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Graduate Legal Education:

Preparing the World’s Next Generation of Leaders

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL


contents

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Why GW Law?

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Faculty: Who We Know

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Special Programs

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International Students at GW Law

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Career Services

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General Degree Information

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Business and Finance Law

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Environmental AND ENERGY LAW

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Government Procurement Law

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Intellectual Property Law

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International and Comparative Law

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Litigation and Dispute Resolution

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National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

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LL.M. PROGRAMS FULL-TIME FACULTY AND DEANS

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OUR COMMUNITY

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WASHINGTON, DC: A WORLD-CLASS CITY

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DC + GW

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Why GW Law?

The

GW Law Advantage GW Law offers students a legal education unlike any other— an education premised on law in action in Washington, DC, the center of the most dynamic legal and policy activity in the United States. GW Law’s campus is just four blocks from the White House and within close proximity of major international organizations and federal government agencies, law firms, nongovernmental organizations, courts, and international dispute settlement bodies. Proximity to these entities provides our students with myriad opportunities to address real-world problems and offer real-world solutions while gaining practical experience. Our students benefit from a world-renowned faculty, degree programs that address society’s most often debated legal and policy issues, a broad and in-depth curriculum, and strong academic and personal support. Simply put, there is no better place than GW Law to study and participate in the engaging life of the law.

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Our faculty is our greatest asset.

Faculty: Who We Know The men and women who teach at GW Law are among the most frequently cited law professors in the nation, regularly appearing in print, online, and on air in major media outlets.

They are respected scholars, and the authors of leading casebooks and works for general readership, alike. Many remain involved in practice, whether arguing cases before the Supreme Court or serving as counsel to foreign governments. GW Law faculty members travel the world to teach and learn at premier educational institutions and affect dialogue and decision making at seats of global influence, including the International Court of Justice, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and the United Nations International Law Commission. In addition, they have served in the Obama and Bush administrations and held prestigious clerkships, a number of these for sitting members of the Supreme Court. As a complement to our full-time faculty, the Law School’s adjunct faculty reflects the extraordinary wealth of talent in and around Washington, DC. Federal judges (and one Supreme Court justice), partners in law firms, counsel to U.S. government agencies, and officials from major international institutions teach specialized courses in their fields of expertise. In addition to our regular classroom teachers, a steady stream of lecturers and visitors to our campus—including, most recently, judges from the European Court of Human Rights, the general counsel to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the general counsel to The World Bank—adds a diverse, comparative dimension to the environment.

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Our students gain practical legal experience.

Special Programs Field Placement Program At GW Law, students experience the practical and engaging work of the law by participating in a nearly infinite number of opportunities to work with a broad range of domestic and international organizations.

Our prime location gives students a vast range of choices for field placement work. In addition, we rely on our alumni, including more than 150 judges, to help students find ideal opportunities. Recent placements include: American Civil Liberties Union Federal Communications Commission Inter-American Development Bank Office of the White House Counsel Organization of American States Recording Industry Association of America U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit U.S. Department of Defense U.S. Department of Justice U.S. Department of State U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia U.S. Patent and Trademark Office U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee The World Bank World Organization for Human Rights

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Our faculty is dedicated to both scholarship and teaching.

International Students at GW Law Master of Laws (LL.M.) Program

LL.M.–J.D. Transfer Program

Each year, a select group of lawyers trained at law schools outside of the United States comes to GW Law to pursue graduate legal studies. The knowledgeable staff of the Graduate Programs Office (GPO) facilitates for these students a smooth transition to the United States and to the GW campus. The office provides services that range from academic advising and course selection to assistance with issues including housing, campus resources, and life in Washington, DC. The office also organizes a variety of social, cultural, and informational programs.

A limited number of international LL.M. students is eligible to be admitted into the GW Law Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree program after completion of the LL.M. degree. If admitted to the J.D. program, a student might be eligible to transfer 28 hours of credit from the institution that granted their first law degree, thereby allowing the student to complete the J.D. with two years of further study after completing the GW LL.M.

For fall 2012, the GPO received more than 700 applications from 90 countries outside of the United States. The entering class included 130 LL.M. candidates from non-U.S. law schools, representing 44 countries. Class members included judges, prosecutors, corporate counsel, attorneys, students, Fulbright scholars, human rights activists, and government officials. The greatest number of students were from China, Korea, India, Japan, Iran, Germany, Italy, France, Kazakhstan, Thailand, and Mexico. In addition, nine international exchange students enrolled for the 2012–2013 academic year. International students at GW Law do not pursue a separate course of study from their U.S. counterparts; rather, they bring important global perspectives to the classroom while working side-by-side with both U.S.-educated LL.M. students and J.D. students.

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Career Options for International Students After completing the LL.M. degree, some F-1 visa holders remain in the United States for one year of Optional Practical Training before returning to their home countries. Others return directly to work at the corporation, law firm, or post from which they took leave to pursue the degree. A few remain in the United States for longer than a year. Between 30 and 50 percent of the Law School’s international LL.M. graduates take a U.S. bar exam each year; the GPO staff and faculty advisors work with those students to develop an individual plan of study for degree completion and qualification for the bar.


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Career Services Our LL.M. students benefit from a dedicated counselor in the Center for Professional Development and Career Strategy (Career Center) who works closely with students to help them establish individual job search strategies. Experienced in both private and public practice, the Career Center’s counselors offer expertise and knowledge in preparing students for a wide range of career options, including opportunities with government agencies, law firms, federal and state courts, international organizations,

A Global Alumni Network With more than 25,000 alumni throughout the world and in every area of practice, GW Law connects students with a vast network of mentors, advisors, and career contacts. The Alumni Career Advisor Network puts current students and recent graduates in touch with alumni who can provide career advice and professional opportunities. GW Law graduates live and work in 100 countries. A number of international and national alumni groups and events around the world help our alumni to network, support other graduates, and keep in touch with the Law School. In addition, the dean and various faculty members regularly travel across the United States and abroad, and they use these opportunities to connect with alumni.

nonprofit organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and private sector employers.

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General Degree Information The Law School offers two graduate law degrees: the Master of Laws (LL.M.) and the Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.). With the exception of the Litigation and Dispute Resolution program, graduate law students take courses with Juris Doctor (J.D.) students. Graduate students are able to combine traditionally taught courses with in-depth seminars, internships, skills training, and clinical experience for a complete legal education.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degree General LL.M. Program Graduates of non-U.S. law schools may pursue the General LL.M. as a means of studying a range of issues in U.S. law. The General LL.M. program accepts a limited number of U.S. law school graduates to study in areas other than those covered in the specialized programs. U.S. law school graduates applying to the General LL.M. program must submit a proposed program of study that includes courses to be taken and a general statement outlining the intended area of concentration for the thesis. Before admission, the student is paired with a faculty member in that area who will assist in further developing a curriculum and supervising the student’s thesis. Recent General LL.M. candidates have focused in such areas as labor law, constitutional law, health care law, criminal law, and antitrust law. Areas of interest are limited only by the availability of faculty advisers.

Specialized LL.M. Programs In addition to the General LL.M., specialized fields of study include Business and Finance Law, Energy and Environmental Law, Environmental Law, Government Procurement Law, Government Procurement and Environmental Law, Intellectual Property Law, International and Comparative Law, International Environmental Law, Litigation and Dispute Resolution, and National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law.

“Where else but GW Law can you take literally every course you like taught by practicing judges, former State Department officials, and a former ICJ judge! It is a truly exceptional experience.” —Olya Kroyter, LL.M. ’10 10

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The Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) Degree

Requirements for the LL.M. Degree

The Doctor of Juridical Science degree offers a small number of highly qualified students who have already earned the Master of Laws degree the opportunity to concentrate on scholarly research and writing in a specific area of interest. The program is designed for students with an interest in legal scholarship, principally those interested in teaching, whose outstanding academic record indicates they would be able to produce a publishable dissertation.

U.S. Law School Graduates U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements: Completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum and written work in the specialized programs; attendance for an enrollment period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters; and achievement of a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.67 at the time all requirements are met. Students may attend either full or part time.

Non-U.S. Law School Graduates Non-U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements: Completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum and written work in the specialized programs; attendance for an enrollment period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters; completion of Legal Research and Writing for International LL.M. Students, and Fundamental Issues in U.S. Law; and achievement of a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 at the time all requirements are met (2.67 for non-U.S. law school graduates who previously earned an LL.M. from a U.S. law school). A thesis is not required, although students may choose to complete a thesis in connection with the degree. Non-U.S. law school graduates generally are expected to complete all degree requirements in one academic year. For more detailed information on LL.M. program degree requirements and academic regulations, see the Law School Bulletin at www.law.gwu.edu/gwl/bulletin.

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Mary L. Schapiro, J.D. ‘80, 29th Chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, gave the keynote address at the C-LEAF conference “Navigating Dodd – Frank: Are We Avoiding Another Financial Crisis?” in October 2012.


Business and Finance Law The LL.M. in Business and Finance Law highlights GW Law’s unique strengths, which include an expert faculty, extensive curriculum, access to the Washington, DC, and international regulatory communities, as well as important links to the New York and international financial markets. The program enjoys strong ties to regulators, business leaders, and scholars both domestically and abroad, including in China, Korea, and India.

GW Law offers an integrated and intensive program for the study of the laws governing economic and financial markets and institutions. Our full-time faculty members have authored books and articles in the areas of business and finance that number well into the hundreds. The program’s adjunct faculty includes experienced private practitioners, seasoned general counsel, and distinguished regulators and judges. The curriculum includes everything necessary to master the basics and beyond. We offer courses supporting concentrations in commercial law, corporate law, securities regulation, finance, and international business and trade. Students are welcome to design a curriculum that suits their own interests and career plans.

GW Law provides close proximity to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board, and dozens of other government authorities, associations, organizations, and think tanks committed to the regulation and study of financial markets. This proximity, coupled with the interest and involvement of our faculty, creates numerous opportunities for learning and networking outside the classroom, including participation in the Law School’s Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF).

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Business and Finance Law

Curriculum Requirements A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.* For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 other credits in the field of study are required. If the thesis requirement is waived, U.S. law school graduates must complete two research papers, each of which is written in connection with a separate two-credit course. For non-U.S. law school graduates, one research paper is required. Non-U.S. law school graduates also must complete Corporations (unless they have previously completed equivalent course work). For both U.S. and non-U.S. law school graduates, Corporations may be counted toward the 16-credit Business and Finance curriculum requirement.

Commercial Law Courses

Finance Law Courses

Banking Law

Banking Law

Business Bankruptcy and Recognition Commercial Paper­— Payment Systems

Business Bankruptcy and Reorganization

Consumer Protection Law

Business Planning

Corporations

Corporate Finance

International Business and Trade Law Courses

Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection

Corporate Taxation

Admiralty

Corporations

Advanced International Trade Law

E-Commerce

Antitrust Law

International Banking

Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection

International Business Transactions

Foreign Direct Investment

International Commercial Law

Insurance

Secured Transactions

International Anti-Money Laundering International Finance

Corporate Law Courses

International Project Finance

Business Bankruptcy and Reorganization

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law

Business Planning

Law and Accounting

Corporate Finance

Law of Real Estate Financing

Corporate Taxation

Secured Transaction

Corporation Law Seminar

Securities Regulation

Corporations

Venture Capital Law

International Taxation

Employee Benefit Plans Law and Accounting Nonprofit Organizations: Law and Taxation

Securities Regulation Courses

Takeovers and Tender Offers Venture Capital Law White Collar Crime

Chinese Business Law Corporations Foreign Direct Investment International Anti-Money Laundering International Arbitration International Banking International Business Transactions International Business Transactions Seminar International Commercial Law International Competition Law Regime International Finance International Negotiations International Project Finance International Taxation International Trade Law

Partnership and LLC Taxation

Business Planning

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law

Securities Regulation

Corporate Taxation

Law of the European Union

Takeovers and Tender Offers

Corporations

Trade and Sustainable Development

Unincorporated Business Organizations and Agency Law

Law and Accounting

Trade Remedy Law

Regulation of Derivatives

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation

Venture Capital Law

Regulation of Mutual Funds and Investment Advisers Securities Law Seminar Securities Regulation

Contracts I and Contracts II also will be available, with the permission of the program director, to those students who have not completed equivalent coursework.

*

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin. 14

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Special Programs: Business and Finance Law Small Business and Community Economic Development (SBCED) Clinic GW Law provides free start-up legal assistance to selected area businesses and nonprofit organizations that cannot afford to pay a lawyer. Most clients are microbusinesses comprising one to three persons with less than $35,000 in start-up capital.

GW Law in New York Through its innumerable connections to New York City’s economic, business, and financial resources, GW Law is developing an innovative destination program to help students, faculty, and alumni forge exciting educational, research, and career pathways.

Banking Law Society

Center for Law, Economics & Finance

Corporate and Business Law Society

GW Law’s Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF) is a think tank designed as a focal point in Washington, DC, for the study and debate of major global issues in areas of economic and financial law. The center offers the opportunity for those completing a thesis as part of the LL.M. in Business and Finance Law to participate in the C-LEAF Working Paper Series, which showcases the work of both students and faculty.

The Banking Law Society and Corporate and Business Law Society student organizations encourage the exploration of contemporary issues in banking law and in corporate and business law, respectively. Through a variety of student and alumni events and programs, these groups work to educate members, raise awareness of opportunities available in the field, and facilitate the development of professional contacts.

The Manuel F. Cohen Memorial Lecture Series

Field Placement The Field Placement Office maintains lists of agencies and organizations that provide internships for law students and helps match each participant with an organization that most closely aligns with his or her area of interest. The Law School’s location and the experience of the full-time and adjunct faculty provide students interested in business and finance law with access to exceptional internship opportunities.

The Manuel F. Cohen Memorial Lecture Series was created by the friends and colleagues of Manny Cohen in 1979 as a living memory to Cohen, a leader in the field of securities law, a dedicated public servant, a former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a legal scholar, and a teacher at the Law School for nearly two decades. The lectures have been presented by notable figures, including David M. Rubenstein, co-founder and managing director of The Carlyle Group; and Kenneth Feinberg, Special Master for TARP Executive Compensation.

“I looked for a program that would provide me with a comprehensive understanding of the influences on the global business and financial market, knowledge from which any international business lawyer would highly benefit.” —Naama Davidovich, LL.M. ’11

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Business and Finance Law

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Co-Directors Theresa A. Gabaldon Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law; Director, Academic Programs and Administration, C-LEAF

F. Scott Kieff Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law; Director, Planning and Publications, C-LEAF

Full-Time Faculty

Susan L. Karamanian Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Gregory E. Maggs Interim Dean and Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program

Jeffrey Manns Associate Professor of Law

Dalia Tsuk Mitchell Professor of Law and History

Adjunct Faculty The Business and Finance Law faculty includes more than 50 adjunct faculty members who are prominent legal professionals from leading law firms, nonprofit organizations, U.S. government agencies, and international organizations including: • Basel Institute on Governance • Covington & Burling • Environmental Defense Fund • E*Trade Bank

Michael B. Abramowicz

Thomas Morgan

Professor of Law

Oppenheim Professor of Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law

• Federal Trade Commission

Donald Phillip Rothschild Research Professor of Law

Richard J. Pierce, Jr.

• NFL Players Association

Neil Buchanan

John Andrew Spanogle, Jr.

• Sidley Austin

Professor of Law

William Wallace Kirkpatrick Research Professor of Law

• U.S. Department of Justice

Karen B. Brown

Steve Charnovitz

Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law

Associate Professor of Law

Arthur E. Wilmarth, Jr.

Donald C. Clarke

Professor of Law; Executive Director, C-LEAF

• The Miller & Smith Companies • Repatriation Group International

• U.S. Department of the Navy • U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

David Weaver Research Professor of Law

• U.S. Tax Court

Lawrence A. Cunningham

• Vinson & Elkins

Henry St. George Tucker III Research Professor of Law; Director, C-LEAF in New York

• WilmerHale

Lisa M. Fairfax

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

Leroy Sorenson Merrifield Research Professor of Law; Director, Conference Programs, C-LEAF

• The World Bank

Miriam Galston Associate Professor of Law

Susan R. Jones Professor of Clinical Law

TOP: The Honorable Gary Gensler (center), Chairman of the U.S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission, served as keynote speaker at a recent C-LEAF symposium on the Dodd-Frank Act.

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BOTTOM: Professor Arthur Wilmarth (far left) with guests at a C-LEAF symposium.


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Environmental and Energy Law LL.M. students engage in hands-on work both in the legal world and in the natural world.


Environmental and Energy Law Degree Programs: Energy and Environmental Law Environmental Law Government Procurement and Environmental Law International Environmental Law Established at the beginning of the modern environmental law era, GW’s Environmental and Energy Law Program has been at the forefront of education in the field for more than 40 years. Today, the program is expanding to provide the next generation of environmental and energy lawyers with the tools they need to tackle the local, national, and international challenges facing the planet and its inhabitants, including climate change, fisheries depletion, air pollution, water scarcity, and the development of new sources of energy.

Located in Washington, DC, where environmental and energy law policy is debated and created, GW Law allows students to gain firsthand experience inside and outside of the classroom. With the recent growth in our energy law program, students now can explore the connection between energy law and critical issues of public importance including national security, project financing, siting of new facilities, and the impact of climate change on energy production.

Inside the classroom, students benefit from the expertise of talented teachers with years of practical experience. Outside the classroom, students gain exposure to currently debated topics through field placements and a variety of conferences and other opportunities. GW Law serves as host and co-sponsor of the annual Conference on the Law of Demand Response and regularly hosts myriad energy law events such as an Energy Law career panel. In addition, members of GW Law’s Journal of Energy and Environmental Law enhance their legal research and writing skills, while having the opportunity to become published legal authors.

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Environmental and Energy Law Degree Programs

Curriculum Requirements Energy and Environmental Law Energy is at the forefront of the public policy debate on issues ranging from environmental protection to national security, and the Energy and Environmental Law concentration provides students with the academic background needed to enter this growing field of law. It also offers students the unique opportunity to serve as interns with federal agencies such as the Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as well as some of the nation’s leading energy nonprofit organizations.

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.* For U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include four credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 credits in the field of study are required. Students are encouraged to write a thesis. Air Pollution Control

Environmental Negotiations

Atomic Energy Law

International Climate Change Law

Energy and the Environment

International Project Finance

Energy Law and Regulation

Oil and Gas Law

Environmental and Energy Policy Practicum (energy-related projects)

Water Pollution Control

Property will also be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 16 credits required in the field. *

Environmental Law The Environmental Law field gives students flexibility in planning their programs of study, allowing them to choose from a substantial number of environmental law courses.

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.** For U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include completion of Air Pollution Control, Water Pollution Control, and Control of Hazardous Waste (RCRA & CERCLA). In addition, this requirement must include four credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For non-U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include completion of one of the following courses: Air Pollution Control, Water Pollution Control, or Control of Hazardous Waste (RCRA & CERCLA). Non-U.S. law school graduates may enroll in Environmental Law, which will count toward the 16-credit Environmental Law curriculum requirement.** In addition, this requirement must include two credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 credits in the field of study are required. Students are encouraged to write a thesis. Advanced International Trade Law

Regulation of Toxic Substances Risk

Air Pollution Control

Environmental Issues in Business Transactions

Atomic Energy Law

Environmental Law Seminar

Trade and Sustainable Development

Coastal, Navigation, and Wetlands Resource Law

Environmental Lawyering

Water Pollution Control

Environmental Negotiations

Wildlife and Ecosystems Law

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA)

Environmental Protection and Human Rights

Energy and the Environment

Federal Facilities Environmental Law Issues

Energy Law and Regulation Environment and Energy Policy Practicum

Graduate Environmental Placement

Environmental and Toxic Torts

International Environmental Law

Environmental Crimes

International Trade Law

Environmental Crimes Project

Natural Resources Law

International Climate Change Law

Oil and Gas Law

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Sustainable Regional Growth Seminar

Torts and Property will also be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 16 credits required in the field. **


Government Procurement and Environmental Law The Government Procurement and Environmental Law field addresses the environmental work performed by governments at the federal, state, and local levels using government contracts and recognizes that many firms doing business with the government have legal problems that involve both contracting and environmental laws.

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required. For U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include four credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 credits in the field are required. Students are encouraged to write a thesis. Air Pollution Control

Government Contracts Cost and Pricing

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA)

Performance of Government Contracts Water Pollution Control

Formation of Government Contracts

International Environmental Law The International Environmental Law field was developed in recognition of the increasing focus of environmental policy on issues of global concern, from international trade to global climate change.

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.** For U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include four credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For non-U.S. law school graduates, two credits graded on the basis of a research paper are required. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 credit hours in the field are required. Students are encouraged to write a thesis. Non-U.S. law school graduates may enroll in Environmental Law, which will count toward the 16-credit Environmental Law curriculum requirement. Advanced International Trade Law

International Environmental Law

Air Pollution Control

International Law

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA)

International Negotiations

Environmental and Energy Policy Practicum (international project)

International Business Transactions

Human Rights and Environmental Protection

Trade and Sustainable Development

International Climate Change Law

International Trade Law

Torts and Property will also be available; only non-U.S. law school graduates who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 16 credits required in the field. **

International Organizations Water Pollution Control

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin.

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Environmental and Energy Law Degree Programs

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Associate Dean LeRoy C. (Lee) Paddock Associate Dean for Environmental Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Full-Time Faculty

Dinah L. Shelton

• Fish & Richardson

Manatt/Ahn Professor Emeritus of International Law

• Greenberg Traurig

Jonathan Turley J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law; Director, Environmental Law Advocacy Center; Executive Director, Project for Older Prisoners

Steve Charnovitz

Adjunct Faculty

Robert L. Glicksman J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Environmental Law

Robin L. Juni Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Sean D. Murphy Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law

Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law

• Paul Hastings • Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman • Sidley Austin • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers • U.S. Department of Energy

Associate Professor of Law

Richard J. Pierce, Jr.

• Holland & Knight

The Environmental and Energy Law Program includes more than 20 adjunct faculty members who are prominent practitioners in the field. They come from leading law firms, nonprofit organizations, U.S. government agencies, and international organizations including: • American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

• U.S. Department of Justice • U.S. Department of the Navy • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency • Van Ness Feldman • The World Bank

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

• Cohen Milstein • Environmental Defense Fund • Environmental Law Institute

“My GW Law education solidified my expertise in environmental law, which is why I’m now litigating matters on behalf of the state of Maryland.” — Roberta R. James, LL.M. ’08

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RIGHT: Associate Dean Paddock (far left, second row from bottom) with the International Student Energy Research Project contingent.


Special Programs: Environmental and Energy Law Degree Programs Environmental and Energy Policy Practicum Students conduct in-depth law and policy development work on behalf of environmental or energy nonprofit organizations or government agencies, working closely with the client organization or agency to research substantial policy issues. The research is expected to lead to rule comments, a white paper, policy recommendations, draft legislation, revised organization procedures, or other similar policy outcomes. Projects have included work for the World Wildlife Fund; The Nature Conservancy; Environmental Integrity Project; National Wildlife Federation; U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corporation; United Nations Institute for Training and Research; and the Solar Energy Industry Association of Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, among others.

Environmental Law Advocacy Center Operating under the direction of Professor Jonathan Turley, the Environmental Law Advocacy Center comprises three independent projects: the Environmental Crimes Project, the Shapiro Environmental Law Clinic, and the

Environmental Legislative Group. The Environmental Law Advocacy Center enables J.D. and LL.M. students to work on international, national, and local issues in areas ranging from environmental justice to community outreach programs. Students may focus on litigation as part of the Shapiro Clinic or on a variety of special projects such as “white papers” and investigations as part of the Environmental Crimes Project, which works exclusively in the area of environmental criminal violations.

Graduate Environmental Placement Students can individualize their degree programs through internships with government agencies or nonprofit organizations concerned with environmental issues. This is a valuable tool for students with specialized interests, and it can be used to augment the student’s thesis research. Students can engage in legal analysis and policy formulation at the White House Council on Environmental Quality; the Environmental Protection Agency; the Departments of Justice, Energy, Interior, and Defense; or nonprofit environmental organizations.

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Professor Steve Schooner with student


Government Procurement Law Government Procurement and Environmental Law: see Environmental and Energy Law

Established in 1960 by Professors Emeritus Ralph C. Nash Jr. and John Cibinic Jr., GW’s Government Procurement Law Program is the only one of its kind in the United States and is recognized as a leading program in this field around the world. As governments in the United States and abroad increasingly effectuate public policy through contracting, the program’s internationally known faculty, myriad curricular offerings, and cutting-edge public programs are at the forefront of innovation in this crucial area of law. In addition to its rigorous academic course of study, the Government Procurement Law Program also publishes the Public Contract Law Journal and administers the McKenna Long & Aldridge “Gilbert A. Cuneo” Government Contracts Moot Court Competition.

Government procurement law continues to interest policymakers, corporations, and legal employers. As the global marketplace becomes more fluid and integrated, knowledge of international and comparative public procurement becomes increasingly vital. The evolution of the World Trade Organization and the growth of the European Union, which boasts a public procurement market exceeding one trillion euros annually, have sparked fresh dialogue about the role of public procurement for both developing and developed countries.

The full-time faculty of GW’s Government Procurement Law Program—Professors William Kovacic, Steven Schooner, Joshua Schwartz, and Christopher Yukins, as well as Associate Dean Daniel I. Gordon—offer students years of experience in the federal government and the private sector. The program curriculum includes a group of core courses, supplemented by seminars that provide topicality by covering areas of long-standing interest as well as those chosen in response to current developments in the field. The program also offers colloquia and symposia addressing evolving issues and presenting esteemed speakers from academia, government, and private practice.

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Government Procurement Law

Curriculum Requirements A minimum of 14 credits from the following courses is required,* including four credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 10 credits from the following courses are required. U.S. law school graduates enrolled in the program are expected to complete a thesis. Waiver of the thesis may be granted by the program directors. The program curriculum includes a group of core courses that all LL.M. degree candidates are expected to take. In addition to participating in the Moot Court Competition, students are advised to take one or more of the government contracts seminar courses offered each year.

Core Courses

Elective Courses

Comparative Public Procurement

Government Contracts Seminar

Formation of Government Contracts

Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Law Seminar

Government Contracts Advocacy Government Contracts Cost and Pricing Performance of Government Contracts

Graduate Government Contracts Placement

Contracts I and Contracts II also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 14 credits required in the field.

*

The Thesis and Research Opportunities LL.M. students who elect to write a thesis do so under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The student’s faculty adviser assists in identifying and selecting an appropriate topic and works with the student on developing the focus and direction of the thesis. The thesis represents the culmination of students’ formal academic study and challenges them to develop innovative expertise as they synthesize and rationalize existing doctrine, critique the state of the law, and advance carefully grounded proposals for reform. Program faculty members also are available to assist students in identifying publication opportunities for their theses. A number of theses are published in the Public Contract Law Journal, Public Procurement Law Review, and other major periodicals. Theses also are eligible for the American Bar Association Public Contract Section’s annual writing competition and the prizes awarded to the winners of that competition. Additional opportunities for in-depth research are provided through the government contracts seminar courses, which require the preparation of a research paper. For many of these papers, students may select and pursue a topic of their choosing, further developing their expertise in an area of particular interest. Student research is supported by the unique resources available to the Law School, including: (a) the unparalleled collection of government procurement materials found in GW’s Jacob Burns Law Library, (b) a research specialist with expertise in the field of procurement law, and (c) access to government agencies and other institutions located in Washington, DC.

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin.

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RIGHT: Dean Dan Gordon (center) and Professor Steve Schooner (right) greet John S. Pachter, J.D. ‘66, LL.M. ‘70, a judge for the semi-finals of the 2012 McKenna Long & Aldridge “Gilbert A. Cuneo” Government Contracts Moot Court Competition.


Special Programs: Government Procurement Law McKenna Long & Aldridge “Gilbert A. Cuneo” Government Contracts Moot Court Competition The McKenna Long & Aldridge “Gilbert A. Cuneo” Government Contracts Moot Court Competition is an annual intrascholastic competition open to both J.D. and LL.M. students. Each participant has the opportunity to argue both sides of a government contracts case before senior practitioners, including sitting judges from the various Boards of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. The final round is usually argued in the ceremonial courtroom of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The competition problem and the best briefs are published each year in the Public Contract Law Journal.

The Public Contract Law Journal The Public Contract Law Journal, which is produced jointly by the Law School and the Public Contract Law Section of the American Bar Association, is the premier journal read by practitioners of government procurement law. The journal, published quarterly, is edited and managed by J.D. and LL.M. students.

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Government Procurement Law

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Associate Dean

Full-time Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

Daniel I. Gordon

Jessica L. Clark

Associate Dean for Government Procurement Law Studies

Associate Professor of Legal Research and Writing; Associate Director, Legal Research and Writing Program; Co-Director, Scholarly Writing Program

The Government Procurement Law Program includes adjunct faculty members who are prominent legal professionals in the field. They come from leading law firms, nonprofit organizations, U.S. government agencies, and international organizations including:

Co-Directors

Laura A. Dickinson

Steven L. Schooner

Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law

Nash and Cibinic Professor of Government Procurement Law

William E. Kovacic

Joshua I. Schwartz E.K. Gubin Professor of Government Contracts Law; Faculty Chair, Presidential Merit Scholars Program

Christopher R. Yukins Professor of Government Contracts Law

• Government Accountability Office

Global Competition Professor of Law and Policy; Director, Competition Law Center

• U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Karen Da Ponte Thornton

• U.S. Department of Energy

Associate Professor of Legal Research and Writing; Coordinator, Scholarly Writing Program

Jessica Tillipman Assistant Dean for Field Placement and Professorial Lecturer in Law

• U.S. Department of Agriculture • U.S. Department of Justice • U.S. Department of the Navy • The World Bank • World Trade Organization

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

“The Government Procurement Law Program was transformative. Even with a few years of experience under my belt, the program helped fill in gaps in my knowledge, engage a whole new network of practitioners, and energize my scholarly writing. You can’t find a better group of professors in this field.” —Mark J. Nackman, LL.M. ’11 28

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RIGHT: Professor Christopher Yukins greets alumna Jennifer S. Zucker, LL.M. ‘07, at the annual Government Procurement Program Alumni and Friends Luncheon.


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Judge Paul Michel, former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, presented the fall 2012 A. Sidney Katz Lecture. 30 GW Law  | graduate law programs


Intellectual Property Law GW Law has been a national leader in intellectual property education and scholarship for more than 100 years. In fact, when the Law School established a master’s of patent law program in 1895, its alumni already had written the patents for Bell’s telephone, Mergenthaler’s linotype machine, and Eastman’s roll film camera, among hundreds of other inventions; dozens more alumni had worked in the U.S. Patent Office. Today, GW Law is internationally known for its intellectual property law program, with significant strength in the areas of patents, copyright, trademark, communications, computer and Internet regulation, electronic commerce, and genetics and medicine.

In the early 1950s, long before the term “intellectual property” was in wide use, GW Law recognized the close relations between patents, trademarks, and copyrights by establishing at the Law School the Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Foundation, the country’s first research institute in any of those areas. In recent years, as intellectual property law issues have become more tightly interwoven with issues in commercial law, computer and Internet regulation, communications law, and the regulation of medicine, GW Law has been among the first to add faculty and courses in those areas. At the same time, we have not neglected our core strength in patents and have continued to develop an unparalleled patent law faculty and curriculum. The result: an Intellectual Property Law LL.M. Program that is second to none and that equips students to respond successfully to the innovations of the coming century.

The LL.M. degree program is designed for both U.S. and non-U.S. law school graduates interested in intensive study of U.S., international, and comparative intellectual property law. Many U.S. attorneys complete the program to gain the specialized knowledge necessary to practice, teach, or regulate in a legal field that has been one of the hottest and most interesting for the last several decades. Many non-U.S. attorneys complete the program to get their first in-depth look at U.S. intellectual property law, while qualifying to take a bar examination that will enable them to practice in one of the United States, such as New York.

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Intellectual Property Law

Curriculum Requirements A minimum of 14 credits from the following courses is required,* including two credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 10 credits from the following courses are required.

Advanced Trademark Law

Intellectual Property Antitrust Seminar

Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law Seminar

Intellectual Property Law Seminar

Chemical and Biotech Patent Law

International and Comparative Patent Law

Computer Law

International Copyright Law

Copyright Law

International Intellectual Property

Design Law

Law in Cyberspace

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission

Licensing of Intellectual Property Rights

Entertainment Law The Federal Circuit Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar Intellectual Asset Management

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Patent Appellate Practice Patent Enforcement Patent Law Patent Strategies and Practice Trademark Law and Unfair Competition

Property also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law school degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 14 credits required in the field. *

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin.


Special Programs: Intellectual Property Law Field Placement

The Dean Dinwoodey Center

The Washington, DC area has the country’s highest concentration of internship opportunities with nonprofit and trade groups, courts, and government agencies specializing in intellectual property, including the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Copyright Office, U.S. International Trade Commission, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. Through field placements, students gain mentorship from members of the local intellectual property community, as well as up to four hours of academic credit (five hours of work per week are required for each credit). GW Law’s Intellectual Property Law Program maintains a list of approved placements.

The Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies, directed by Professors Martin Adelman and Robert Brauneis, sponsors research, lectures, conferences, and activities on a broad range of intellectual property issues. The center is funded in part by the Bureau of National Affairs in memory of its founder, Dean Dinwoodey, LL.B. ‘29.

Research and Writing Each LL.M. student must write either a thesis for credit or a substantial research paper in connection with a seminar or independent study project for at least two credits. Our students have published their work not only in general law reviews in the United States (including GW’s Law Review and International Law Review) but also in specialized journals such as the American Intellectual Property Law Association Quarterly Journal; Journal of the Patent and Trademark Office Society; International Review of Industrial Property, Copyright, and Competition Law; and the counterpart German language journals of the Max Planck Institute of Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich.

LEFT: Each summer, GW Law hosts the Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program. Here, Professor Robert Brauneis (front row, left) poses with students outside the European Patent Office.

Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program Participants in the Munich Intellectual Property Summer Program—held each July at the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center in Munich, Germany—study current intellectual property issues with a focus on international law in the city known as Europe’s intellectual property capital. Leading academics in the field offer courses on topics such as international patent law, copyright law, and Internet law. Special lectures and visits to institutions such as the European Patent Office are part of the program.

“As a practicing patent lawyer on a year’s sabbatical, I chose GW Law for its course roster and its location in the nation’s capital. I was gratified by the quality of teaching, the accomplished faculty, and the excellent facilities.” –Sunita K. Sreedharan, LL.M. ’06 GW Law  | graduate law programs

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Intellectual Property Law

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Associate Dean and Co-Director

Full-time Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

Michael B. Abramowicz

The adjunct faculty for the LL.M. program in Intellectual Property Law includes approximately 25 faculty members who are prominent legal experts in the field. They come from leading law firms, nonprofit organizations, U.S. government agencies, and international organizations including:

Professor of Law

John M. Whealan Intellectual Property Advisory Board Associate Dean for Intellectual Property Law Studies; Co-Director, Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies

Orin S. Kerr Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law

F. Scott Kieff Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, Business and Finance Law Program; Director, Planning and Publications, C-LEAF

Co-Directors Martin J. Adelman Theodore and James Pedas Family Professor of Intellectual Property and Technology Law; Co-Director, Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies

Dawn C. Nunziato

Robert Brauneis

Jonathan R. Siegel

Professor of Law; Co-Director, Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies; Member, Managing Board, Munich Intellectual Property Law Center

Professor of Law

Roger E. Schechter Professor of Law

F. Elwood and Eleanor Davis Research Professor of Law

• Covington & Burling • Greenberg Traurig • Max Planck Institute of Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law (Germany) • Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit • U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Daniel J. Solove John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law

Sonia M. Suter

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

Professor of Law

“I was impressed with the networking opportunities the program presented: I took classes taught by a former PTO director, a former Register of Copyrights, a former Solicitor at the USPTO, and the Chief Judge of the Federal Circuit.” —Josh Miller, LL.M. ’11

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RIGHT: Chief Judge Randall R. Rader, J.D. ‘78, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, serves on the adjunct faculty at the Law School.


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GW Law hosted a historic discussion between judges from the U.S. Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights. Pictured here: European Court of Human Rights Judge Lech Garlicki (left) and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.


International and Comparative Law International Environmental Law: see Environmental and Energy Law

The International and Comparative Law Program at GW Law prepares the next generation of leaders in the legal profession to work in a complex and dynamic world, one defined largely by the ability of professionals to solve problems that increasingly involve multiple jurisdictions and a wide range of international and comparative law issues. The program offers one of the most extensive international law curricula in the country. Courses in the areas of public international law, international human rights, international trade and business law, international commercial law, foreign direct investment, international arbitration, and comparative law are focal points of the program. The curriculum is continually updated to keep pace with developments in the field.

GW Law’s approach to international and comparative law is unique, giving students the tools and resources to rise to the challenges of the demanding legal market. Armed with a firm grounding in legal theory and doctrine, students learn how to put their knowledge to practical use. The program boasts one of the largest and most distinguished full-time faculties in the field, with faculty members who are recognized both for their scholarly accomplishments and for their real-world involvement in defining relevant legal standards.

A vital part of the GW Law experience is having international and comparative law available at every turn. Because of its location, the Law School is able to draw on a distinguished corps of adjunct faculty members—noted practitioners, government officials, and jurists who offer seminars in their fields of specialization—and to attract distinguished scholars and lawyers from around the world.

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International and Comparative Law

Curriculum Requirements A minimum of 12 credits from the following courses is required,* including two credits graded on the basis of a research paper. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses are required. In the application process, preference will be given to applicants who, in addition to having outstanding academic qualifications, have special international experience or interests and a working knowledge of one or more foreign languages.

International Business and Trade Law

Public International Law

Comparative Constitutional Law

Advanced International Trade Law

International Climate Change Law

Comparative Law

Chinese Business Law

International Criminal Law

Comparative Law Seminar

Comparative Public Procurement

International Environmental Law

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission

International Family Law

Comparative Law Chinese Business Law

Islamic Law

Foreign Direct Investment

Law of the European Union

International Arbitration

Law of Japan Law of the People’s Republic of China Law of Race and Slavery

International Banking International Business Transactions International Business Transactions Seminar

Traditional Jewish Civil Law

Human Rights Law Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights— Law and Practice **

Human Rights Lawyering Human Rights and Refugee Law** Immigration Law I Immigration Law II

Law of the Sea Law of War Nation Building and the Rule of Law National Security Law Public International Law Seminar

International Competition Law Regime

U.S. Foreign Relations Law

International Intellectual Property

Human Rights in the Marketplace

International Organizations

International and Comparative Patent Law

Gender, Sexuality, and International Human Rights Law**

**

International Litigation

Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy

International Copyright Law

Human Rights and Military Responses to Terrorism**

International Law

International Commercial Law

Fundamentals of International Human Rights Law **

Human Rights Advocacy and Dissemination**

Counterterrorism Law

International Finance International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism International Negotiations International Project Finance International Taxation International Trade Law

Space Law

Conflict of Laws also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law school degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 12 credits required in the field.

*

Oxford–GW Summer Program in International Human Rights Law courses.

**

Trade Remedy Law Trade and Sustainable Development U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation

Immigration Law Clinic International Human Rights Clinic International Human Rights of Women International Law of Human Rights Refugee and Asylum Law Regional Protection of Human Rights War, Peace, and Human Rights**

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin. 38

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Special Programs: International and Comparative Law Oxford–GW Summer Program in International Human Rights Law

Gruber Foundation International Law Fellow

Complementing and enriching the program is the Oxford–GW Summer Program in International Human Rights Law, held in Oxford each summer. The program is intended to prepare students to contribute to the improvement of human rights conditions in their homelands and around the world.

A generous award from the Gruber Foundation has enabled GW Law to provide funding to a graduate who has been selected to clerk at the International Court of Justice in The Hague.

International Law Society

Students in the Immigration Clinic handle immigration law matters under faculty supervision. Because the clinic’s clients come from all over the world, cultural sensitivity is essential and diverse language skills are welcome.

LL.M. students are encouraged to join the Law School’s International Law Society (ILS), one of the largest student groups on campus. ILS regularly hosts lectures and social events, as well as an annual International Law Week during the spring semester that culminates with a gala at one of the embassies in Washington, DC.

International Human Rights Clinic

Human Rights Law Society

The International Human Rights Clinic introduces students to the practice of law in the cross-cultural context of international human rights litigation and advocacy.

Another active student group, the GW Human Rights Law Society hosts a wide range of events related to human rights and also hosts an annual conference.

Competition Law Center

Global Internet Freedom and Human Rights Distinguished Speaker Series

Immigration Clinic

Directed by Professor William Kovacic, the Competition Law Center sponsors research and promotes education in the field of competition law—also known as antitrust law—particularly relating to issues of international enforcement and the harmonization of national laws and policies.

Established in 2011 with the generous support of the Microsoft Corporation, the series brings to the Law School prominent experts in the fields of free speech and human rights.

International and Comparative Law Colloquium Held each month, the colloquium features a speaker who presents a paper on a topic in the field. All members of the Law School community are encouraged to attend.

“Discussing international disputes and international law simply becomes more real when you have classmates from all over the globe. You get a real feel for the legal and cultural perspectives that we all bring to the table.” –Elin Hofverberg, LL.M.’11

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International and Comparative Law

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Associate Dean Susan L. Karamanian Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Full-Time Faculty Alberto M. Benítez Professor of Clinical Law

Paul Schiff Berman Manatt/Ahn Professor of Law

Francesca Bignami Professor of Law

Eleanor M. Brown Associate Professor of Law

David Fontana Associate Professor of Law

Renée Lettow Lerner Associate Professor of Law

• Blank Rome • Covington & Burling

Michael J. Matheson

• Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Visiting Research Professor of Law

• Environmental Defense Fund

Sean D. Murphy

• Environmental Law Institute

Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law

• Federal Aviation Administration

Peter Raven-Hansen

• GW’s Elliott School of International Affairs

Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program

• Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

Thomas J. Schoenbaum

• International Centre for Asset Recovery

Visiting Research Professor of Law

Dinah L. Shelton

Karen B. Brown

Manatt/Ahn Professor Emeritus of International Law

Donald Phillip Rothschild Research Professor of Law

John Andrew Spanogle, Jr.

• Jones Day • Mobil Oil Française • Overseas Private Investment Corporation • Sidley Austin

Thomas J. Buergenthal

William Wallace Kirkpatrick Research Professor of Law

Lobingier Professor Emeritus of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence

Ralph G. Steinhardt

• U.S. Department of Energy • U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Visiting Associate Professor of Law

Professor of Law and International Affairs; Arthur Selwyn Miller Research Professor of Law

Arturo Carrillo

Joseph Straus

• U.S. Department of the Navy

Jay Alexander Hilton Butler

Professor of Clinical Law

Steve Charnovitz Associate Professor of Law

Marshall Coyne Visiting Professor of International Law

Edward T. Swaine Professor of Law

Donald C. Clarke David Weaver Research Professor of Law

Professor of Law, of History, and of Sociology; Harold Paul Green Research Professor of Law

Laura A. Dickinson Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law

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• U.S. Department of Defense

• U.S. Department of Justice • U.S. Department of State • Vinson & Elkins • Vital Voices Global Partnership • The World Bank

Adjunct Faculty

Robert J. Cottrol

40

• Baker & Miller

The International and Comparative Law Program includes more than 35 adjunct faculty members who are prominent legal professionals. They come from leading law firms, nonprofit organizations, U.S. government agencies, and international organizations including:

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty. TOP: Farhana Khera, Executive Director of Muslim Advocates, participated in the GW Law-hosted panel discussion “Confronting Discrimination in the Post-9/11 Era: Challenges and Opportunities 10 Years After.” BOTTOM: Professors Edward Swaine (left) and Dinah Shelton (right) along with Dean Susan Karamanian judged the finals of the Grenadier International Law Moot Court Competition.


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Dean Alfreda Robinson


Litigation and Dispute Resolution GW Law’s Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program offers comprehensive instruction in the wide range of professional skills and values that lawyers need to successfully represent clients in a legal profession that is increasingly competitive and demanding. Geared to accommodate the schedules of working professionals, the program is led by leaders who are respected nationwide by fellow academics and by practicing lawyers and judges. Faculty members challenge students to develop and enhance the lawyering skills required for effective representation in today’s complex practice of law, and the program provides students with opportunities to put those skills into action.

A successful lawyer—whether a litigator or not—must master skills associated with trial, negotiation, settlement, mediation, and alternative dispute resolution, including international dispute resolution. GW Law’s Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program is dedicated to providing comprehensive instruction in professional skills and values. The curriculum complements the theoretical study of the law with actual experience in interviewing clients; drafting, preparing, and filing pleadings and motions; investigating facts; appearing before government agencies; mediating; arbitrating; and conducting trials before judges and juries. All this takes place in the heart of the Washington, DC, legal community, just minutes away from dozens of important national and international organizations. That close proximity means GW Law students not only learn professional legal skills, but they also use them in meaningful ways.

Accommodating the Working Lawyer’s Schedule Each course (except the College of Trial Advocacy) meets in one three-hour session per week during the 13-week semester. Classes are held in the evenings, and students may choose to complete the program in either one or two years.

Individualized Instruction Trial advocacy and dispute resolution skills can be mastered only through hours of training and practice. Individualized instruction is the most effective way to convey the full spectrum of trial advocacy and dispute resolution skills and is an absolute necessity to ensure that each student is making progress. To guarantee a high level of contact between faculty and students, enrollment is limited to a small number of graduate students.

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Litigation and Dispute Resolution

Curriculum Requirements The College of Trial Advocacy and 21 credits from the following courses are required.

Advanced Evidence

Ethics in Adjudication and Settlement

Systems Design

Advanced Trial Advocacy

International Dispute Resolution

Pre-Trial Practice in Civil Cases

The American Jury

Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Pre-Trial Practice in Criminal Cases

Arbitration

Negotiation and Conflict Management

BOTTOM: Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program Co-Directors Professor Stephen Saltzburg and Dean Alfreda Robinson (center at podium) with adjunct faculty members (left to right) James Falk, Sr., Robert Weinberg, Francis Gilligan, and Zol D. Rainey.

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Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Associate Dean and Co-Director

Adjunct Faculty

Alfreda Robinson Associate Dean for Trial Advocacy and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Co-Director

The Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program’s adjunct faculty members are sitting judges on U.S. courts and prominent legal professionals from leading law firms and U.S. government agencies, including: Ezio Borchini

Stephen A. Saltzburg

Law Offices of Ezio Borchini

Wallace and Beverley Woodbury University Professor of Law

David Bowen Grant Thornton

James Falk, Sr. Falk Law Firm

Francis Gilligan Office of Military Commissions, U.S. Department of Defense

Judge Marian Blank Horn

Zol D. Rainey Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Robert Rhoad Crowell & Moring

James Schaller Jackson & Campbell

Sandra Sellers Technology Mediation Services

The Honorable Ricardo M. Urbina (retired)

Robert Weinberg Williams & Connolly

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

U.S. Court of Federal Claims

Judge John Mott Judge Rhonda Winston Judge Melvin Wright Superior Court for the District of Columbia

“The experienced faculty and real-world curriculum challenge students at every turn to develop and enhance the skills they need to succeed in the practice of law.” —Adam M. Foslid, J.D. ‘03 , LL.M. ‘04 Shareholder, Greenberg, Traurig

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Professor Sean Murphy meets with a student.


National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law The National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program highlights GW Law’s unique strengths: a nationally recognized faculty, a comprehensive curriculum, and access to the extensive Washington, DC, foreign relations and national security law community. The nation’s capital hosts national security agencies and institutions ranging from the White House National Security Council and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and the U.S. Institute of Peace. The dozens of research centers and think tanks that conduct research in foreign relations and national security law include GW’s on-campus National Security Archive, which provides a trove of declassified documents pertaining to national security for advanced research. Easy access to Capitol Hill allows students the opportunity to observe the work of House and Senate subcommittees firsthand. This practice area, which has grown exponentially over the past decade, explores the nature and origins of the federal government’s foreign relations powers and the U.S. law of national security and counterterrorism. The field includes law on the use of the armed forces at home and abroad, intelligence operations abroad, counterterrorism, electronic surveillance and privacy, cybersecurity, homeland security, disaster relief and crisis management, immigration, nonproliferation, treatment of detainees, the law of war, congressional investigations and oversight, classified information, and related topics. GW Law’s full-time faculty members have authored four of the leading casebooks in the field, and its full-time and adjunct faculty include: the U.S. Department of Justice’s leading counterterrorism expert and advocate; the former general counsel of FEMA; leading experts on computer crime and cyber law issues and on privacy and surveillance; a draftsman of the Military Rules of Evidence (and a member of the American Bar Association’s Task Force on Terrorism

and the Law); the head of appellate litigation for the military commissions prosecution team; and a U.S. Department of Justice attorney who has litigated leading foreign relations law cases. While several U.S. law schools offer one or two courses in this field, few others approach the number of courses available at GW Law. Students interested primarily in counterterrorism law, for example, can take Counterterrorism Law along with Homeland Security Law and Policy, Information Privacy Law, and Immigration Law for a thorough and up-to-date grounding in the evolving field. In addition, those students may participate outside the classroom in panel discussions, seminars, and conferences featuring leading practitioners of counterterrorism law. Students interested primarily in foreign relations law, for another example, can take U.S. Foreign Relations Law, the Law of War, and International Criminal Law, among other courses, in addition to participating in numerous opportunities for learning and networking outside the classroom. GW Law  | graduate law programs

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National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

Curriculum Requirements A minimum of 14 credit hours from the following courses is required,* including two credits graded on the basis of a research paper; this curriculum requirement must include National Security Law and U.S. Foreign Relations Law. For students who choose to write a thesis instead of a research paper, Thesis and a minimum of 10 credits from the following courses are required.

Core Courses

International Criminal Law International Law

National Security Law

International Law of Human Rights

U.S. Foreign Relations Law

International Litigation Law of the Sea

Elective Courses

Law of Separation of Powers

Constitutional Law I and Constitutional Law II also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law school degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 14 credits required in the field.

*

Law of War

Comparative Military Law

Military Justice

Computer Crime Congressional Investigations Seminar Counterterrorism Law

Nation Building and the Rule of Law National Security Law Seminar Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy

Cybersecurity Law Disaster Law Homeland Security Law and Policy Human Rights Lawyering

Public International Law Seminar Refugee and Asylum Law Regional Protection of Human Rights

Immigration Law I

Space Law

Information Privacy Law

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation

Intelligence Law

For course descriptions and a full listing of the Law School curriculum, including courses related to this field, please see the Law School Bulletin.

“I was most impressed by the incorporation of several student ideas into the current program curriculum. It is a display of flexibility and adaptation to a changing legal environment not seen at RIGHT: Professor Peter other institutions.” —Timothy L. Weston, LL.M. ’12 48

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Raven-Hansen meets with program students in a book club discussing program-related books.


Special Programs: National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law National Security Law Moot Court Competition GW Law’s Moot Court Board sponsors the National Security Law Moot Court Competition, an interscholastic competition held every year in Washington, DC. By competing in the nation’s capital, students are able to argue national security issues in front of a distinguished panel

of recognized experts in the field. Past final round judges have included White House counsel, a former director of the CIA, a former general counsel of the National Security Agency (NSA), a former acting attorney general, and federal judges from the district courts and courts of appeals. Preliminary round judges traditionally have been drawn from the national security law community.

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National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

Faculty Full biographical information for full-time faculty members and deans begins on page 52.

Co-Directors

Full-time Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

Gregory E. Maggs

Alberto M. Benítez

Interim Dean and Professor of Law

Professor of Clinical Law

Peter Raven-Hansen

Arturo Carrillo

Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law

Professor of Clinical Law

The adjunct faculty for the LL.M. program in National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law includes prominent professionals in the field from settings including:

Laura A. Dickinson Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law

Orin S. Kerr Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law

Sean D. Murphy Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law

Jeffrey Rosen Professor of Law

Stephen A. Saltzburg

• Federal Emergency Management Agency • U.S. Department of Defense • U.S. Department of Homeland Security • U.S. Department of Justice • U.S. Department of State

Full biographical information for our adjunct faculty members is available at www.law.gwu.edu/faculty.

Wallace and Beverley Woodbury University Professor of Law; Co-Director, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program

Dinah L. Shelton Manatt/Ahn Professor Emeritus of International Law

Daniel J. Solove John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law

Ralph G. Steinhardt Professor of Law and International Affairs; Arthur Selwyn Miller Research Professor of Law

Jonathan Turley J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law; Director, Environmental Law Advocacy Center; Executive Director, Project for Older Prisoners

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RIGHT: Professor Jonathan Turley (left) and students filed a challenge to the Libyan war on behalf of members of Congress.


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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans Michael B. Abramowicz Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., Amherst College J.D., Yale University Professor Abramowicz specializes in law and economics, spanning areas including intellectual property, civil procedure, corporate law, administrative law, and insurance law. His research has been published in numerous law reviews. He also has published a book, Predictocracy: Market Mechanisms for Public and Private Decision Making, with Yale University Press.

Martin J. Adelman Theodore and James Pedas Family Professor of Intellectual Property and Technology Law; Co-Director, Intellectual Property Law Program; Co-Director, Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies

Program Intellectual Property Law

Professor Benítez directs the Immigration Law Clinic and teaches the course in immigration law. He has taught at the law schools of the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM) and the Universidad Panamericana in Mexico City. As a visitor at the William S. Boyd School of Law of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, he helped develop the school’s immigration clinic.

Paul Schiff Berman Manatt/Ahn Professor of Law

PROGRAM International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University J.D., New York University Professor Berman is the former Dean of GW Law and of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. He is the author of numerous books and scholarly journal articles, including Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence for Law Beyond Borders (Cambridge University Press, 2012). For the 2006–07 academic year, he was a Visiting Professor and Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University in the Program in Law and Public Affairs. Previously, he was the Jesse Root Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law.

EDUCATION B.A., M.S., J.D., University of Michigan Professor Adelman has written numerous law review articles on patent law, the economics of patent law, and patent-antitrust law. From 1977 to 1988, he was one of the co-authors and currently is the sole author of Patent Law Perspectives (Matthew Bender). He is a co-author of Cases and Materials on Patent Law (West Group, 1998, 2003).

Alberto M. Benítez

Francesca Bignami Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University M.Sc., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University

Professor of Clinical Law

Programs International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

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Professor Bignami’s expertise is in the expanding field of European Union law. Her writings cover such topics as comparative privacy law, comparative administrative law, and rights and accountability in global governance.


Robert Brauneis Professor of Law; Co-Director, Intellectual Property Law Program; Co-Director, Dean Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Law Studies; Member, Managing Board, Munich Intellectual Property Law Center

Professor Brown has co-authored a book on international tax transactions, co-edited a book on tax reform, and written numerous articles and book chapters. In addition, she has delivered many presentations on federal taxation. She is a member of the American Law Institute and the International Fiscal Association.

Program Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz J.D., Harvard University Professor Brauneis’s interests include property, copyright, trademark, and intellectual property theory. He is a member of the managing boards of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center and the Creative and Innovative Economy Center. From 2007 to 2008, he served as president of the Giles S. Rich American Inn of Court.

Eleanor M. Brown Associate Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.S., Brown University M.Phil., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University Professor Brown came to GW Law from Harvard Law School, where she was the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow. She is also a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation. She writes about the intersection of U.S. immigration and global development policies. Professor Brown is a Rhodes Scholar and a former law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Karen B. Brown Donald Phillip Rothschild Research Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University J.D., LL.M., New York University

Neil Buchanan Professor of Law

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., Vassar College M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University J.D., University of Michigan Professor Buchanan teaches tax law, tax policy, contracts, and law and economics. His research addresses the longterm tax and spending patterns of the federal government, focusing on budget deficits, the national debt, health care costs, and Social Security. He also is engaged in a long-term research project that asks how current policy choices should be shaped by concerns for the interests of future generations.

Thomas J. Buergenthal Lobingier Professor Emeritus of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Bethany College J.D., New York University LL.M., S.J.D., Harvard University Professor Buergenthal joined the Law School faculty in 1989. In 2000, he was elected to the International Court of Justice in The Hague, where he served for a decade before returning to the Law School in fall 2010. Considered one of the world’s leading international human rights experts, Professor Buergenthal was a Judge and President of the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights as well as President of the Administrative Tribunal of the Inter-American Development Bank. He was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee and the UN Truth Commission for El Salvador.

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED Jay Alexander Hilton Butler Visiting Associate Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University B.A., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University Professor Butler teaches public international law, and his research focuses on regime change and state responsibility. He previously clerked at the International Court of Justice for President Hisashi Owada and Judge Giorgio Gaja. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a Rhodes Scholar.

Arturo Carrillo

Before joining the GW Law faculty, Professor Charnovitz practiced law for six years at WilmerHale. Previously, he was the director of the Global Environment and Trade Study (GETS) at Yale University. He also has served as the policy director of the U.S. Competitiveness Policy Council; a legislative assistant to the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (Wright and Foley); and an analyst at the U.S. Department of Labor, where his assignments included worker rights in U.S. trade negotiations, trade adjustment assistance, and technical cooperation with Saudi Arabia.

Jessica L. Clark Associate Professor of Legal Research and Writing; Associate Director, Legal Research and Writing Program; Co-Director, Scholarly Writing Program

Program Government Procurement Law

Professor of Clinical Law

Programs International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University J.D., The George Washington University LL.M., Columbia University Professor Carrillo has directed the International Human Rights Clinic since 2005. He served as a senior advisor on human rights to the U.S. Agency on International Development in Colombia.

Steve Charnovitz Associate Professor of Law

EDUCATION B.A., Lawrence University M.S.Sc., Syracuse University J.D., The George Washington University Professor Clark spent three years at the Office of the General Counsel, Department of the Navy, as a law clerk and later as assistant counsel. She practiced federal procurement law and federal employment law. During the 2006–07 academic year, she was an adjunct professor in the Legal Research and Writing Program and received the Best Contribution to the Program Award. Her scholarship interests include legal research and writing, law school pedagogy, and federal procurement law and policy.

Donald C. Clarke David Weaver Research Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law Environmental and Energy Law International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., J.D., Yale University M.P.P., Harvard University

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Programs Business and Finance Law International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University M.Sc., University of London J.D., Harvard University


Professor Clarke, a specialist in Chinese law, joined the Law School after teaching at the University of Washington School of Law and at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, as well as practicing for three years at a major international firm with a large China practice. His recent research has focused on Chinese legal institutions and the legal issues presented by China’s economic reforms, and he has published extensively.

Laura A. Dickinson

Robert J. Cottrol

Before joining GW Law, Professor Dickinson was the Foundation Professor of Law and the faculty director of the Center for Law and Global Affairs at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. Her work focuses on human rights, national security, foreign affairs privatization, and qualitative empirical approaches to international law. Her monograph, Outsourcing War and Peace, was published by Yale University Press in 2011.

Professor of Law, of History, and of Sociology; Harold Paul Green Research Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Ph.D., Yale University J.D., Georgetown University A specialist in American legal history, Professor Cottrol’s recent research contrasts the role of law in the development of systems of slavery and racial hierarchy in the United States and Latin America. He has lectured on American law at the Federal Universities of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil and at the University of Buenos Aires and La Universidad del Museo Social in Argentina.

Lawrence A. Cunningham Henry St. George Tucker III Research Professor of Law; Director, C-LEAF in New York

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., University of Delaware J.D., Yeshiva University

Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law

Programs Government Procurement Law International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION A.B., Harvard University J.D., Yale University

Lisa M. Fairfax Leroy Sorenson Merrifield Research Professor of Law; Director, Conference Programs, C-LEAF

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., J.D., Harvard University Professor Fairfax teaches courses in the business area including corporations, securities regulation, and seminars on securities law and corporate transactions. Her scholarly interests include corporate governance matters, shareholder activism, fiduciary obligations, securities fraud, and privatization and education. She is also a contributing author on a book focusing on the legal, social, and ethical implications of the Martha Stewart case and a permanent writer for the blog The Conglomerate.

Professor Cunningham teaches contracts, corporations, and law and accounting. He is the author of Introductory Accounting, Finance and Auditing for Lawyers (West, 5th ed., 2010); co-editor of Corporations and Other Business Organizations (LexisNexis, 7th ed., 2010); and, from 1993 to 2001, was co-editor of the treatise, Corbin on Contracts. His dozen books include The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America and Contracts in the Real World.

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED David Fontana Associate Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., University of Virginia J.D., Yale University Before joining GW Law, Professor Fontana clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He is the author and co-author of papers on constitutional or comparative constitutional law that have been published by leading scholarly journals in law, including the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Columbia Law Review. He writes about constitutional issues for a number of general interest publications, including most frequently The New Republic, and he has consulted with Congress, presidential campaigns, and foreign constitution-drafters on issues of constitutional law.

EDUCATION B.A., Cornell University Ph.D., University of Chicago J.D., Yale University Professor Galston has taught courses on corporations and other business relationships, state debtor and creditor rights and federal bankruptcy law, state and federal law of nonprofits, and jurisprudence. She has written articles and essays in book collections in the areas of legal theory, the history of legal ideas, and public policy issues affecting exempt organizations. She also has served for many years as co-chair of the Subcommittee on Political and Lobbying Activities of the Exempt Organizations Committee of the Tax Section of the American Bar Association.

Robert L. Glicksman J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Environmental Law

Program Environmental and Energy Law

Theresa A. Gabaldon Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law; Co-Director, Business and Finance Law Program; Director, Academic Programs and Administration, C-LEAF

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.S., University of Arizona J.D., Harvard University Before joining GW Law, Professor Gabaldon was a member of the law faculties of the University of Colorado and the University of Arizona. Before entering academia, she was an associate and then a partner with the law firm of Snell & Wilmer in Phoenix. Her areas of specialization are corporate and securities law, contract law, and professional responsibility. Her primary research interests are in the field of securities regulation.

EDUCATION B.A., Union College M.A., Harvard University J.D., Cornell University Professor Glicksman is an internationally recognized expert on environmental, natural resources, and administrative law issues. His areas of expertise include environmental, natural resources, administrative, and property law. Before joining GW Law, he taught at the University of Kansas School of Law, where he was the Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professor of Law in 1995. He is co-author of two law school casebooks, Environmental Protection: Law and Policy (Aspen Publishers, 6th ed.) and Administrative Law: Agency Action in Legal Context (Foundation Press), as well as numerous chapters and articles.

Daniel I. Gordon Associate Dean for Government Procurement Law Studies

Miriam Galston

Program Government Procurement Law

Associate Professor of Law

Program Business and Finance Law

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EDUCATION B.A., Brandeis University M.Phil., University of Oxford J.D., Harvard University


Before joining GW Law, Dean Gordon was the Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy, a position to which he was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate. Before that, he worked for 17 years in the Office of General Counsel of the Government Accountability Office, where he began as a line attorney, rising through the ranks and ultimately holding the positions of Deputy General Counsel and then Acting General Counsel. He also served as a court law clerk at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and then practiced for a number of years with a private law firm in Washington, DC.

Susan R. Jones Professor of Clinical Law

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., Brandeis University M.A., J.D., Antioch School of Law Professor Jones is the supervising attorney of the Small Business and Community Economic Development Clinic. Before joining the Law School, she was a private civil and administrative law practitioner. She has held teaching positions at City University of New York Law School at Queens College, where she taught lawyering skills and clinical simulations and was the 2004 Haywood Burns Visiting Chair in Civil Rights, as well as at American University’s Washington College of Law and at Antioch School of Law.

Robin L. Juni Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Program Environmental and Energy Law EDUCATION B.A., Hamline University J.D., Harvard University Before joining GW Law, Dean Juni practiced environmental law for almost 20 years. She worked as a trial attorney in the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, then moved to Jones Day, where her practice involved a variety of domestic and international environmental issues.

Susan L. Karamanian Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Programs Business and Finance Law International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.S., Auburn University B.A., University of Oxford J.D., University of Texas Dean Karamanian joined the Law School after a 14-year career at Locke Lord in Dallas, Texas. While in private practice, she represented foreign and domestic clients in a variety of commercial disputes. She also maintained an active pro bono docket, in which she represented inmates on Texas death row in their post-conviction appeals. She has served in many leadership capacities in the American Society of International Law, including having been its Vice President from 1996 to 1998, and is a former President of the Washington Foreign Law Society. She is a Rhodes Scholar and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Orin S. Kerr Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law

Programs Intellectual Property Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.S.E., Princeton University M.S., Stanford University J.D., Harvard University Professor Kerr is the nation’s leading authority on electronic surveillance and a recognized expert on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). He is the author of the casebook Computer Crime Law, as well as Searching and Seizing Computers and Obtaining Electronic Evidence in Criminal Investigations. He posts regularly on national security and surveillance topics at the popular blog The Volokh Conspiracy, available at www.volokh.com.

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED F. Scott Kief

Renée Lettow Lerner

Fred C. Stevenson Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, Business and Finance Law Program; Director, Planning and Publications, C-LEAF

Associate Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology J.D., University of Pennsylvania Professor Kieff joined GW Law in 2009 after serving as a Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, with a secondary appointment in the School of Medicine’s Department of Neurological Surgery. He is the Ray and Louis Knowles Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, where he directs the Project on Commercializing Innovation and serves on Hoover’s Property Rights, Freedom, and Prosperity Task Force. In addition, he is a faculty member of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center at Germany’s Max Planck Institute. President Barack Obama nominated Professor Kieff as a member of the U.S. International Trade Commission in September 2012.

William E. Kovacic Global Competition Professor of Law and Policy; Professor of Law; Director, Competition Law Center

Program Government Procurement Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University J.D., Columbia University Before joining GW Law, Professor Kovacic was a Foundation Professor at the George Mason University School of Law. Previously, he served as General Counsel for the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and from 2006 to 2011, he served as an FTC Commissioner, including, for part of that time, as the Chairman of the Commission. He is a recognized expert in the fields of antitrust law and government contracts law. He has authored or co-authored numerous books and articles in the field. Since 1992, he has served as an adviser on antitrust and consumer protection issues to numerous foreign governments.

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Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Princeton University M.Litt., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University Professor Lerner joined the Law School in 1997, after serving as a law clerk to Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the Supreme Court of the United States and to Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. She later served as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Legal Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice. Professor Lerner’s interests, reflected in her writings, include English and U.S. legal history, civil and criminal procedure, and comparative law.

Gregory E. Maggs Interim Dean and Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program

Programs Business and Finance Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., J.D., Harvard University Dean Maggs teaches mainly in the areas of commercial law, constitutional law, contracts, and counterterrorism law, and he has written extensively on these subjects. He received the Law School’s Distinguished Faculty Service Award in 1997, 1998, 2004, 2005, and 2011 by vote of the classes graduating in these years. Previously, he was a law clerk for Justices Clarence Thomas and Anthony M. Kennedy of the Supreme Court of the United States and for the late Judge Joseph T. Sneed of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.


Jeffrey Manns Associate Professor of Law

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., University of Virginia D.Phil., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University Professor Manns’s teaching and research interests focus on securities regulation, financial institutions, and mergers and acquisitions law. As a law student, he served as a Senior Editor of the Yale Law Journal, and his note on terrorism reinsurance received the Israel H. Peres Prize for the best student publication in the Yale Law Journal. Before joining GW Law, he clerked for the Honorable J. Harvie Willkinson III of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and practiced law in Washington, DC, most recently with Latham & Watkins.

Michael J. Matheson Visiting Research Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., LL.B., Stanford University Professor Matheson has published a book on the UN Security Council and numerous articles. He has served on the board of editors of the American Journal of International Law, the executive council of the American Society of International Law, the advisory committee on public international law of the U.S. State Department, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Dalia Tsuk Mitchell Professor of Law and History

Program Business and Finance Law

Professor Mitchell’s research focuses on the history of U.S. legal thought with particular emphasis on the role that groups and organizations played in legal scholars’ visions for the modern state. Her book, Architect of Justice: Felix S. Cohen and the Founding of American Legal Pluralism, won the 2007 American Historical Association’s LittletonGriswold Prize for the best book in any subject on the history of American law and society. She also is co-author of a casebook on corporate law.

Thomas Morgan Oppenheim Professor of Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., Northwestern University J.D., University of Chicago Professor Morgan teaches antitrust law and professional responsibility. An author of articles and widely used casebooks in both subjects, he also writes about administrative law, economic regulation, and legal education. A consultant to law firms on questions of professional ethics and lawyer malpractice, he was selected by the American Law Institute as one of three professors to prepare its new Restatement of the Law Governing Lawyers and by the American Bar Association as one of three professors to draft revisions to its Model Rules of Professional Conduct.

Sean D. Murphy Patricia Roberts Harris Research Professor of Law

Programs Environmental and Energy Law International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., Catholic University J.D., Columbia University LL.M., University of Cambridge S.J.D., University of Virginia

EDUCATION LL.B., Tel Aviv University M. Phil., Yale University LL.M., S.J.D., Harvard University

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED Before entering academia, Professor Murphy served as legal counselor at the U.S. Embassy in The Hague and in the U.S. Department of State, Office of the Legal Adviser. He recently co-authored a new edition of the first casebook in the field of foreign relations law, Foreign Relations Law and National Security, and is the author of Principles of International Law, as well as numerous articles on international law. He is a member of the United Nations International Law Commission.

Dawn C. Nunziato Professor of Law

Program Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., M.A., J.D., University of Virginia Professor Nunziato is an internationally recognized expert in the area of free speech and the Internet. Her primary teaching and scholarship interests are in the areas of Internet law, intellectual property, and law and philosophy. Her articles have appeared in a variety of law reviews and journals. Her book Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age was published by Stanford University Press.

of Environmental Policy for 13 years, as Manager of the Office’s Agriculture and Natural Resources Division, and a member of its executive committee.

Richard J. Pierce, Jr. Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law Environmental and Energy Law EDUCATION B.S., Lehigh University J.D., University of Virginia Professor Pierce is the most frequently cited scholar in the country in the field of administrative law and government regulation. He is a member of the Administrative Conference of the United States and is the author or co-author of Administrative Law Treatise (5th ed., 2010) and Administrative Law and Process (5th ed., 2009), as well as numerous other books and over 120 articles on government regulation, regulatory economics, and the effects of various forms of government intervention on the performance of markets.

Peter Raven-Hansen LeRoy C. (Lee) Paddock Associate Dean for Environmental Studies and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Program Environmental and Energy Law EDUCATION B.A., University of Michigan J.D. University of Iowa Dean Paddock’s most recent work has been in the area of environmental enforcement. He is lead editor on the book Compliance and Enforcement: Towards More Effective Implementation (Edward Elgar Press). Before joining GW Law, he was Director of Environmental Legal Studies at Pace University Law School. He was a Visiting Scholar at the Environmental Law Institute (1999-2002), focusing on the Clean Air Act, the state-federal relationship, and enforcement issues. From 1978 until 1999, he was an Assistant Attorney General with the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office, where he served as Director 60

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Glen Earl Weston Research Professor of Law; Co-Director, National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program

Programs International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., J.D., Harvard University Professor Raven-Hansen teaches national security law, counterterrorism law, and civil procedure and evidence. He is a co-author of the casebooks National Security Law and Counterterrorism Law and also author of National Security Law and the Power of the Purse, and First Use of Nuclear Weapons, as well as various articles on national security law.


Alfreda Robinson

Program Litigation and Dispute Resolution

Professor Saltzburg founded and began directing GW Law’s master’s program in litigation and dispute resolution in 1996. He has served as a Special Master in two classaction cases in the District of Columbia District Court and is currently a mediator for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

EDUCATION B.A., M.A., University of Chicago J.D., The George Washington University

Roger E. Schechter

Associate Dean for Trial Advocacy and Professorial Lecturer in Law; Co-Director, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program

Professor of Law

Before joining the Law School administration in 1989, Dean Robinson was in private practice. Before that, Dean Robinson served as a Senior Trial Counsel and Trial Attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, where she was in charge of litigation involving various commercial activities at the trial and appellate levels.

Jeffrey Rosen Professor of Law

Program National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University B.A., University of Oxford J.D., Yale University Professor Rosen is author of The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age and The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America. He writes regularly on law topics for The New Republic and has been hailed by the L.A. Times as “the nation’s most widely read and influential legal commentator.”

Stephen A. Saltzburg Wallace and Beverley Woodbury University Professor of Law ; Co-Director, Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program

Programs Litigation and Dispute Resolution National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

Program Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., The George Washington University J.D., Harvard University Professor Schechter teaches a variety of intellectual property courses, including copyright law and trademark law. He is a member of the advisory council of the McCarthy Center for Intellectual Property and Technology Law of the University of San Francisco and sits on the advisory board of Bloomberg BNA’s Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Journal.

Thomas J. Schoenbaum Visiting Research Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., St. Joseph’s College J.D., University of Michigan D.E.S.S., University of Louvain Ph.D., University of Cambridge Professor Schoenbaum specializes in international commercial and environmental law. He is the author of many articles and books, including International Business Transactions: Problems, Cases, and Materials; The World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Practice; Admiralty and Maritime Law; and Environmental Policy Law.

EDUCATION B.A., Dickinson College J.D., University of Pennsylvania

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED Steven L. Schooner

Dinah L. Shelton

Nash and Cibinic Professor of Government Procurement Law; Co-Director, Government Procurement Law Program

Manatt/Ahn Professor Emeritus of International Law

Program Government Procurement Law

Programs Environmental and Energy Law International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

EDUCATION B.A., Rice University J.D., College of William and Mary LL.M., The George Washington University

EDUCATION B.A., J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Before joining the Law School, Professor Schooner was the Associate Administrator for Procurement Law and Legislation at the Office of Federal Procurement Policy in the Office of Management and Budget. He previously served as a trial and appellate attorney in the Commercial Litigation Branch of the U.S. Department of Justice. He also practiced with private law firms and, as an active duty Army judge advocate, served as a commissioner at the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals.

Much of Professor Shelton’s recent work has focused on the intersections between human rights and environmental law. She recently published (with co-author Don Anton) the book Environmental Protection and Human Rights (Cambridge University Press). She was the first woman nominated by the United States to become a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, which was established by the Organization of American States to promote and protect human rights in the Western Hemisphere. She was elected to a four-year term in June 2009.

Joshua I. Schwartz E.K. Gubin Professor of Government Contracts Law; Faculty Chair, Presidential Merit Scholars Program; Co-Director, Government Procurement Law Program

Program Government Procurement Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University M.R.P., J.D., Cornell University Professor Schwartz served for five years in the Office of the Solicitor General in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he was responsible for briefing and arguing cases before the Supreme Court. In addition to his law degree, he holds a master’s degree in city and regional planning. He teaches in the fields of property, administrative law, government contracts, and legislation. He is serving a second term as a member of the Advisory Committee for the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

Jonathan R. Siegel F. Elwood and Eleanor Davis Research Professor of Law

Program Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University J.D., Yale University Professor Siegel teaches the basic course in intellectual property law. Before joining the Law School, he was a member of the Appellate Staff, Civil Division, U.S. Department of Justice. He has published articles in numerous law reviews and journals.

Daniel J. Solove John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law

Programs Intellectual Property Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., Washington University J.D., Yale University

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Professor Solove is a leading authority on privacy. His writings include the casebook Information Privacy Law, as well as four other books on information privacy in the digital age. He is a frequent panelist and speaker on national security law–related subjects, including electronic surveillance and data mining.

John Andrew Spanogle, Jr. William Wallace Kirkpatrick Research Professor of Law

Programs Business and Finance Law International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.S.E., Princeton University J.D., University of Chicago Professor Spanogle has taught at numerous institutions. He has written many articles on commercial and consumer law. He drafted three Titles of Maine’s state statutes on banking, commercial, and consumer law. A founding member of Ralph Nader’s Public Interest Research Group, he is co-author of the widely used casebook Consumer Law. In addition, he is the co-author of International Business Transactions, the most widely used casebook in its field, and also a West Group Treatise on the same subject.

Ralph G. Steinhardt Professor of Law and International Affairs; Arthur Selwyn Miller Research Professor of Law

Programs International and Comparative Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., Bowdoin College J.D., Harvard University Professor Steinhardt pioneered the application of international human rights law in U.S. courts and has served as counsel to several high-profile individuals alleging violations of international human rights law. He is the author of the casebook International Civil Litigation, as well as a book on the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Joseph Straus Marshall Coyne Visiting Professor of International Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION LL.B., University of Ljubljana, Slovenia Dr. jur., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Germany Professor Straus has served as a professor of law at the Universities of Munich and Ljubljana and as Director of the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich. He is author or co-author of numerous publications in the field of intellectual property law, with a particular focus on the protection of biological invention.

Sonia M. Suter Professor of Law

Program Intellectual Property Law EDUCATION B.A., Michigan State University M.S., J.D., University of Michigan Professor Suter joined the Law School faculty in 1999 after holding a Greenwall Fellowship in bioethics and health policy at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities. Before attending law school, she earned a master’s degree and achieved Ph.D. candidacy in human genetics. She then worked as a genetic counselor for two years. Her scholarship focuses on legal issues in medicine and genetics as well as bioethics.

Edward T. Swaine Professor of Law

Program International and Comparative Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University J.D., Yale University

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LL.M. Programs Full-Time Faculty and Deans contINuED Before joining the Law School faculty in 2006, Professor Swaine was an Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. He also previously served as the Counselor on International Law at the U.S. Department of State. He is co-author of a leading casebook on foreign relations and national security law.

Karen Da Ponte Thornton Associate Professor of Legal Research and Writing; Coordinator, Scholarly Writing Program

Program Government Procurement Law EDUCATION B.A., Providence College J.D., Georgetown University LL.M., The George Washington University Professor Thornton is a former Deputy Assistant General Counsel at the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), where she served as legal advisor to numerous audits of Department of Defense procurement programs, conducted at the request of the House and Senate Armed Services Committees. She joined GAO after serving as a Procurement Attorney for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Jonathan Turley J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law; Director, Environmental Law Advocacy Center; Executive Director, Project for Older Prisoners

Programs Environmental and Energy Law National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law EDUCATION B.A., University of Chicago J.D., Northwestern University Professor Turley is a nationally recognized legal scholar who has written extensively in areas ranging from constitutional law to legal theory to tort law. He has served as counsel in some of the most notable cases in the last two decades, including his representation of the Area 51 workers at a secret air base in Nevada and of four former U.S. attorneys general during the Clinton impeachment litigation.

John M. Whealan Intellectual Property Advisory Board Associate Dean for Intellectual Property Law Studies; Co-Director, Intellectual Property Law Program

Program Intellectual Property Law

Jessica Tillipman Assistant Dean for Field Placement and Professorial Lecturer in Law

Program Government Procurement Law EDUCATION B.S., Miami University J.D., The George Washington University Dean Tillipman manages the Law School’s externship program, including the supervision of nearly 700 students per year. She also teaches an anti-corruption seminar that focuses on corruption control issues in government procurement. Before joining GW Law, she was an associate in Jenner & Block’s Washington, DC office, where she was member of the firm’s Government Contracts and White Collar Criminal Defense and Counseling practice groups.

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EDUCATION B.S., Villanova University M.S., Drexel University J.D., Harvard University Before joining GW Law in 2008, Dean Whealan worked at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, where he had served as Deputy General Counsel for Intellectual Property Law and Solicitor since 2001. During his tenure, he argued approximately 30 cases before the Federal Circuit and, with his staff, was responsible for briefing and arguing more than 250 cases. He also assisted the U.S. Solicitor General on virtually every intellectual property case before the Supreme Court between 1999 and 2008. Dean Whealan also served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary from 2007 to 2008.


Arthur E. Wilmarth, Jr. Professor of Law; Executive Director, C-LEAF

Program Business and Finance Law EDUCATION B.A., Yale University J.D., Harvard University Professor Wilmarth joined GW Law following 11 years in private practice. He teaches courses in banking law, contracts, corporations, and American constitutional history. He has served as Executive Director of the Law School’s Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF) since 2011. He is the author of more than 30 articles and book chapters in the fields of banking law and American constitutional history, and he is co-author of a book on corporate law. In 2005, the American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers awarded him its prize for the best law review article published in the field of consumer financial services law during the previous year.

Christopher R. Yukins Professor of Government Contracts Law; Co-Director, Government Procurement Law Program

Program Government Procurement Law EDUCATION B.A., Harvard University J.D., University of Virginia Professor Yukins has many years of experience in public procurement law. He was for several years a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, where he handled trials and appeals involving bid protests and contract claims against the U.S. government. He teaches courses on government contract formations and performance issues, bid protests, Contract Disputes Act litigation, and comparative issues in public procurement, and focuses especially on emerging public policy questions in U.S. procurement.

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Washington DC

Our Community As the first law school in the nation’s capital, GW Law has long been an integral part of the Washington, DC, community. Part corporate hub, part government seat, part college town, part cultural center, DC is an ideal place to study the law.

The George Washington University The Law School is on the George Washington University’s main campus in historic Foggy Bottom, giving students access to the resources of a world-class institution—from a 183,000-square foot fitness center and one of the city’s leading performing arts centers to nine other graduate schools, boasting more than 10,000 undergraduates and more than 13,000 graduate students.

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Washington, DC

A World-Class City Washington, DC, has been called the most livable city on the East Coast. Each neighborhood has a unique character, and few cities can match DC’s urban energy, international flavor, and cultural offerings. DC is the headquarters of all three branches of the federal government, major national and international organizations, and hundreds of embassies and think tanks, and its population is highly educated and multinational.

As with any great international city, DC is home to worldclass museums, including 16 of the 19 museums of the Smithsonian Institution—many of which are free or offer student discounts—as well as bookstores, theaters and concert halls, seasonal festivals, professional sports teams, coffee bars, and an eclectic mix of restaurants. GW Law students can easily access almost any part of the DC metro area using Metrorail and Metrobus. From the Foggy Bottom–GWU stop, located right on campus, students can arrive within minutes at internships on Capitol Hill, a game at Nationals Park, or an exhibit at the National Gallery. The city is also a hub for travel. Richmond, Philadelphia, and New York are one, two, and three hours away by train, respectively. Reagan National Airport is conveniently reached from the Foggy Bottom Metro station, and two other airports are less than an hour away, making both international travel and exploration within the United States a breeze. The DC metropolitan area can be a great place for raising a family. In addition to numerous strong public school systems, there is a wide variety of kid-friendly activities (many of them free). Favorite sites include the National Zoo, the Air and Space Museum, the Museum of Natural History, and the monuments along the National Mall. Foggy Bottom and GW Law are close to several other DC areas that provide students and their families with a variety of diversions. Rock Creek Park, to the west of Foggy Bottom and more than twice the size of New York City’s Central Park, features biking and jogging trails, concert facilities, a nature center, and a planetarium.

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Foggy BottomGWU

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Constitution Ave

Lincoln Memorial

Constitution Gardens Reflecting Pool

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Department of Commerce

Constitution Hall Organization of American States

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5 U.S. Court of Federal Claims U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit Five blocks from the Law School, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims hears claims made against the U.S. government. At the same location, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has nationwide jurisdiction in a number of subject areas. GW Law students can find clerkships with judges in both courts.

6 Organization of American States Made up of 35 nations in North and South America, the OAS works to preserve peace and further

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The executive branch’s agency of foreign affairs, the State Department is a Foggy Bottom landmark three blocks from GW Law. It provides students with a first-hand look at international law at the highest level.

Located right across the street from the Law School, the IMF oversees the global financial system and gives students the chance to observe international law and finance law in action.

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National Air and Space Museum

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Through its work helping fund improvements in developing countries, the World Bank—only a block from GW Law—is a valuable resource for students interested in international law and finance law.

US Court House

National Gallery of Art

Tidal Basin

Four blocks from GW Law, the White House—seat of the nation’s executive branch—and nearby Executive Office Building provide several outplacement opportunities in fields such as constitutional law and administrative law.

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National World War II Memorial

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Corcoran Art Gallery

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Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial

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development on both continents. GW Law students can find field placements in fields as varied as trade law and drug law.

7 Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts As the nation’s official center for performing arts, the Kennedy Center hosts a variety of cultural events and is home to the National Symphony Orchestra, the Washington Ballet, and the Washington National Opera.

8 Lincoln Memorial 9 Washington Monument 10 Jefferson Memorial These three monuments to American presidents are some of the most recognizable landmarks in DC. All are within walking distance of the Law School.

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GW Law students are active participants in the legal dialogues

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taking place every day in the nation’s capital. At the Law School,

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The famed Smithsonian “Castle” is the headquarters of the institution, which oversees 17 Washington museums, including the National Air and Space Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.

The highest court in the land is an ideal venue for students to observe high-profile legal proceedings, as well as pursue clerkships and field placements. During the past seven years, six GW Law grads have one on to clerk for Supreme Court justices. The court is accessible by Metro.

12 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Students interested in enviromental law can find field placements at this federal agency charged with protecting human health and the environment. The EPA’s headquarters is a short Metro ride from GW Law.

15 Library of Congress

13 U.S. Capitol and Congressional Offices

16 Department of Justice

Recent field placements on Capitol Hill have included the Senate Health, Education, and Pensions Committee; the Senate Judiciary Committee; and the House Republican Judiciary Committee The Hill is easily accessible from GW Law by Metro.

With the world’s largest collection of legal materials, the Library of Congress is an excellent research resource for law students in all areas of specialization.

17 U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia The federal trials court for Washington, DC, offers clerkship opportunities in the chambers of its judges. The district court is Metroaccessible from GW Law.

18 Patent and Trademark Office This Alexandria, Virginia, office is a center of the intellectual property law community. Recent GW Law students have been placed in the Office of the Commissioner. The Patent and Trademark Office is easily reached by Metro and is a 20-minute drive from the Law School.

GW Law students frequently find field placements at the government’s legal headquarters, working in fields ranging from counterterrorism to intellectual property litigation. The Justice Department is a short Metro ride from the Law School.

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GW Law

By The Numbers

600

Our Field Placement Program places more than 600 students in pre-approved externships each year.

430

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Approximately 430 events take place at GW Law each year.

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During the 2011–12 academic year, seven Supreme Court justices of the United States visited GW Law (Alito, Breyer, Kagan, Kennedy, Scalia, Sotomayor, and Thomas).

The 2012 LL.M. entering class represents 44 countries.

GW Law hosts 14 on-campus advocacy competitions each year.


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THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL 2000 H Street, NW Washington, DC 20052 U.S. law school graduates: grad@law.gwu.edu 202.994.0715 Non-U.S. law school graduates: igpo@law.gwu.edu 202.994.7242

LLM Brochure 2012-13  
LLM Brochure 2012-13  

LLM Brochure 2012-13