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JANUARY 2015

INSIDE Vol.22 Number 1

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Science STARS Shine Bright

in this issue 6 | WHAT'S ONLINE 8 | EDITOR'S NOTE  UZZWORTHY IN THE 10 | B COMMUNITY 22 | PARENTING 7 Ways to Teach Goal Setting 26 | BOOK NOOK Best Books of 2014

more features

28 | C  OMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT Girl Scouts Go Digital

18 Forever Homes

// WHAT TO CONSIDER WHEN ADOPTING A FAMILY PET

30 | MODERN MOM Resolutions for the Not-So-Perfect Parent  OUR FAMILY 32 | Y ACTIVITIES 10 Ways to Connect with Your Kids When Family Dinner Doesn't Work 36 | C  ALENDAR OF EVENTS • Family-Friendly Events 46 | FIVE PLACES 5 Sledding Locales in the Rochester Area

this month's contributors SUE HENNINGER is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent who enjoys writing about the unique people, places, and events that can be found in the Finger

Lakes region. [Page 12] JOHN BOCCACINO is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper.

on the cover 131 Things to Do This Month 36 Forever Homes - What to Consider When Adopting a Family Pet 18 Rochester's Science STARS Shine Bright 12 Resolutions for the Not-So-Perfect Parent 30 7 Ways to Teach Goal Setting 22 10 New Ways to Connect With Your Kids 32

He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster. [Page18] CHRISTINA KATZ is an author, journalist and writing coach who has learned that constructive engagement always follows

genuine interest no matter the age of the goal-setter. [Page 22] DEENA VIVIANI is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. [Page 26]

As a freelance journalist, GAYLA GRACE loves sharing experiences to encourage other parents. She is thankful for her five children, who love her despite her not-so-perfect parenting. [Page 30]

ALYSSA CHIRCO is a freelance journalist and mother of two. Although she can rarely get her whole family together at the dinner table, she serves family breakfast (even if it's just cold cereal) every morning. [Page 32]

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ONLINE

january

WHAT YOU CAN FIND THIS MONTH AT WWW.ROCPARENT.COM

LACE UP THOSE SKATES

You don’t have to be an inspiring Olympic skater to enjoy this family activity. Our list includes both area indoor and outdoor skating locations for maximum family fun.

HANGIN' WITH ROCPARENT.COM ON PINTEREST Join rocparent.com on Pinterest as we celebrate the new year. CABIN FEVER BOREDOM BUSTERS Snow day have you cooped up inside? Check out our “Boredom Busters” Pinterest board that is filled with ideas to make the cold, blustery days fly by. GET ORGANIZED Here's to a new year! Out with the old and in with the new! Our “Get Organized!” board will help you get your house ready for a brand new year. FIND US AT pinterest.com/gvparentmag

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SEEKING SUMMER Not a winter person? We have you covered! Get your green on at these area locations that remind us that summer is on the way.

SKIING & SNOWBOARDING From snow bunnies to experienced skiers, check out our list of the top places to hit the slopes.

CAMP GUIDE Our Annual Camp Fair is March 8th, but our Camp Guide is currently available online so you can browse area camps and plan for an awesome summer.


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EDITOR'S NOTE

By Jillian Melnyk

ringing in the new T

he start of a year is all about newness. New plans, new goals, new ideas. I try to make some form of resolution each year, but the truth is that I rarely make it past a few weeks before I slip back into my old habits. This used to stress me out and I felt like a failure. But I've since learned that NOT reaching goals can be fine. Not only that, it teaches me something and gives me a new standard to set my next goal against.

WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?  Email our Publisher, Barbara: mail@GVParent.com Email our Editor, Jillian: editor@GVParent.com

The thing that I'm focusing on in this new year is to not be hard on myself. So, I didn't meet a goal… Or I didn't complete a project by the deadline I set for myself… Something didn't work out the way I wanted… Instead of feeling negative about the situations and beating myself up, I'll analyze why, how and what. Why didn't I achieve the goal? How can I do so in the future? What do I need to do moving forward?

And sometimes we just need to sit back and say "it's ok!" You will fail, it's a part of life. Your kids will fail too. If you're one of those parents who sometimes feels less-than-perfect, this month's article, Resolutions for the Not-So-Perfect Parent (page 30), will help you out. And if you want to help your child (and yourself) achieve goals in the new year, check out 7 Ways to Teach Goal Setting (page 22.) Remember, give yourself a break now and then. We're all a little lessthan-perfect.

Here's to a happy and successful 2015!

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Staff PUBLISHER Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Ken Stevens CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella Office@GVParent.com Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2015, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

MEMBER OF THE BRIGHTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


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BUZZWORTHY IN TOWN

THE STRONG MUSEUM EARNS HIGHEST NATIONAL RECOGNITION

The Strong has achieved reaccreditation by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the highest achievement for excellence in the museum community. AAM’s rigorous accreditation process can take up to a year or more to complete and examines all aspects of a museum’s operations. “It’s an honor to be accredited once again and to be recognized by our peers as a world-class organization,” says G. Rollie Adams, president and CEO of The Strong. “This recognition is a testament to the high quality of work being done by the museum’s board, leadership, and staff.” Of the nation’s nearly 35,000 museums, only about three percent are currently accredited. The Strong has maintained this highest designation since 1984. 

GEVA ANNOUNCES THE PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND Philip Seymour Hoffman often cited Geva Theatre Center in interviews. He would tell of his mother taking him to plays at Geva and a particular production of All My Sons that fired up his interest in acting “As one of Rochester’s own, it is fitting that we recognize Philip Seymour Hoffman’s contribution to the arts,” says Nannette Nocon, Geva Honorary Board Member . The fund will provide two scholarships annually for Geva’s Summer Academy Program, a summer conservatory training program for youth ages 12 – 18. To make a donation to The Philip Seymour Hoffman Scholarship Fund visit  www.GevaTheatre.org (click “Support”), or call (585) 420-2013. You may also mail gifts to Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd, Rochester, NY 14607.

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REGISTER FOR THE FAST & THE FURRIEST® 2015

Mark your calendar for Saturday, June 6, 2015, for The Fast & The Furriest® Race, Walk & Pet Fest. Join the 9th Annual 10K, 5K, dog walk, and pet festival, which will again feature live music, food trucks, sponsor giveaways, vendors, pet contests, and a variety of activities for you, your family and your pets. Get out and help celebrate your love of animals and our city. To register or for any questions contact them at vsasinc@gmail.com or at 237-8366.

DO YOU HAVE BUZZWORTHY LOCAL NEWS YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE? SEND IT TO

OFFICE@GVPARENT.COM


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// FEATURE STORY //

WORDS SUSAN HENNINGER

science STARS

shine bright “E

very kid needs and deserves creative space and adults who believe in them,” says April Luehmann, Associate Professor of Science at the University of Rochester (U of R). More than a decade ago, April used her teaching expertise and love of science to combine two diverse groups of people into a single program that has subsequently grown by leaps and bounds.

The Rochester City School District (RCSD) was in need of an afterschool science club for girls that would allow the urban teens and tweens access to topnotch scientific equipment and technology as well as highly committed science teachers-in-training. At the same time, Get Real! Science, a fifteen month innovative, inquiry-based approach to science teacher education at the Warner Graduate School of Education at the U of R, was in need of a group of young students who could

to students’ lives so it’s imperhelp its graduate student ative for student teachers teachers learn to who work with these teach science in youth to understand more effective My goal is to the unique perand inspiring make science more ways to kids in spectives African attractive and appealing city schools. American girls to young women and to bring to scientific According to understanding, she April, historinurture diverse cally many of elaborates. participation in it." the teachers in her program – APRIL LUEHMANN, ASSOCIATE Breaking PROFESSOR OF SCIENCE AT THE are Caucasian Stereotypes UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER and from middle That’s where Science and upper-midSTARS (Students Tackdle socioeconomic ling Authentic and Relevant backgrounds and have little Science) fits in. For the past six experience with inner city or Afriyears, the afterschool science club, led by can American cultures. “Equity in science April and the Warner student teachers, education is key and a huge part of that is has found a welcoming home at East High developing relationships with all types of School. “Principal Anibal Soler Jr. was inpeople,” she notes, adding that learning strumental in making us part of the educato work with groups of kids who may have tional culture here,” April explains. Science different skill sets and priorities than oneSTARS is made up of kids who have a full self is an essential component of being an range of preconceived expectations and effective teacher. Science education works stereotypes about what being a scientist best when it feels meaningful and relevant means. One of April's favorite exercises is

CONTINUED >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015 13


to have the students draw a person ill-defined, and all about creative "engaged in science." Without collaboration,” she says. “My fail, she says the pictures goal is to make science more show a white man with attractive and appealing “crazy hair” in a lab to young women and to I think any coat working with nurture diverse partictime that you help youth scientific equipment ipation in it.” take ownership in posin isolation, rather Though than someone who scientific inquiry itive ways, this spreads looks like the girls and process are the to families’ lives and our in the program. cornerstones of the community spaces." Her job is to shift STARS program, this paradigm to a there are plenty of – APRIL LUEHMANN, ASSOCIATE belief system in which secondary benefits. PROFESSOR OF SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER anyone who is interestParticipants learn how to ed in, and committed to, balance their own strengths scientific discovery can be and weaknesses with those of successful, not only personally, the others on their team. Older but as an agent of change within their teens learn how to motivate and direct community. Young women who reach maturitheir peers’ work and how to negotiate so that ty feeing like they “can’t do” science effectively the rules are fair for everyone. These all take shut the door on a number of career choices, courage to master, April says, and many of April emphasizes. the verbal skills, like introducing themselves Another erroneous perception April and to strangers, crafting interview questions, or the student teachers address is that science is doing public presentations are transferable a subject with only one right answer. “Our to other situations in the girls’ lives. Science science is what real scientists do, not what STARS also teaches the young scientists how school science does,” she says. For the Science to effectively communicate what they did in the STARS, science is not about memorizing facts. program when they’re working on resumes and “I want the girls to see that science is messy, college applications. “We want to make sure

SEE SCIENCE IN ACTION Watch some of the films created by the scicene STARS. You are Not Alone – by East High Science STARS through the University of Rochester Our Life. Our Meat. Our Story. – by East High Science STARS (Spring, 2013) BPA and our Bodies – by East High Science STARS (Spring, 2012) Txtg Cn B Trgc – by East High Science STARS (Spring, 2012) Visit www.RocParent.com for quick links to these films and more.

CONTINUED >>>

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they have the language to explain what they’re doing, and to tell others why it’s important,” April says.

The Program

Science STARS is now held for a full year instead of only the fall term and this year marks the first time that boys are participating in the program as well. During the fall weeks, the students and their teachers (who have developed lesson plans that are both fun and accessible) meet at East High where they break into five teams and take part in a variety of experiences that help provide answers to the scientific question the team created. The students engage in activities like collecting samples, creating data tables, and taking mini-field trips to enhance their learning experience. Examples of this year’s research topics include “Vitamin C and Me: Which Foods Have the Most Vitamin C” and “How Does Music Move Us? Creating the Ultimate Play List.” The semester culminates in a final round table discussion of projects, led by the five teams of students who share their findings with family, friends and faculty during a "Collaborative Conversations" event. "Science STARS has been a wild success," April says proudly. “We finally got the structure exactly right…We found the right balance between stretching and stressing them.” For the second half of the year, club members make documentaries, many of which can be found on YouTube, about a scientific issue that interests them and how they approached it. Past topics have included “BPA and Our Bodies,” which addressed the health effects of bisphenol-A, a chemical found in certain plastics, canned goods and soda cans, and “Our Life, Our Meat, Our Story,” which inspired one of the Science STARS to become a vegetarian. Another student documentary, “You Are Not Alone” (http://vimeo.com/103742233), about the science of teen depression, won the Philip Seymour Hoffman Award for Best of Festival at the Rochester Teen Film Festival in 2014. Stay tuned for the free public screening of this year’s Science STARS films in March 2015 at Cinema Theater at 957 South Clinton Avenue.

Benefits for All

Students are the obvious beneficiaries of the Science STARS club. But others, including the student teachers, gain as well, April says. Not only are the graduates of Get Real! Science exceptionally well-prepared to teach science, they are also committed to a different vision of what science education can, and needs to, look like. The Rochester community profits from the club as well. “I think any time that you help youth take ownership in positive ways, this spreads to families’ lives and our community spaces,” April asserts. Not only that, but it’s clear to her how much urban parents care about their children’s education. “Our auditorium is overflowing when we have programs,” she says, adding that it’s important for all Rochester residents to hear stories about kids who are doing constructive and interesting things. When asked what the hardest part of her job is, April responds candidly: “It’s a whole lot of work all the time. The physical and logistical demands are significant. Every one of us has to be on our 'A' game all the time. Things are constantly shifting [in the students’ lives] but we [the adults] need to be consistent. The things these kids have to deal with on a daily basis are extremely challenging. We need to find a balance between being supportive and understanding, while continuing to have high expectations for what they can do.” In 2011, everyone’s hard work was publically acknowledged when the program received a $1.25 million dollar grant

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from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in support of Science STARS. Increased funding has allowed the Science STARS program to expand out from the Rochester area to Lansing, Michigan and Seattle, Washington, to measure both its scalability and how informal community-based science learning can positively contribute to urban girls’ lives and futures. Not only that, says April, the NSF grant validates her belief in the importance of supporting learning in out-of-school spaces, especially for students who have been traditionally underserved by both their schools and society. “It’s a whole lot of money and it’s an awesome experience to have this level of research and programmatic support to think collaboratively and creatively about science” April says. However, she adds, in the end, it’s often the little things that make it all worthwhile, “like seeing how proudly our kids wear their Science STARS t-shirts.”  SUE HENNINGER is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent who enjoys writing about the unique people, places, and events that can be found in the Finger Lakes region. Contact her at www.fingerlakeswriter.com

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// FEATURE STORY //

WORDS JOHN BOCCACINO

forever homes WHAT TO CONSIDER BEFORE ADOPTING A FAMILY PET

T

he idea of adopting a dog, cat or other family pet can begin harmlessly enough. Maybe one of your children spent the night playing with an energetic dog at a friend’s house. Maybe you came across a warm and affectionate cat while visiting in-laws over the holidays. Whatever the rationale behind the thought, before a family goes about adopting a new, four-legged member of the family, local animal shelters say there are several steps to follow to ensure long-term happiness, both for the family and for the pet.

Responsibility and Commitment

Adopting a pet is a huge commitment, says Gillian Hargrave, the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester. As an open admission shelter, Lollypop

adoption, so we recomFarm takes in all mend families sit down kinds of animals, The benefits and have an honest ranging from of adoption can be conversation about dogs and cats the commitment to rabbits, overwhelmingly positive, the family is about hamsters, provided a family goes in to make, and gerbils, with open eyes and does what this means snakes, turtheir homework." tles, lizards, for the family,” says Hargrave, parakeets – GILLIAN HARGRAVE, THE VICE and macaws. whose organization PRESIDENT AND CHIEF OPERATING helps place more Lollypop also OFFICER OF LOLLYPOP FARM than 6,000 animals into features an adopt homes on a yearly basis. and surrender farm, “Families need to figure out where animals such as chickens, goats, sheep, horses how this new pet will fit into their lives. It is a big investment of time, money and Vietnamese pot bellied pigs are available for specialized adoption. and energy, and before families can adopt, they need to figure out if their lifestyle will Before welcoming in a furry new allow for pet ownership. You need to be friend, Hargrave says that parents must sit down with their children and figure out able able to walk and play with the pet, as well as clean up after and spend time enseveral important questions. Who will be gaging with the animal. Then there are the the animal’s primary caretaker? Hargrave finances. Animals can be very expensive, says that while it is easy for an enthusiastic and you need to be able to afford a pet for and well-intending child to make claims its entire lifetime. Dogs can live between 10 that he or she will feed, play with and and 15 years, and cats are living to be 20.” clean up after the pet, the reality is, pet ownership is a family-wide responsibiliCONTINUED >>> ty. “You really want to avoid an impulse

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SPECIAL// //SOMETHING FEATURE STORY

If you are interested in adopting a particular breed of dog, look into an adoption organization that specializes in certain breeds. Cindy Bauer is the president of Greyhound Adoption of Greater Rochester, an agency that tries to find loving homes for retired greyhound racing dogs. Once a family has expressed an interest in a retired greyhound, Bauer and her staff will interview the family to see if there is a possible fit. (Note that households can not have any children under the age of 5.) “Our dog adoption is like no other, as we are working to try to find ‘Forever homes’ for dogs that have never lived in a home environment before,” Bauer says. “We are looking for families that want a companion animal. Retired racing greyhounds are the type of dog that needs to be kept inside and just enjoy being with the family members. They can also run at 45 miles-anhour, so a retired racing greyhound can never be let off a leash unless they are in a fully-enclosed, fencedin area."

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Other factors that families

for a special bond between the animal and its caretakers. routines, and if they have That unconditional the time required to love gives children If parents provide good care for confidence. And bring their children to the pet. If both the there’s an added mother and father benefit of choosthe shelter, we can assess work during the ing a pet from and see how the children day, who will a shelter. That act around the dogs and take the family teaches children cats, if they are fearful or dog on long walks the wonderful during the business lesson of giving excited by the dogs/cats." day? If one of the an animal a – ASHLEY NOWAK, ADOPTIONS parents travels fresecond chance and DIRECTOR FOR SCOTTSVILLE quently for work, or if adopting a pet that VETERINARY ADOPTIONS the family takes frequent was once homeless or out-of-town vacations, who mistreated.” will watch the dog, cat or other animal while the family is out of town? Finding the Perfect Adopting a pet can be a tremendous blessing Forever Friend for both parents and children, but only if Scottsville Veterinary Adoptions has been the pet will be properly cared for, Hargrave serving the greater Rochester area for 20 adds. “The benefits of adoption can be overyears, and has placed more than 1,700 dogs whelmingly positive, provided a family goes and cats with new homes this year alone. in with open eyes and does its homework,” Ashley Nowak is the Adoptions Director Hargrave says. “Pets can really be a part of for Scottsville Veterinary Adoptions, and the family, and the relationship that can be she urges parents to ensure they have the created between a child and a pet is pretty time, energy and resources to properly special. Owning a pet can be a tremendous provide for a pet before making the decision experience for children. It teaches them reto adopt. Another key piece, according to sponsibility and compassion for animals, and both Hargrave and Nowak, is to bring the pets love us unconditionally, which provides

WORDS JOHN BOCCACINO must consider are their daily


children to the aniLEARN MORE & VISIT mal shelter to meet Lollypop Farm their prospective pets www.lollypop.org, 223-1330 before completing the adoption process. Scottsville Veterinary Adoption Nowak says that she www.petadoption.cc, 889-8340 and her staff can witness the interacRochester Animal Services tion between pet and www.rochesteranimalservices.com, child, and can make 428-7274 recommendations for different breeds that Greyhound Adoption of might better suit a Greater Rochester child/family’s needs www.greyhoundadopt.org, and temperament. 314-0187 “If parents bring their children to the shelter, we can assess and see how the children act around the dogs and cats, if they are fearful or excited,” Nowak says. “We want the dog or cat to be tolerant of the child, so if the child is tugging on the pet, or is constantly putting their hands in the food bowl, that family needs to be placed with a pet that will tolerate this kind of behavior. After seeing how the family interacts with the pet, we make our recommendations, but the ultimate choice of which pet to adopt still comes down to the owner.” Once the family has made their decision, Nowak says there is a simple, two-page adoption application that must be completed before the process is finalized. She adds that most animals are then taken home with their new families that day. Among the area shelters, Lollypop Farm, Scottsville Veterinary Adoptions and Rochester Animal Services will provide age-appropriate vaccinations to all pets before allowing them to go home with their new owners. Most agencies will also spay and neuter any newly-adopted pets before they go home with their new families. Chris Fitzgerald, the Director of Animal Services for Rochester Animal Services and the City of Rochester, says one of the biggest issues he hears about regarding pet adoption is when well-intentioned owners are forced to return their pet due to a sudden lifestyle change, like losing a job, accepting a new job, having to relocate across the country or developing new allergies. He echoed the sentiments of both Hargrave and Nowak, stressing the importance of long-term planning to ensure that both the family and the adopted pet will be taken care of. “When you decide to adopt a pet, you are adopting for the pet’s entire lifetime, and you need to be sure you are able to provide the pet with a sufficient home and meet its needs for its entire lifetime,” says Fitzgerald, who estimates that Rochester Animal Services has adopted out more than 1,700 pets in 2014. “We encourage area families to adopt from a shelter resource, because these are homeless pets that really need a good home, and by adopting, you’re helping the area shelters not be so overwhelmed with homeless animals. Another tip is to keep your pets properly identified, and to keep cats indoors. Dogs and cats should have identification collars, so if the pet does get out of the house and out of the yard, a neighbor can easily return the pet instead of it ending up back in a shelter.” Committed to adding a furry friend to your family? Talk to shelter staff; they're friendly and ready to help you choose the perfect forever friend.  John Boccacino is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster.

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PARENTING ALL AGES

By Christina Katz

"I Double-dog Dare You." 7 WAYS TO TEACH GOAL SETTING

w

e are living in an age of constant interruption. So when it comes to setting and accomplishing goals in the future, kids who learn how to concentrate and focus will have a distinct advantage over those who cannot. We need to help our children learn how and when to put their blinders on so they can apply focused goal setting to challenges of their own choosing. Achieving personal goals helps kids channel the energy they have productively and inspires them to become more confident action-takers in the future.

Kids are not lazy or unmotivated these days; it's simply easier then ever for them to be distracted and disengaged. As a parent, you can encourage your children to practice healthy goal setting. Follow these suggestions and you will notice your kids stepping up to set and meet new challenges that bring smiles to their faces. As for your role, get ready to cheer them on and give them credit for their contributions as any good coach would.

1. Let them steer. Choose an age-appropriate, just out-of-reach goal. Be careful you don't interject your own desires into this process. For a child who is unsure about what goal to set, be patient and offer many choices until something appeals. You will be playing a supporting role in helping your child

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accomplish whatever goal is chosen, but it must be your child's goal, not yours.

2. Emphasize fun. If your child is overweight, focusing overly on weight loss as his goal is not going to help. Forget the problems you think your child needs to solve and emphasize the fun of setting and reaching goals instead. Let children who have become too sedentary in the past come up with goals like joining a team or training for a race for the fun of it, not just to get mom and dad off their backs. Share stories of goals you've set and met to inspire your children to achieving their own.

3. Embrace strengths. Every person has strengths and weaknesses. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you only mirror your child's

negative qualities and mention them constantly, perhaps you have not spent enough time considering their best qualities. There are not merely five or ten positive qualities that describe

people; there are hundreds. Pick up a little book called Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath. Then go through the book and circle the words you think describe your child. Mention these qual-


goals for Younger Kids

You can help prepare your kids to meet life's challenges later by turning everyday tasks into fun double-dog dares. • Complete a chore in a specific amount of time • Find the groceries on the shopping list • Create a to-do list for something they already learned how to do • Teach something they learned to another family member • Complete a puzzle all by themselves • Build something they have never built before • Make up an invention that solves a problem around the house • Cook something using a new recipe

Goals For Older Kids

By helping tweens and teens choose goals that suit their aptitudes, you can increase their willingness to take safe risks in the future. As your children get older, encourage them to set goals that are just beyond what they think they can accomplish like... • Running a 5K • Installing an exhibit of their art • Creating a healthy eating plan • Submitting writing to a contest • Raising money for a cause • Trying out for something they are not already good at • Sticking to a new plan for one month • Saving money to make a dream come true

ities often and watch your child's confidence blossom.

4. Assist with challenges. Offer yourself as a sounding board when your child runs into challenges reaching her goals, but don't solve her problems for her. Instead listen to your child's concerns and ask her questions. Get her thinking about various approaches that might help. If you have input, instead of telling your child what to do, ask if she thinks any of your ideas might be good ways to offset challenges. Don't feel internal pressure to unstick a stuck child. Brainstorm with her and then let her do it.

5. Praise progress. If your child is continually focused outward, measuring where he stands in comparison to others, this robs him of personal power. Instead of encouraging your child to be the generic best, encourage him to achieve his personal best. Celebrate the fruition of this expression no matter how it measures up with

others. In this way, a ribbon for Most Improved can be viewed as just as valuable as First Place or MVP.

6. Respect weaknesses. Just as strengths can be discovered and flexed for increasing success, weaknesses should be acknowledged and honored, too. The idea of respecting weaknesses rather than denying or trying to correct them may seem strange. But consider whether or not the investment of time and energy to turn weaknesses around is worthwhile. Sometimes flaws teach kids valuable things they need to learn about themselves. For example, a forward who can't score might make a better midfielder on the soccer field. A dancer who can't do acrobatic tricks might have a strong sense of showmanship on stage. A scattered student in the classroom might be a talented artist in the studio. Forgive weaknesses and pursue the undervalued abilities they may be trying to point you toward, instead. CONTINUED >>>

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7. Play the long game. As your child focuses on setting and reaching personal goals, things may not always go quite the way anyone expected. Life has a way of bringing twists and turns to the table. This means short-term victories don't always pan out as expected, even after much time and energy has been invested. When disappointments happen, and they will, help your child focus on the big picture. Getting the most personal satisfaction out of the process and achieving the most personal growth while making valuable contributions to the whole in the long run should always be the plan. Stay the course and things will usually work themselves out.  Christina Katz is an author, journalist and writing coach who has learned that constructive engagement always follows genuine interest no matter the age of the goal-setter. She is the author of The Writer's Workout, 366 Tips, Tasks & Techniques From Your Writing Career Coach.

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BOOK NOOK

By Deena Viviani

what's old is new again

T

he New Year will bring a fresh selection of children’s books to the shelves – but don’t miss out on these gems from 2014!

MORE READS

Looking for more suggestions? Check out these other favorites from 2014: PICTURE BOOKS The Crocodile Who Didn’t Like Water By Gemma Merino A Dance Like Starlight: One Ballerina’s Dream Written by Kristy Dempsey & Illustrated by Floyd Cooper Sparky Written by Jenny Offill & Illustrated by Chris Appelhans Uni the Unicorn Written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Illustrated by Brigette Barrager MIDDLE GRADE Abby Spencer Goes to Bollywood By Varsha Bajaj Manhunt By Kate Messner The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights By Steve Sheinkin Sisters By Raina Telgemeier YOUNG ADULT Gilded By Christina Farley The Lies We Tell Ourselves By Robin Talley The Shadow Hero By Gene Luen Yang & Sonny Liew

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Flashlight

By Lizi Boyd Chronicle, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 3-5 Who’s afraid of the dark? Not the boy in this picture book when he’s armed with a flashlight! Readers can search the wordless pages for animals and plants along with our main character and his beam of light. Keep an eye on the critters who have their own plans for that flashlight in the adorable ending.

Bad Bye, Good Bye

Written by Deborah Underwood & Illustrated by Jonathan Bean Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 3-5 Moving from one house to another can be scary. It can also lead to a wonderful neighborhood full of new friends. Emotive illustrations and short phrases of clear rhymes make this book a perfect choice for preschoolers.

Two

By Kathryn Otoshi KO Kids Books, 2014, hardcover, $18.95, Ages 3-5 It doesn’t feel good to be left out, whether you’re an even or an odd. The author of Zero and One tells the story of what happens when two friends become three, and three becomes

a crowd. Otoshi’s numeral illustrations carry as much expression as any human characters. Two is a picture book kids can count on.

Absolutely Almost

By Lisa Graff Philomel, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 8-12 Fifth grader Albie has trouble with math, fails spelling tests, and worries that he’s not smart enough to please his parents. It takes his nota-babysitter and new teacher to help him figure out some important right answers on his own. Short chapters and concise scenes make this a good choice for reluctant readers. A smart story about learning to love yourself.

Crossover

By Kwame Alexander Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 10-14

Twins Jordan and Josh Bell love playing Junior High Basketball with each other and recreational games with their former European pro dad. This year things change when Jordan gets a girlfriend and their dad's heart grows weaker. Can Josh prove his worth to his team, his family, and his brother? Written in free verse and lines of rhymes, this novel is a story of brotherhood, basketball, and coming of age.

The Great Greene Heist

By Varian Johnson Alfred A. Levine, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 10-14 Jackson Greene has sworn off school capers. That is until his not-girlfriend Gaby runs for school president against sneaky Keith. Jackson puts together a topnotch team of talent to take


back the election from a cheating opponent. The multiple points-of-view, cast of talented and multicultural characters, and Star Trek references make this an entertaining middle school read.

We Were Liars

By E. Lockhart Delacorte, 2014, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 13-18 Cady, her two cousins, and their buddy Gat are best friends who spend every summer together on a private island off Martha's Vineyard. During the summer she is fifteen, Cady hits her head in the ocean and forgets most of what happened. Two years later she returns to discover what she has forgotten. A satisfying and heartbreaking ending make this novel memorable.

Conversion

Afterworlds

By Katherine Howe G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 2014, hardcover, $18.99, Ages 13-18 Eighteen-year-old Darcy sells her first young adult novel, a paranormal romance about Lizzie, for big money so she moves to New York City. There, she meets her first love and navigates the business of publishing. This book contains two novels in one that are equally compelling; both Darcy’s and Lizzie's worlds are hypnotic and thrilling. An addicting read, especially for budding writers.  DEENA VIVIANI is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian. Read more reviews on her blog www.deenaml.livejournal.com or send her a note at DeenaViviani@hotmail.com – she loves to hear from readers!

By Katherine Howe G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 2014, hardcover, $18.99, Ages 13-18 High school senior Colleen Rowley feels the pressure to succeed at her elite Massachusetts boarding school. It only gets worse when her classmates come down with unexplainable ailments that threaten all their health and futures. Based on the 2012 LeRoy, NY “mystery illness” and the 1600s Salem Witch trials, the sharp writing and storytelling thrive in this high interest novel.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

girl scouts go digital I

' m an absolute Thin

Mint addict. When cookie season rolls around, I can't wait to buy my box (ok, boxes) of the delicious cookies. Starting this year, we cookie fans will have a new way to make our cookie purchases – the Girl Scouts are going digital. But it's not just for our benefit, the digital platform aims to build and strengthen skills in technology and e-commerce for young women.

How will the digital platform work? With the new digital platform – Digital Cookie -- local Girl Scouts will be able to take in-person cookie orders from customers and, for the first time, automate cookie shipments through a transaction application designed specifically for Girl Scouts. Customers who buy cookies from girls using the application will be able to have their order processed, paid for, and confirmed right in front of their eyes. The platform places an emphasis on the safety of girls and customers alike and offers an online experience that allows girls to learn about digital money management using dashboards to track their sales and goals, and teaches modern skills while

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EMILY GLIDDEN AND TAYLOR SHAKESHAFT AT A GIRL SCOUT COOKIE DRIVE THRU EVENT THAT TOOK PLACE AT THE GIRL SCOUTS OF WESTERN NEW YORK ROCHESTER SERVICE CENTER IN MARCH 2014.

aligning with the interests of today’s girls.

What kind of skills does the new platform teach? The digital layer will broaden and strengthen the essential 5 Skills girls learn in the traditional cookie program, including goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics. “Having our Girl Scouts participate in Digital Cookie will truly change their lives as it allows girls to hone the important business and technological skills needed to compete in the digital age,” says Cindy L. Odom, CEO of Girl Scouts of Western New York. “Girl Scouts will be better positioned to become leaders both today and in the future.”

More than two-thirds of the female CEOs Having our on the Fortune 500 Girl Scouts participate in list learned basic Digital Cookie will truly business acumen by change their lives as it allows selling Girl Scout girls to hone the important Cookies and are business and technological part of the more skills needed to compete in than 59 million the digital age." living Girl Scout alumnae today. Yet – CINDY L. ODOM, CEO OF GIRL SCOUTS OF only 21 percent of chief WESTERN NEW YORK information officers at Fortune 100 companies are women, and an even smaller number are CEOs of firms girls learn 21st century skills that engaged in science, technology, dovetail with traditional door-toengineering or math (STEM) door and booth sales to combine fields. Digital Cookie tailors the customer relationship and intertraditional Girl Scout Cookie personal skills with e-commerce Program to fit the modern training. world, helping give more "Girl Scout Cookies have girls an important foundation always been about so much more in technology. It also gives than a delicious treat — they’re customers a new way to help


about helping girls learn important business lessons,” says Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA. “This year, when you’re buying your Thin Mints and Caramel deLites digitally, you can feel good that you’re helping girls learn the 5 Skills the cookie program has always instilled in a 21st century way, turning today’s girls into tomorrow’s business and tech leaders.”

Will the revenue for digital sales differ from traditional in-person sales? As with the traditional cookie program, the net revenue earned from the cookie sale will remain with the Girl Scout council that sponsors the sale. Girls decide how to spend their troop cookie money and reinvest it back into their neighborhoods through community service projects and learning experiences, like travel opportunities. Because 100 percent of the net revenue raised through the Girl Scout Cookie Program stays with the local council and troops, customers who purchase Girl Scout Cookies are not only getting a delightful treat, but they are also making an important investment in their communities.

When will the digital roll-out begin? The Girl Scout Cookie Program officially kicks off January 17, 2015, in Western New York, although local Girl Scouts will be able to get started with the Digital Cookie program before then. Even though the program will be underway in January, girls can register at any point in the year to become a Girl Scout and can participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Program right away. The Girl Scout Cookie Program ends March 28, 2015, in Western New York. For information on the 2014–2015 cookie season, visit gswny.org. 

DO YOU KNOW A COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION OR GROUP THAT DESERVES TO BE FEATURED IN THE SPOTLIGHT?

EMAIL OUR EDITOR AT EDITOR@GVPARENT.COM Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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MODERN MOM

By Gayla Grace

parenting resolutions FOR THE NOT-SO-PERFECT PARENT

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onsidering the innumerable parenting books I've read and parenting workshops I've attended, I should be a perfect parent. I'm not. I've been a parent long enough, however, to realize that if I keep pressing forward and doing the best job I can with a loving and sincere heart, my kids won't be eternally scarred by my imperfections.

This year, instead of making resolutions about being a better parent, I decided to ponder a few resolutions on how to move past my imperfections and keep going on days I want to quit as a not-so-perfect parent. This year I commit to...

maybe our thinking isn't right. Mommy Guilt comes from the expectation that we need to be perfect. But... a perfect mom doesn't exist. We can choose to let go of unrealistic expectations that keep us bound to guilt when we don't measure up.

Let go of the Mommy Guilt.

Forgive myself when I fail.

We all experience it from time to time. We do too much for our kids one day and the next day we do too little. One day we give them too much slack and the next day we nag them incessantly. Our parenting choices never seem right. Or

A defeated parent doesn't parent effectively. When we barrage ourselves with negative self-talk over a poor parenting choice, we continue down a negative path. Forgiving ourselves for less-than-stellar parenting moments allows us

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to begin again with a renewed mind and fresh perspective for our parenting challenges.

Seek out support from other moms on hard days. My neighbor is a single parent with two school-aged children. She recognizes her need for help in juggling her responsibilities and seeks out other moms to assist with car pool or after-school care when the demands of her work schedule become overwhelming. Fellow moms understand the struggles and are usually happy to help when asked.

Listen to my heart on how to parent my child, instead of others' opinions. It's easy to run to the phone and ask our best friend what to do when we're facing a difficult parenting moment, but if we step back and listen to our heart while considering our options, we make better decisions. Considering our child's personality (which we know better than anyone) as part of the parenting equation allows us to view our parenting in a healthier light.


Take time to run, or quilt, or whatever activity works for me to re-group when the parenting strain takes over. It's important to re-group and make time for self-care when we're about to go off the parenting cliff. Balancing parenting demands with activities we can look forward to and enjoy alone or with others, creates a well-rounded parent who can more effectively handle the strains of parenting.

Remember that my kids love me, even on days I'm a not-so-perfect parent. Our kids don't expect us to be perfect parents. If they know we are doing our best to care for them, emotionally and physically, they love us on our good days and our days that aren't so good. I heard the reply of a young

child recently when asked what he thought about his mom's significant weight loss. "I don't see her any different - I love her either way 'cuz she's my mom." As you start a new year, do you have resolutions to consider as a not-so-perfect parent? Do you need a mindset do-over that includes room for imperfection and second chances as a parent? Perhaps that's the ticket to success this year on your not-so-perfect parenting journey.  As a freelance journalist, Gayla Grace loves sharing experiences to encourage other parents. She is thankful for her five children, who love her despite her not-so-perfect parenting.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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YOUR FAMILY ACTIVITIES

By Alyssa Chirco

when family dinner doesn't work 10 MORE WAYS TO CONNECT WITH YOUR KIDS

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s parents, we have been hearing for years about the many benefits of family dinner. Research shows that children who routinely enjoy meals with their parents have lower rates of substance abuse and depression, a stronger sense of belonging and even a better vocabulary. Unfortunately, non-traditional work schedules, extra-curricular activities and other necessary obligations make routine family dinners all but impossible for some of us to achieve.

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If you find yourself struggling to fit family dinners into your nightly schedule, remember that opportunities to establish meaningful connections with your kids exist throughout the course of the day, not just in the evening – and certainly not just at the dinner table. There are plenty of alternative ways for families to connect and spend time together on a regular basis. Here are ten ideas that may work for you.

Family Breakfast Is your entire family at home in the morning? Instead of grabbing Pop Tarts on the go, get up a bit earlier and sit down at the breakfast table together before everyone heads out for the day. Keep in mind that family breakfast does not need to be elaborate or time-consuming. Set up a cereal bar with several dry cereal options and plenty of fresh fruit or search for overnight slow cooker recipes that require minimal effort on busy mornings.


Family Dessert Even if you find yourself reheating dinner when Dad gets home late or eating fast food in the car before soccer practice, the whole family can still indulge in a sweet treat together before everyone turns in for the night. Bake a batch of homemade cookies or buy a container of the family’s favorite ice cream, then gather around the table at 8 or 9 pm (depending on your children’s ages and bedtimes, of course) and take turns talking about the highlights of the day.

Family Car Trips Instead of feeling like a taxi service while you chauffeur your children from dance classes to piano lessons, use the opportunity to start a real conversation. Turn off smartphones and gaming devices and break the ice by playing a fun game like Twenty Questions. When the game ends, ask your kids which topics they would like to discuss. Their answers may surprise you.

Family Game Night Whether you play every Friday night or only once a month, a fun-filled family game night is an easy and inexpensive way to bring the whole family together. Pull out a classic board game like Battleship or Parcheesi. Help your preschooler learn colors and numbers with a card game like Uno. Or turn on the Wii or Xbox and get everyone in the competitive spirit with a video game dance-off. Yes, Mom and Dad have to dance too.

Family Meetings When held regularly, family meetings have the power to resolve conflicts, build family unity and foster a sense of autonomy by engaging children of all ages in the family’s decision-making process. Plan for all members of the family to meet at least twice a month

to share accomplishments, discuss upcoming plans and brainstorm solutions to problems or concerns within the family.

Family Vacation Leave the stress of daily life behind and spend quality time together by taking a break from the ordinary. Whether you travel to an exotic destination, plan a cheap weekend getaway or spend a few lazy days at home on a family staycation, focus on relaxing with your kids and making happy memories.

A Family Journal When you keep a family journal, every person in the family has a designated place to write notes for other family members to read at their convenience. To get started, purchase a basic notebook and encourage everyone to share and read at regular intervals. You can also keep your family’s journal online. For example, a family journal is included when you create a free account with family organization website www. Cozi.com.

Family FaceTime Applications like FaceTime and Skype – which allow for face-to-face video calls -- are wonderful inventions for parents who travel, work late or do not live in the same home as their kids. They are also a valuable tool for parents of teenagers, since touching base with tech-savvy teens often requires meeting them where they are at – which these days is almost always on a smartphone.

One-on-One Time Children love to receive a parent’s undivided attention, but when siblings stand in the way, they often find it hard to come by. So if Dad works the night shift and cannot be home for family dinner, an occasional father-daughter or father-son "date" would be a

CONTINUED >>>

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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wonderful (and much appreciated) way for him to sneak in more quality time with the kids.

Sunday Supper Even if there is only one day of the week that works for everyone, add family dinner to the calendar and honor the commitment. Many families find that cooking a special ‘Sunday Supper’ or splurging on Sunday Brunch at a favorite restaurant is a nice way to bring the whole family together on a day that is typically less busy than the rest. Your family may never manage to dine together every evening, but you can still keep the spirit of family dinner alive -and reap its many benefits -- by finding multiple ways to build strong and loving connections with your kids.  Alyssa Chirco is a freelance journalist and mother of two. Although she can rarely get her whole family together at the dinner table, she serves family breakfast (even if it's just cold cereal) every morning.

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CALENDAR

JANUARY EVENTS

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

DINOSAURS

NOT EVEN EXTINCTION COULD KEEP THEM AWAY! WHERE Rochester Museum and Science Center 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607 COST Admission to RMSC $13 adults; $12 seniors and college students with ID; $11 ages 3 to 18; Free for RMSC members and children under 3 WHEN Exhibit runs through January 25, 2015. HOURS Monday–Saturday: 9am–5pm Sunday: 11am–5pm MORE INFO 271-4320, www.rmsc.org

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hen was the last time you were greeted by a giant T-Rex? Don’t miss your opportunity at the DINOSAURS Exhibition at the Rochester Museum and Science Center. Be transported back to the Mesozoic era and see magnificent dinosaurs hatching, roaring, chomping and stomping in realistic detail. There are more 36

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than a dozen prehistoric creatures of land and sky to experience. Colossal in size and individually handcrafted, each monstrous creature has been designed to resemble what scientists believe dinosaurs really looked like more than 65 million years ago. Advanced computer programming technology allows the animals to

move in amazingly fluid, lifelike and brilliantly complex ways. Feeding, bellowing and fighting, these dinosaur models act and interact with captivating authenticity. Distinguished paleontologists were consulted to ensure accuracy and realism. The exhibit offers many hands-on opportunities. Use robotics to control dinosaur movements

or create your own story with magnetic boards. DINOSAURS continues through January 25, 2015 so don’t miss out. And while you’re visiting check out the film, Dinosaurs: Giants of Patagonia at the Planetarium! ----------------------Did you know Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent is proud to be a sponsor for this exhibit? We hope you get a chance to see and enjoy it!


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Hochstein Alumni Orchestra

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calendar guide: February ������������������43

01 * Thursday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia

Huge, thundering beasts darken the sky as they tower over you in the Star Theater dome! About 45 minutes. Best for ages 6 through adult. Next show at 4:15pm. 2 PM. Strasenburgh Planetarium, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/Schedule/

Hochstein Alumni Orchestra directed by Evan Meccarello. Concerts are free and occur in the Hochstein Performance Hall, unless otherwise noted. 5 PM. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, N. Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. 454-4403. hochstein.org R

Pets On The Road Lollypop Farm

now comes right to your neighborhood! Come meet adoptable animals and bring home your new best friend the very same day at one of our remote adoption events. Noon - 4 PM. Country Max, Route 19, Brockport 14420. 223-1330. www.lollypop.org

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Lego Castle Adventure SchoolBreak Week Continues Explore

the LEGO Castle Adventure® exhibit, featuring LEGO models of real-world castles created by LEGO® Master Builders. Included with general museum admission fees. Noon - 5 PM. Strong National Museum of Play, Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. museumofplay.org

RMSC Electricity Theater Get “charged up” in RMSC’s Electricity Theater and enjoy musical electricity shows with amazing arcs of lightning. 12pm, 2pm and 4pm. Included with admission. Noon. Rochester Museum & Science Center, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org

TYKES PRESENTS SOLO CIRCUS / SAT. JAN. 10

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RMSC Light The City Explore this

exciting challenge with your friends and family. How many blades should your turbine have? Get your creative juices flowing and work with others to generAnimal Tales - Drop-In ate the energy needed to power up the Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pilcity. Included with admission. 10 AM low and enjoy an animal-themed story - 4 PM. Rochester Museum & Science or two and a humane education comCenter, East Ave., Rochester 14607. ponent. Great way to introduce the won271-4320. www.rmsc.org der of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Saturday Family Fun on Center. 11 AM - Noon. Lollypop Farm, Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. 233-1330. Snowshoes Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike on the Pioneer Trail. Warm lollypop.org up watching a children’s nature movie Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia in the Riedman Theater. Program fee: Free for RMSC members. $3 per perSee Jan 1. 2 PM. son or $10/family, 10 AM - 11 AM. Exhibition Tour: Golden Legacy Cumming Nature Center, Gulick Rd., This docent-led tour of Golden Legacy: Naples 14512. 374-6160. www.rmsc.org 65 Years of Golden Books is included

& SUN. JAN. 11

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02 * Friday

This show is best enjoyed by boys and girls ages three and up. SOLO CIRCUS is a fast-paced, variety show for all ages featuring amazing magic, juggling, circus/ sideshow stunts and audience interaction. JCC Hart Theatre, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester 14618, 461-2000, www.tykestheatre.org

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in Gallery admission. 2 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu R

Frosty Fun at Buffalo Museum of Science No matter what weather

Mother Nature brings, you can have frosty family fun at Tifft! Enjoy an afternoon of hands-on activities celebrating the wintry season. Ages 5+. $5 non-members, BMS members save 10% 10 AM - Noon. Buffalo Museum of Science, Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo 14211. 716-825-6397. www.sciencebuff.org

04 * Sunday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 2 PM. R

Exhibition Tour: Golden Legacy See Jan 2. 1 PM. R

Saturday Night Skies This concise tour of the stars, constellations and planets in the current sky uses new solid-state lasers to guide you through the magnificent starfield produced by the 46-year-old star projector. 7 PM. Strasenburgh Planetarium, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www. rmsc.org/StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Schedule/

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Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals Snowshoes are available to

rent at Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center during the months of January, February, and Winter Break Family Fun The Museum is offering a variety of activities March, weather permitting. Cost: $5/ pair, a driver’s license needs to be during the upcoming winter break! All left at Nature Center. Noon - 3 PM. included with general museum admisGenesee County Park, Bethany Center sion and free for BMS members. 11 AM - 2 PM. Buffalo Museum of Science, Rd., Rochester 14054. 344-1122. www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/ Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo 14211. soilandwater/ 716-896-5200. www.sciencebuff.org R

Golden Books Reading

Sundays during Golden Legacy: 65 Years of Golden Books, hear members of the community read from their favorite Golden Books. Included in Gallery admission. 2 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. Noon. R

RMSC Light The City See Jan 3. 10 AM - 4 PM.

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Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

Winter Break Family Fun See

Jan 2. 11 AM - 2 PM. R

05 * Monday Storytime Club: Frosty Fun

Have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book! This month: Frosty Fun. Included with general museum admission fees. 10 AM 11 AM. Strong National Museum of Play, Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org R

06 * Tuesday Artist Meet Up Group This group of talented people is forming to bring creative individuals together to brain storm and discuss how to showcase our art forms and present them to the community in conjunction with other artists. 6 PM. Cobblestone Arts Center, Route 332, Farmington 14425. 3980220. www.cobblestoneartscenter. com R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

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03 * Saturday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia

Winter Break Family Fun See

Jan 2. 11 AM - 2 PM. R

See Jan 1. 2 PM.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 07 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. Held at Z.O.T. Zone. Free with Zoo admission. 11 AM. Seneca Park Zoo, St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. 336-7213. www.senecaparkzoo.org R

Volunteers Needed to Teach Adults Literacy Skills Literacy

Volunteers of Rochester has several one-hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. 5 PM - 6 PM. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester, South Avenue, Rochester 14620. 473-3030. www.literacyrochester.org

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08 * Thursday RMSC Electricity Theater See Jan

3. 4 PM.

Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

TYKEs Presents - Solo Circus

This show is best enjoyed by boys and girls ages three and up. SOLO CIRCUS is a fast-paced, variety show for all ages featuring amazing magic, juggling, circus/sideshow stunts and audience interaction. Next show starts at 2pm. 11 AM. JCC Hart Theatre, Edgewood Avenue, Rochester 14618. 461-2000. tykestheatre.org

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Wonders of Orion Once again, the easy-to-find constellation Orion and his entourage blaze in the icy winter nights. With gorgeous Hubble Space Telescope pictures, take a tour of must-see destinations in Orion. About 60 min. For ages 5 and up. 1 PM. Strasenburgh Planetarium, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/Schedule/

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09 * Friday

11 * Sunday

Au-Some Evening Once a month,

Crescent Trail Hike Guided Hike organized and hosted by the Crescent Trail Association. Adults, teenagers, and children supervised by an adult are welcome to participate. The hikes are free and do not require advance registration. 1 PM - 3 PM. Crescent Trail-Town of Perinton, E. Jefferson Road, Fairport 14450. 234-1621.

these special evenings will give children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, their friends and family an opportunity to play and learn together in an understanding and supportive environment. Free to participants. Reservations needed. 5 PM. Explore & More Museum, Gleed Ave., East Aurora 14052. 716332-4170. www.exploreandmore.org R

Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 4 PM. R

Southeast Family NightUltimate Family Challenge

Compete again other families on who can build the largest free standing balloon tower, marshmallow and spaghetti structure, and run the fastest in the obstacle course! Free to YMCA Members, Non-members must present photo ID and check in. 6 PM - 8 PM. Southeast YMCA, East Jefferson Road, Rochester 14534. rochesterymca.org R

10 * Saturday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 2 PM. R

Pets On The Road Lollypop Farm now comes right to your neighborhood! Come meet adoptable animals and bring home your new best friend the very same day at one of our remote adoption events. Noon - 4 PM. PetSaver Healthy Pet Superstore, Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. 223-1330.

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RMSC Electricity Theater See Jan

3. Noon. R

RMSC Light The City See Jan 3. 10 AM - 4 PM.

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THEATREWORKS: SKIPPYJON JONES / SAT. JAN.

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Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 1 PM. R

RMSC Electricity Theater See Jan

17: 12PM & 2PM

3. Noon. R

RMSC Light The City See Jan 3.

Based on the wildly popular book by Judy Schachner, Skippyjon Jones is an enchanting musical about unleashing your imagination and following your dreams. Nazareth Arts College, 4245 East Ave., Rochester 14618, 389-2170, artscenter.naz.edu

10 AM - 4 PM.

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Second Sunday Family Tour

Young friends and their families are invited to enjoy a story and a short tour. Included in Gallery admission. 2 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu

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Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

TYKEs Presents - Solo Circus

This show is best enjoyed by boys and girls ages three and up. SOLO CIRCUS is a fast-paced, variety show for all ages featuring amazing magic, juggling, circus/sideshow stunts and audience interaction. Next show starts at 4:30pm (ASL interpreted) 2 PM. JCC Hart Theatre, Edgewood Avenue, Rochester 14618. 461-2000. www.tykestheatre.org

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Winter Tour of Mount Hope Cemetery The Friends of Mount

Hope Cemetery offer an opportunity to experience the beauty of the cemetery in Winter with a Sunday guided tour, 60-90 minutes long,

depending on weather conditions. $5 per person-members free. 1 PM. Mount Hope Cemetery, Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester 461-3494. www.fomh.org R

12 * Monday Dating After Divorce How do

you know when you are ready to date? How do you talk to your children about your social life? Learn at this helpful workshop as you navigate this new journey. Member: $15 non JCC member: $18 includes lunch. Noon. Jewish Community Center, Edgewood Ave, Rochester 14618. 461-2000 ext 232.

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Holistic Moms Network January Meeting It’s The

Rochester Holistic Moms Network’s Second Annual White Elephant Party!

Wrap a gently pre-loved or new item that could be loved and appreciated by another and pick one especially for you! It’s a new year and time to recycle. 6 PM - 8 PM. Christ Episcopal Church, South Main Street, Pittsford 14534. hmnrochester.homewebs.com/ R

Monday Kicks for Ages 2 to 6 Playful learning activities designed

for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Included with general museum admission fees. This month: Fun with Storytelling. 10 AM - 2 PM. Strong National Museum of Play, Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. museumofplay.org R


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Painting with a Purpose at Painting With A Twist By pop-

ular demand, the Junior League is excited to announce its first social painting night! Try your hand at the sip-and-painting craze while supporting the JLR, which will receive 50% of the profits from this event. 7 PM - 9 PM. Painting with a Twist, Fairport Rd, Fairport 14450. 585-278-3565. www.jlroch.org

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13 * Tuesday RBTL Presents PIPPIN PIPPIN is

Broadway’s high-flying, death-defying hit musical! Full of extraordinary acrobatics, wondrous magical feats and soaring songs from the composer of Wicked, PIPPIN will lift you up and leave you smiling. 7 PM. Rochester Broadway Theatre, East Main Street, Rochester 14605. 222-5000. rbtl.org

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RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

14 * Wednesday Book and Beast See Jan 7.

11 AM.

Public Library. Please register. 6 PM 7 PM. Great Northern Pizza, Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. 359-7092. hpl.org R

RBTL Presents PIPPIN See Jan 13. 7 PM.

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15 * Thursday Art & Story Stroll Creative

Workshop instructor Amy J. Fisher reads Iggy Peck, Architect by Andrea Beaty.This hour-long story reading and art viewing experience is for children 2 to 5 with accompanying adult. $5 per adult (children free); preregister 11 AM - Noon. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8971. mag.rochester.edu

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Mother of Twins Club Meeting

If so, the Greater Rochester Mothers of Twins Club (GRMOTC) is for you! Come meet other twin mothers experiencing the same joys and challenges of raising multiples. Prospective members are warmly welcomed. 7 PM - 9 PM. Laurelton Presbyterian Church, Helendale Road, Rochester 14609. www.grmotc.com

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Books and Bites Teen Book Club Enjoy pizza and discuss books!

The group meets at Great Northern Pizza on the second Wednesday of each month. Sponsored by Henrietta

RBTL Presents PIPPIN See Jan 13. 7 PM.

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RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM.

RPO Presents - Kaddish On

the 70th anniversary of the Allied Forces’ liberation of the World War II Nazi concentration camps, the RPO features an inspiring composition titled ‘Kaddish – I am Here’ by Lawrence Siegel. 7 PM. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Gibbs St., Rochester 14604. 454-2100. www.rpo.org

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16 * Friday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 4 PM.

might otherwise be just a chapter in history books. 7 PM. JCC Hart Theatre, Edgewood Avenue, Rochester 14618. 461-2000 x 235. www.deeparts.org R

Children’s Film Festival Special One-Time Screening - Part of the Little Buddies series. Rated G (Recommended for children ages 8-18) ome of these programs are in English and others have English Subtitles. 11 AM. Little Theatre, East Avenue, Rochester. www.thelittle.org R

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Lift it, Launch it, Let it go

Re-invent the perfect projectile launcher. It’s a whole new challenge to explore with your friends and family. Friday, January 16–Sunday, June 21. Included with admission. 2 PM - 4 PM. Rochester Museum & Science Center, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-4320. www.rmsc.org

RBTL Presents PIPPIN See Jan

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13. 8 PM.

Family Fun in the Winter Woods Have all kinds of fun on the

Helen Gordon Trail. Then, warm up by watching a children’s nature movie in the Riedman Theater. Program fee: Free for RMSC members. $3 per person or $10 per family is requested for general public. 10 AM - 11 AM. Cumming Nature Center, Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. 374-6160. www.rmsc.org

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17 * Saturday And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank Don’t miss this power-

ful performance of Holocaust survivor testimony, live actors and historical footage. This important theatrical event puts a human face on what

Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 2 PM. MLK Jr. Celebration: InsideOut Take a look inside things to

find out how they work! Learn about what makes up the human body and see X-rays of different animals. Use tools to take apart old electronics and watch explosions by the RMSC Players.

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FIND MORE! FOR MORE CALENDAR EVENTS AND PLACES TO GO, CHECK OUR WEBSITE WHERE YOU WILL FIND: Access to events by month and day Review events by selection of library, storytimes, free events, sports, outdoor fun and more... New events posted weekly

WWW.ROCPARENT.COM Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Noon - 4 PM. Rochester Museum & Science Center, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 697-1942. www.rmsc.org 13. 2 PM.

Jones is an enchanting musical about unleashing your imagination and following your dreams. Next show starts at 2pm. Noon. Nazareth College Arts Center, East Ave., Rochester 14618. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu

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RMSC Electricity Theater See Jan

Wonders of Orion See Jan 10.

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RBTL Presents PIPPIN See Jan

3. Noon.

RPO Presents Audra McDonald Welcome one of the most honored performers of her generation to the Eastman Theatre stage for a special one-night-only performance with the RPO. 8 PM. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Gibbs St., Rochester 14604. 454-2100. www.rpo.org

1 PM.

18 * Sunday And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank See Jan 17. 2 PM. R

Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 1 PM.

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Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM.

MLK Jr. Celebration: InsideOut See Jan 17. Noon - 4 PM.

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The Snowball Earth Talk at MOST Talks are aimed at middle

school students, who must be accompanied by a parent or adult. After the event, students and their parents are invited to tour the MOST’s exhibits for free. A light breakfast is served before the event. Please RSVP. 9 AM - 11 AM. MOST - Museum of Science and Technology, S. Franklin Street, Syracuse 13202. 315-425-9068. www.most.org

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Theatreworks: Skippyjon Jones Based on the wildly popular

book by Judy Schachner, Skippyjon

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Monster Jam See Jan 17. 2 PM. R

Musical Mystery Tour: Annual Winter Open House Fun for fam-

ilies with instrument petting zoo, etc. Tickets for the Musical Mystery Tour are $3 per child, $5 per adult, and $10 per family max and are available at the door. Children 2 and under free of charge. 2 PM - 4 PM. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, N. Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. 454-4496. hochstein.org R

RBTL Presents PIPPIN See Jan 13. 1 PM.

RBTL PRESENTS: PIPPIN / TUES. JAN. 13 – SUN. JAN.18

PIPPIN is Broadway’s high-flying, death-defying hit musical! Full of extraordinary acrobatics, wondrous magical feats and soaring songs from the composer of Wicked, PIPPIN will lift you up and leave you smiling. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St., Rochester 14605, 222-5000, www.rbtl.org


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. Noon. R

Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

Winterfest at Mendon Ponds

Winter is just an excuse to have fun at Mendon Ponds Winterfest! Learn about and trying out winter activities such as ice fishing, snowshoeing and ice boating. Free event. 11 AM - 4 PM. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road, Honeoye Falls 14472. 753-7275. www2.monroecounty. gov/parks-mendonponds.php R

19 * Monday MLK Jr. Celebration: InsideOut See Jan 17. Noon - 4 PM. R

Storytime with Miss Anne at Wegmans Join Miss Anne in the

Calkins Road Wegmans Market café for a special storytime! This program for children of all ages and their caregivers includes stories, songs, rhymes, and simple sign language. 10 AM. Wegmans Calkins Road, Calkins Road, Rochester 14623. 359-7092. hpl.org R

20 * Tuesday RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

MAG Highlights Tour This docent-led tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. Meet at admissions desk. 2 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu R

24 * Saturday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 2 PM. R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. Noon. R

RMSC Prehistoric Party Adults Only Journey to the land

of the lost as you roam through the traveling exhibition, DINOSAURS, while partying prehistorically with friends! This is a 21 and older event. Must have proof of ID at the door. 7 PM. Rochester Museum & Science Center, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 697-1942. www.rmsc.org

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Serendipity Winter Wonderland Walk There is so

much going on in the winter woods. Discover plants, fungi and animals, and where, why and how they do the things they do! Program fee: Free for RMSC members. $3 per person or $10 per family is requested for general public. 10 AM - 11 AM. Cumming Nature Center, Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. 374-6160. www.rmsc.org R

21 * Wednesday Book and Beast See Jan 7. 11

AM. R

Identification Series-The Joy of Winter Weeds Many weeds

are just wildflowers growing where you don’t want them to! Identify winter wildflower silhouettes on the trail and in the field. Free for RMSC members. $3 per person or $10 per family is requested for general public. 9 AM - 10 AM. Cumming Nature Center, Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. 374-6160. www.rmsc.org R

Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

The Harlem String Quartet at Corning The string quartet’s

mission is to advance diversity in classical music, engaging audiences through the discovery and presentation of varied repertoire that includes works by minority composers. 7 PM. Corning Museum of Glass, Museum Way, Corning 14830. 866-4636264. www.corningcivicmusic.org R

Wonders of Orion See Jan 10. 1 PM.

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22 * Thursday Alternative Music Film Series

Enjoy a film screening cosponsored by the Averell Council and Lakeshore Record Exchange. Admission is $10 at the door. 7 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu

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RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

23 * Friday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 4 PM.

25 * Sunday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 1 PM. R

Exhibit Closing - Dinosaurs at RMSC Don’t Miss Out- Last

Chance to Experience Dinosaurs! It’s time to encounter the most magnificent animals that ever roamed the Earth. Are you ready? Dinosaurs are back and thundering through the Riedman Gallery. 11 AM - 5 PM. Rochester Museum & Science Center, East Ave., Rochester 14607. 2714320. www.rmsc.org R

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Give your plants a facelift for Spring Winter can be tough

on your plants. Learn about what your seeing, how to prevent damage, how to flush out healthy growth and easy tips to keep your houseplants looking and feeling healthy. 10 AM. Grossmans, Route 250, Penfield 14526. 377-1982. www.grossmans.com R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. Noon. R

RPO-The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra Take

a magical trip through the orchestra with Benjamin Britten’s masterpiece. This listening adventure for kids of all ages showcases each instrument of the orchestra separately before uniting them all together for an unforgettable ending. 2 PM. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, N. Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. 454-2100.

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Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

26 * Monday Storytime Club Have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book! This month: Frosty Fun. Included with general museum admission fees. 10 AM - 11 AM. Strong National Museum of Play, Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. museumofplay.org R

27 * Tuesday Black History Heritage Art Exhibition In honor of Black

History Month the Link Gallery will feature an art exhibition on the history and heritage of the Black community from January to March. Free Event. 9 AM - 5 PM. Link Gallery at Rochester City Hall, Church Street, Rochester 14614. 325-6669.

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Conversation on Race at Maplewood Library

Conversations on Race are facilitated and open dialogues about race and its impact on the community. 4 PM - 6 PM. Maplewood Community Library, Dewey Ave, Rochester 14613. 428-8220. www3.libraryweb.org

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RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

Science Cafe Science Cafes are interactive events that involve a faceto-face presentation with leading scientists about current science topics. This month Dr. M. Ehsan Hoque will discuss “Conversing with Computers to Improve Social Skills.” 7 PM.

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Barnes & Noble - Pittsford, Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. 586-6020. R

28 * Wednesday Book and Beast See Jan 7. 11

AM. R

29 * Thursday MAG Highlights Tour This docent-led tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. Meet at admissions desk. 6 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu R

RMSC Electricity Theater See

Jan 3. 4 PM. R

30 * Friday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 4 PM. R

Harlem Globetrotters Before

the game, take part in a once-in-alifetime experience with your family where you have an opportunity to spend time on the court with the Globetrotters-shooting, trying out ball tricks, and getting autographs and photos. 7 PM. Blue Cross Arena, War Memorial Square, Rochester 14614. 800-745-3000. www.bluecrossarena.com

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Owl Moon Nature Trail Tours

Take a moonlit, interactive, guided walk through the wintry woods and experience how NY state owls adapt to their environment. $12/$10 museum members. Reservations are required to take the guided hike. 6 PM - 8 PM. Wild Wings at Mendon Ponds Park, Pond Road, Honeoye Falls 14472. 294-8218. www.gcv.org R

Stages Presents Tarzan the Musical Tarzan struggles to navi-

gate a jungle, thick with emotion as he discovers his animal upbringing clashing with his human instincts in this musical presented by Stages. 7 PM. Stages Theater, E. Main Street, Third Floor Auditorium Center, Rochester 14605. 935-7173. mjtstages.com R

31 * Saturday Dinosaurs-Giants of Patagonia See Jan 1. 2 PM. R

HochLovesRoc Campaign Begins A weeklong showcase of

student ensembles, soloists, and multiple performances in a variety of venues across the City of Rochester! 7 PM. Hochstein School of Music & Dance, N. Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. 454-4403. hochstein.org

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Owl Moon Nature Trail Tours

Take a moonlit, interactive, guided walk through the wintry woods and experience how NY state owls adapt to their environment. $12/$10 museum members. Reservations are required to take the guided hike. 6 PM - 8 PM. Wild Wings at Mendon Ponds Park, Pond Road, Honeoye Falls 14472. 294-8218. www.gcv.org R

RMSC Electricity Theater See Jan

3. Noon. R

Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

Stages Presents Tarzan the Musical See Jan 30. 7 PM. R

Wonders of Orion See Jan 10. 1 PM.

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February 01 * Sunday Snowshoeing and Snowshoe Rentals See Jan 3. Noon - 3 PM. R

Stages Presents Tarzan the Musical See Jan 30. 2 PM. R

What’s Up: Poets Walk Memorial Art Gallery docent Kitty Jospe presents “An Inside, Illustrated Look at Poets Walk.” 2 PM. Memorial Art Gallery, University Ave., Rochester 14607. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu R

Wonders of Orion See Jan 10. 1 PM.

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02 * Monday Storytime Club: Love is in the Air Have your Storytime Club pass-

port punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book! This month: Love Is in the Air. Included with general museum admission fees. 10 AM - 11 AM. Strong National Museum of Play,

Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. 263-2700. museumofplay.org R

03 * Tuesday Artist Meet Up Group This group of talented people is forming to bring creative individuals together to brain storm and discuss how to showcase our art forms and present them to the community in conjunction with other artists. 6 PM. Cobblestone Arts Center, Route 332, Farmington 14425. 398-0220. www.cobblestoneartscenter.com R

The Engine That Could Earns Her Whistle Back to reprise its

sold-out premiere season, ArtsPower’s dynamic, song-filled adventure portrays Watty Piper’s timeless tale about hard work, determination, and the meaning of true friendship. Shows at 10am and 7pm. 10 AM. Smith Opera House, Seneca Street, Geneva 14456. www.thesmith.org

BOOK AND BEAST AT SENECA PARK ZOO /

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04 * Wednesday Book and Beast See Jan 7. 11

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7

AM. R

Disney on Ice: Princesses & Heroes Join Ariel as she yearns to

explore the world above the waves and Prince Eric as he breaks Ursula’s slithering spell to reclaim his one true love. Tickets Prices: $60, $45, $35, $25. 7 PM. Blue Cross Arena, War Memorial Square, Rochester 14614. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com/ R

Mindful Parenting Learn tech-

niques and strategies that will allow you to be more present in your parenting. With practice, mindful parenting helps you connect on a deeper level with your child. Members: $15 non JCC members: $18 price includes lunch. Noon. Jewish Community Center, Edgewood Ave, Rochester 14618. 461-2000 ext 232.

It's story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. Held at Z.O.T. Zone. Free with Zoo admission. 11 AM. 3367213, Seneca Park Zoo, St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org

05 * Thursday

06 * Friday R

Beethoven’s Fifth It starts with

the most recognizable four notes ever written, but what follows is unlike anything before or since. Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony has astounded generations of audiences. 7 PM. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Gibbs St., Rochester 14604. 454-2100. www.rpo.org

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Disney on Ice: Princesses & Heroes See Feb 4. 7 PM. R

Wine at Center Ice to Benefit Holy Childhood Leave the ice skates at home and dress in warm and cozy attire for this unique wine and craft beer tasting. For just $50 a ticket, enjoy tastings and hearty food options at center ice--all to benefit Holy Childhood. 7 PM - 10 PM. Bill Gray’s Regional Iceplex, BrightonHenrietta TL Rd., Rochester 14623. 359-3710 ext. 169. www.billgraysiceplex.com/specialevents

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PLEASE NOTE:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT IN PRINT & ONLINE?

To submit an event to our calendar e-mail: calendar@GVParent.com NEW:  Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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2/15/13

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Are you planning a party? CHECK OUR PARTY & CELEBRATION GUIDE AND ARTICLES ONLINE FOR GREAT PARTY IDEAS! WWW.ROCPARENT.COM

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • January 2015

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FIVE

PLACES

By Carol Harvey

hit the hills

FIVE SUPERB SLEDDING LOCALES IN THE ROCHESTER AREA

S

ledding can be one of the best activities on a snowy day! Who doesn't love riding down the slopes at fast speeds, racing their siblings, friends or parents? That's right parents; get in on the fun! Even though most people don't even think about it, sledding can be a wonderful workout. Climbing up the hill builds leg strength and endurance, and staying sitting up in the sled while going downhill is great for those stomach muscles. Lucky for you, Rochester has a variety of perfect sledding hills to choose from. Remember to dress warmly and enjoy these winter wonderlands. Grab your sleds and have fun!

Black Creek Park

3835 Union St., Chili, 14514 Black Creek Park has one designated sledding hill that is located behind the Woodside Lodge. This hill is open to the public throughout the winter months if snowy conditions exist. Sledding is done at your own risk.

Ellison Park

395 Rich’s Dugway Rd., Penfield, 14625 Ellison Park offers two designated sledding hills, and an ice skating rink. The sledding hills are located off Landing Road by the Disc Golf Course. The ice skating rink is located in the large parking lot off Blossom Road. There are no skate rentals; you must bring your own.

Mendon Ponds Park

North Hampton Park

Powder Mills Park

There are two designated sledding hills located across from the Cavalry House Lodge on Douglas Road, and next to the East and West Lodges on Canfield Road. Many trails are groomed throughout the winter, which accommodate the more than 20 miles of marked cross country skiing and snowshoeing trails.

At North Hampton the designated sledding hill is located across the street from the Ski Lodge on Hubble Road. The park also features a ski hill with a rope tow, which is located on Hubble Road. Swain Ski Center runs the learn-to-ski program for the Monroe County Parks Department.

At Powder Mills Park there is one designated sledding hill located by the North and South Lodges. Swain Ski Center runs a learn-to-ski program for the Monroe County Parks.

95 Douglas Rd., Honeoye Falls, 14472

304 Salmon Creek Rd., Brockport, 14420

154 Park Rd., Pittsford 14534

HELPFUL INFORMATION / Sledding is legal in the Monroe County Parks, but only on designated hills in Black Creek, Ellison, Mendon Ponds, Northampton, Powder Mills, and Webster Parks. Sledding is done at your own risk. Sledding is not permitted in any other place in any other Monroe County Park. For more information about Monroe County Parks visit www2.monroecounty.gov or call 753-7275.

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent - January 2015  

Rochester NY's Premier Parenting & Family Activity Resource

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent - January 2015  

Rochester NY's Premier Parenting & Family Activity Resource