 9 by Mike Franzkowiak (a member of Camberley Golf Club), also with 17 points. We also had prizes for nearest the pin on the 14th hole, again won by Danny Hudson, and longest drive on the 3rd hole, won by Bob Nicholls. After an enjoyable dinner, our captain Howard Hughes welcomed everybody and Bob Hudson presented the individual prizes which in summary were as follows: 1st Overall 2nd Overall Front 9 Back 9 Nearest the pin Longest Drive

Danny Hudson Mike Pegram Berin Boyce Mike Franzkowiak Danny Hudson Bob Nicholls

The School won the match comfortably, with a couple of the boys scoring over 40 points, so they won the Les Stokes trophy again. Best individual score for OHGS was Ian Court with 38 points, best front 9 was Patrick Mattar with 16, and best back 9 Steve Carleton with 20 points. The match was played in a good spirit and everyone seemed to enjoy the event – hopefully, next year, we will win the trophy back! In early September we have a tri-partite match against Old Kingstonians and Old Cranleighans, which will be played at Surbiton Golf Club on Monday 3 September. Then on Thursday 18 October, we will have a joint fixture at Hindhead Golf Club with Old Tiffinians. Our final fixture of the year will be the annual Christmas meeting at Strawberry Hill Golf Club on Friday 14 December. Martin Read (Secretary)

31 pts 30 pts 17 pts 17 pts

On 29 June, OHGS hosted the 2018 Surrey Schools Golf Societies’ Festival (SSGSF) at Bramley Golf Club, where our own Brian Collison was a past captain. This shotgun start event attracted entries from 9 societies, and a total of 67 players. Each society could enter a team of 7 players, with the best 5 Stableford scores counting towards the team result, and a few societies also sent a number of additional non-scoring players. On another glorious summer day, the course proved to be more testing than it appeared, as only 3 players were able to better their handicap. The individual winning score was 42 points by Peter Williams of Old Tiffinians, followed by Lance Condon of KCS on 37 points (second on countback), and Nigel Taunt of Old Reedonians on 37 points. The team prize and trophy was claimed by Old Tiffinians, with an aggregate score of 175 points – an amazing average of 35 points per player! – easily beating Old Reedonians on 160 points into second place. Old Hamptonians finished a creditable 4th with 156 points. A late afternoon lunch and prize-giving followed the golf, and wine was generously provided on all the team tables by Brian Collison. On an extremely warm early July afternoon, the annual match between the OHGS and the School took place. It is a team Stableford competition with groups teeing off in 3 balls (1 schoolboy, 1 Old boy, + 1 schoolmaster) and two teams of 9, with the best 7 scores from each team counting in the overall score. Fulwell Golf Club was in immaculate condition as ever, with fast greens and after the prolonged hot weather, brown and dangerously free-running fairways. the lion the magazine of hampton school

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OBITUARIES DONALD VICTOR DRURY OH (1946) 22 October 1927 – 3 March 2018

Donald Victor Drury, a third-generation stained glass artist and former head of the Menlo College library, died at Stanford Hospital Saturday, 3 March 2018, at the age of ninety. Don was born 22 October 1927, in Fulham, London, in an apartment adjacent to Glass House, his family’s place of business: a stained glass studio and workshop for independent artists. The company, Lowndes and Drury, was founded in 1897 by his grandfather, Alfred John Drury; Alfred designed and constructed the building in 1906. Don’s parents were John Victor and Mary Angus Drury; he was their only child. Mary, one of four sisters, had come to London from Edinburgh as a young woman. Don grew up in London, but the family relocated to Hampton during the War, and Don spent some time safely in Scotland with relatives. In 1945, he won an open scholarship to Cambridge University and studied modern languages at Gonville & Caius College, graduating in 1949 with honours. During the 1950s, he spent a year in Vienna, studying for an advanced certificate in German, to qualify him to teach that language. He entered the family firm, continuing his art studies at Twickenham School of Art in Middlesex. He also pursued studies in experimental stained glass at the Central School of Arts & Crafts in London, studying under John Baker. He learned techniques including etching, plating, painting, staining, and faceted glass in concrete. Don emigrated to the US in 1957, to work with firms that were interested in new and experimental techniques. He first was employed with Cummings Studio in San Francisco and John Hogan Studios in

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San Jose. In 1962, he established his own studio on Mary Street in San Francisco. He created installations for several churches and other buildings in the Bay Area, including his Creation Series windows at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Berkeley (1964-68); clerestory windows in the Santa Rosa Public Library (1965-67) – an abstract panorama of Sonoma County from the ocean to the Sierras; and windows for the Christian Brothers retreat house chapel in St Helena. His major work was St Bartholomew’s Catholic Church in San Mateo, a truly impressive and inspiring structure whose glass walls were designed and constructed by Don and one assistant. Don met his wife, the former Dorothy Perry, shortly after his arrival in the Bay Area; they married on 25 November 1959 and were devoted to each other until her death on 20 November 2003. Dorothy was a native of Calcutta, India, where her father was stationed with the Royal Scots Regiment. Thirteen years Don’s senior, she had a rich and fascinating life before meeting him. To support his stained glass studio, she worked and earned her degree in English literature at San Francisco State in 1967.

Don began a second career after completing a degree in library science at UC Berkeley in 1972. He served as librarian at Menlo College for more than thirty years; he and Dorothy lived in a cottage on the school grounds until he retired in 1995. They then bought a home in Redwood City. After Dorothy’s death, Don moved to Channing House in Palo Alto, first to an apartment, and later to the skilled nursing area, after he fell and injured his back. Don was musically gifted and sang with the Berkeley Chamber Singers in the 1960s. He joined a small, informal madrigal group in Palo Alto, and his fellow singers remember his beautiful, resonant bass voice. He was very knowledgeable about many styles of music and their interpretation, and those

who sang with him learned a great deal from his kindly tutelage. Sadly, his hearing loss in later years precluded him from continuing to enjoy live concerts and recorded music. Ian Angus Gordon of London, Don’s first cousin, died five days before him. He is survived by second cousins and many friends in both the U.S. and the UK. We suggest memorials in his name to a charity of the donor’s choice, especially musical groups and organizations that support music.

Stephen John Mott OH (1971) Sadly, Stephen passed away on 6 May in Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford after a battle with bowel cancer. He was 64. Whilst at Hampton School, he was in the CCF and also played cricket for Old Hamptonians in the early 70s. Once his job with Hambros Bank relocated from London to Essex, he had to give up playing cricket for the Old Boys. After his marriage, Stephen and his wife Sue moved to Chelmsford in 1975. He continued his love of cricket by playing for the Bank and locally. He also followed the MCC. He played football and, on retirement from the game, he took up refereeing where he became a Class 1 referee. He supported Wolves from the age of 10. In the last 20 years, he and Sue followed, and were season ticket holders for, Wasp Rugby Club going to many European matches. He also played Golf. Hambros moved back to London and, on redundancy from them in 1993, he carried on in the financial world until he became disillusioned and, in 2010, he became a driving instructor which he thoroughly enjoyed. He also had a great passion for cooking.

Owen Pugh OH (1943) Owen Rowlands Pugh was born on 9 August 1926, in Southall, Middlesex. His father William Thomas Pugh was from Nelson near Cardiff and his mother Emily May Waite – a farmer’s daughter from Gosberton,

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the University of North London – to study building, surveying and architecture.

William and May moved to London in the early 1920s, and brought Singleton & Sons in Hampton Hill. The family moved to one of the houses William built in Chudleigh Road, Twickenham.

Sadly, Owen developed Alzheimer’s about seven years ago and when his beloved wife Rosemary passed away in 2015, he became too ill to look after himself. He moved to Marling Court, a care home in Hampton. The staff there were absolutely wonderful and cared for him until his death on 30th July.  

During this time, Singleton & Sons prospered. William built many houses in Twickenham and Hampton. May was the first customer of the NatWest when it opened its branch in Twickenham. Her account was number 1, a fact that amused Owen greatly. Several years later, the family moved to Hampton, to another house William built adjacent to Carlisle Park. The house had a concrete air raid shelter in the garden. Owen would often recount how he would stand on the shelter watching the vapour trails and aerial dogfights that took place during the Battle of Britain. He went to Denmead School, then onto Hampton, where he developed a passion for History and Sports, in particular athletics and cricket – and ran for Middlesex County. He would often recount the time when whilst training for a county athletics competition at Twickenham rugby ground, everyone had to scatter as they heard the engine cut on a V1 flying bomb that was heading towards the stadium. Fortunately, it passed silently overhead and hit an adjacent street. Owen retained a keen interest in history, athletics, rugby and cricket throughout his life and latterly took up golf on retirement.  He joined the Army signals regiment as a radio operator, intelligence gathering in current vernacular and posted to Catterick camp in Yorkshire. He would always joke that the Germans never took Catterick!  He met his future wife Rosemary when he was just fourteen. She was a cousin of his next-door neighbours in Carlisle Road, Hampton. Owen and Rosemary married on St George’s Day 1949.  A year after their wedding, Rosemary gave birth to a daughter, Sandra in April 1950. Four years later, in October 1954, their son David was born.  After he left the army, Owen resumed his studies at the Northern Polytechnic – now

Phil Sallis OH (1962) For as long as I can remember, I have dreaded the past week and having to say goodbye to my precious big brother. I would rather celebrate his rich life, which started during the austere years of World War 2 in Rumney, South Wales. Dad, an Officer, was away in the Army. Mum lived with her brother, Fred and sister-in-law, Ros, and baby Phil was surrounded by Love. Dad came home from the War and the little Family moved to England, where I was born in Nottingham. What a big brother he was, allowing me to join in with him and his big boy friends, traipsing around the neighbourhood streams and hillsides in Gedling. Moving along quickly to Grammar Schools in Hampton and Twickenham, our lives in winter revolved around Rugby; I remember Phil carrying the chopping block so he could stand on it and see over big people’s heads. He became a very active NCO in the School Cadet Force until he discovered rowing in the late 1950s. Our lives changed dramatically. We attended every race, every regatta, Heads of the River and many training Sessions, as well as crewmembers’ and family events. Phil followed on into Moseley Boat Club and became, first, the official Bar Steward and then Captain in 1971. Phil’s successful rowing career is reflected by the long row of Pewter Tankards and medals that he won for VIIIs and IVs events from 1960 to 1971. That was a very precious part of our family lives spanning more than 12 years.

There was a physical gap in our relationship as I left the UK 47 years ago, but I attended his wedding in 1972 to Jackie, the mother of his adored children, Mark and Anna. Hundreds of letters crossed the ocean and the skies, and then he visited Cape Town, alone, in 1981. I introduced Phil to my best friend, Margie, and my husband and I saw the electricity pass between them. More than 10 years later, Phil returned on holiday, with his children, and asked me for Margie’s phone number. Both were free agents by then, so there is no scandal unfolding here! Eventually, they married in 1995 and their love affair bloomed for all to see. That love spilled over and he embraced Susan and Michael as his own family. Never has there been a more devoted husband, brother, uncle, father and, lately, granddad. He was the epitome of love and generosity – this you probably all know. During his time in South Africa – once he was allowed to work as a Permanent Resident – he worked for the Electoral Commission for two national elections and did survey work, including counting traffic for SANRAL. Then, he discovered Acting. He participated in many local and International ads and in Movies, as an Extra or Featured Bit Parts. He used to refer to ‘my friend Nicolas Cage, or Samuel L Jackson, or Richard E Grant’. In fact, while in hospital Phil was instructed to grow a beard for a possible part in a TV series being filmed here from October. No sooner had we said goodbye to Margie, in April, than his own hideous diagnosis threw the family into the turmoil of hope and despair. Phil fought bravely, long and hard, to be back home in Sea Point, and then to be able to travel to the UK to see his children and the grandchildren. He did see them, but they had to come here to see him in hospital. Thank you Phil for being my rock, my biggest supporter and gentle critic. Your spirit will live on in our hearts. I love you and miss you already. Sheila Sloane (formerly Canham, née Sallis)

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IN MEMORIAM Name Dates at school  David Amos 1941 - 2017 1952 - 1959 (OH) Cyril Astell 1918 - 2017 1930 - 1935 (OH) Gordon Bates b 1922 1934 - 1938 (OH) Peter Brown 1940 - 2016 1905 - 1905 (OH) James Dannatt 1938 - 2018 1949 - 1954 (OH) Donald Drury 1927 - 2018 1940 - 1946 (OH) Alan Duddy 1928 - 2018 1939 - 1944 (OH) Geoffrey Fraser 1929 - 2017 1940 - 1945 (OH) Alex Green 1995 - 2017 2007 - 2014 (OH) David Grossel 1951 - 2018 2011 - 2016 (Staff) Peter Hounslow 1949 - 2017 1961 - 1968 (OH) Alan Jones d 2018 1989 - 2018 (Staff) Alan Jones d 2017 1965 - 1993 (Staff) Patrick McGrath 1957 - 2017 1968 - 1973 (OH) Brian Miller 1955 - 2018 1966 - 1973 (OH) John Moore 1931 - 2017 1942 - 1949 (OH) Stephen Mott 1953 - 2018 1964 - 1972 (OH) John Partridge 1939 - 2017 1952 - 1956 (OH) Denis Phipps 1928 - 2017 1939 - 1946 (OH) Crispian Pickles d 2018 1975 - 2000 (Staff) Stanley Prier 1929 - 2016 1940 - 1945 (OH) Peter Ridgway 1931 - 2018 1942 - 1949 (OH) Philip Sallis 1943 - 2017 1954 - 1962 (OH) John Schauerman 1928 - 2016 1939 - 1942 (OH) Donald Scrivener 1927 - 2016 1939 - 1945 (OH) Clare Sewell 1925 - 2017 1940 - 1942 (OH) Leslie Spiller 1936 - 2017 1948 - 1953 (OH) Raymond Thorne 1919 - 2018 1930 - 1936 (OH) Edward Wearn 1923 - 2017 1933 - 1939 (OH) Bernard Wigginton 1945 - 2018 1956 - 1964 (OH) Robert Willson 1956 - 2017 1969 - 1975 (OH) Julian Zambra 1958 - 2017 1970 - 1975 (OH)

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