Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent February 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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Inside february Vol.21 Number 2

our party issue

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Artfully Entertained

how to host an art-themed birthday party

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Writing Thank-You Notes how TO teach lifelong graciousness

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9 Ways to Reduce the Drama at Your Next Birthday Party

in this issue

feature articles

6|R ocParent.com On the Web in February 8 | Editor’s Note

12 17 Celebrating Black Parting With the

10 | Buzzworthy  Newsworthy & Notable

places to visit & things to do

History Month //

Pacifier // how to break the habit

20 Time to Tango With

the Tooth Fairy //

when your child loses her baby teeth

22 | Book Nook Feeling Chilly? Cuddle Up With These Winter Reads 24 | Parenting Teens & Tweens Brutal Boyfriends: What Parents Should Know About Dating Violence 60 | Calendar of Events • Family-Friendly Events • Winter Events • Library Events • Ongoing Events & Exhibits

this month's contributors Susan Henninger is a contributing writer to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine and the mother of three teenage boys. She lives in upstate NY. [Page 12]

also inside rochester baby guide winter edition pages 35-58

Malia Jacobson is a nationally published sleep expert, health journalist, and mom. [Page 17]

Life, a resource for moms seeking a more balanced social life that supports their emotional health. [Page 20]

Freelance journalist Christa Melnyk Hines is a mom of two boys and the author of Confidently Connected: A Mom's Guide to a Satisfying Social

Deena Viviani is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. [Page 22]

on the cover OUR PARTY ISSUE 125 Things to do this February 60 Party Issue 26-33 Dental Health Month 17, 20 Celebrating Black History Month in Upstate New York 12 Rochester Baby Guide 35-58

Myrna Beth Haskell is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you. [Page 24]

Heather Lee Leap is a freelance writer and mom who held an art party for each of her daughters when they turned four. [Page 26] Author Christina Katz keeps a list of people she feels grateful towards as part of her gratitude practice. Her latest book is

The Writer's Workout. [Page 28] Sue LeBreton is a freelance writer and mom of two. She is always happy to survive a birthday party without tears. [Page 30]

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

february // what you can find this month at www.RocParent.com

Tweet, Tweet! Still not sure why you should be on Twitter? Check out some of our favorite recent Tweets:

5 Tweeters to Watch Our picks for great tweets:

@taxgirl: My 11yo makes a sturdy cup of coffee. This, folks, is why you have kids.

@DrSeussQuotes / Dr. Seuss Quotes: Quoting your beloved memories of Dr. Seuss, one tweet at a time. Not affiliated with Dr. Seuss.

@chavelaque: Children's publishing: One of the few industries where you can have intense discussions about imaginary horse psychology at 10 a.m.

@RecoverRoc / Recover Rochester redistributes leftover food to the hungry Rochester population. Believers in reducing waste and addressing the dire needs of the poverty stricken in Roc. @ROCtheFuture / Aiming to Inspire, Inform & Improve education in Rochester NY through collective impact. @goodnews / Huff Post Good News: Nothing but good news from the editors of The Huffington Post! @HenriettaTeens / Henrietta TeenCorner: Keep up to date with all of the events for teens in Henrietta (run by the Henrietta Public Library) Don’t forget to follow us at @RocParent

Tweet to us @RocParent or comment on our Facebook page or posts and you could see your comments/ feedback here!

online content + editorial

r

Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day will soon be here and our article, Sweet Ideas for Valentine’s Day offers some yummy recipes that are sure to please all the “sweet hearts” in your family.

BREAFAST TIME!

February is National Hot Breakfast Month! Make breakfast a special time this monthwith some of our favorite hot breakfast recipes. Have an original favorite you want to share? Email it (with photos if possible) to Community@gvparent.com

Giveaways

Cabin Fever?

Getting tired of the same old routine and looking for something to brighten the winter days? Well check out our interesting and fun ideas to keep your family from an attack of the winter-blues.

New Year, new prizes! This year we'll continue to bring you tons of great freebies, contests and tickets to the best shows and attractions around!

 Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways 6

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

get out and about

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what’s on your mind?

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I would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@GVParent.com

re you down in the dumps and feeling like winter is dragging on forever? Don't fret – February is bursting with great things to do and fantastic events that will get you out of the house! We've packed this issue with ideas for celebrating this February... whether you're planning a party, or just looking for a local activity, this issue is full of ideas. Need stuff to do during February Break? Check out our calendar and Susan Henninger's article about Celebrating Black History Month in Upstate New York. Getting ready to have a party? We have you covered! This month's issue focuses on parties and includes great tips and ideas for planning and hosting an awesome bash. Have you joined us on Pinterest yet? This month we'll be pinning some of our best ideas for February – Valentine's DIY and crafts, winter activities, and much more. Join us there at www.pinterest.com/ GVParentMag Is adding a new bundle of joy to your family on the horizon? This month's issue includes the winter edition

of our Rochester Baby guide – find it after page 35. This edition focuses on getting ready for baby: nesting, eating healthy, and getting the sleep you need.

Spring is right around the corner! Have a great February,

Jillian

Staff

publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Ken Stevens Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2014, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

member of parenting media association

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[ buzzworthy ]

newsworthy + notable

smash that cake! For many parents, a baby’s first birthday celebration wouldn’t be complete without a messy, hands-on cake tasting. According to a recent Betty Crocker survey conducted by KRC Research, 58 percent of moms think watching the birthday baby scoop, smear and smash their first cake is the most memorable moment of the party. Betty Crocker offers this adorable cake (with cupcakes) recipe which is designed to catch baby's eye – and hands – on the big day.

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Peas & Carrots Smash Cake Prep time: 45 minutes Total time: 2 hours Yield: 24 servings

INGREDIENTS • 1 box Betty Crocker SuperMoist yellow cake mix • 1 cup mashed very ripe bananas (2 medium) • ½ cup vegetable oil • ¼ cup water • 3 eggs • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened • 1 container (6 ounces) Yoplait Original 99% Fat Free French vanilla yogurt • 3 tablespoons strained carrots baby food • ¼ cup Green Giant frozen sweet peas, cooked, cooled

DIRECTIONS Heat oven to 350°F (325°F for dark or nonstick pans). Grease bottom only of 8x4-inch loaf pan with shortening or cooking spray, and place paper baking cup in each of 18 regular-size muffin cups. In large bowl, beat cake mix, bananas, oil, water and eggs with electric mixer on low speed for 30 seconds. Beat on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally, until smooth. Place 1¾ cups batter into loaf pan. Spoon remaining batter into muffin cups. Bake loaf cake 35 to 40 minutes and cupcakes 18 to 23 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans to cooling rack. Cool completely, about 30 minutes. For

easier handling, refrigerate or freeze loaf cake 30 to 60 minutes or until firm. In small bowl, beat cream cheese and yogurt with electric mixer on medium speed until creamy and smooth. Stir in baby food until well blended. Trim rounded top off loaf cake. Using 3-inch biscuit cutter, cut 2 rounds from loaf cake. Place one round cake cut side up on plate. Spread cut side with cream cheese frosting. Top with remaining round cake, cut side down. Frost sides and top of cake with cream cheese frosting. Decorate with peas. Use remaining frosting to frost cupcakes, if desired. Store cake and cupcakes loosely covered in refrigerator.

Visit www.bettycrocker.com/smashcakes for more recipe ideas and smash cake inspiration. www.RocParent.com


Do you know an area youth who deserves recognition for his or her achievements?

Recognizing outstanding youths in our community in arts, sports, community service, and innovation.

Nominations are now open! Visit www.RocParent.com/20under20 for more information!

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celebrating

black history month

events, exhibits & activities in Rochester & around upstate New york By Susan Henninger

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lack History Month offers a plethora of events and activities that can serve as a way to open kids’ eyes to the struggles for equality that many Americans have engaged in, both in past and present times. Try a few of the suggestions below, or go to all of them, the choice is yours. But keep in mind that when you set time aside in your busy schedule to learn more about Americans of all races who were committed to seeing that everyone in our country be treated equally, you’re communicating to your offspring that we’re all in this together and that embracing diversity is one of your family’s core values.

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RIGHT HERE IN ROCHESTER

The Rochester Museum and Science Center’s (www.rmsc.org) year round exhibit, "Flight to Freedom: Rochester's Underground Railroad," allows kids to literally open a door to discover an interpretive panel highlighting Rochesterians Austin Steward, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Reverend Thomas James and their involvement with the Abolition Movement. The exhibit is frequently used by elementary and middle school teachers to illustrate what RMSC's Collections Manager, Sarah LeCounte, calls “an underappreciated facet of our history in Rochester.” LeCounte adds that the powerful display has the ability to foster deeper conversations between children and the adults in their lives about slavery and its aftermath. “It’s vital that we all understand that we, as a society, have the power to promote inclusiveness and prevent our country from ever going down that path again,” she notes. On Sunday, February 16th from 12-5 pm., the Memorial Art Gallery (mag. rochester.edu) will host their annual Black

History Month Family Day with art activities, storytelling, music and dance performances, and tours of the art gallery. Why should families plan to attend? Director of Community Programs and Outreach, Debora McDell-Hernandez explains that it gives all generations a chance to see some of the memorable African American art in MAG’s collections, including the maquette of Swing Low (a Harriet Tubman memorial) by sculptor Alison Saar and Jacob Lawrence’s “Summer Street Scene in Harlem.” The event is both accessible and affordable, with a $5.00 suggested donation for families. “It’s a quality program that gives people a chance to connect with our art collections on a number of levels,” says McDell-Hernandez.

A SHORT DRIVE AWAY

Rochester isn’t the only upstate New York town that championed equal rights for all. Farther afield, Historic Palmyra (www.historicpalmyra.com) will be commemorating Black History Month with a


plan your visit Rochester museum & science center (RMSC) www.rmsc.org memorial art gallery (MAG) mag.rochester.edu historic palymra www.historicpalmyra.com underground railroad heritage trail http://nysparks.com/historic-preservation/heritage-trails/underground-railroad/default.aspx harriet tubman house harriethouse.org Seward House sewardhouse.org LeRoy Historical Society www.leroyhistoricalsociety.org Onondaga Historical Association www.cnyhistory.org

Afro-Panamanian dance by the Panamanian Group of Rochester. Photo credit Brandon Vick

program on February 20th at 7:00 p.m. titled “The Underground Railroad in Palmyra.” The talk will be complemented by an exhibit of the same name and is appropriate for school aged children and teens. Director Bonnie Hays notes that many people don’t realize just how much Black history there is in the Wayne County area. “In 1860 there were more free Blacks living here than in Rochester," Hays explains. "People didn’t start moving to Rochester until the canal came there." Additionally, Palmyra’s Western Presbyterian Church was a station on the Underground Railroad and the Anti-Slavery Society was founded there by Dr. Horace Eaton, a

reverend whose influence and contributions to the area are still cherished today. Many abolitionists also used the church as a venue to speak out against slavery during the 1800s. Hays is full of stories about real-life incidents which happened in upstate New York that many families might not be aware of. She talks about Captain Helms, an unscrupulous man who pretended to organize a big reunion for all of the freed slaves in the Palmyra area, but once the guests had gathered at the Brister House he planned to capture them so he could collect financial rewards from their previous owners. The party was in full swing when Helms’ henchman surrounded the house but Hays

notes “the freedom seekers held them off with everything they had." Captain Helms, his plan thwarted, died penniless in Bath, NY. True stories like this bring history alive for kids, she says, and tend to be remembered long after memorized dates and names have faded from a child’s mind. Palmyra is one local stop on the Underground Railroad Heritage Trail (http://nysparks.com/ historic-preservation/heritage-trails/ underground-railroad/default.aspx). Others include the Harriet Tubman House (harriethouse.org) in Auburn which houses a Visitors Center full of artifacts and interpretive signage about Tubman’s many accomplishments, along with offering a brief tour of Tubman’s Home for the Aged, a historical landmark. Right down the street is another stop, the Seward House (sewardhouse.org) where families can take a tour and discover both the similarities and the differences between the courageous former slave and the lifelong politician. Seward came late to abolitionism, but was ultimately committed to seeing an end to the practice of slavery, while keeping America one united continued >>>

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rmsc's flight to freedom exhibit

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nation. Though the Seward House Museum is closed during the month of February, special tours, specifically focusing on abolitionist history in the area, will be offered. Contact John Kinglsey at (315) 252-1283 to make a reservation. The LeRoy Historical Society (www.leroyhistoricalsociety.org) takes a different approach to learning more about the Underground Railroad history – a self-guided driving tour. For $1.00, families can pick up a map at the Historical Society that includes numerous stops on a sixteen mile trail tracing the history of abolitionism in that part of the state. Curator Lynne Belluscio gives an example of one stop on the tour, a house where Elijah Huftelen lived. (Huftelen assisted Underground Railroad stationmaster Daniel MacDonald in helping many freedom seekers pass through LeRoy.) According to Belluscio, Huftelen subsequently wrote two small books which greatly helped


to piece together LeRoy’s part in the anti-slavery movement. Syracuse also has a stop on the Heritage Trail – the Onondaga Historical Association (www. cnyhistory.org). Karen Cooney, Support Services Administrator, says they have two ways for families to learn more about how the Underground Railroad operated in the Syracuse area. There’s an ongoing, permanent exhibit, “Freedom Bound: Syracuse and the Underground Railroad,” along with two special dramatic presentations during the month of February. “Jerry’s Story” (February 2nd and 8th) tells the story of a freed black man, Jerry, who lived and worked in Syracuse. When the Fugitive Slave Act passed, Jerry was jailed and was to be returned to the South. Outraged by this, a crowd of Syracuse residents broke into the jail to free him. The second reenactment, “Salt City Abolitionists” (Feburary 16th) dramatizes the meeting that took place following Jerry’s rescue, when the people who had freed him were attempting to deal with the repercussions that followed. Cooney suggests seeing both presentations, if possible, as it allows families to gain a deeper perspective on the types of issues abolitionists were facing during that time period. The cost is $8/ person, $6/students and reservations are highly recommended as seating is limited. For further information, contact Karen Cooney at (315) 4281864 ext. 312. Seeing the actual places where events that shaped our country’s history occurred as well as hearing stories about real people who participated in the abolitionist movement give kids and parents an accurate sense of place and a context for the history they’ve read about in books. It can also open the door for families to have meaningful conversations about equality, justice, and tolerance. For a brochure of the Underground Railroad Heritage Trail go to: www. rmsc.org/experiences/exhibits/urrheritagetrail/  Susan Henninger is a contributing writer to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine and the mother of three teenage boys. She lives in upstate NY. Contact her at sue@fingerlakeswriter.com or online at www.fingerlakeswriter.com.

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february is

dental health month

parting with the

pacifier how to break the habit

By Malia Jacobson

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hether they’re crystal clear, neon-bright, or covered in rhinestones, pacifiers are the modern baby’s accessory of choice. Thanks to studies showing that they reduce the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), most pediatricians have given pacifiers the green light. A study reported in the journal Pediatrics found that a whopping 68 percent of parents give them to their babies before six weeks of age. Babies aren’t the only ones who love them; parents quickly become addicted to the soothing effects of pacifiers on their offspring. Unfortunately, it often becomes a habit that overstays its welcome.

Why Wean?

While some children give up non-nutritive or comfort sucking on their own, others cling to the habit well into the preschool years. According to Dr. Maria Aslani-Breit, a Rochester area dentist, using a pacifier too much (sucking vigorously) or too long (many hours per day) can change the position of teeth, resulting in flared and spaced maxillary incisors, an anterior open bite, a narrow palate and maxillary arch, which can also result in a posterior crossbite. Many doctors and dentists recommend ending the habit before permanent front teeth begin to emerge, which can happen before kindergarten. "Weaning can start around 12 months of age - the same time that you wean a child from the bottle," recommends Aslani-Breit. "If your child is not ready, you can aim to stop the habit by age two. Remember it is always easier to wean a child from the pacifier than from thumbsucking" Potential problems extend beyond the teeth. Pacifier use is associated with otitis media, or middle ear infections. Minor health upsets like gastrointestinal infections and oral thrush are also more commonly seen in pacifier users.

Parents may be swayed by medical data and dentists’ recommendations, but kids often need some coaxing to give up the long-held habit. Guilt-inducing lectures about dental problems or germs may be counterproductive, causing them to dig in their heels. Instead, help them become confidently pacifier-free with these tactics.

Literary Loss

Before embarking on a pacifier-purge, check out some children’s books on the topic. After listening to stories like The Last Noo-Noo by Jill Murphy or Pacifiers Are Not Forever by Elizabeth Verdick, your child may be more receptive to the idea.

Pacifier Bear

"Substitute the pacifier with a comfort object - such as a favorite stuffed animal instead of using the pacifier," Aslani-Breith recommends. When three-year-old Violet was ready to give up her pacifier, mom Bec Langham took her to a popular build-yourown-stuffed-animal store. Violet deposited her last pacifier safely inside the teddy bear before it was sewn up. The bear now continued >>>

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serves as both a cuddly friend and a unique reminder of Violet’s younger days.

Baby Charity

Your child may be willing to donate her pacifiers to a good cause. Gather up the pacifiers, and pay a visit to a friend with a young baby. Have your child “gift” the baby with the pacifier collection, and shower her with praise for her generosity.

The Paci Fairy

Steal this idea from Supernanny Jo Frost: have your child place his pacifiers in a large envelope to mail to the “pacifier fairy." Put the envelope in the mailbox together before bed. Once he’s asleep, swap the envelope for a new toy. When he wakes up, excitedly take him to the mailbox to find his new treasure.

Make the Cut

Snipping a small hole in a pacifier can help it lose its appeal quickly, encouraging a child to give it up on his own. Be sure to dispose of a broken pacifier promptly, because it can harbor bacteria or become a choking hazard if a child continues to use it.

Out of Sight, Out of Mind Parents seeking the quickest route to pacifier-freedom can simply throw them all away. Kelly Stallings opted for the cold-turkey approach with daughter Taylor. “The first night was rough, but after that, she didn't care,” she says. Just make sure to get rid of each and every one, so your child isn’t tempted to relapse (and you’re not tempted to cave).

No matter how stubbornly your child clings to a beloved binky, eventually it will be a thing of the past. Once your child is free of the pacifier habit, you’re free as well — from relentlessly searching for them, washing them, and buying them. Enjoy your well-earned liberation (at least until the next must-have item comes along.)  Malia Jacobson is a nationally published sleep expert, health journalist, and mom. She blogs about sleep and family health at www. thewellrestedfamily.com.

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february is

dental health month

time to tango with the tooth fairy tips for when your child is ready to lose her baby teeth

By Christa Melnyk Hines

I

t seems like just days ago when I waited patiently for my son's first little biters to erupt in his infant mouth. Those days somehow melted magically into years and before I knew it, I could hear the Tooth Fairy getting ready to flutter about. Like many parents, I wondered: what is developmentally normal when it comes to baby tooth loss; how does the tooth-obsessed fairy collect her pearly prizes; and what is the paying pixie's going rate for a baby tooth these days?

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Losing Baby Teeth

According to Dr. Randy Raetz, a Rochester-based dentist, a child's first adult molars usually come in around age 6 (there are no baby teeth that these replace). The first baby tooth lost is usually the central incisors, typically around age 7. Should you yank a loose tooth? "If a baby tooth is wiggly, then yes, go ahead and loosen it up," says Ratez. "If you are unsure, or afraid, or the child is afraid, see your dentist." If your child is anxious about the loose tooth, Ratez recommends that parents avoid using words like shot, pain, needle, and hurt. "Use the term pressure and wiggle," he says. "If you tell the child this is not going to hurt, then they are going to think it is going to hurt. " How can you help a loose tooth along? Ratez suggests wiggling it back and forth. Apples and sticky foods help too!

Enter the Tooth Fairy

That first loose tooth can cause anxiety for some children. Often, anxiety turns to excitement as children listen to tooth-loss stories exchanged among classmates and anticipate the reward the Tooth Fairy leaves behind. While the exact origin of the enigmatic Tooth Fairy is steeped in mystery, historically the loss of baby teeth is an important rite of passage. The earliest known written records regarding baby teeth date from northern Europe and describe a tann-fe, or tooth fee, in which money was paid for a baby tooth. In the Middle Ages, Europeans, fearing witches could curse their children if they acquired their baby teeth, buried the teeth in the ground. The Vikings wore baby teeth as jewelry, considering them good luck talismans in battle. Other cultures fed the teeth to animals


believing the adult tooth would resemble the animal's powerful, strong teeth. Today, countries all over the world continue to mark the loss of baby teeth with various customs. In Spain, France, Italy and Mexico, for example, the Tooth Fairy appears as a small white mouse or rat, symbolic because rodents have strong teeth that never stop growing. In Sweden, the baby tooth is placed in a glass of water where it is mysteriously replaced overnight with coins. And, it is customary in much of the Middle East for baby teeth to be thrown towards the sun and in Asia, onto the roof. The Tooth Fairy as many of us know her, appeared in the early 1900s.

Cups, Pillows, Pockets and Doors

The Tooth Fairy isn't picky about how she collects baby teeth. Lori Poland grew up placing her baby teeth in a clear glass of water on her nightstand. She says she loved fishing a wet $2 bill out of the cup the next morning, setting it out to dry and storing it in her memory box. Although a tooth placed in a plastic ziplock bag or envelope tucked under the pillow should do the trick, many parents opt for a Tooth Fairy pillow or pouch for their youngster. Retailers offer an assortment of pillows or try making your own. Monica Bradford designed a Tooth Fairy Pocket for her 6-year-old son when he lost his first tooth. "He placed his tooth in the pocket, hung it on his bedpost and woke up to find $2 for his first tooth," she says. (For instructions on making your own Tooth Fairy Pocket, visit Bradford's blog thttp://scrapinspired. com/2011/10/tooth-fairy-pocket/.) Cathy Green, mom of three, says the Tooth Fairy enters their home through a small ceramic door that Green's step-mother designed. The door is outside the kids' bedrooms. After collecting the tooth from a small box under the child's pillow, the Tooth Fairy replaces the tooth with her reward and leaves the box next to the tiny door.

The Going Rate

According to a 2013 survey conducted by Visa, kids are receiving an average of $3.70 per tooth. That's up from $2.60 per tooth in 2011 -- a 42 percent jump. Beth Foster says that the Tooth Fairy typically pays $1 per tooth although her daughter Logan, 6, discovered a $5 payout under her pillow for her fifth tooth. "This is a Foster tradition and I've been assured the good old fairy does not leave $10 for the tenth," Foster says.

What Does the Tooth Fairy Do with Those Teeth?

Legend says that the Tooth Fairy tosses the teeth up to the sky and they become stars. Naturally, many theories exist. Foster's daughter Logan says, "The fairy uses her wand to shrink the teeth to a very small size so she can carry them in a bag with her from house to house. She then takes the teeth to Santa so he can use them to make toys." Whatever she does with them, with each tooth lost, adulthood gains another foothold on our kids. No wonder throughout the ages we've found ways to mark this stage in our kids' lives, which seems as fleeting as the Tooth Fairy herself.  Freelance journalist Christa Melnyk Hines is a mom of two boys and the author of Confidently Connected: A Mom's Guide to a Satisfying Social Life, a resource for moms seeking a more balanced social life that supports their emotional health. She is a regular contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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[ book nook]

By Deena Viviani

feeling chilly?

cuddle up with these snowy reads more reads

Need some more books to get through February break? Try these chilly choices: Picture Books A Perfect Day By Carin Berger Over and Under the Snow Written by Kate Messner & Illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal Ladybug Girl and the Big Snow By David Soman and Jacky Davis Cold Snap Written by Eileen Spinelli & Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman Non-Fiction Winter By Stephanie Turnbull Middle Grade Because of Mr. Terupt By Rob Buyea Breadcrumbs By Anna Ursu Young Adult After the Snow & One Crow Alone By S. D. Crockett Trapped By Michael Northrop Bittersweet By Sarah Ockler Cold Spell By Jackson Pearce

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Penguin and Pinecone: A Friendship Story

By Salina Yoon Walker & Company, 2012, hardcover, $13.89, Ages 2-5 What’s cuter than a penguin wearing a scarf? A pinecone wearing a scarf! Join Penguin as he travels from his snowy home to bring Pinecone to the forest so he can grow big and strong. Sparse text and accessible illustrations make this book a hit with preschoolers. Keep some pinecones and yarn on hand for a post-reading craft party!

The Very Fairy Princess Sparkles in the Snow

Written by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton & Illustrated by Christine Davenier Little, Brown, 2013, hardcover, $18.00, Ages 3-5 The snow is falling in this sparkly addition to the New York Times bestselling series, but Geraldine doesn’t mind. In fact, the snow will make her Winter Wonderland Festival chorus performance even more magical. That is until it’s time for her solo and her sparkle starts to fade. Will she summon her inner fairy princess in time to save the concert? Don’t let the celebrity authors fool you; Geraldine stands up on her own two purple feet.

Colored pencil and ink illustrations add the perfect expressive and sweet touches to this story for princess lovers.

Mountain Dog

Written by Margarita Engle & Illustrated by Olga and Aleksey Ivanov Henry Holt, 2013, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 9-14 After his mother is sent to prison, 11-year-old Tony moves from L.A. to the Sierra Nevada region to live with a great-uncle he’s never met. There, Tony bonds with Uncle Leo’s searchand-rescue dog Gabe who helps Tony get through this transitional period with love and loyalty. This novel is in verse, so it looks like a poem but reads like lyrical prose,

the perfect combination to appeal to reluctant readers.

Lara's Gift

By Annemarie O’Brien Knopf, 2013, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 9-14 All Lara has ever wanted is to be the next kennel steward and breed borzoi dogs fit for the Tsar. Then her baby brother is born and Lara’s future is demoted to seamstress and wife – unless she can prove her connection to these amazing animals. Lara is a brave, smart girl and role model in this historic Russian tale that will make readers want a puppy of their own.


Ashfall

By Mike Mullin Tanglewood, 2012, paperback, $10.95, Ages 14 and up Below the hot springs and geysers of Yellowstone National Park lies a supervolcano that is overdue to erupt. Like most people, Alex doesn’t worry about it – until the day it blows. Alex must survive amongst the ash, chaos, and outbreaks of violence as he seeks out his family. This natural disaster novel is a survival story of the best kind: one that makes the reader think, what would I do? The cliffhanger ending would be maddening if the sequel did not already exist: Ashen Winter released in 2013, and book three, Sunrise, is coming in spring 2014.  Deena Viviani is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. Read more reviews on her blog www.deenaml.livejournal.com or send her a note at DeenaViviani@hotmail.com – she loves to hear from readers!

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

brutal

boyfriends

what every parent should know about dating violence

a

parent’s worst nightmare: Her teen daughter’s fairytale relationship has somehow spiraled violently out of control, and she doesn’t seem to want to free herself from it. Unfortunately, relationship violence is not all that uncommon. According to a 2011 survey conducted by researchers at the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), “9.4 percent of high school students reported being hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend in the twelve months prior to the survey.”

Dating violence crosses all racial, economic, and social lines. Most victims are young women, who often keep their suffering secret, so it is typical that parents don’t find out until things have gotten extremely out of hand. As a mother of a teenage daughter who was abused by a controlling and violent boyfriend, Heidi* explains, “We only found out because my husband took her phone for another reason and was shocked to see messages our daughter’s boyfriend was sending her.” Heidi says that Sabrina’s* boyfriend did not start mistreating her until months into the relationship. By that time, he had already established control over her. “He would tell her things like, ‘Your mom and dad don’t love you like I do,’” Heidi reports. She says that the

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situation escalated rapidly. The abuse was both physical and verbal, but Heidi explains that Sabrina would hide the abuse from them. “The school called us one day and said that we had to get there immediately because our daughter had been hurt by her boyfriend.” Heidi describes the fear, hopelessness, anger and frustration that a parent feels when this is happening to her child. “It’s hard to understand how awful this is unless you are going through it.” The entire family is affected by the situation. “It started to affect our marriage and our other children because we were consumed with Sabrina’s situation.” Can parents help their daughters out of the abyss?

Avoiding Abuse from the Get-Go A healthy and loving relationship with male caregivers is a good prerequisite for future relationships because girls will know what to look for in a male companion. However, this does not guarantee that your daughter won’t become involved in a destructive relationship. “The key lies in creating a strong loving bond between a daughter and her dad. This is the first relationship with a man that starts your daughter on her love map and later leads to her choice of men to date and marry,” explains Carole Lieberman, MD, host of the weekly Internet radio show, Dr. Carole’s Couch, and member of the clinical faculty at UCLA's Neuropsychiatric Institute. Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, founder of “This World: The Values Network” and international best-selling author of thirty books, including Ten Conversations You Need to Have with Your Children (William Morrow, 2006), counsels, “I reject the modern, fraudulent notion that you’re not supposed to mettle in your child’s life. Parents need to be up to

speed on what their children are doing.”

Warning Signs Some suitors don’t seem violent at first, so it is imperative that parents are aware of potential warning signs. Christine Weber, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist practicing in Seaford, NY, instructs parents to be wary of the following behaviors: •Y our teen stops sharing information with friends and family. •Y our teen becomes isolated because her abuser uses isolation to satisfy a need for control. •Y our teen defends or justifies the abuse (e.g. “He didn’t mean to shove me.”). •Y our teen drastically changes her appearance to satisfy her boyfriend’s needs instead of her own. •Y our teen’s boyfriend refuses to meet you. (Not necessarily a sign of abuse, but a general “red flag.”)

Steps Parents Should Take “If you really want your teen daughter to navigate her way through a difficult or abusive relationship, you need her to

Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: Adolescents affected by divorce. How parents can help. Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com www.RocParent.com


steps to get out of an abusive relationship. (share with your teen) The following tips are provided by Mike Domitrz, founder of The Date Safe Project (www. DateSafeProject.org) which provides educational programs and materials about verbal consent, respecting boundaries, healthy intimacy, and support for survivors of violence. Recognize the Abuse: You deserve equal choice and freedom in all aspects of a relationship. Disrespect or violence of any kind (emotional, verbal, or physical) is NEVER okay. Document: Document the abuse in order to see the red flags and take steps to leave the relationship. Seek medical attention. Not all injuries are visible and it is another way to document the abuse. Change All Access: Change your phone password and all online passwords prior to telling the abuser you are ending the relationship. Safety First: If your safety is at all a concern in meeting with the abuser, you do not “owe it”

trust you; otherwise, she won’t even be able to hear you,” says Robert Epstein, PhD, a senior research psychologist at the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology and author of Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence (Linden Publishing, 2010). “The most important way to achieve this is to show her that you trust her judgment, and not to criticize her for being an idiot who is being taken advantage of by a defective male.” Rabbi Boteach says that parents need to be in positions of authority but understand their child’s needs. “Rather than saying ‘I won’t allow it,’ ask questions about what your teen is feeling, such as ‘Do you feel this young man respects you?’” Lieberman recommends that parents encourage their

to the abuser to meet in-person to end the relationship. Be Clear: When ending any relationship, use clear wording. For example, “This relationship is not one I want to be in today or at any time in the future. We are no longer dating.” Hand Over & Report Technology: Give your phone to a trusted adult who will report any abusive messages sent to you from the abuser. Free Yourself of Stress: Stay away from online communities where the abuser may try to influence you (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, etc.) Your Options: Be willing to call the police and/or turn to additional resources such as: + Local abuse crisis centers + The National Dating Abuse Helpline: 1.866.331.9474 + www.breakthecycle.org (online dating abuse prevention program) +w ww.loveisrespect.org (information about healthy relationships)

daughter to see a therapist, but must step in to protect their child from violence. “If she ignores your warnings and sneaks out anyway, contact the school and the police, especially if there is proof of physical abuse.” Epstein urges parents to be on their daughter’s side by giving her a better quality of love than her boyfriend is giving -- unconditional love and being there to pick up the pieces is essential.  *The names of the people in the lead-in interview have been changed to protect their privacy. Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). Visit www.myrnahaskell.com. Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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artfully entertained

how to host an art-themed birthday party By Heather Lee Leap

A

n art-themed party at home requires creativity and flexibility, but no significant artistic ability. Best of all, it will keep guests and the birthday child creatively engaged. This party theme is ideal for children ages four to nine with a guest size of six or fewer children. Recruit a few parents to stay or hire a neighborhood teen to offer support and encouragement for these open-ended party activities.

Art Party Table

Jump right in to your art theme by inviting guests to decorate the table as they arrive. Spread your table with a white paper cloth and supply guests with crayons. If you expect a tame group, leave crayons loose for kids to exchange them with one another. For a more rambunctious crowd, sort crayons into baskets or cups so that each child has a wide range of colors to choose from without haggling for the cerulean blue or resorting to tossing them across the room.

Art Party Activity

Say no more to the party craft that gets thrown in the trash as soon as the guests leave. Instead, have each child decorate a tote bag that they can use over and over again. At your local craft supply store, purchase a canvas tote bag for the birthday child and each guest. While you’re there, buy fabric markers and squeeze bottles of fabric paint in a variety of colors. Save thin cardboard, such as cereal boxes, in the weeks leading up to the party. Before guests arrive, cut cardboard to an appropriate size and insert one piece into each bag to

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prevent paints or markets from bleeding through. Spread a drop-cloth or tarp on the floor to use as a work surface. Place the markers, paints and tote bags on the tarp. Children can sit around the perimeter with materials in the center to minimize damage from spills. Avoid directing children how to create with the materials – each child’s art creation will be unique. Do not expect young children to make precise letters or shapes. Adults can write children’s names and ages on the bags for them with the fabric markers or paint. Keep a bucket of warm soapy water and a washcloth beside the work station to quickly clean up spills and paint-covered hands. Small children may need a reminder not to turn their bags over while they are wet. Instruct them to decorate only one side. When finished, put the bags in a safe place to dry. Leaving the cardboard inside allows the bags to stay flat for transport if they are still wet at the end of the party. After decorating bags, pick up craft supplies and fold up the tarp to free up space for the kids to play.

Art Party Cake

A birthday cake is a perfect blank canvas. A half-sheet sized cake will leave you an excess of leftovers, but offers a large enough canvas for a small group of eager decorators. Ice the cake simply with white frosting and forgo the usual “happy birthday” message. Place the cake on a coffee table or bench to allow everyone to participate at once. Have kids wash hands thoroughly, then they can stand or kneel at the bench to work. Offer a limited color selection of squeezable frosting and sprinkles. This cuts down on squabbles over colors and results in a less chaotic looking cake. Try this same technique with cupcakes – let each child decorate his own cupcake with sprinkles and colored frosting.

Art Party Goodie-Bags

A keepsake tote bag may be enough swag, but in some circles an elaborate goodie bag has become the norm. Prior to the party, stock up on art supplies that can be repackaged for each child. Glitter glue, glue sticks, colored pencils, stickers and fun erasers often come in packages of five or eight. Repackage these into goodie bags, with just one or two of each item for each child rather than a whole pack of each. You can also include watercolor paint sets, sketch pads and scrapbook paper. Surplus supplies can be added to your own stock of craft supplies for future use. Party guests and your child will end the day with a unique tote bag, a memorable cake-decorating experience and a few art supplies of their own. An extra bonus for the birthday child is an opportunity to decorate the other side of the bag at a later date. You will have an activity for the next rainy day, a reminder to use up the last of your markers and paints and the satisfaction of knowing you pulled off a creative and engaging party.  Heather Lee Leap is a freelance writer and mom who held an art party for each of her daughters when they turned four. Cake decorating has become a party tradition in her home.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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writing thank-you notes how to teach lifelong graciousness

By Christina Katz

T

eaching kids to express gratitude doesn't have to end in tears or tantrums, if you approach the task with an upbeat, playful attitude yourself. Teach your kids to think of gratitude as "thank-you time," instead of attaching too much anxiety to the task of writing a simple note. Using a simple, relaxed approach, you can teach your kids valuable lessons about appreciation that will last a lifetime.

Somebody loves you. Start by reminding your child that needing to write a thankyou note is wonderful in the first place because it means someone loves you enough to give you a gift. Who wouldn't want to say thank you when you put it like that?

Let preschoolers scribble. Use blank

cards and envelopes to get very young children involved in the thank-you note process. Explain what you are creating in a cheery tone, and you will set a great precedent for fun, colorful thank-you notes down the road.

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Forget time-pressure. Chillax. Writing

thank-you notes is not a race or a competition. The more pressure you apply to grateful actions, the more angst you instill in the task. If your mother insisted you write your notes within twenty-four hours doesn't mean that's the only way. Let the kids write the thank-you notes when you can find some thoughtful, downtime to get the job done well, rather than feeling rushed.

Keep a gift list. This is key at a busy

party. Keep a clipboard handy where you mark down who to thank and why. If someone gives a gift, describe the gift with a few details. But don't stop there. If someone does a good deed, jot down a few words about the person and the deed. This clipboard becomes your go-to source for a regular thank-you note practice. When it comes time to craft your notes, you'll have special and thoughtful information to include.

Keep cards at the ready.

Purchase a greeting-card sorter so you can keep track of all types of cards, including blank cards and homemade cards. Let kids choose the card design they prefer or let them create their own.

In a Pinch: Digital Thank-you Notes Are Fine Sometimes you just can't sit down together and create that special gratitude-imbued note with your child or kids. In which case, turn to digital thank-you notes to get the job done. And don't be hard on yourself. You'll send the snail mail card next time, when you are less stressed. Here are some great resources for online thank-you cards: Jacquie Lawson: www.jacquielawson.com Egreetings: www.egreetings.com JibJab: www.jibjab.com Punchbowl.com: www.punchbowl.com

Have special thank-you tools.

Create a thank-you note kit with special supplies just for thank-you note writing to make the process more fun. Here are some ideas of what to include: •P ens or markers – think glitter or calligraphy •S tickers or even envelope sealing wax •S pecial thank-you-note stamps


have you thanked these people lately? Thank-you notes are not just for family. Make sure the folks who support your child occasionally make it onto her thank-you list. Consider adding: • Classroom teachers • Extra-curricular teachers • Coaches • Group leaders • Elderly relatives • Good neighbors • Babysitters • Tutors or big buddies • Volunteers who work with your child • Anyone who goes above and beyond

Provide writing templates. Neatly handwrite or type

up age-appropriate templates for your child to follow when writing thank-you notes until your child learns what is typically is included by heart. Be sure to include: 1. A greeting 2. A thank-you for the gift or gesture 3. What the recipient likes most 4. Tell the giver you hope to see them soon 5. Say "thanks again" 6. Close on an upbeat note

Also provide address templates.

Very young children will need to have their thank-you notes addressed for them. Once kids are old enough to write, create an address template for them to follow, including the return address, address, and where the stamp goes. Teach them to add, "Please do not bend," when sending photos and to use extra postage for notes with extra goodies added.

Encourage self-expression.

Teach your children that thank-you notes are a form of self-expression. Add drawings of the gift or gifts, photos of the opening of the gift, photos of the gift in action, a photo of your child with the gift-giver, or a drawing of the child with the gift-giver. See what ideas your child can come up with and let him use his unique talents and work with what you've got on hand.

2-4-6-8, look for folks to appreciate!

Don't merely write thank-you notes for gifts. If someone's good deed impacts your child, ask if that person should go on the gratitude list. In this way, note writing becomes a celebratory habit, not merely a task to dread after gifts have been received.  Author Christina Katz keeps a list of people she feels grateful towards as part of her gratitude practice. Her latest book is The Writer's Workout from Writer's Digest Books.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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9 atways to reduce the drama your next birthday party By Sue LeBreton

E

xpectations of both parents and children run high to have the perfect party. This makes planning and hosting a birthday party stressful. Despite your best efforts, if you have a young or sensitive child, it is possible that your child or a guest may end up in tears at the exciting, stimulating event in which you have invested considerable time and money. Prevent your party from becoming a tear fest. Follow these nine easy steps to keep the enjoyment level elevated for all attendees – you included.

1.

When setting your guest list follow the classic rule of your child’s age plus one for the number of invitations. Not many three year olds can handle the thrill of a huge party. How does your child do with other large, family events such as Thanksgiving? Use any lessons you have learned from other celebrations to help you develop this party.

2.

Schedule the festivities when your child is at their natural peak. If they still nap do not schedule the party at the time of day when they are usually sleepy. If your child is an early bird, plan a morning

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event. If your tween or teen is lobbying for a sleepover party but you know from experience that they turn into a nightmare without enough sleep, steer them in another direction.

3.

Look at a variety of options for the party location. For some children a party held at home will reduce the potential for emotional overload. However, this is not always the case. Shandy Tilley’s daughter had meltdowns at a few home parties before her mom recognized that she was stirred up even by the preparations. “Having them offsite allowed us to have a real start and finish time and two hours was plenty. It made the transition easier for Tatiana if everyone came to the party at the same time and left at the same time.”

4.

Think about the timing of gift opening. Who says the gifts must be opened at the end of the party? My son pushed back at this concept one year and we let him open the gifts as guests arrived. This freed him to enjoy the planned activities instead of coming over every two minutes to ask when we were opening all those glorious presents. Anne Marie Healey used the same tactic when her two children were young. “ It also allowed the giver to have some one-on-one attention on their gift.”

5.

Gift giving can be a source of potential anxiety for guests as well. Children

are usually excited about showing off the present they brought and wrangle to have theirs opened first. When Healey worked at a preschool that hosted parties they managed this process by giving each child a square with a number on it. The child sits until their number is drawn and then they offer their gift to the guest of honor.

6.

Manage your child’s expectations about presents to prevent an embarrassing or hurtful response to a gift. To avoid a random “I hate it” or “I already have that”, you can role-play before the party. Rehearse several times by putting silly things, such as a can of peas, in a box. Have the child open it and teach them to respond with the requisite thank you.

7.

Think about the games or activities you are offering. Even simple, seemingly age appropriate activities can backfire if they don't fit your child. Tilley suggests, “Don't play competitive games. Who knew musical chairs could be so trauma provoking?”

8.

Be organized with the games or activities so that the guests are too busy to misbehave. “I always have extra activities planned in case things go faster than expected,” says Tanya Bonham, mom of two and owner of Parties to Go.


9.

If you feel pressured to keep up with parties being coordinated by your mom friends take Tilley’s advice, “Don't worry about competing with the supermoms. Invite them to help.” As your guest list grows along with your child and parents no longer stay at the party, recruit extra hands. Most importantly, tailor the party to your child’s personality and temperament. If tears occur, take heart and remember that it will be funny several years down the road. 

Sue LeBreton is a freelance writer and mom of two. She is always happy to survive a birthday party without tears.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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2/15/13

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Are you planning a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

www.rocparent.com Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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Join our Team! Interested in working for an award-winning company that cares about Rochester’s families? Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is looking for an Account Executive to work with area businesses who focus on the parenting community for both our print and growing web products. For information on this and other positions at GVP, go to www.RocParent.com/employment

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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Rochester

Baby

Guide • Winter 2014 Edition

contributing writers

john boccacino is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster. [Page 40] Meagan Ruffing is a freelance parenting writer. She is pregnant with her third child and is currently enjoying the nesting stage. [Page 44] malia jacobson is s a freelance writer specializing in sleep and health. Her most recent book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades. [Page 46] dr. ruth lawrence is the Medical Director of the Breastfeeding and Human Lactation Study Center and a Professor of Pediatrics, Obstetrics/ Gynecology at Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong in Rochester.[Page 48] sarah lindsey is a freelance writer (and mom of four young children) who specializes in family nutrition. [Page 51]

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Nesting 101: hello, third trimester!

inside 38 Publisher's Note

an introduction from our publisher

40 DayStar

a day respite service for children braving serious medical & developmental complexities

46 Pregnant-zzzzz

getting the sleep you need while you're expecting

48 A Mother's Precious Gift

51

Eat Up! natural remedies for common pregnancy ailments

the benefits of breastfeeding for mom & baby

54 Area Resources and Support Services

find past editions of our baby guide online at rocparent.com/baby

>>

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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[ publisher’s note ]

Celebrating 20 years of excellence!

By Barbara Melnyk

Oh, Baby! W

elcome to our 14th Rochester Baby Guide and our second annual Winter Baby Guide. Each edition features unique content that will guide you through new parenthood and raising your little one.

YOUR FAVORITE

award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE

• G old Award WINNER for the design of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • S ILVER Award WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2012 issue) • S ILVER General Excellence Award for our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • B ronze GENERAL EXCELLENCE award for Genesee Valley Parent’s website RocParent.com • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide

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What’s inside? We decided to focus this edition primarily on you and your pregnancy. In this issue you will find tips on managing sleep, remedies for common pregnancy ailments and handling your sudden urge for nesting. We are also pleased to introduce you to Daystar, a wonderful service in the area that provides services for children braving serious medical and development complexities. Plus, don't forget to check out our area resource list that includes local groups, services, and organizations. We’re proud to announce that our Baby Guide continues to be a winner! Last year’s Rochester Baby received two awards – Finalist in Overall Writing and Gold Award Winner in Overall Design – from the Parenting Media Association.

Missed previous editions? Catch up on Baby content and find more pregnancy and maternity related articles on our website at www.RocParent.com Look for our Summer Edition on stands in early July.

Happy Parenting!

Barbara


Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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DayStar

a day respite service for children braving serious medical & developmental complexities

By John Boccacino

f

or parents seeking day care options in and around Rochester, there exists a

bevy of choices that offer creative activities and ample social interactions in an educational setting. But what about parents of medically fragile children with chronic illnesses such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, cerebral palsy, congenital heart disease and muscular dystrophy?

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Ryan Ortiz-McCullough at daystar

For these children, living with a chronic debilitating condition often requires the use of medically-driven technology to remain alive while juggling a sometimes intense and complex medication routine. Additionally, these children often need to be monitored more closely than their peers to prevent deterioration in their medical conditions that could seriously threaten their physical

and mental development as well as their ability to live.

Offering Comfort and Care For parents of medically fragile children like Jill Milliman, finding a safe and healthy day care atmosphere where her child can learn and play with peers while receiving the best medical


attention can be a trying task. Milliman, a Webster resident, has a daughter, Lilyana, 3, who lives with both epilepsy and cerebral palsy. Lilyana originally spent time in a traditional day care setting, but without a full-time health professional on hand, Lilyana wasn’t receiving the proper medical treatment, and often, her seizures would go unnoticed by the staff members. After speaking with a neighbor who used to be a pediatric nurse, Milliman was told about DayStar for Medically Fragile Children, a center located in Brighton that happens to be the state’s only pediatric day-respite center. With a stated goal of serving the needs of families with children as young as six months old through age five who are coping with serious medical conditions and developmental complexities, Milliman decided to enroll Lilyana in DayStar. More than a year later, Milliman says her daughter has made “significant strides” in her personal development — specifically her ability to walk and to talk — and her interpersonal development, as Lilyana now feels much more comfortable dealing with people. “Lilyana has excellent educational support as part of DayStar, and she also has attentive staff who have helped her learn to walk, talk, even become better at picking up objects. She has grown so much since she started,” Milliman says of her daughter, who happily refers to the facility as her ‘Day House.’ “The staff is in tune with her medical condition," Milliman adds. "They know to watch out for her seizures and they know all about her

medications. We feel comfortable having Lilyana at DayStar because we know we can trust the people who are looking out for her. The staff will go with her into the hallway and practice walking with her. She works closely with both a physical therapist, a vision therapist and a speech therapist and she is really building her skills.”

About the Program DayStar, which is open Monday through Friday year-round, has been around for 25 years and ensures a student to staff ratio of 2 to 1. Recently, DayStar moved into a new building in Brighton at 700 Lac De Ville Boulevard. The move has allowed the facility to offer its services to more children and families (from 12 full-time equivalent children in the old facility to 40 full-time equivalent children in the new center). Currently 26 area families have children enrolled at DayStar. Kim Condon, DayStar’s executive director, takes care not to refer to the center as a day care, since DayStar “offers a full assortment of full-time, family-supported services for children as soon as they get out of the hospital until they start kindergarten” and features a fulltime director of education with classrooms guided by special education-licensed instructors and trained therapists. The facility has 20 staff members, including a full-time education director, six special education teachers and two speech language pathologists. Additionally, since all of DayStar’s clients are children with severe medical needs, there are skilled pediatric nurses on hand to monitor these medically continued >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

41


fragile children. In order to qualify for enrollment at DayStar, Condon says a child must have a preexisting medical condition. Condon and her staff will schedule an intake visit with the family and offer tours of its facility. After a child has been accepted, the staff will work with the parents to create an individualized care plan that encompasses both the child’s medical and developmental needs. “Typically, you will have a child who warrants pediatric nursing, but the family’s only option after returning from the hospital is private, 24/7 nursing, which is expensive and can hurt the child’s growth and development,” Condon says. “Children learn so much and grow from being around their peers, but if you have a child with a severe medical condition, they might lack the opportunity to grow from their peers and those relationships if they’re isolated at home all day with their illness.” DayStar also offers important services to parents, such as coordinating medical coverage and offering a sounding board for working through any complications that may arise from their child's conditions. But above everything else, Condon and Milliman both say that DayStar affords these parents the chance to relax and breathe easy knowing their children are being cared for by capable and compassionate professionals. “A lot of families need DayStar as a respite from the chaos of their lives, and DayStar can provide them with a few hours a day to have to themselves, or to spend with family and friends,” Condon says. “I feel more peaceful knowing Lilyana is being well cared for,” Milliman adds. “You can see how much everyone there really cares about the children they work with and as a concerned parent, that’s what matters most to me.” For more information on DayStar, call (585) 385-6287 or visit www.daystarkids.org. 

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John Boccacino is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster.


Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • February 2014

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Nesting 101:

hello, third trimester! By Meagan Ruffing

r

ight around the end of your second trimester and somewhere in the begin-

ning of your third trimester, something magical happens in a woman’s pregnancy. This something magical is called "nesting." This is simply a term that means you are preparing for baby and therefore wanting to clean everything in sight to get ready for your tiny, precious bundle of cuteness. For some women, this period of nesting is a relaxing and comforting time as they organize and control what goes where. For others, it can be a bit stressful depending on other factors in your life such as an outgrown home where there is not enough storage and space to put things in the place. So what do you do when you are in your nesting stage and are feeling overwhelmed with where to begin? Many women ask this question because sometimes this very distinct stage in a woman’s pregnancy may cause more stress than relaxation. Try these 7 tips to get you started on your way to creating a calm, organized home that results in a place where the entire family wants to gather. No matter the size of your living quarters or the question of where to begin, this list will give you the nudge you need to get things going.

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Make a list. Lists are great because they are visual. Do it the old fashioned way with a pen and paper. Take a seat and write down everything you want to get done – from organizing your shoes to washing all of the baby’s new clothes. Having something tangible to read from will help you stay focused.

Be realistic. You may think that repainting your master bathroom three months before you deliver is a great idea. But hang on. Nesting is a time of organizing and settling in. Save the painting for your husband or paint your soon-to-be baby a one-of-a-kind masterpiece if you really have the itch to paint.

their younger sibling. Something as simple as putting the baby’s bows in a bin to vacuuming the nursery can make all the difference to your children when they want to help out.

Reflect. After one thing is done, take a break and eat a snack. Take time to reflect on where you are in your pregnancy. Enjoy the moment. Relish in the fact that your other children get a smile out of helping. Embrace the idea of waiting until after naptime to tackle the dishes. Take time to be in the moment. Save something for your husband. Just

your list of things to be done and do them one at a time. Trying to tackle everything at once will leave you feeling overwhelmed and defeated before you have even tackled that first item. Give yourself grace when it comes to tidying things up and take it slow.

because you think you can get everything done by yourself doesn’t mean that leaving a thing or two for your husband to do is a bad idea. This serves two purposes: You can direct your attention to another task and your husband will feel needed and appreciated when he sees how happy you are now that the curtains are hung in the baby’s room. It’s a win-win situation.

Enjoy nesting. Nesting

Nesting happens.

Take your time. Revisit

is one of the many fun times during a woman’s pregnancy. It says, "The end is near," and this, this and this needs to be done before the baby is born. Nesting allows for some sort of control over the pregnancy and signals to the brain that "Yes, I am ready for this baby to come." Bottom line, it feels good to be prepared.

It is part of a woman’s pregnancy that many look forward to. Take this list of ideas and get started on your own list of "to do’s." If the baby decides to come early, you will be comforted knowing that everything is in its place before the arrival. If you go past your due date, well, now you just have more time to nest. 

Include the kids. If you

Meagan Ruffing is a freelance parenting writer. She is pregnant with her third child and is currently enjoying the nesting stage.

have other children this is a great time to let them help you with organizing the home. Kids love to help; especially when it comes to the arrival of

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Pregnant-zzzzz getting the sleep you need while you're expecting

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By Malia Jacobson regnant women are often told to “sleep

now, while you can” — but sleeping during pregnancy is easier said than done. Just ask Emily Waggoner, who was surprised to find herself sleepless while pregnant with her daughter Sarah, now 1. “Before pregnancy, I would get in bed, fall asleep easily and wake eight hours later,” she says. That changed around her sixth week of pregnancy, when she started waking multiple times every night. “I was sleepy at work and desperate for uninterrupted sleep.”

Waggoner isn’t alone: Nearly 8 out of 10 pregnant women experience sleep troubles. “The high progesterone in early pregnancy contributes to fatigue, but it also disturbs sleep-wake patterns, so women feel sleepy but they may not be able to sleep well,” says Mary L. Rosser, MD, PhD, an obstetrician and gynecologist with Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. And sleeping well during pregnancy isn’t just about comfort; a mom’s sleep can affect the health and outcome of her pregnancy.

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According to a new study, disrupted sleep during pregnancy is linked to preterm births. To help keep you healthy and rested while you’re with child, here are the top pregnancy-related sleep woes, and how to start getting the sleep you need.

Potty Party Pregnancy increases the workload of the kidneys, which results in one of the earliest symptoms of pregnancy: more frequent urination. Often, these frequent bathroom breaks continue around the clock, interrupting sleep just as newly-pregnant women are feeling more fatigued. “Getting up at night to use the bathroom is one of the most common sleep complaints during pregnancy,” says Rosser.

For Better Sleep: Waggoner started experiencing nighttime bathroom trips early in her first trimester. “Eventually, I learned to make it to the bathroom without fully waking up, and that made it easier to get back to sleep,” she says. If nature is calling too frequently at night, Rosser recommends eliminating caffeine, and limiting liquid intake after 6 pm.

Burning Love Pregnancy hormones relax the esophagus, so gastric acids can creep up. The resulting heartburn is a nightly trial for many pregnant women,

according to ob stetrician David E. Zepeda, MD, of Texas Children’s Hospital. Deborah Flandé of Houston suffered from nighttime heartburn with both of her pregnancies. “I had acid reflux all the way through my pregnancies—the third trimester was the worst,” says Flandé. For Better Sleep: To put the brakes on acid indigestion, avoid acidic foods like chocolate, coffee, and tomato sauces, especially late in the day. “In general, you want to avoid large meals in the evening if you’re having trouble with heartburn,”


says Rosser. “Eat earlier in the day: Have a large breakfast and lunch, and a lighter dinner,” says Rosser. Sleeping with the upper body elevated – even in a recliner – can also help keep heartburn at bay.

Left Awake Pregnant women are usually told to sleep on their left side to avoid placing pressure on vital organs and arteries. But for women who aren’t used to sleeping in this position, discomfort and worry can hinder sleep. “Many women are very concerned about sleeping in the correct position, and the stress can make sleep difficult,” says Zepeda. For Better Sleep: While sleeping on the left side is preferred, women don’t need to feel chained to their left side during the night. “In truth, if a women sleeps on a soft surface, she doesn’t need to be overly concerned about occasionally rolling to her back or right side during sleep. If blood flow is compromised during sleep, the mother will automatically wake up,” says Zepeda, who notes that in 30 years of practice, he’s delivered over 8000 babies, and never seen a problem stemming from a mother’s sleeping position.

Legs in Motion A quarter of pregnant women experience restless legs syndrome, or RLS. Because most of these women didn’t experience RLS before pregnancy, they may not recognize the condition, which causes a creepy-crawly sensation in the extremities (which can include the arms) and a strong urge to move at night. RLS can become worse with each subsequent pregnancy, says Rosser.

For Better Sleep: While the cause of RLS is unknown, research has shown that the condition can be related to deficiencies in certain key nutrients, including iron, folate, and magnesium. “We know that the vitamins and minerals involved in bone growth and contraction play a role in symptoms of RLS,” says Rosser. Women should have their physician check their levels of ferritin (stored iron) and continue taking their prenatal supplement daily. Regular exercise and a warm bath before bed can also help keep legs at peace during the night.

Stress Less Sleep problems can peak during the third trimester, as physical discomfort increases along with worries about the approaching delivery and imminent parenthood. “Around week 26 or 27, women start to get stressed about the birth, and this can affect their sleep,” says Rosser. For Better Sleep: Often, it’s a fear of the unknown that keeps moms-to-be awake, she says, so taking a childbirth class can help, especially a group class where momsto-be can meet other expectant parents. “Anything moms can do to set their minds at ease can help them sleep,” she says. After a fitful first trimester, Waggoner accepted “her new normal” and started allowing more time for sleep: 10 hours per night instead of 8. “I was a rested, thriving woman again by my second trimester. And it was great training for motherhood.”  Malia Jacobson is a freelance writer specializing in sleep and health. Her most recent book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades.

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A Mother’s Precious Gift the benefits of breastfeeding – for mom & baby

By Dr. Ruth Lawrence

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any women think about how they will feed their baby long before they become pregnant. It’s

important for every woman to have the opportunity to make an informed decision and know all the facts. Much research and experience has been collected recently about the tremendous value of breastfeeding for both the mother and infant. While these thoughts are not new, the new documentation has become very substantial.

How Breastfeeding Benefits Babies Advantages to the infant include bonding between mother and baby through the physiologic manner in which the baby nurses at the breast, which is quite different from sucking on a bottle. The infant has been sucking in-utero from about 14 to 16 weeks gestation and knows the proper action of the tongue and the swallowing mechanism very well. Other advantages for the infant include the fact that it is perfect nutrition for growth and development and specifically for ideal brain growth. Exclusively breast-fed infants have been shown to score better on intelligence tests and developmental tests. In addition to nutrition, breastfeeding provides

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protection against infection. Breast-fed infants have a low incidence of otitis media, pneumonia, diarrhea and other infections. The immunologic protective components in human milk provide ongoing protection until the baby is weaned and beyond – no matter how old the infant is at the time of weaning. Human milk contains many protective properties including the apparent reduced incidence of childhood onset cancer, diabetes and Crohn’s Disease. Don’t underestimate the short-term and long-term breastfeeding benefits for mothers as well.

Be Patient with Yourself Many mothers worry that they won’t know how to breastfeed. Breastfeeding is not a reflex for the mother but

a learned procedure, but the baby (who is born to breastfeed) knows exactly what to do. Read about breastfeeding before delivery to gain familiarly on the subject like The Nursing Mother’s Companion by Kathleen Huggins. Women should also consider attending local breastfeeding group meetings before delivery. La Leche League International has local groups all over the world. Four groups meet in the Rochester area – North, Southeast, South and West. Call Lifeline at 275-5151 to locate your nearest group. Breastfeeding mothers, mothers-to-be and babies are welcome to attend. Your obstetrician’s office can also provide breastfeeding information and your hospital of delivery usually has a session on breastfeeding in their preparation for child birth series. Some mothers worry about breastfeeding because they need to go back to work. This does not mean you can’t breastfeed. Any time spent breastfeeding (one week, two, three, or a few months) is a very good investment in the infant’s well-being. There is plenty of help for working mothers. In some circum-

stances, women can return to work and arrange to feed their baby at daycare while they work, or pump at work and save the milk for the baby the next day.

Focus on the First Few Days The first few days of breastfeeding in the hospital are very important. The first opportunity to breastfeed is right after birth. The World Health Organization and UNICEF “Baby Friendly” guidelines suggest that every mother have the opportunity to put her baby to breast within the first hour following delivery. The baby is ready and eager and it is the perfect opportunity to interact with the infant for the first time. The bedside nurses in the birth center or the delivery room will help mother position herself and the baby so the feeding will go smoothly. Actually, babies placed on mother’s abdomen and left to their own resources will find their way to the breast and latch on if not interfered with. Babies are born to breastfeed. Following this initial experience at the time of delivery, mothers should be ready to breastfeed the


how breastfeeding benefits mothers Short-term Benefits • When one breastfeeds, the uterus responds and contracts which contributes to a reduced loss of blood and a more prompt return to the pre-pregnancy state • Women who breastfeed lose the additional weight they gain during pregnancy more quickly •B reastfeeding mothers are also at lower risk for postpartum obesity than women who bottle feed Long-range Benefits • Women who breastfeed have a decreased incidence of osteoporosis, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer • Many women describe a tremendous feeling of well-being while they are breastfeeding • Women with diabetes are often in much better control of their disease during the period of lactation

infant whenever the infant demonstrates interest in feeding. Interest in feeding is manifested by the baby bringing his own hands to his mouth or getting more active and rooting around. Crying is a late sign of hunger. Babies latch on and feed much more effectively if they are fed before they get frantic. While in the hospital, ask for help. It should not hurt to breastfeed. If it does hurt, it’s because the baby has not latched on correctly so ask for help in getting the baby adjusted comfortably. When discharged from the hospital, plans for follow-up should be made with the pediatrician and the lactation support person in the pediatrician’s office. They will want to see the baby within a few days and see how things are going.

Knowing How Much is Enough Some mothers are uncomfortable not knowing exactly how much milk the baby received when breastfeeding. The way to tell how much the baby

receives is listening for the swallowing sounds and seeing a little milk drip from the breast during a feeding. In addition, the baby’s weight and output should be monitored. A well-fed, breastfed baby in the first month of life should have at least three seedy yellow stools per day. The baby also should wet at least six or seven diapers a day. With disposal diapers, it is often hard to be sure they have wet, although the weight of the diaper will change. Breastfeeding is a wonderful opportunity to provide a lifetime of good health and the most precious gift a mother can give her infant. If there is illness, it may be a life-saving gift, and, if there is poverty, it may be the only gift.  Dr. Ruth Lawrence is the Medical Director of the Breastfeeding and Human Lactation Study Center and a Professor of Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology at Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong in Rochester.

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Eat Up!

natural remedies for common pregnancy ailments By Sarah Lindsey

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lowing skin, doubled cup-size, and shiny hair are all commonly touted as side effects of pregnan-

cy. But there are some other pregnancy symptoms usually kept on the quiet such as heartburn, nausea, and constipation. You know, the things no one ever really talks about when mentioning the lovely glow. The good news is that there are simple, natural rem-

edies for these common pregnancy ailments…and you can find them all at your grocery store.

Constipation

Heartburn

Your gestating body experiences an increase in progesterone, which causes digestion to slow down and intestinal muscles to relax. Also, your growing baby applies pressure to your lower abdomen and intestines, which can result in a fecal blockage. Vitamin supplements are also known to cause constipation, especially if the doctor prescribes that you take several together (such as iron, calcium, and other prenatal vitamins.)

Hormonal variations, such as the aforementioned increase in progesterone, are to blame for that horrible burning sensation in your throat and chest. The valve that normally prevents stomach acid from backing up into the esophagus relaxes, causing irritation. As your baby grows, an increasing amount of pressure is placed on your stomach and intestines, thereby passing stomach acids into your esophagus and causing heartburn.

Remedy: The best solution for constipation is to avoid it in the first place. Do this by staying hydrated (drink at least eight cups of water daily), eating a well-balanced diet (full of fruits, veggies, and whole grains), and getting plenty of exercise. If it’s already too late and you experience constipation, then try drinking a glass of prune juice, increasing your fiber and fluid intake, and taking a warm bath.

Remedy: Ginger, ginger, and ginger. Try brewing a nice, hot cup of tea. If you find warm drinks difficult to stomach, then consider a cold glass of ginger ale. You could also try snacking on ginger candy or ginger snaps. Another option is to take a papaya supplement with meals.

Morning Sickness and Nausea While no one really knows what causes “morning sickness” or nausea, it is likely a result of rapidly increasing hormones. An enhanced sense of smell and a sensitive stomach also contribute to the problem. Some women experience nausea as a direct result of taking prenatal vitamins. Remedy: A simple switch from taking your vitamin supplements in the morning to taking them at night can sometimes solve the problem because by the time the continued >>>

THE PREGGO MAMA’S SUPERFOOD: GINGER Studies have shown ginger to be effective in relieving nausea and morning sickness. Emily Streich, LM, CPM, and instructor at Bastyr University, takes you beyond the ginger snap by sharing some different ways to add ginger into your diet. • Use fresh grated ginger in cooking, (especially good in stir fries!) • Drink tea made from simmering fresh ginger in water for 10-20 minutes • Use powdered ginger in baking or cooking • Take ginger capsules

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SHOP TIME! Take this list with you next time you head to the market so you can stock up on these much-needed remedies. The prepared mama can avoid a lot of discomfort by having these on hand. Ailment and Remedy Constipation > Prune Joice Heartburn or Nausea > Ginger & Papaya Nausea > Coconut Water & Raspberry Leaf Tea Diarrhea or Yeast Infection > Yogurt Diarrhea > Pumpkin Hemorrhoids > Black Tea & Potato Yeast Infection > Sauerkraut Itchy Skin > Flaxseed & Fatty Fish

queasiness kicks in, you will already be snoozing. The remedies for curing heartburn – ginger and papaya – also work wonders for curing morning sickness. Emily Streich, LM, CPM, and instructor at Bastyr University, says that if you are vomiting, fluid replacement and electrolyte replacement is important. An alternative to Gatorade is coconut water, which can be found in many natural food and grocery stores. Also sucking on ice cubes made of coconut water or weak red raspberry leaf tea can also help nausea while replacing some lost electrolytes.

Diarrhea While some women struggle with constipation throughout their entire pregnancies, you might experience the opposite extreme. This could be caused by an increase in exercise, diet changes, or even as a result of taking prenatal vitamins. Remedy: While these suggestions don’t make diarrhea go away, they will help you through the nasty experience. Plenty of water is necessary to keep you from getting dehydrated. Put down your pickles and ice cream and start eating the BRAT diet (bananas,

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rice, applesauce, and toast.) Streich says, “Pumpkin is also a veggie that contains a lot of fiber and can be very good at firming stools, and finally, yogurt contains many good probiotic bacteria which can help the digestive system.”

Hemorrhoids Hemorrhoids, blood vessels that become swollen, most often appear as a result of straining due to constipation. Remedy: “Trying to keep stools soft is the key to not worsening them, so make sure there is adequate fiber and water in the diet, and stop processed foods,” says Streich. Applying chilled witch hazel packs or soaking in a warm sitz bath can help alleviate the pain. Streich suggests holding a (cool) black tea bag on the area, which soothes and helps shrink them. You can also cut a potato in half and hold it on the area for the same effect.

Yeast Infection Due to higher estrogen levels during pregnancy, your vagina produces more glycogen, which creates a breeding ground for yeast. Remedy: Increase your dietary intake of foods containing live-active


yogurt cultures (such as cottage cheese, yogurt, and Kefir milk). Streich says that miso, kimchi, and sauerkraut contain beneficial bacteria as well. Yeast feeds on sugar, so reduce your sugar intake while battling a yeast infection.

Itchy Skin Higher estrogen levels and stretched skin are at the root of your constant itch. Remedy:The best way to turn off the itch is to add more EFAs (essential fatty acids) to your diet. Streich says, “These can be in the form of fish oils from fatty fish that are low in heavy metals and toxins such as sardines, wild salmon, and anchovies, or a plant based source such as flaxseed or flax oil.” Eating the right foods can prevent most of these ailments from even occurring. Streich notes the importance of maintaining a healthy and varied diet since it is “the building blocks used to grow a baby, and keep the mother strong and healthy through the pregnancy, birth, and beyond."  Sarah Lindsey is a freelance writer (and mom of four young children) who specializes in family nutrition.

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Services & Groups

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Adoption Resources

Child Care Council, Inc. 595 Blossom Rd., Suite 120, Rochester 14610. 654-4720 | www.childcarecouncil.com

Adoption Resource Network at Hillside Children’s Center 100 Metro Park, Rochester 14623 350-2500 www.hillside.com/AdoptionMain Jewish Family Services of Rochester, Inc. 441 East Ave., Rochester 14607 461-0115 ext.120 www.jfsrochester.org/adoption.php

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Breastfeeding

Highland Hospital Breast Pump Rentals. Operates in conjunction with Highland Hospital Lactation Education services. 341-0519 www.urmc.rochester.edu/hh/services-centers/maternity

Child Care Resources

Strong Fertility Center 500 Red Creek Drive, Suite 220, Rochester 14623. 487-3378 | www.fertility.urmc.edu

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Strong Midwifery Group 905 Culver Rd., Rochester 14609 275-7892 | www.midwifery.urmc.edu

Childbirth Education

Birthright of Rochester 385-2100 or toll free at 800-550-4900 www.birthright.org Emergency pregnancy support services. Pregnancy tests, non-judgmental counseling, follow-up, material assistance, and referrals.

Highland Hospital Mother’s Help Line. 341-8021

Highland Hospital Center for Women 1000 South Ave., Rochester 14620 271-4636 473-2229 for Family Classes Highland Hospital Childbirth Classes . 473-2229 www.urmc.rochester.edu/hh/services-centers/maternity/childbirth-programs.cfm

La Leche League Lifeline Call Lifeline at 275-5151 for referral to the local leader nearest you.

Infertility Focus, Inc. P.O. Box 343, Pittsford 14534 385-1628 | www.infertilityfocus.org

Rochester General Lactation Consultant 922-LINK (-5465) www.rochestergeneral.org

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/ Syracuse Region 114 University Ave., Rochester 14605 866-600-6886 | www.pprsr.org A non-profit organization that provides education and reproductive health-care services regardless of age, race, sexual orientation, disability or economic circumstances.

Highland Hospital Lactation Consultant. 341-6808

URMC Breastfeeding Hotline 275-9575 | (Noon-1 p.m. M-W-F) 275-0096 | Breastfeeding classes The Specialty Shop at Strong Memorial Hospital 601 Elmwood Av, Rochester 273-1276 | (10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. M-F)

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Strong Beginnings Education Program 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester 14642 275-0096 http://www.stronghealth.com/services/ womenshealth/maternity/strongbeginnings.cfm

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Rochester General Childbirth Education Program 1425 Portland Ave., Rochester 14621 922-5465 or 877-922-5465 www.rochestergeneralhospital.org Rochester General Hospital offers a modern Birthing Center, outstanding pediatric services and leading-edge, minimally invasive OB/GYN procedures.

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Hospitals

Golisano Children’s Hospital 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester 275-URMC (8762) www.golisano.urmc.edu A division of U of R Medical Center, Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong Memorial Hospital is the area’s only children’s hospital and a referral center for seriously ill and injured children from the Finger Lakes region. Highland Hospital 1000 South Ave., Rochester 14620 473-2200 | www.highland.urmc.edu Exceptional healthcare specialist skill delivered with a warm, attentive, compassionate attitude. A family-centered hospital which considers every visitor (patient, family member or friend) a guest. Newark-Wayne Community Hospital 1212 Driving Park Ave.,Newark 14513 . (315) 332-2022 www.rochestergeneral.org Dedicated to providing the best care possible (to people from Wayne County and beyond) in direct partnership with Rochester General hospital. Rochester General Hospital 1425 Portland Ave., Rochester 14621 922-4000 | www.rochestergeneral.org Modern Birthing Center, outstanding pediatric services and leading-edge, minimally invasive OB/GYN procedures. Among Thomson Reuters List of Nation’s 100 Top Hospitals® for Cardiovascular Care.


Strong Memorial Hospital 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester 14642 275-2100 | www.strong.urmc.edu Strong Memorial Hospital, Highland Hospital and Golisano Children’s Hospital (w/other Strong Health care providers) are part of The U of R Medical Center – a leader in clinical care, research and education. Unity Hospital (formerly Park Ridge Hospital) 1555 Long Pond Rd., Rochester 14626 723-7000 | www.unityhealth.org Offering specialty services at Unity Hospital and at more than 50 other locations throughout Rochester and Monroe County (including Unity St. Mary’s Campus in Rochester, formerly St. Mary’s Hospital).

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Midwifery Care

DONA International (Doulas of North America) 888-788-DONA (3662), Toll Free www.dona.org Doula Cooperative 234-0164 | www.doulacooperative.org Strong Midwifery 905 Culver Rd.,Suite 2B, Rochester 14609 275-7892 | www.midwifery.urmc.edu

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Parenting support Groups & Services

2-1-1 Finger Lakes Region 2-1-1 or 1-877-356-9211 Toll Free www.211fingerlakes.org Available 24 hours a day. Run by local counselors trained to address your needs. Providing information and human service agency referrals. 292-BABY 292-2229 | www.292baby.org Free phone service connects parents w/ Non-Emergency questions about baby/ child health or development to pediatricnurses.

Al Sigl Center 1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 300 Rochester 14620 442-4100 | www.alsiglcenter.org Providing shared and dedicated facilities, business services, awareness and financial support for independent human service agencies. Autism Speaks, Inc. www.autismspeaks.org Funding global biomedical research, raising awareness about autism and bringing hope to those dealing with related hardships. Birthright of Rochester 320 N. Washington St., Suite 116, Rochester 14625 385-2100 1330 Buffalo Rd. Suite 201, Rochester, 14624 328-8700 or 800-550-4900 (Toll-free) www.birthright.org Other locationsavailable. Emergency pregnancy support services. Pregnancy tests, non-judgmental counseling, follow-up, material assistance & referrals. Crisis Nursery of Greater Rochester 201 Genesee Park Blvd., Rochester 14619 546-8280 crisisnursery75@gmail.org, www.cngr.org CNGR is a non-for-profit agency where children (birth to age 10) can stay when their families are in crisis. Services are free of charge and can be used in cases of illness, unemployment, housing problems, respite care, judicial problems, and for many other reasons. No referral is necessary. Easter Seals N.Y. 103 White Spruce Blvd., Rochester 14623 292-5831 | www.ny.easterseals.com Provides assistance to children and adults with disabilities and other special needs to live, learn and work independently in their communities. Epilepsy Foundation of Rochester-Syracuse-Binghamton 1650 South Ave., Ste. 300, Rochester 14620 442-4430 or 800-724-7930 (Toll-free) www.epilepsyUNY.org Aiming to prevent, control & cure epilepsy through service, education, advocacy & research. Helping people with epilepsy & related disabilities reach their potential. Family Resource Centers of Crestwood 2nd floor in Bishop Kearney 89 Genesee St., Rochester 14611 436-0370 | www.hillside.com Flower City Down Syndrome Network 2117 Buffalo Rd. #132, Rochester 14624 56Tri-21 (568-7421) | www.fcdsn.com A group of individuals joined to provide support & education regarding issues relating to Down Syndrome to families & the community.

Infertility Focus P.O Box 343, Pittsford 14534 385-1628 | www.infertilityfocus.org Offers support, education and information to individuals and couples at any stage of and with any type of infertility. La Leche League Lifeline 275-5151 | www.lalecheleague.org Call Lifeline for your local chapter. Go to www.lllusa.org for area meeting times and other information. March of Dimes (Genesee Valley/Finger Lakes Division) 3445 Winton Pl., Ste. 121, Rochester 14623 424-3250 | www.marchofdimes.com Our mission is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. Mental Health Association (Better Days Ahead) 320 Goodman St. N. Suite 202 Rochester 14607 325-3145 | www.mharochester.org Endorses creative thinking, focuses on family strengths, supports action which empowers. Information, referrals & support. Moms Offering Moms Support (MOMS) Clubs Various locations throughout Rochester 234-6667 www.momsclub.org/links.html MOMS offers support to stay-at-home moms and their children, as well as playgroups and other activities. Mommies for Miracles 5 Grey Fox Lane, Fairport 14450 507-5367 http://mommiesformiracles.org This non-for-profit raises funds to purchase gifts for sick or disabled children in need of specailized services. Mothers & More Rochester www.MothersandMoreRochester.org Extended neighborhood of women which meets twice monthly to share concerns, friendship, acceptance & fun. Mothers of Twins Club www.grmotc.com Open to any mother of multiple birth children, including those expecting multiples. Offering discussion groups to support mothers. Noogieland (at Gilda’s Club Rochester) 255 Alexander St., Rochester 14607 423-9700 | www.gildasclubrochester.org Noogieland is a unique arts & activities based program that meets the needs of children who have cancer or a loved one who is living with cancer.

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Parents Without Partners P.O. Box 204, Fairport 14450 251-3647 | pwproc683@yahoo.com Support, friendship, an exchange of parenting techniques and growth opportunities await single parents and their children.

Rochester Holistic Moms & Holistic Moms West www.holisticmoms.org Local chapter of a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting mothers with an interest in natural health and mindful parenting.

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/ Syracuse Region 114 University Ave. Rochester 14605 866-600-6886 | www.pprsr.org A non-profit organization that provides education and reproductive healthcare services regardless of age, race, sexual orientation, disability, or economic circumstances.

Rochester Society for the Protection and Care of Children 148 South Fitzhugh St., Rochester 14608 325-6101 | www.spcc-roch.org Provides various programs supporting children and strengthening families.

Regional Early Childhood Direction Center Monroe #1 BOCES 41 O’Connor Rd., Fairport 14450 249-7817 | www.monroe.edu/recdc Supporting families with children birth to 5 years by providing free information and individualized assistance to connect them with programs and services. Rochester Area Birth Network 425-7105 | www.rabn.org The purpose of Rochester Area Birth Network is to advocate for health, safety and informed options in childbearing.

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Ronald McDonald House of Rochester, Inc. 333 Westmoreland Dr. , Rochester 14620 442-5437 | www.ronaldshouse.com Providing a home-away-from-home for families while their child receives healthcare in Rochester area hospitals. Also awards community grants. Stepfamily Assoc. of Rochester 442-3440 | www.stepfamilyrochester.org A non-profit organization offering education, support and counseling on the challenges involved in blending families and nurturing stepchildren.

United Cerebral Palsy Association 3399 Winton Rd. S., Rochester 14623 334-6000 | www.cprochester.org Advancing the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities.

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Mail entries to: Genesee Valley Parent's Sesame Street Live Coloring Contest P.O. Box 25750, Rochester, NY 14625

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Calendar

february events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

exhibit opening:

Animation

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Opens Feb. 1

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xplore the science behind the art of animation amid colorful, larger-than-life graphics of popular characters from Cartoon Network. During opening weekend, meet and pose for pictures with Scooby Doo, Cartoon Network’s canine celebrity. See an array of animation tools and techniques, including cartoon drawing, computer animation and more. Where: National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607 When: Opens February 1, during regular museum hours Cost: Included with museum admission. For More Info: www.museumofplay.org

sat sun fri sat

sun

1, 2, 7, 8 & 9 STAGES PRESENTS: INTO THE WOODS

When a baker and his wife learn that they cannot have a child because of a witch’s curse, the two set off on a journey to break the curse. Rated PG. 7:30pm. $13. Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

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sat

sun

8&9

CITY OF ROCHESTER’S LAKESIDE WINTER CELEBRATION A winter celebration, including the 4th Annual Lake Ontario Ice Wine Festival, outdoor children’s games, Chilly Chili Challenge, horse-drawn carriage rides, snow sculpture contest, dog sled demo and more. 11am-4pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave Rochester 14613. www.cityofrochester.gov/wintercelebration

sat

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TYKE'S THEATRE PRESENTS: TREASURE ISLAND Once again, TYKE's presents an incredible concept in children’s theatre: full-scale musicals with sets, costumes, make-up and props, starring up to 64 local kids in the performance, all put together within a week! 1 & 3:30pm. $11. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: March ����������������������67 Library ����������������������66 Ongoing ������������������68

01 * Saturday Family Fun on Snowshoes Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike along the Pioneer Trail. In Pioneer Field, visitors hop, run, jump, skip, and then warm up by watching a children’s nature movie in the Riedman Theater. 10-11:30am. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org Barnes & Noble Bookfair and Concert Families make purchases that benefit Hochstein during a variety of ensemble and solo performances at the Pittsford Barnes & Noble Bookstore. 10am-4pm. Barnes and Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. www.hochstein.org Exhibit Opening: Animation Explore the science behind the art of animation amid colorful, larger-thanlife graphics of popular characters from Cartoon Network. See an array of animation tools and techniques, including cartoon drawing, computer animation and more. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org Sign Language Tours at the George Eastman House. Tour the historic George Eastman House with a signed and spoken guide from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. This tour will cover the same information covered during the museum’s daily guided tour. 11am. Included with regular museum admission George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 14607. www.eastmanhouse.org Stages Presents: Into the Woods When a Baker and his wife learn that they cannot have a child because of a Witch’s curse, the two set off on a journey to break the curse. Rated PG. 7:30pm. $13. Stages, 875 East Main St., Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

02 * Sunday Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 2pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St., Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

03 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This

month: Love Is in the Air. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org

04 * Tuesday FREE *New Day Christian Preschool Open House Meet the teachers, see the classroom, and ask any questions you may have about the preschool experience. 6:30-8pm. New Day Christian Preschool (inside Park Ridge Church) 10 Straub Rd., Rochester, 14626. www.parkridgefmc.org/preschool

Balloon Manor : The VERY Tall Tale of Jack and his Beanstalk

05 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

February 5-9 Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a five-story sculpture of Jack and his beanstalk made entirely out of balloons! This incredible air-filled sculpture will be built over a span of four days and there will be a balloon popping party when the exhibit closes. 10am-7pm. The Sibley Building, 228 E. Main St., Rochester, 14604. www.balloonmanor.com

07 * Friday Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St., Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

members, $7 for non-member with general museum admission. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

Winter Campfire Program Huddle around a roaring campfire, listen to Native Americans stories that are told during the winter season, sing along to traditional campfire tunes, enjoy fun games and activities, and warm up with hot cocoa and roasted marshmallows. 6:30-8pm. $4/child, $6/adult, $20/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

Rochester Children’s Theatre: Shrek The Musical Shrek, The Musical—based on the Oscar® Award-winning film—brings the hilarious, all-ages story about what it means to be a hero to life onstage with beloved characters and all-new songs. 2pm. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu

08 * Saturday Celebrate a Rhino-riffic Birthday. Celebrate birthdays for Bill and Roscoe, the Zoo’s male white rhinos. Learn fascinating facts, help sing ‘Happy Birthday’ and watch as they enjoy some special birthday treats! 1-3pm. Free with zoo admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org FREE *City of Rochester’s Lakeside Winter Celebration A winter celebration, including the 4th Annual Lake Ontario Ice Wine Festival, Outdoor Children’s Games, Chilly Chili Challenge, Horse-Drawn Carriage rides, Snow Sculpture Contest, Dog Sled Demo and more. 11am-4pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. www.cityofrochester.gov/ wintercelebration Dissection Discoveries Investigating and explore the inner workings of organisms around us! Try your hand at beginner level dissections in the Human Lab Workshop- this month they will be dissection Asterias. (Otherwise known as Sea Stars). Space is limited. 11am-12pm. $5 for BMS

Hot Cocoa and Snow and Snowshoe Hike Snowshoe hike over flat terrain in our winter wonderland. Learn how to read the stories that animals leave for us in the snow and how to identify the birds that are spending the winter at Montezuma. After the hike we’ll warm up with some hot cocoa. 10-11:30am. Fee with snowshoe rental*: $6/child, $8/adult. Fee without rental*: $4/child, $6/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Identification Series: The Joy of Winter Weeds Many weeds are just wildflowers growing where they are unwanted! Visitors identify winter wildflower silhouettes on the trail and in the field, and pick a small bouquet to take home. 10-11:30am. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

Nite Hike Enjoy the Genesee County Park & Forest at night. Take a stroll on snowshoes through the park and have refreshments by a warm fire at Pavilion A. Snowshoes will be provided. Dress for the weather. Pre-registration required. 6-8pm. $15/person. Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany 14054. Science Saturdays: Mars Rocketry Experience handson experiments and lively demonstrations from local scientists. Science Saturdays programs are designed for you and your family to experience all the fun and excitement of science together. 11am-3pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Science Saturdays: Use of Minerals in Industry, Fluorescent Minerals, and Local Minerals Experience hands-on experiments and lively demonstrations from local scientists. Science Saturdays programs are designed for you and your family to experience all the fun and excitement of science together. 11am-3pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 7:30pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

CELEBRATE A RHINO-RIFFIC BIRTHDAY

February 8: Celebrate birthdays for Bill and Roscoe, the Zoo’s male white rhinos. Learn fascinating facts, help sing ‘Happy Birthday’ and watch as they enjoy some special birthday treats! 1-3pm. Free with zoo admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

FREE *Youth Wind Symphony Conducted by Casey Springstead, high school students in concert. 7:30pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. www.hochstein.org

09 * Sunday FREE *City of Rochester’s Lakeside Winter Celebration See Feb 8. 12-4pm. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., Rochester 14613. www.cityofrochester.gov/ wintercelebration Hochstein Youth Symphony Orchestra & Philharmonia Concert An annual combined program featuring both orchestras. HYSO conducted by Casey Springstead and Philharmonia conducted by John Fetter. 7pm. $5 Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. www.hochstein.org Live Bug Encounters Get an up-close view of the living bugs in the collection. You’ll have the opportunity to hold a hissing cockroach in your hand, examine the many legs of a millipede, and investigate the clever way some beetles protect themselves from predators. 12-2pm. Included with museum admission. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt

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Parkway, Buffalo,14211. www.sciencebuff.org Second Sunday Family Tour. Our youngest friends and their families are invited to enjoy a story and a short tour. 2pm. Included with admission. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester. www.mag.rochester.edu Stages Presents: Into the Woods See Feb 1. 2pm. $13 Stages, 875 East Main St, Auditorium Center, Third Floor, Rochester. www.mjtstages.com Rochester Children’s Theatre: Shrek The Musical See Feb. 8, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, artscenter.naz.edu

10 * Monday Monday Kicks for Ages 2 to 6 Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Celebrating Friendship. 10am-2pm. Included with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. www.museumofplay.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 11 * Tuesday FREE *Homework Workshop Homework hassles can be a challenge for both parents and students. In this workshop we will discuss the seven most prevalent problems facing parents when dealing with their child’s homework and step by step solutions to these common problems. 6:30pm. Huntington Learning Center, 3050 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, 14618. www.huntingtonhelps.com RBTL Presents: Sister Act The story of Deloris Van Cartier, a wannabe diva whose life takes a surprising turn when she witnesses a crime and the cops hide her in the last place anyone would think to look: a convent. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

12 * Wednesday Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour Hop in the van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald eagle sightings are a possibility too! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm. $8/child; $13.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org Senior Snowshoe Sojourn (Easy Pace) Attendees enjoy a beautiful snow-covered trail with senior naturalist Shariee Edersheim. Mrs. E takes attendees on an informative hour-long snowshoe adventure. If there is no snow, attendees should plan for a leisurely walk. 9:30-10:30am. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

13 * Thursday RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 7:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

14 * Friday RCT: Shrek The Musical See Feb. 8, 7 pm. 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. artscenter.naz.edu www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org, Free youth admission days at the Zoo Take advantage of a zooper admission special with your family - enjoy one free youth

admission with the purchase of one adult admission! This is a great way to spend a day exploring the wonder of nature with your little ones. 10am-3pm. Purchase one adult admission at the Zoo’s Front Gate and receive one free youth admission, effective all day long. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 8pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. www.rbtl.org RPO Presents: Singin’ in the Rain See the timeless comedy Singin’ in the Rain—regarded as one of the best Hollywood musicals of all time and starring Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds—on the big screen as your RPO performs the score live. 8pm. Ticket price varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. www.rpo.org

Penfield/ Fairport, 2160 Penfield Rd., Webster 1270 Creek St. www.rochesterkarate.com Family Fun in the Winter Woods Adventure awaits along the Helen Gordon Trail. Families spy on springtails, be a deer on the hunt for food, and find the wild horse hoof fungus. Then, visitors warm up by watching a children’s nature movie in the Riedman Theater. 10-11:30am. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

15 * Saturday

Fat-Brain School-Break Week Fatten up your brain through play! Put on your thinking cap and challenge yourself to mind-expanding Fat Brain games and toys such as the new Squigz and Tobbles, along with classics such as Twig, Animalogic, Reptangles, and Hexactly. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

FREE *Bully Proof Workshop Children will learn how to show a confident attitude in order to avoid being bullied, how to use “verbal karate” in dealing with a bully and what to do in a variety of bullying situations. Participation is free but you must register to attend. 12:30 -1:30pm. Martial Arts America Brighton/Henrietta, 3450 Winton Pl.,

February Break Week: CircusCircus A juggler, sword-swallower, balloon artist, gymnast, magician and parkour expert are included in the line-up. Also, visitors explore the science of fire in a special ‘Fire Show’, and meet live animals. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., www.rmsc.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Hot Cocoa and Snow - Full Moon Snowshoe Hike Travel along the trails at the MAC looking and listening for short-eared, great horned, screech and barred owls. Afterwards, warm up in the Center with hot cocoa and talk about what you saw and heard. 6:30-8pm. Fee with snowshoe rental*: $6/child, $8/ adult. Fee without snowshoe rental*: $4/child, $6/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org Kids Fest at Total Sports Experience. Giant inflatables, a ROCK Wall, the Rochester Red Wings, Rochester Rhinos, Rochester Rattlers, the Gates Fire Dept. and Volunteer Ambulance, the Monroe County D.A.R.E Unit, Nolan’s Inflatable Obstacle Course, and much more. 10am-4pm. $5-$7 Total Sports Experience 880 Elmgrove Road, Rochester 14624. www.wbee.com

elevation of 1700 ft to 2200 ft, so this is not for the faint of heart! If weather dictates so, this may be a snowshoe hike. Reservations are appreciated. 10am-12:30pm. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Rd. Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org RCT: Shrek The Musical See Feb. 8, 2 pm. 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. artscenter.naz.edu www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org

16 * Sunday Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 12-5pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 2 & 8pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 11am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., www.rmsc.org

RPO Presents: Singin’ in the Rain See Feb 14. 8pm. Varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., Rochester. www.rpo.org

National Engineering Week Kick-Off Help kick-off National Engineering Week by taking part in various fun engineering activities. Learn about robotics, polymers, automotive engineering and more. Facilitated by University at Buffalo’s engineering club members.

Wilderness Hike (Vigorous Pace) A rugged 3-mile hike in a pristine area of the nature center rarely visited. The climb is from an

KIDS FEST 2014

February 15 : Giant inflatables, a ROCK Wall, the Rochester Red Wings, Rochester Rhinos, Rochester Rattlers, the Gates Fire Dept. and Volunteer Ambulance, the Monroe County D.A.R.E Unit, Nolan’s Inflatable Obstacle Course, and much more. 10am-4pm. $5-$7 Total Sports Experience 880 Elmgrove Road, Rochester 14624 www.wbee.com

Please Note:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 11am-2pm. Included with museum admission. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org RBTL Presents: Sister Act See Feb 11. 1 & 6:30pm. $32.50- $75. Ages: 9+yrs. Auditorium Center, Third Floor, 875 E. Main Street, Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org Black History Month Family Day All ages are invited to celebrate Black History Month with family art activities, music and dance performances, tours and storytelling. 12-5pm. Suggested donation $5 per family. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester. www.mag.rochester.edu RCT: Shrek The Musical See Feb. 8, 2 pm. 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. artscenter.naz.edu www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org

17 * Monday Expore Together with Independent Health A variety of educational, hands-on activities. Learn how to keep your family active through exercise and proper nutrition. Hear from special guest Strength and Conditioning Assistant Coach of the Buffalo Bills. 11am-1pm. Included with museum admission Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Free youth admission days at the Zoo See Feb 14. 10am-3pm. Purchase one adult admission at the Zoo’s Front Gate and receive one free youth admission, effective all day long. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org The Art of Chemistry Sparks Discovery Camp Children will explore the chemistry of liquids, solids, & gases through an artistic lens and use their findings to be creative. By making small tweaks to scientific experiments the brain can be trained to utilize the scientific content to be creative. 9am-4:30pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10% Ages: 5-12yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org WOW (Wonders of Winter) Discovery Camp at Tifft Nature Preserve. The cold weather can keep us from seeing the beauty found in the winter world. Campers will engage in exciting exploration and experiments, as well as creative

crafts, with the wintery elements that surround us this time of year. 9am-4pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 5-9yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org RCT: Shrek The Musical See Feb. 8, 2 pm. 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. artscenter.naz.edu www.rochesterchildrenstheatre.org

18 * Tuesday

Land, Sea & Air Discovery Camp Campers will explore the principles of buoyancy, drag, lift, aeronautics and alternative energy! Exploring the topics of land, sea and air, students will look at the way things move and construct models of different forms of transportation. 9am-4:30pm. $150 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 10-14yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

National Engineering Week Activities Celebrate National Engineering Week with family-friendly engineering activities in the science studios and Hamlin Hall. Programs include Explorations, Engineering Organs, Filtration Investigation, Spider Webs, Artful Engineering and Nano Waterproofing. 10am-4pm. lncluded with museum admission Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

The Art of Chemistry Sparks Discovery Camp See Feb 17. 9am-4:30pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10% Ages: 5-12yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

The Art of Chemistry Sparks Discovery Camp See Feb 17. 9am-4:30pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10% Ages: 5-12yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

WOW (Wonders of Winter) Discovery Camp at Tifft Nature Preserve. See Feb 17. 9am-4pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 5-9yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

Winter Breakout- Animal Adaptations Students (5-12 yrs) will explore how different animals survive our cold Central New York winters! Students should be dressed for outdoor activities and should bring lunch and a snack. Hot cocoa will be provided. 9am-4pm. Fee: $35/child for the full day Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

19 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org Challenger Learning Center of Greater Rochester Embark on a virtual voyage of discovery to the planet Mars at the Challenger Center, a high-tech, hands-on facility for space flight simulation. Children must be at least 7 yrs. Children 7 -10 must be teamed one-to-one with adult. Reservations required. 10:30am-12:30pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

WOW (Wonders of Winter) Discovery Camp at Tifft Nature Preserve. See Feb 17. 9am-4pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 5-9yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

20 * Thursday Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org FREE *HONK! The Musical Comedy Odyssey Music & Drama presents HONK! From the creators of Broadway’s “Mary Poppins”, it tells the story of the Ugly Duckling - a perfect show for the entire family. Tickets available at Wegmans, ShowTix4U. com and at the door. 7pm. $9 - $12 Greece Odyssey Academy Auditorium 750 Maiden Lane, Rochester, 14615. www.odysseymusicanddrama.com

FREE *HONK! The Musical Comedy Odyssey Music & Drama presents “HONK!” Written by the creators of Broadway’s “Mary Poppins”, this musical is a quirky, contemporary retelling of the tale of the Ugly Duckling. Tickets are available at Wegmans, online at ShowTix4U.com and at the door. 7pm. $9 for Children (3-12) and Seniors (65+), $11-$12 for Adults. Greece Odyssey Academy Auditorium 750 Maiden Lane Rochester, 14615. www.odysseymusicanddrama.com Land, Sea & Air Discovery Camp See Feb 19. 9am-4:30pm. $150 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 10-14yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org National Engineering Week Activities See Feb 19. 10am-4pm. lncluded with museum admission Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org The Art of Chemistry Sparks Discovery Camp See Feb 17. 9am-4:30pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10% Ages: 5-12yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org WOW (Wonders of Winter) Discovery Camp at Tifft Nature Preserve. See Feb 17. 9am-4pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 5-9yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

21 * Friday Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Land, Sea & Air Discovery Camp See Feb 19. 9am-4:30pm. $150 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 10-14yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org National Engineering Week Activities See Feb 19. 10am-4pm. lncluded with museum admission Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org The Art of Chemistry Sparks Discovery Camp See Feb 17. 9am-4:30pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10% Ages: 5-12yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

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library // 01 * Saturday Family Craft Craziness Drop in and make a wonderful creation of your choosing! No registration is required. 11:30am-1pm. Winton Library Branch, 611 Winton Road North, Rochester, 14609. www. libraryweb.org It’s Magic of Course! Magician Ted Burzynski will put on a show that will astonish you and make you laugh! And each child that checks out a book with their own library card will get a balloon! 11am-12pm. Charlotte Branch Library, 3557 Lake Ave., Rochester. www.libraryweb.org Star Wars Day Calling all Star Wars fans ages 2-92! Come to the library and meet various costumed characters! No registration required. 2-4pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org Take Your Child to the Library Day. Prize drawings throughout the day! At 2pm there will be a program; including a torch runner, Mother Goose Olympics, and awards. Take your child to the Library today! No registration. 10am-5pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. www.gateslibrary. com

02 * Sunday Family Fun Craft: Groundhogs! Celebrate Groundhog’s Day by creating a cool Groundhog puppet. If you take your puppet outside and see its shadow, you’ll know there will be another six weeks of winter. All supplies will be provided while they last. 1:30-4pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. www.libraryweb.org

03 * Monday Widget and Her Pal Joey Meet licensed therapy dogs Widget and Joey and read them a story! 3-4pm. Brockport-Seymour Library, 161 East Avenue, Brockport, 14420. www. libraryweb.org

04 * Tuesday Teen Tuesday- Game Day and Make It, Bake It, Take It Craft The Wii and PS3 are available with games such as Super Smash Bros Brawl and Just Dance. Create something cool out of polymer clay or Shrinky Dinks, too! Free refreshments! Registration is not required. 2:45-4:15pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. www.libraryweb.org

06 * Thursday Friends of Chili Public Library Winter Booksale Friends Preview for the Winter Booksale is this evening! If you are not a member of our Friends you may get a membership at the door! 4-7pm. Chili Public Library, Ireland Room, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. www. libraryweb.org Homeschool Nonfiction Book Club This month’s book is: “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles, Beatlemania, and the Music That Changed the World” by Bob Spitz. Please read the book and come prepared with a project or short presentation based on some aspect of the book. 10:30am-12pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. www. libraryweb.org

07 * Friday Friends of Chili Public Library Winter Booksale See Feb 6. 11am-4pm. Chili Public Library, Ireland Room, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. www.libraryweb.org

08 * Saturday Chloe the Reader Rabbit Chloe the Rabbit is waiting to hear you read her a story. Bring your own or read one of the library’s. 11am-12pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. www. libraryweb.org Valentine Party for Child and Dad (or other favorite male adult) You and your special guest are invited to a Valentine’s Day party! We’ll decorate and eat some sweet treats, make a valentine craft,

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programs & activities

and enjoy other fun activities. Please register. 11am-12pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. www.libraryweb.org Valentine’s Day Card Workshop Learn to craft old fashioned Valentine cards in this workshop. All supplies provided. Limited registration. 2-3:30pm. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 14534. www. libraryweb.org

11 * Tuesday Teen Tuesday- Movie Day For grades 9-12: “Ender’s Game” (2013, rated PG-13). Enjoy the movie on the big screen with friends and free refreshments. Registration is not required. 2:45-4:45pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. www.libraryweb.org

17 * Monday Arts & Scraps There are lots of leftover craft supplies from the past year. Come to the community room and get creative with arts and crafts! For children 3 and up and their caregiver. 2-4pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

18 * Tuesday Stuffed Animal Pet Show Bring your favorite stuffed animal to the library for the 12th annual stuffed pet show! Have lots of fun with pet crafts and activities and every pet will receive an award! Please bring one stuffed animal per child. 11am-12pm. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Road, Penfield, 14526. www.libraryweb.org Teddy Bear Sleepover Come in your pajamas for a special storytime about teddy bears! Then, leave your teddy bear for a sleepover at the library. Your friends will have many adventures to share the next time you see them. Your teddy bear can be picked up the next day. 7-8pm. Chili Public Library, Ireland Room, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. www. libraryweb.org

19 * Wednesday Beach Party with Tops Cooking School Make a fruit

smoothie, a beach scene in a cup with graham cracker crumbs, and other yummy goodies. All materials will be supplied. 10:30-11:30am. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. www.libraryweb. org Recycled Robot Party The library will provide materials. You are welcome to bring in any supplies you think you may need. Preregistration required 12:30-2pm. Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Road North, Rochester, 14609. www.libraryweb.org

20 * Thursday Eat Your Heart Out: A Zombie Fashion Show Create your own zombie fashion masterpiece. Already have a work of zombie fashion at home? Come in and walk the runway! Awards will given for the best zombie models! Registration is required. 2-3:30pm. Chili Public Library, Ireland Room, 3333 Chili Avenue, Rochester. www.libraryweb. org Origami Yoda Do you love Star Wars? Do you love Origami? Do you love the Origami Yoda book series by Tom Angleberger? Then join in for this hands-on program where you’ll learn how to make some of your favorite Star Wars characters out of paper! Registration required. 2-2:45pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

March

01 * Saturday Irish Step Dancing Get into the spirit of Saint Patrick’s Day with Irish dance instructor and dancers. There will be a demonstration of the beautiful and ancient art of traditional Irish step dancing, as well as a chance for audience members to learn a few basic steps. 12-1pm. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County 115 South Ave Rochester, 14604. www.libraryweb.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Winter BreakoutEnvironmental CSI Follow clues to solve mysteries left in nature. This program is designed for children ages 5-12. Please make sure students are dressed for outdoor activities and should bring lunch and snack. Hot cocoa will be provided. 9am-4pm. Fee: $35/child for the full day. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

Sign Language Tours at the George Eastman House. Tour the historic George Eastman House with a signed and spoken guide from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. This tour will cover the same information covered during the museum’s daily guided tour. 11am. Included with regular museum admission George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 14607. www.eastmanhouse.org

WOW (Wonders of Winter) Discovery Camp at Tifft Nature Preserve. See Feb 17. 9am-4pm. $190 per camper; BMS Members save 10%. Ages: 5-9yrs. Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

TYKE’S Theatre Presents: Treasure Island Once again, TYKE’s presents an incredible concept in children’s theatre: full-scale musicals with sets, costumes, makeup and props, starring up to 64 local kids in the performance, all put together within a week! 1 & 3:30pm. $11. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

22 * Saturday FREE *Edgerton Model Railroad Club Open House and Train Show The Edgerton Model Railroad Club in conjunction with the Upstate NY Chapter of the TCA will be hosting an open house and train show at the Edgerton Recreation Center. 4 Seasons layouts are free to visit, train show admission separate. 10am-3pm. Train Room Free, Train Show $5. Edgerton Recreation Center 41 Backus St., Rochester 14608. www.edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 10am-8pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 9am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

23 * Sunday Fat-Brain School-Break Week See Feb 15. 12-5pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org February Break Week: CircusCircus See Feb 15. 11am-5pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester, 14607. www.rmsc.org Genesee Valley Nordic Hot Dog Days See Feb 22. 11:30am-2:30pm. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

Genesee Valley Nordic Hot Dog Days Visitors are encouraged to support the Genesee Valley Nordic Ski Patrol. This volunteer organization will be selling hot dogs, chili, hot mulled cider, homemade cookies and brownies. 11:30am-2:30pm. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

24 * Monday

National Engineering Week Activities See Feb 19. 10am-4pm. lncluded with museum admission Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, 14211. www.sciencebuff.org

26 * Wednesday

Serendipity Winter Wonderland Walk Visitors discover plants, fungi and animals, and where, why and how they do the things they do! 10-11:30am. Requested donation for general public $3 per person and $10 per family; RMSC members free. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Love Is in the Air. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. www.museumofplay.org

Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

27 * Thursday Montezuma Raptor Van Tour Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center van for an excursion to Montezuma’s premier birding locations to encounter snowy owls, short-eared owls, bald eagles, rough-

Annual Camp & Summer Activity Fair

March 9: Sponsored by Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine, the Fair has the best options for your child’s summer. Meet Camp Organizers from more the Greater Rochester area and national camps--from preschool day camps to teen sleepaway camps. 11am-5pm. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. www.rocparent.com legged hawks and more! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera. 3-6pm. $8/child; $13.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

March

01 * Saturday FREE *Tails of Hope Telethon to Benefit Homeless Pets Tune in and donate to the 18th event to raise fund to care for animals at Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester. The public is also invited to Eastview Mall in Victor to see the action live. Donate at www.lollypop. org/telethon2014. 3-9pm. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. www.lollypop.org/telethon2014

05 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

12 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org FREE *The Sexual Objectification of Women and Girls Feminists for Nonviolent Choices will host a showing of the documentary Sexy Baby followed by a Q&A with Melinda Tankard Reist, Australian activist and author of Getting Real, Challenging the Sexualization of Girls. Appropriate for ages 14 & up. 6-9pm. $6 The Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Rochester. www.countertheculture.wix.com/2014

13 * Thursday Montezuma Birding Van Tour Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center’s van for a tour of Montezuma’s birding hotspots where hundreds of thousands of waterfowl can be seen! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm. $8/child; $13.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing

events & exhibits Math Midway Step right up to interactive Math Midway, a carnival-themed, traveling exhibition dedicated to the hands-on amazement of mathematics. A tour of mathematical concepts, Math Midway features exciting and surprising activities that illustrate the principles of math. Rochester Museum and Science Center 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. Included with admission during regular museum hours, through March 17. For more info visit www.rmsc.org or call 271-4320

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+.

AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact.

SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10. MYSTERIES OF THE DARK UNIVERSE Journey though some of the many puzzling parts of the universe that emit no visible light. Explore cutting-edge astronomical research while enjoying stunning images in the dome. A high-resolution video system surrounds audiences with magnificent images Saturdays, 1pm. Ages: 6yrs to adult. $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, college students, and ages 3-18, and free for RMSC members.

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DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning! Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers. ERIE CANAL LOCK EXHIBIT. The new permanent exhibit features several enhancements made to the Museum’s previous Eric Canal Lock exhibit. Enhancements include six computers to control the system, a new tugboat, improved lighting, new plumbing and electrical systems and more.

National Museum of Play at The Strong

One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. WEGMANS Super Kids Market. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: A 900-acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, www.rmsc.org Science Studios A new model of interactive science exhibition – one which connects the museum’s unique collections with the engagement of hands-on activities. Current exhibits include: Explore YOU, Our Marvelous Earth, In Motion, and Bug Works. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt

Pkwy, Buffalo. 716-896-5200. www.sciencebuff.org Cultures for Kids. Learn about kids from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., E. Aurora. 716655-513. www.exploreandmore.org Tour the Riedman Robotic Milking Center. Tours available Mon-Sat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum. Operates two historic carousels. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org A Step Into Africa. This state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St, Rochester, 14621. 3367200. www.senecaparkzoo.org

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