Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent September 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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INSIDE

SEPTEMBER 2014

Vol.21 Number 9

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Therapy Animals Work Wonders

in this issue 8|E DITOR'S NOTE 26 | SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW Susan Rizzo 28 | BOOK NOOK School Daze 30 | PARENTING TEENS & TWEENS Now That You've Given Them Wings - Exploring Your New Parenting Role 32 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT Parenting Village - Support & Community for Rochester Area Parents 34 | EDUCATION Keep the Language Love Alive 36 | RESOURCES Special Needs Resources

more features

16 Revisiting Samantha

FOLLOWING UP WITH A GAP YEAR STUDENT

KAREN HIGMAN is a Rochester-based freelance writer and a consultant to local non-profit agencies. [Page 10]

SUE HENNINGER is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent who enjoys writing about the unique people,

MARTIAL

ARTS & SELF-DEFENSE

141 Things to do This September Special Needs Issue 10, 26, 34, Martial Arts & Self-defense 5 Places to Pick Apples

54 | FIVE PLACES Apple Picking

RACHEL BLUM is an Editorial and Journalism Intern from Pittsford Sutherland High School. [Page 10]

20 Mind, Boddy & Soul //

on the cover

38 | CALENDAR OF EVENTS • Family-Friendly Events • Noteworthy in our Community • Library Events

this month's contributors

//

places, and events that can be found in the Finger Lakes region. [Page 16] JOHN BOCCACINO is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with

the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster. [Page 20] DEENA VIVIANI is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services

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Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. [Page 28] MYRNA BETH HASKELL is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS

and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you. [Page 30] JULIA GARSTECKI is a teacher and writes for the education market. [Page 34]

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ONLINE

september

WHAT YOU CAN FIND THIS MONTH AT WWW.ROCPARENT.COM

OUR NEW SITE DESIGN

We have re-vamped our website to bring you a mobie-friendly site that is easy to navigate, whether you are on your phone, tablet or computer. Have a suggestion for the site? Tell us at Mail@gvparent.com

Need a ...? HANGIN' WITH ROCPARENT.COM ON PINTEREST Join rocparent.com on Pinterest as we jump into Fall! APPLES Follow our Apple board for awesome ideas to use your farm market and apple picking bounty. LUNCH IDEAS Looking for quick, easy and healthy ideas for school lunches? Our Lunch Box board will have you covered! Find us at www.pinterest.com/ gvparentmag

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Looking for everything from afterschool activities to pediatricians to educational resources? Our new Directories section includes all the pertinent information including a google map to get you on your way.

I'm Bored! No Way!

Our new Things to Do section will help to pick just the right activity to do with the kids... from storytimes to museum events, you can find something for everyone. Scan and search quickly then check the google map and head out the door.

MOVIE REVIEWS

Wondering what's playing at the theaters and if apprpriate for your kids? From current releases to TV shows and DVDs check out our Movie Review column each week. www.RocParent.com

GRAB THE CAR KEYS

Time to head out with the family as we bring you great "Roundup" ideas on where to go with the kids. This month places to go apple picking and to get that final scoop of summer ice cream.

Giveaways Fall into some great family fun with giveaways from Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent. Museum passes, concert tickets, stage shows ‌. oh my!  Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways


Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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EDITOR'S NOTE

By Jillian Melnyk

be brave, be bold B WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND?  Email our Publisher, Barbara: mail@GVParent.com Email our Editor, Jillian: editor@GVParent.com

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ravery and boldness come in many forms. There are obvious examples, of course, such as saving someone from a burning building, but sometimes there are less obvious ways to be brave. Last October, when we first ran the Gap Year feature story about Samantha Jones (a high school student who decided not to follow the traditional path to college after graduation and instead decided to take a "gap year"), the first thing I thought was, "Wow, that girl is brave."

This month, we feature a follow up piece about Samantha and what she accomplished during her gap year. Her story is inspiring. There are a lot of pressures on us to follow the norm and do what our peers are doing – whether it's in social situations, how we craft our friendships and relationships, and decisions as monumental as the choice to go (or not to go) to college. Sometimes our paths feel mapped out for us, and at times it can feel easier to simply follow that path. High school to college to job to marriage to family… each are stepping stones on the path of life. But what if we decide that one of these steps is not for us? It takes bravery and courage to diverge. We need to remind ourselves that we don't have to do what everyone else is

doing just because it's the thing we are "supposed to do." In this digital age, it's easy to see what our parenting peers and their kids are doing. And it can be easy to constantly compare ourselves. But life isn't about comparisons or measuring up to others. Do what's right for you. Do what's right for your family. Be brave and bold, even if you step off the path and have to forge your own.

Jillian

Staff

PUBLISHER Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Cynthia Goldberg Ken Stevens CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR Sandy Citarella calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2014, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

MEMBER OF PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION


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// FEATURE STORY //

WORDS KAREN HIGMAN & RACHEL BLUM

therapy animals work wonders

BUDDY, A THERAPY DOG, REGULARLY VISITS HOLY CHILDHOOD. PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURIE OTTO.

A

ny pet owner will tell you that one of the primary reasons that he chooses to have a pet is because of the companionship and love that is shared. While age-old debates continue between dog and cat owners about which type of animal is “bet10

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ter,” other species can also bring joy to a household including birds and domesticated farm animals. It is the special bond that can form between people and animals and its beneficial effect that serves as the basis for “animal assisted therapy,” or AAT.

The Difference Between Therapy & Service Animals

Gwen Warren, a veterinary technician at Media College and a volunteer at Therapy Animals of Western New York (TAWNY) in East Aurora, says that there are distinct differences between therapy dogs and service dogs. The former are used to visit people in public places or institutions such as hospitals


and nursing homes, in order to help reduce stress and make people feel better. The unconditional love of an animal has clinically proven healing power and can provide daily comfort or emotional support in crisis situations such as the aftermath of natural disasters or in counseling victims of crime and abuse. Therapy animals are well-trained and enjoy being around people and participating in social activities. Dogs are used most often in this role, but other species may include cats, horses, rabbits, and birds. Although TAWNY is an educational provider (they do not certify or supply animals), Warren stresses the importance of doing your research before engaging a therapy dog on behalf of any organization. “The animals need to be certified by an independent organization through generally-accepted tests and be insured for each

therapy visit,” says Warren. “I have seen the effects on people and they are heartwarming. When a person pets an animal, it is much like a mother holding and rocking a baby; it truly calms them down.” She has even seen therapy dogs assist kids in learning how to read! “Kids will read aloud to dogs and it helps them because they won’t hold back like they would with a parent or teacher,” Warren says. There are many local organizations that benefit from the help of therapy animals, including Holy Childhood, a Rochester-based, non-denominational, non-profit agency that has enriched the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities for more than 65 years. “We have been working with Buddy (a dog) and his owner, Mike Fiorella for more than four years and it is amazing to see the relationships that have CONTINUED >>>

WHY & HOW ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY (AAT) WORKS

Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is a type of therapy that involves animals as a form of treatment to improve a person’s mental, social, or physical well-being. Although degree programs in this field are not common, some schools offer graduate-level certificate programs to those in related fields such as counselors or social workers. These programs relate to both human psychology and animal welfare. There are also plenty of national and local organizations that help train volunteers to work with animals so that they can take them on local therapy visits to schools, hospitals, nursing homes and other venues. The goal of AAT is to improve a patient’s social, emotional, or cognitive functioning. Sometimes the animals participate in organized activities and other times they socialize with people informally. Most people that have participated in AAT agree that — given the proper training of handlers and animals – the unconditional love exhibited by animals has a healing effect on all. According to the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, research shows that contact with animals increases attention span, cooperation, physical mobility, motor coordination, and language skills while simultaneously reducing stress, anxiety, hostility, and maladaptive behaviors. Moreover, animals augment traditional forms of therapy by teaching the critical skills and rewards of nurturance, play, acceptance, trust, kindness, feelings of self-worth, and love.

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tional and innovative ways. Guide been formed, as well as the boost in self-esteem and condogs are most commonly used fidence in the students," by those with visual probWe have been lems including blindness, says Kathryn Miller, but they are effective Assistant School working with Buddy helpmates for people Program Director (a dog) and his owner, Mike at Holy Childhood. with many physical Fiorella for more than four years "The growth for disabilities. Paws for and it is amazing to see the a Cause also works some may be evirelationships that have been with hearing dogs dent within a thirty formed, as well as the boost in for people who are minute visit or over self-esteem and confidence hearing impaired/ time, but the smiles in the students." on the students’ faces deaf; seizure response – KATHRYN MILLER, ASSISTANT are priceless! Buddy dogs for people with SCHOOL PROGRAM DIRECTOR is a great friend and our seizure disorders; and AT HOLY CHILDHOOD service dogs for children number one cheerleader to with Autism. all of us at Holy Childhood.” Service dogs are sometimes confused with therapy dogs because both proLocal Therapy Animals vide a benefit to people, but service dogs are Make A Difference really part of a class of “assistance dogs,” which The Greater Rochester area is fortunate to along with guide dogs and hearing dogs, assist have resources for those seeking to use the people with disabilities to complete essential services of therapy animals as well as for tasks so they can increase their independence people who may be interested in serving as and improve their quality of life. According volunteer animal handlers for therapy visits. to the national group Paws for a Cause which Equicenter, located on a 200-acre horse farm provides services to people in 30 states and has in Mendon, is a therapeutic equestrian center trained and placed more than 2,500 assistance serving children and adults with a wide range dogs, these animals can be utilized in tradiof disabilities, as well as at-risk youth, veterans

For more information about Equicenter, visit www.equicenterny.org For more information about Holy Childhood, visit www.holychildhood.org

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ELLA SCHILLING RIDES AT EQUICENTER.

and their families. According to Equicenter President & CEO Jonathan Friedlander, the physical composition of a horse is similar to that of a human, so when a person is on the back of a horse the movement radiates up through the body and recreates walking for the person who is riding. “Therapy with horses builds self-control because the rider is influencing a 1,500 pound animal, “ says Friedlander, “which helps the person gain confidence and build trust and communication skills.” Michele Schilling has seen the direct impact that therapy animals can have on a person. She credits Equicenter and its volunteers with making a transformational change in her daughter, Ella, who is almost four years old and has Pitt Hopkins Syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder with about 350 diagnosed cases worldwide. Ella has been coming to Equicenter for two years and volunteers like Ruth Meyers work with her to clap her hands to communicate and grab rings while she is riding to work on her fine motor skills. The gentle nature of the horses and the calming effect that they have on their riders is evident to Ruth and to Ella’s mother, Michele. “It’s amazing to me that working with one animal can help my daughter with her gross and fine motor skills as well as her communication skills,” explains Schilling. “Ella clearly enjoys it and she is excited when we drive in to Equicenter. She communicates through her face because she can’t speak yet, so for me to see her excitement and her progress is so amazing to watch; it’s special.” With the proper training and handling, animals can provide a unique level of therapy to people with many physical, emotional, and psychological challenges. It is critical to work only with animals and trainers who are professionally prepared for this work, or to seek out organizations who use animals as part of their program offerings.  KAREN HIGMAN is a Rochester-based freelance writer and a consultant to local non-profit agencies. RACHEL BLUM is an Editorial and Journalism Intern from Pittsford Sutherland High School.

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// FEATURE STORY //

WORDS SUSAN HENNINGER

REVISITING S

SAMANTHA TO READ THE ORIGINAL GAP YEAR STORY FEATURED IN OUR OCTOBER 2013 ISSUE, VISIT WWW.ROCPARENT.COM

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amantha Jones was a graduating senior at Pittsford Mendon High School last summer when I interviewed her mother, Lori Jones, about the gap year Sam was planning to take. This summer I met Samantha at a Rochester coffee shop to see how her gap year had transpired. On the surface, it might not appear that the nineteen-yearold had done anything earthshaking. But the longer we talked, the more I came to realize just how valuable her past year has been. Though Samantha may have chosen the “path less traveled on,” she seems to have gained as much personally, and in terms of identifying her future goals, as the typical college freshman.


WHAT SAM LEARNED...

FOOD SERVICE IS NOT THE CAREER FOR HER Samantha was employed by Tim Hortons in high school and worked the 6am to 2pm shift through March 2014 of her gap year. At that point she says she was ready to move on and put the restaurant business behind her. Currently she’s working at Alex and Ani by Eastview Mall, a boutique store that specializes in jewelry made from materials like recycled metals. “I love it!” Sam says. “It’s all about positive energy and transformation.” A TRADITIONAL FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE PROBABLY ISN’T FOR HER According to Sam, she filled out applications for several fouryear colleges in Florida and was accepted by all of them. However, after visiting her boyfriend at I was the University of diagnosed with ADD Miami and her best during my junior year friend at SUNY of high school. I’d Geneseo, she doesn’t feel like the struggled so hard for standard college those 11 previous years experience is for that I needed her. Given this, a break." what are Samantha’s plans for the remain– SAMANTHA JONES der of 2014? Her parents have told her that this fall she’ll either need to enroll in some type of college program or she’ll have to start paying room and board. She’s begun exploring schools that offer programs/certification in acupuncture, a holistic treatment that has become increasingly attractive to her. “The Eastern philosophy is open and accepting and a much better fit for me,” she explains, adding that she’s always wanted to help people on some level. Sam has been in contact with several schools to learn more about their acupuncture programs and to see what core requirements she would need before enrolling (i.e. biology or anatomy). She’s also planning to visit a local acupuncturist, both for the experience and to ask her questions about why she chose that field, what the training is like, and where she received her education.

SHE HAS MORE PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL STRENGTH THAN SHE REALIZED Having never been an athlete in high school, studying yoga has helped Sam understand that she’s physically stronger than she previously thought. When practicing the tougher yoga positions, she tells herself ‘I am strong. I can do this!’ One of her biggest accomplishments this year has been learning not to take things so personally and not to care as much about what others think about the choices she makes. Samantha has discovered that it’s the people she doesn’t know who are often the most judgmental. “Some of my customers at Tim Hortons were like ‘What are you, nuts? You’ll never go to college now,’” she recalls, asserting, “I do want to go to college and I am going to go to college but not on your timeline, on mine.” She adds, “You have one life and you should enjoy it, instead of always doing what others want you to do.” The lesson Sam says she’s learned from these encounters is to be less judgmental of others and to assume positive intent until proven otherwise. “When people are not in a good place you should extend compassion,” she observes. “PeoCONTINUED >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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to go to Europe.” At the time of our interview she was also planning a summer trip to Colorado for ten days You have where she hopes to one life and you try some things she’d should enjoy it, never done before instead of always like horseback riding, white water rafting, doing what others and soaking in the hot want you to do." springs.

ple may be having things going on in their lives that you have no clue about.”

THE VALUE OF MONEY Samantha has a credit card but she tries to use it sparingly (even when clothes shopping!) and pays her bill in full – SAMANTHA JONES each month. Though HOW TO CHOOSE A she currently lives at home REALISTIC GOAL AND TAKE SPECIFIC STEPS TO rent-free and her parents pay ACHIEVE IT for her phone, she has paid for a porOne of Sam’s biggest accomplishments tion of the car she drives and is responsible during her gap year was receiving her yoga for her monthly car insurance payments and gas. She has several different bank teacher training certification for 200 hours. accounts, including one she never touches, Though she had originally considered and she takes advantage of services like applying to the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, NY, her yoga teacher at Prana Yoga direct deposit and automatic payments to in Fairport convinced her to enroll in the keep herself financially solvent. YogaWorks Teacher Training course inSam had hoped to travel more extenstead, a local, and less expensive, endeavor. sively this year but quickly discovered that “It cost $3,000, which is the biggest check it would be too expensive. Though she was I’ve ever written,” Sam notes proudly. able to take a cruise with her parents and The course also involved a substantial visit Florida several times she admits, “It’s time commitment. Trainings were held not exactly what I had in mind. I wanted

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every other weekend for twelve hours from November 2013 to April 2014 and Sam had to order and pay for five books for her classes, including The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a book well-known in the yoga community. Though Samantha was the youngest member of her class and relatively inexperienced compared to some of the other students, she wasn’t deterred by this or the amount of required reading, homework, or the intense schedule. The hardest part for her was when the students had to practice teaching classes in front of each other. “It was scary at first,” Sam admits. “But it got easier once we were on more intimate footing with each other.” She also practiced teaching her mother and friends positions she learned in class to get more comfortable in her new role. One of her best memories was when the class celebrated the conclusion of their yoga teacher training by going to Letchworth State Park and spending the day hiking and relaxing. “It was definitely a big investment, but so worth it,” Samantha concludes. “I’d recommend it to anyone.” Besides getting her certification, she’s also created a personal “yoga room” at home which sheuses as a retreat when she needs time to think. “It’s


an important part of my life now,” she says. “A place I can go to quiet the chaos in my mind.” As her gap year draws to a conclusion, does Samantha have any regrets? Not really. “I was diagnosed with ADD in my junior year,” she explains, adding that up until then she had just thought she wasn’t as smart as other students. Because of this, senior year was easier but she notes, “I’d struggled so hard for those 11 years that I needed a break. I just wanted to take some time to work and explore different things I was interested in…I’d be miserable if I had gone right to college.” Most of all, Samantha has enjoyed having the time and space to move toward becoming an independent adult. “I like facing challenges and trying to work things through by myself,” she concludes.  SUE HENNINGER is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent who enjoys writing about the unique people, places, and events that can be found in the Finger Lakes region. Contact her at www.fingerlakeswriter.com

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// FEATURE STORY //

WORDS JOHN BOCCACINO

MIND, BODY & SOUL MARTIAL ARTS & SELF-DEFENSE

w

hen it comes to studying the ancient discipline of martial arts, there are many misconceptions abound regarding this physically and mentally demanding activity. Some children enter the dojo (training center) convinced they are about to embark on a journey that features their sensei (instructor) teaching them how to vanquish foes with their fists. These children imagine their karate lessons will feature aerial stunts as they learn how to use their bodies as weapons by delivering accurate punches and devastating kicks. But this far-fetched vision of karate couldn’t be further from the truth. Rather, the dozens of dojos in and around Rochester and the surrounding communities have much more practical and pragmatic goals contained in their lessons.

A sensei often spends time in the classroom correcting these misnomers that have, in large part, been created thanks to glamorization on the big screen and television.

all structured that way. Our Between television shows and students learn those skills movies such as the “Teenwhile also working on age Mutant Ninja Martial arts developing the physTurtles,” the “Power involves your mind, body ical skills needed for Rangers,” “Kung and soul, all of it, and it all martial arts.” Fu Panda,” and stems from respect: knowDorsey and “Crouching Tiger, his staff of 12 Hidden Dragon,” ing how to respect your instructors teach a new generation body, respect your sensei karate to more than of children has and respect others." 400 children each grown up equating – MATT DORSEY, SENSEI & year, offering classes karate with being FOUNDER OF MARTIAL to children as young as able to inflict punishARTS AMERICA four years old. Students ment on another human being through flying flips and are separated into skill-appropriate age groups, and early on, jumps. But karate’s intended purpose is to teach important life lessons such as instructors educate the pupils on the dos and don’ts of karate. The most important self-control, self-discipline and respect, skills that will serve its students for their lesson? While karate is a valuable tool for increasing a child’s self-confidence, it is not whole lives. meant to be used as a weapon in a potenIt’s a fascinating discipline that is much more than punching and kicking, tial attack. “The first thing we teach kids is not how to punch or kick, but how to block says Matt Dorsey, a sensei and founder of Martial Arts America, which has locations an attack as a means of self-defense,” says Meaghan Murray, a sensei with Samurai in Pittsford/Brighton, Penfield/Fairport and Webster. “Martial arts involve your Martial Arts in Rochester who has been a karate student for 22 years and a sensei mind, body and soul, all of it, and it all stems from respect: knowing how to respect for 15 years. “When we practice self-deyour body, respect your sensei and respect fense situations, we teach them three steps. First is to try and walk away to avoid the others,” says Dorsey, who started taking situation. Or they can speak up to defend karate lessons when he was 16 years old themselves by finding an adult to help reand has taught for 35 years. “The tradisolve the conflict. But if they are in danger tional martial arts teach respect, discipline, self-control and focus, and our classes are and there is no other recourse, our students

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Most area dojos will offer trial programs, where parents can enroll their child in a series of lessons where they will receive instruction and a uniform while learning if the program is a right fit. MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA (585) 475-9250 or visit www.rochesterkarate.com SAMURAI MARTIAL ARTS (585) 429-6340 or visit www.samuraimartialarts.com ---------------------------------BACK-TO-SCHOOL BULLYPROOF CLASS Saturday, September 20 12:15 PM - 1:30 PM Kids need all the tools they can get to deal with the challenges they face in school and in life. This workshop is being held at all branches of Martial Arts America. Call or go to the website listed above to register.

all have the confidence to use the white belt and progresses up to black skills they’ve learned to deal belt (Dorsey is an eighth-degree with the conflict.” black belt), students make their While on the way up the belt ladder only The first thing surface, it would seem after displaying a certain we teach kids is not karate is all about proficiency of both the how to punch or kick, hitting people and required skills and verbal but how to block an intimidating potential commands. “The belt attack as a means of threats, it is the job of system is set up in a way self-defense." the instructors to hamthat is based on making a – MEAGHAN MURRAY, SENSEI mer home the point that list of goals and then workWITH SAMURAI MARTIAL the more a pupil knows ing on achieving those goals. ARTS IN ROCHESTER about karate, the less they The belts are a great incentive are expected to use their skills program,” Dorsey says. “Once to hurt someone. Instead, children the children start to develop some skill learn that their sparring skills are only to be mastery, they move up to the next level, where used in a last-ditch scenario for self-defense they learn new skills and begin to master those from a potential attacker. The result is a group skills. The physical process of earning new of considerate, respectful, strong, self-assured belts gives children a sense of accomplishment, individuals who know that violence is not the but also a sense of confidence because they only way to deal with conflict. won’t move up to the next belt until they’re Murray says the focus of the first classes ready.” is kept very simple, with children learning the Each school, instructor and discipline of proper way to kick, block and punch. Children karate is different when it comes to belts and learn how to properly shift their weight, how the progression from one level to the next, to make a proper fist and other fundamental however a demonstrated mastery of a set of skills that provide a solid foundation. Once skills is necessary for any type of advancethey master the basics, these skills can be exment. Students must master katas, or a series panded upon as their karate careers advance. of movements featuring blocks, punches and Using a tiered belt system that starts with kicks in the air, in conjunction with steps and

CONTINUED >>>

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turns to form a sequenced strategic maneuver. There are nearly one hundred different types of katas, and children learn early on the importance of maintaining perfect form, technique and posture of their katas. On the average, a student in one of Dorsey’s classes will receive instruction 2-3 times per week, with classes running from 30-45 minutes each. Classes are offered in traditional karate skills (including judo, aikido and kung fu) as well as self defense and physical fitness. When it comes to bullying, Dorsey is proud that his students learn at an early age that violence is not the answer, unless it is their last resort to solving a problem. While the children might be tempted to unleash a potentially devastating series of moves on their bully, they learn that it is more important to deal with a bully either by using their words, by finding an adult or by avoiding the conflict all together. “When parents bring their children into our centers, they want their child to be able to handle a bully situation, but they don’t want their child to use violence,” Dorsey says. “Our children understand that karate is about teaching an alternative to bullying, but it also gives them the tools which students can use, if necessary, to successfully defend themselves.” “Once you’re in the classroom, when someone is trying to hit you, one of our students will go for a block, and they figure out pretty quickly that karate is not about violence,” Murray adds. “If you can get through your entire life not having to use your martial arts skills, you’ve done well. The goal is not to fight crime or create heroes; it’s to teach self-confidence, discipline and respect.”  JOHN BOCCACINO is monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. He reported on sports and local news for more than 6 1/2 years with the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He is currently the Director of Sports Information for Keuka College. Boccacino is a Brighton native who currently resides in Webster.

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SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW

By Jillian Melnyk

susan rizzo

MOTHER OF TOBY (6) & SIMON (6)

"I

wouldn’t necessarily say Simon has special needs," says Susan Rizzo of her 6-year-old son. Born with a short right leg, Simon has Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency (PFFD). In PFFD, the hip does not develop as expected, resulting in a shortening of the femur (thigh bone). In Simon’s case, his femur is so short that his right foot falls at about the level of his left knee. He lacks an observable knee on the right, and his foot has only three toes. "He has needs, as all children do," Susan adds, "but, because one of his legs is shorter than the other, his needs include an appliance. But is that really so different than needing glasses, a hearing aid or even braces? To us, his prosthetic leg is not so special; in fact, we view it as an extension of him."

Tell us a bit about Simon: Simon’s limb difference would have been noticeable from birth. We adopted Simon from China when he was 2. In the orphanage where he’d lived, he used a walker to get around. When we brought him home, he scooted for the month or so before we got him his first prosthesis. Now,

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THE RIZZO FAMILY OF PITTSFORD: SUSAN, RICK, TOBY & SIMON

Simon walks and runs with the aid of an above-knee prosthetic leg. The fun part about having a “robot leg,” as kids tend to call it, is that Simon can put cool pictures on his socket, the part of the prosthesis that fits onto his anatomical leg. Right now, his socket has superheroes all over it. Simon is followed by a physical therapist at school; he doesn’t do any PT outside of school. He participates in physical education with his classmates and has done soccer, gymnastics, horseback riding and swimming at various times outside of school.

Tell us about your adopiton process: Our PFFD journey was probably very different than others who have kids that are born with the disorder. Adopting allowed us to pick which waiting child we wanted, and we looked specifically for a child with limb difference. We hadn’t, however, heard specifically of PFFD before reviewing Simon’s file. So when we read the diagnosis, we got in touch with a prosthetist close to our then Chicago-area home, who educated us about PFFD and reassured us that Simon would do

great, despite (or possibly even because of) it. While we waited to travel to China to adopt Simon, that same prosthetist, who would later build Simon’s first leg, introduced us to other kids and teens with PFFD so we could put faces to the diagnosis.

What kind of challenges do you and your son face on a daily basis? The biggest challenge for me is probably the staring. Curiosity is natural, and not particularly uninvited, but there are ways to be curious that aren’t also inappropriate or offensive. I think what is


most challenging to me is that Simon often does not notice, or chooses to ignore, the staring and the unintentionally cruel comments that sometimes accompany it. So I have had to learn to either help him stand up for himself, or let perceived cruelty roll off my back - if it doesn’t bother him, it probably shouldn’t bother me!

What do you wish other parents knew? There are really two things I wish others recognized. One is that it’s okay to be different. In fact, we celebrate it! Simon’s short leg doesn’t make him deficient or inferior, it just makes him different in that one tiny way from you and me. He does all the same things you and I do, but he does some of them differently, and that is perfectly okay. In fact, life is more interesting because of it. The other thing I’d like to share is this: parents, it’s okay for your kids to ask questions. Upon seeing Simon's leg, I can’t tell you how many times kids, particularly young kids, turn to their parents for explanation and are immediately shut down. They are hushed and scurried away, as if asking questions or commenting on difference is bad. Not only does this send the wrong message to your kids, but it also implies that Simon’s leg is something for him to be ashamed of. We don’t feel that way; nor should you or your children! Questioning is perfectly healthy. You may be able to answer your kids’ questions, and that is fine; if not, we’re happy to help. It’s just much more respectful of your kids and mine to engage in dialogue rather than to sweep the issue under the rug.

What advice would you give to other parents of children with special needs? If possible, network with other individuals and families with similar special needs not only so your kids don’t feel so “one-of-a-kind,” but also so you have the support you need. If your child has a low-incidence need, the internet is a great place to turn; I don’t know a lot of local families whose kids have PFFD, but I know many through Facebook and they’re always available to share information and encouragement.

Describe Simon in one word: Undaunted. Describe your parenting style: Democratic Favorite activities you like to do as a family: We like taking road trips, particularly when they involve stays at hotels with cool pools.

The best piece of parenting advice you ever got: Kids aren’t breakable. Do your worst and they usually survive. Try your best and they do even better. If your best doesn’t work, modify it on the second pass. If your intentions are good and your methods aren’t ridiculously off-base, your kids and you will likely survive.  JILLIAN MELNYK is the Editor of Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Do you know an area parent or family with an interesting story to tell? Email Editor@GVParent.com.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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BOOK NOOK

By Deena Viviani

School Daze

L

abor Day brings the end of summer and new beginnings, too! Whether your child is starting preschool, kindergarten, or first grade, prepare them for the fun and learning to come with these picture books.

MORE READS

You won’t get bored reading these boarding school novels: MIDDLE GRADE Canterwood Crest series By Jessica Burkhart The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls By Claire Legrand The Lost Treasure of Tuckernuc By Emily Fairlie The School for Good and Evil series By Soman Chainani Spy School series By Stuart Gibbs YOUNG ADULT Finishing School series By Gail Carriger Gallagher Girls series By Ally Carter Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children series By Ransom Riggs Openly Straight By Bill Konigsberg Sekret by Lindsay Smith Shades of London series By Maureen Johnson The Tragedy Paper By Elizabeth LaBan Winger By Andrew Smith

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Dinosaur vs. School

By Bob Shea Disney Hyperion, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 3-5 Dinosaur is ready to make new friends, play dressup, and eat a snack, but is he ready to clean up? This little red dino takes on his biggest challenge yet! Fans growing up with Dinosaur vs. The Potty and Dinosaur vs. Bedtime will roar for this preschool tale.

Foxy

By Emma Dodd Harper, 2012, hardcover, $14.99, Ages 3-6 Emily is worried about the first day of school. Will she have everything she needs? Good thing Foxy and his magical tail are there to furnish all her supplies! Soon Emily has a pencil and a penguin, a pencil case and a birdcage, an eraser and an elephant. This bushy-tailed red fox and his cute bluebird companion will make readers feel confident that they can tackle the first day of school – and make new friends!

Planet Kindergarten

Written by Sue GanzSchmmitt & Illustrated by Shane Prigmore Chronicle, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 4-6 Three…two…one…kindergarten! As the first day

approaches, a student prepares to blastoff into unknown territory. Will he survive away from his mom and dad under the direction of the commanding teacher? Good thing NASA says failure is not an option! Bright illustrations by the creator of the Coraline film characters perfectly compliment this story.

The Pout-Pout Fish Goes to School

Written by Deborah Diesen & Illustrated by Dan Hanna Farrar Straus Giroux, 2014, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 4-6 Little Mr. Fish swims for the school with other fish, but which classroom is his? He can’t write his name in the first one, or draw a shape in the second, or do long division in the third. Maybe he should give up on school altogether. Or does he just

need to find the kindergarten classroom where he belongs? Adorable illustrations of jellies, eels, rays and more fill these pages. The rhyming chorus makes this book a read-out-loud hit.

Kindergarten, Here I Come!

Written by D. J. Steinberg & Illustrated by Mark Chambers Grosset & Dunlap, 2012, paperback, $3.99, Ages 5-7 With his supply list in hand, a boy is ready to tackle kindergarten! Once he’s there he learns the year will be full of so much more. This sporadically rhyming story is broken into different parts of the kindergarten day and year to help prepare readers for what’s to come. Visit with the class pet, go on a field trip,


and learn about show-andtell with this positive tale.

My New Teacher and Me! Written by Al Yankovic & Illustrated by Wes Hargis Harper, 2013, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 5-7

It’s the first day of school and the new teacher sure looks strict and serious. Will that stop an imaginative boy from teaching him about two-headed cows and gophers on the moon? Nah. Learning in this classroom is going to be a two-way street! Readers’ imaginations will soar in “Weird Al” Yankovic’s picture book illustrated with fun watercolor details.

Otto Goes to School

By Todd Parr Little, Brown, 2013, paperback, $3.99, Ages 5-7 What new tricks can a dog learn? Lots when he goes to his first day of school! Follow Otto along in this early reader as he shares his toys and becomes friends with squirrels. Todd Parr’s signature simple yet colorful style will have kids laughing at Otto’s successful first day of school and gets them ready for their own.  DEENA VIVIANI is a Rochesterbased Young Adult Services Librarian. Read more reviews on her blog www.deenaml. livejournal.com or send her a note at DeenaViviani@hotmail. com – she loves to hear from readers!

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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PARENTING

TEENS & TWEENS

By Myrna Beth Haskell

now that you've given them wings EXPLORING YOUR NEW PARENTING ROLE & LIFESTYLE

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y youngest graduated this past June. I welled up with tears on and off throughout the ceremony. These were the “happy-sad” kind which you are probably familiar with – tears conjured by a wide range of conflicting emotions.

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Graduation this year was not just a milestone for my daughter. It was one for me as well. This is because a good deal of my time over the last fifteen years was spent volunteering for our local schools in various capacities. An office at home and a flexible schedule allowed me to be involved in countless ways, as an honor society advisor, PTA president, and booster association president, to name a few. When my daughter reached for her diploma, it marked the end of a chapter in both of our lives. The months prior to the

big day had me thinking about my new role as parent. My son, now halfway through college, has already developed a different kind of relationship with me. He occasionally asks for advice, but he also has a life that is separate from mine. With both of my children off on their own, I can’t help but think, “What comes next?” Does the parenting role change? What is the best way for an empty nester to forge forward? Should one find a new hobby, explore the globe, or clean out the basement? As

always, I’ve solicited advice from both parents and experts alike.

Your New Role Your role has changed, not ended. Your kids will need you – at some level - even when they’re forty. “Often the move to college marks the most distinctive change for a child becoming an adult. There is usually a natural pulling away that happens in the teen years to prepare for this move into adulthood, but it still comes as a real shift,” says Kim Blackham, LMFT, owner and director of Summit View Family


Note from the author

Now that my youngest has graduated from high school, my writing career will be taking another direction. I wanted to let my readers know that it has been my pleasure exploring the teen years with all of you – my fellow parents and hundreds of experts in the field of adolescent development. I have learned so much during this journey. I would like to thank the hundreds of parents who sent in tips since the column’s inception in 2009. I would also like to thank my editors. Your professionalism and guidance has meant the world to me.

Note from our editor

Myrna Beth Haskell's essential parenting advice for parents of teens and tweens has been a staple of our magazine for years… we wish Myrna the best of luck in her new parenting role and with her new endeavors! To read previous articles that were featured in this column, visit www.rocparent.com/topics/myra-beth-haskell

Therapy in Winston Salem, NC. Allow your child to navigate the world solo without too much interference. Blackham points out, “Kids going away to college need to know their parents have confidence in their ability to make it on their own, as well as assurance that there is a safe place for them if needed. This isn’t the same as ‘You can come and live in my basement and play video games until you’re 30,’ but rather an assurance that there is a place that they belong and are valued.” Blackham advises parents to provide counsel, but to be careful about offering an abundance of unsolicited advice. “Sometimes unsolicited advice communicates a lack of confidence in their ability to solve their own problems,” she cautions. Be aware that your child is used to setting his own rules while living away from home and has gotten used to a different lifestyle. “It’s key to recognize that when your child returns home during breaks, they are returning as an adult, not as a child.” Blackham says that college-age children should respect being back in their parents’ home, but parents need to be cognizant of the natural shift in the relationship. I’ve found that explaining expectations works best. For instance, if I ask my son to text me when he gets back to the dorm after a visit home or to let me know which friends he is camping with, I usually couple the request with something like, “Humor me. If I know what your plans are or that you are back safely, I can continue with my day.” Your adult child will realize your inquiries are not about mistrust or lack of confidence in him.

A Lifestyle Change Since the daily responsibilities of parenting have waned, you’ll have more time to delve into those things you’ve put off time and again, such as a home renovation or long-awaited trip. For couples, there can be a renewed energy to their marriage. Donald K. Freedheim, PhD, professor emeritus of psychology at Case Western Reserve University, explains, “When all the children finally graduate from high school, a life adjustment needs to take place. When the kids are out of the everyday picture, it is time to renew what was lost when they were in the home.” Dr. Freedheim describes this lifestyle change as an opportunity for romance and spontaneous activities. He adds that if the effort is made, the consequence is often an enriched marriage. He proposes, “One parent may have to take the lead in guiding the other more reluctant one to change.” However, if the effort is made, you will likely find a renewed excitement about your relationship and a chance to do those things you hadn’t had time for in the past. My husband and I have already made several plans to do those things we didn’t have time for while running to swim meets or attending jazz concerts. Of course, there are occasional college events to attend as well. It truly is a joy to see that familiar smile on your child’s face when he spots you in the crowd.  MYRNA BETH HASKELL is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). Visit www.myrnahaskell.com.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

By Jillian Melnyk

parenting village SUPPORT & COMMUNITY FOR ROCHESTER AREA PARENTS

w

hen Emily Horowitz first moved to Rochester, she found that Rochester was lacking a place where moms and professionals in the community could share the ups and downs of parenting. As a mental health professional who often worked with people who were transitioning into parenthood, Emily wanted to offer a place where parents could come for support and community. With this idea, Parenting Village was born.

How did Parenting Village get started? In 2013, after Emily had her second child here in Rochester, she began to feel isolated during the winter months and she became dedicated to the concept of a nonprofit parenting center that would help parents find connections to one another and to essential area resources. She put out a call on Facebook to see if anyone would want to come to a community meeting on this topic. Figuring she might get a few responses and the interested parties could meet in her living room, she was surprised when over 40 people — moms, dads, birth and childhood related professionals, and interested community members — all

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came to the first meeting to share their thoughts. Out of that meeting a founding board of directors developed, and they met over the next few months to figure out what was needed and what they wanted to offer. Parenting Village was incorporated as a nonprofit in New York State in July 2013, and their first Summer Bash was held in August 2013.

What is the goal of Parenting Village? Parenting Village offers connection and support for expecting, new, and experienced parents. Connection and support are not luxuries afforded to the lucky few but are essential components for raising healthy families. The organization envisions a

To learn more

Like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ParentingVillageRochester. Visit online at www.ourparentingvillage.org or email connect@parentingvillage.org.

mutually supportive community in Rochester in which all parents are empowered to confidently raise healthy, thriving children. They want everyone to know that the cliché adage is completely true — it really does take a village to raise a child!

Tell us a bit about the Summer Bash: Parenting Village's Annual Summer Bash is a free family festival that creates an opportunity for

parents and children to connect while getting a taste of the many wonderful family related businesses and services our community has to offer. This past year more than 40 organizations attended and hosted activity tables and mini-classes to children and their parents. Children had a blast exploring and experiencing all that was offered while parents had a chance to learn, listen, soak up information, meet one another, and play with their children.


WHAT DOES PARENTING VILLAGE OFFER THE ROCHESTER COMMUNITY? VILLAGE PARENTS CIRCLE is a weekly drop-in support and playgroup for parents. This group is a time to come together and share in the joys and challenges of parenting. Each week is facilitated by professionals with expertise in parent-child relationships and infant/ child development. NURTURE is a vital peer-connection program for families with newborns. Nurture volunteers visit parents in their homes weekly and offer a steady and supportive presence through the precious first months of a baby’s life in order to help create a smooth transition and positive experiences for the family. POSTPARTUM WELLNESS COALITION is a new multi-agency initiative to increase community awareness and identification of Prenatal and Postpartum Mood Disorders. CONNECTION ACTIVITIES include monthly social gatherings and opportunities to make meaningful and lasting connections with other families, as well as the opportunity to learn about family activities in our area. The annual Summer Bash is the organization's signature event.

What are the goals for the future? Eventually Parenting Village will have it’s own home, a fully-funded budget, paid staff, and programming. The board envisions a place with flexible drop-in play spaces that can accommodate a range of ages and needs; a full schedule of support groups targeting different populations such as single parents and parents of children with special needs; classes on a variety of topics; and a robust volunteer and peer-support network.  JILLIAN MELNYK is the Editor of Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. Do you have an organization or non-profit group that you would like to see featured in our Community column? Email Editor@GVParent.com.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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EDUCATION

By Julia Garstecki

keep the love of language alive TIPS FOR PARENTS OF STRUGGLING WRITERS

T

eachers across the country are changing instruction strategies to meet new curriculum standards. It’s a confusing time for both teachers and parents as everyone learns about the common core standards. Schools are increasing the "rigor" of their academic programs. Good, bad, or both, it’s challenging for anyone involved with a school age child or teen. For students that have a difficult time with reading and writing, it’s even more so.

Those of us with reluctant language arts lovers need to respect that teachers are doing all they can given limited flexibility. Many still manage to find fun, engaging activities to use in the classroom, but it’s not as common. Here are some things to do with your child to keep his love of the written word alive and support the standards of the common core.

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Use television as your ally. The more students read, the better they read. Reluctant readers and writers are not necessarily strong in this area, making reading harder to encourage. Go with your child's interests, and make sure the material is at or below her reading level. Find books that match apps and television shows your child prefers. Read nonfiction books if your child watches nonfiction videos

or programs about weather, history, or technology. Also, games like Minecraft sell books that teach players how to create a bed, shear sheep, and even supplies a Table of Elements. Children’s shows have many books based on popular characters.

Discover the app. Students are expected to introduce topics and create an organized structure to sup-

port a purpose. This means developing a plot or theme and having the ability to support it so readers can easily follow. Stop animation apps are a blast to play with. Users need to brainstorm ideas, develop a plot, and can add special effects to embellish their story. Don’t forget to share it with family members! We use free apps like LEGO Movie, Stop Motion and StopAnimator.


for more information

To learn more about Common Core, visit www.corestandards. org. For examples of how the Common Core is being adapted specifically to New York State, visit www.engageny.org Genesee Valley Libraries have many resources for families and teachers. Visit their website www.gvlibraries.org for inspiration!

Get creative: STEM isn’t just for science, technology, engineering and math! This is huge for the common core. Even first graders are expected to write informational texts that examine topics and share ideas and material clearly. First graders are also expected to share research and writing projects. Use your child’s love of science for writing. (Science topics are often used on state assessments.) After finding an experiment to try, have your child write a supply list and the steps necessary for an experiment. Encourage more writing by explaining how scientists take notes in order to improve methodology and procedures. Have him keep a notebook just for science activities.

Develop a comic strip. Students are expected to sequentially explain events, and come to logical conclusions based on those events. This "ordered reasoning" specifically targets cause and effect using given information. Students need to focus on actions in the text and connect them. Comic strips provide a perfect mode to practice this skill! You can download comic strip templates easily. Have your child draw the pictures and write dialogue. He is developing characters, plot, and dialogue but it’s less intimidating than looking at a blank page and writing a whole story.

Be a pen pal. Students are expected to form opinions and support those opinions with evidence. Start a notebook between you and your child. To promote longer

entries that encourage her to state an opinion, ask open ended questions about things that matter to her. Ask your child about chores, television shows, or curfews that will take more than one sentence to answer. It’s okay for her to draw pictures instead, especially in the beginning. You might be surprised at what you read!

Read with your high schooler. Students need to elaborate on themes and topics after reading. They need to be able to discuss both sides of an argument. Reading with your older child when books have complex themes and adult situations can help develop this. Talk about the characters and situations in a relaxed, conversational way. My son was more involved when we both had copies of the same book. This was easy to do thanks to our library. He often wanted me to do most of the reading, which was fine. He still talked about it. Teachers really are doing all they can. Many have less control over your child’s education than you think. By using one or all of the strategies above, you can engage your child in language activities that will carry over into school. It’s definitely worth the time!  JULIA GARSTECKI is a teacher and writes for the education market. Visit her website www.juliagarstecki.com and follow her on twitter @juliagarstecki for more tips on how parents can be partners in their child’s education.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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SPECIAL NEEDS RESOURCES

NATIONAL & AREA SUPPORT GROUPS & ORGANIZATIONS 2-1-1 Finger Lakes Region ������������� 2-1-1 or 1-877-FLNY211 www.211fingerlakes.org 24-hours a day and 7 days a week  free, confidential, three-digit phone service that connects people to local specialists which can address their needs. 292-BABY Administered by Monroe Community College  ����������������������� 292-BABY (-2229) www.292baby.org/index.htm A community which links parents and child care providers with other professionals, existing community resources and each other.   Al Sigl Center 1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 300, Rochester, 14620 ����������442-4100 www.alsiglcenter.org Working together to develop a collaborative community solution for accessible space for programs and services to bring abilities to life. The Arc of Monroe County 1000 Elmwood Ave., Rochester, 14620 ����������271-0660 www.arcmonroe.org Arc provides a warm environment where individuals with mental and/ or developmental disabilities exercise their unique talents.

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Arthritis Foundation 3300 Monroe Ave., Suite 319, Rochester, 14618 ���������264-1480 info.uny@arthritis.org www.arthritis.org Asperger’s Support Group Contact Beth Grier-Leva, Twelve Corners Middle School, 2643 Elmwood Ave, Brighton, 14618 ���������� 288-4150 The Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ABVI) Goodwill Industries of Greater Rochester, Inc., 422 S. Clinton Ave., Rochester, 14620 ���� 232-1111 or TTY 232-1698 www.abvi-goodwill.org The Autism Council of Rochester, Inc 1000 Elmwood Ave Suite 200, Rochester, 14620 ���������413-1681 info@theautismcouncil.org www. theautismcouncil.org Providing high quality and individualized community integration services. We support youth, young adults, and parents of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities Autism Jam P.O. Box 245, Fairport, 14450 ������������������������������������755-0010 info@autismjam.org www.autismjam.org

Autism Speaks www.autismspeaks.org Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance 320 N. Goodman St., Rochester, 14607 �������� 924-7936 www.dbsaroch.org Dream Factory of Rochester PO Box 308, East Rochester, 14445 ������������������������ 234-0740 Rochester@dreamfactoryinc.com www.dreamfactoryrochester.com A volunteer organization that fulfills dreams for children diagnosed with critical or chronic illnesses. Compeer Rochester, Inc. 259 Monroe Ave., Rochester, 14607 ���������546-8280 www.rochester.compeer.org This non-profit helps adults and children overcome the effects of mental illness through the healing power of friendship. Continuing Developmental Services Parent Support and Education 860 Hard Rd., Webster, 14580 �����������341-4600 apopeck@cdsunistel.org www.cdsunistel.org Group for parents and family members of people with disabilities to come together for support, resources, and information sharing.

CURE Childhood Cancer   �������������� 800-443-CURE (-2873) www.curechildhoodcancer.org Easter Seals New York 103 White Spruce Blvd., Rochester, 14623 �������� 292-5831 www.eastersealsny.org Epilepsy Foundation of Rochester-SyracuseBinghamton 1650 South Ave., Suite 300 Rochester, 14620 ���������442-4430 www.epilepsyuny.org Flower City Down Syndrome Network 2117 Buffalo Rd., Suite 132 Rochester, 14624 ���������568-7421 www.fcdsn.com Food Allergies: Coping, Teaching, Supporting 31 W. Church St., Fairport, 14450 �������������264-9033 www.FACTSplace.com Future Care Planning 1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 500 Rochester, 14620 �������� 402-7840 www.futurecareplanning.org Create comprehensive plans on behalf of adults with disabilities. Hunter’s Hope Foundation P.O. Box 643, 6368 West Quaker St, Orchard Park, 14127 716-6671200 info@huntershope.org www.huntershope.org


Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) 1200-A Scottsville Rd., Suite 100 Rochester, 14624 ������� 546-1390 www.jdrf.org/rochester

National Stuttering Association �� 800-WeStutter (800-937-8888) info@WeStutter.org, www.nsastutter.org

Kirch Developmental Services Center Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong 601 Elmwood Ave. Rochester, 14642 ������� 275-2986 www.stronghealth.com

Noogieland 255 Alexander St., Rochester, 14607 ������ 423-9700 info@gildasclubrochester.org www.gildasclubrochester.org Serves children with cancer or children with a family member who has cancer - making sure everyone gets the social and emotional support the need.

Make a Wish Foundation of Western New York 26 Corporate Woods, Suite 10 Rochester, 14623 ������� 272-WISH (9474) or ��������1-888-336-WISH (9474) http://wny.wish.org March of Dimes 3445 Winton Place, Suite 121 Rochester, 14623 ������� 424-3250 www.marchofdimes.com/newyork Meeting Extraordinary Moms Out (MEMO) Contact Erin Beyers, erinbeyers@ gmail.com   Melissa’s Living Legacy Teen Cancer Foundation 1000 Elmwood Ave, Suite 300 Rochester, 14620 ������� 563-6221 http://melissaslivinglegacy.org Multiple Sclerosis Society Upstate New York Chapter 1650 South Ave., Suite 100, Rochester, 14620 ������� 271-0801 or ����� 800-FIGHT-MS (344-4867) CHAPTER@MSUPSTATENY.ORG, www.msupstateny.org Muscular Dystrophy Association 1425 Jefferson Rd., Suite 19 Rochester, 14623 ������ 424-6560 www.mdausa.org National Alopecia Areata Foundation PO Box 150760 San Rafael, Ca 94915 ������������������������ . 415-472-3780 info@naaf.org, www.naaf.org

NYS Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities 44 Holland Ave. Albany, 12229 ������������ 866-946-9733 Toll Free www.opwdd.ny.gov Ontario ARC 3071 County Complex Drive, Canandaigua, NY 14424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-394-7500 www.ontarioarc.org Regional Early Childhood Direction Center Monroe #1 BOCES 41 O’Connor Road, Fairport 14450 ����������� 377-4660 www.monroe.edu/recdc Supporting families with children birth to 5 years by providing free information and individualized assistance. Special Olympics 1 Grove St., Suite 216, Pittsford, 14534 9586-7400, www.nyso.orgw Support Organization for Trisomy 18, 13, and Related Disorders (SOFT) 2982 South Union St. Rochester, 14624 ������ 594-4621 or ����������800-716-SOFT (-7638) barbsoft@rochester.rr.com, www.trisomy.org

Find our complete list of Special Needs Services, Resources and Products online at www.RocParent.com To submit your organization’s information, e-mail: office@gvparent. com or mail: GVP Special Needs Resource P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER EVENTS

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

CINDERELLA WEEKEND

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m

SEPT. 27 & 28

eet artist and book illustrator Nancy Wiley and learn about her creative process. See original works of art from her new book, Cinderella, and receive her autograph. Meet and have your picture taken with Cinderella, her evil step-mother, and her ugly step-sisters. Included with general museum admission fees. WHERE: National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607 WHEN: Saturday, 11am-4pm, Sunday, 1pm – 4pm FOR MORE INFO: Call 263-2700 or visit www.museumofplay.org

SAT

SUN

SAT

6&7

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Rochester's largest and oldest fine arts and crafts show is the place to browse and buy original artwork by more than 400 New York artists, experience all-day live entertainment, sample food from some of the area's favorite vendors, enjoy free family art activities, and search for bargains at the Gallery's Sidewalk Sale and used book sale. You can also visit the museum (included in admission). Saturday, 10 am–6 pm, Sunday, 10 am–5 pm. Rain or shine. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607.2768900, www.mag.rochester.edu

New for 2014, extended festival hours! Nighttime activities have been added to the daytime lineup. Returning this year are such favorites as the Food Truck Rodeo, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Show and Kids Zone with new free Rock Climbing Wall. Saturday, September 13, 10am-10pm. High Falls District, Rochester, 14614. www.greentopiafest.com

M&T Bank Clothesline Festival

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Greentopia – ECOFEST

SAT

SUN

27 & 28 Naples Grape Festival

Since 1961, this popular grape festival has been held every September to celebrate everything "grap" that the area has to offer. Ranked #1 Festival in Ontario County, enjoy wine, food, arts and crafts, and music. Bake a pie for the "World's Greatest Grape Pie" contest. Rain or shine. 10am–5pm. Naples High School, Route 21 South, Naples 14512. www.naplesgrapefest.org


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES calendar guide: Noteworthy ��������������45 October ������������������47 Library ����������������������48

Tails and Tales These popular story times, which feature stories and a surprise animal visitor will be held every Friday at 11 a.m. through September. 377-3276. Wickham Farms, 1821 Fairport Nine Mile Point Road, Penfield 14526. wickhamfarms.com

R

R

01 * Monday

06 * Saturday

Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes subject to change, please confirm at rmsc.org. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

2014 Clothesline Festival The area’s largest and longest-running fine art and crafts festival is the place to experience all-day live entertainment, sample food from some of Rochester’s favorite vendors, enjoy free family art activities, visit the museum, and of course, browse! Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607.

Family Fun Walk on the Wild Side: Traipse through streams and underHoliday Special Tour of Mount Hope brush, and crawl on the ground and over logs as you explore what on Earth Cemetery Two-hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads is going on in nature! Expect to get dirty and uneven terrain. Refreshments follow- and a little wet. 271-4320. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., ing the tour. Enter at North Gatehouse Naples 14512. rmsc.org (opposite Robinson Dr.) $5/person; Free/members & children under 16. Grand Canyon Adventure: River at 461-3494. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, fomh.org and family fun combine to tell an Hops Picking Party Visitors are invited engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched to join in the harvest and celebration, planet. Showtimes subject to change, as well as see how the hops contribplease confirm at rmsc.org. 271-4320. uted to the beer-making process. Free Rochester Museum & Science Center, with museum admission. 538-6822. 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford . gcv.org rmsc.org R

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Sundays, September 14, 21, 28: 11am. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 86-year-old electric trolley car. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd., Rush. 585-533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

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Hang Around Victor Day Community festival celebrating everything great about Victor! Bands, games, festival food and FOOD TRUCKS, music, Guided Museum Tour Led by a museum staff member or docent, these magician, kids activities and clowns. Free admission. 729-3852. Downtown fun-filled, fact-filled tours are a great Victor, Victor 14564. way for visitors of all ages to discover the museum’s treasures. 716-693-1885. victorchamber.com Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, Macedon Lumberjack Festival Grab 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda your favorite flannel and axe as you 14120. carrouselmuseum.org head over to the Macedon Lumberjack R

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04 * Thursday

Festival for log rolling, axe throwing and more. 315-986-4736. Macedon Center Firemans Field, 2481 Canandaigua Road, Macedon 14502. macedoncenterfire.org

MAG Highlights Tour This docent-led tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Susan B. Anthony & Women’s Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rights Tour Victoria Schmitt explains Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu the women’s right movement as told through the lives of Susan B. Anthony and other Rochester suffragettes during this 2-hour walking tour. Refreshments Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime following the tour. Meet at North Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy Gatehouse. 461-3494. Mount Hope an animal-themed story or two and a Cemetery, 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, humane education component. Great Rochester 14620. fomh.org way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every The Civil War Tour During this walking tour, hear about the Civil War as Friday in the Learning Center. told against the backdrop of Mount 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Hope Cemetery with a focus on local Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org involvement. Refreshments following the tour. 461-3494. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. R

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07 * Sunday 2014 Clothesline Festival The area’s largest and longest-running fine art and crafts festival is the place to experience all-day live entertainment, sample food from some of Rochester’s favorite vendors, enjoy free family art activities, visit the museum, and of course, browse! Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. Closing-Boardwalk Arcade Exhibit Last chance to play contemporary and historic arcade games, win tickets for prizes and more. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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Closing-Pinball Playfields Exhibit Final day to play your way through more than 80 years of pinball history. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org R

Community Garage Sale & Super Flea Market There will be over 100 different vendors with an astonishing variety of items for sale at bargain prices. 428-6907. The Rochester Public Market, 280 North Union Street, Rochester. cityofrochester.gov

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GGH Kids: Bug Hotels Don’t let the title fool you, learning about bug habitats can be fun. Gratis, no charge. Sign-up appreciated, but not required. Recommended for ages 4-11, but all “kids” welcome. 377-1982. Grossmans, 1801 Route 250, Penfield 14526. grossmans.com Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes subject to change, please confirm at rmsc.org. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Macedon Lumberjack Festival Grab your favorite flannel and axe as you head over to the Macedon Lumberjack Festival for log rolling, axe throwing and more. 315-9864736. Macedon Center Firemans Field, 2481 Canandaigua Road, Macedon 14502. macedoncenterfire.org R

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

BEYOND THE BUMP Saturday, September 20: 10 am-5 pm An event created just for Rochester’s moms and moms-to-be. A fun day out, and leave with information on and connections to local resources that will help you navigate pregnancy and having an infant or toddler. Expo tickets are a $5 donation to March of Dimes when purchased in advance ($8 at the door), and include access to 40+ exhibitors, the Mom & Baby Market, the Physician Meet & Greet, demonstrations, and more. DoubleTree Rochester 1111 Jefferson Road For tickets and detailed information, visit http://beyondthebump2014.eventbrite.com.

Trolley and Track Car Rides Enjoy a 2-mile round trip trolley ride connecting to an open-air track car ride, linking the NYMT with the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum’s country depot and railroad equipment collection. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush 14586. nymtmuseum.org R

08 * Monday Holistic Moms Network 10 Reasons Why Kids Become Picky Eaters (and what YOU can do about it) Are you battling with a picky eater at home? Or worried that your baby or toddler will join the picky eater club someday? . Christ Episcopal Church, 36 South Main Street, Pittsford 14534. www.holisticmoms.org/ The Plant-Based Lifestyle Is the Best Medicine Cardiologist Robert Ostfeld, M.D., MSc, founder and director of the Cardiac Wellness Program at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, will discuss his traditional medical training and

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how he now also prescribes a plantbased diet. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 234-7076. 1441 East Avenue, Rochester 14610. www.heartbeats4life.org R

10 * Wednesday Books & Bites Teen Book Club Enjoy pizza and discuss books! The group meets at Great Northern Pizza on the second Wednesday of each month. 359-7092. Great Northern Pizza, 1918 Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. hpl.org R

11 * Thursday MAG Highlights Tour This docentled tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu R


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 12 * Friday

13 * Saturday

Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org

Animal Birthdays - Bornean orangutan Sing “Happy Birthday” song and treats for the birthday animals at 2 pm. Touch table station. Bring a gift to the party - check the website for suggestions. Included with admission. 336-7200. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org Festival of the Arts North Winton Village 8TH Annual Festival of the Arts offers, arts and crafts, musical entertainment and more. Linear Garden, 1 Linear Park, Penfield 14526. www. northwinton.org/neighborhood/festival-of-the-arts

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Inventor Center Exhibition New Challenge: Wind Energy, Starts today: Free with regular Museum admission: $13 adults, $12 seniors and college students with ID, $11 children (3-18), free for children under 3 and RMSC members. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Tails and Tales These popular story times, which feature stories and a surprise animal visitor will be held every Friday at 11 a.m. through September. 377-3276. Wickham Farms, 1821 Fairport Nine Mile Point Road, Penfield 14526. wickhamfarms.com

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Geology at Mount Hope Cemetery Geologist, Bill Chaisson, will share the history of the Rochester terrain as it existed hundreds of years ago, where it can be seen first hand. Refreshments following the tour. 461-3494. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. fomh.org

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Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes subject to change, please confirm at rmsc 271-4320. Rochester Museum &

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Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org Greentopia ECOFEST Everything that Rochester has come to love in past Greentopia Festivals will still be involved, just in one jam-packed all-day-into-night event. High Falls District, 81 Browns Race, Rochester 14614. www.greentopiafest.com

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LobsterFest in the Village Mark your calendar now for this one-of-a-kind evening in the village complete with fabulous food, live and silent auctions, and live music from the John Beck Quartet. 538-6822. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford 14511. gcv.org

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Over the Rainbow Weekend Skip down the Yellow Brick Road to meet Dorothy and friends, create rainbow works of art, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. www.museumofplay.org

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Positively Pittsford Festival Our last big event of the season – more games, rides, activities, food from local restaurants, festival-style treats and great music all day, plus an awesome fireworks display over the canal at 9:00pm. 248-6280. Pittsford 14534. townofpittsford.org

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14 * Sunday Artists Row The art show that will feature over 180 new and emerging artists. Come to the market to check out unique and one of a kind art that cannot be found at any other arts fair this summer. 325-5058. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester 14605. cityofrochester.gov Fall Foliage by Trolley and Trains These beautifully restored fire trucks are proudly displayed by the Genesee Valley Antique Fire Apparatus Association. Enjoy the beauty of autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 86-year-old electric trolley car. 533-1113. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush 14586. nymtmuseum.org

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Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes please confirm at rmsc.org. 1 & 2pm. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Over the Rainbow Weekend Skip down the Yellow Brick Road to meet Dorothy and friends, create rainbow works of art, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. Second Sunday Family Tour Young friends and their families are invited to enjoy a story and a short tour. Included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu

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Sunday Walks The approximately 1.5-mile walk will last 60-75 minutes. Hiking boots and binoculars are recommended. Meet at the Flint Hill Admission area to begin your adventure. Free with museum admission. 374-6160. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. rmsc.org

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15 * Monday Foodlink’s Festival of Food The festival features over 100 local restaurants, wineries, breweries, bakeries and farms samplings. It is the best and biggest food and drink tasting event in the region! All proceeds benefit Foodlink. 328-3380. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester 14605. foodlinkny.org

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Storytime Club Hear children’s stories all about friendship and have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book. Included with museum admission. 2632700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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18 * Thursday MAG Highlights Tour This docentled tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu R

19 * Friday Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org R

Tails and Tales These popular story times, which feature stories and a surprise animal visitor will be held every Friday at 11 a.m. through September.

WEEPEATS CHILDRENS' & TWEEN EVENT Friday, September 26: 9am-6pm, Saturday, September 27: 9am-4pm, Sunday, September 28: 9am-12pm. WeePeats is a seasonal event for you to buy and sell QUALITY, NAME BRAND, like-new Children's Items from over 1700 registered consignors. Dome & Expo Center, Henrietta. www.weepeats.net


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 377-3276. Wickham Farms, 1821 Fairport Nine Mile Point Road, Penfield 14526. wickhamfarms.com

& Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org Guided Museum Tour Led by a museum staff member or docent, these fun-filled, fact-filled tours are a great way for visitors of all ages to discover the museum’s treasures. 716-693-1885. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda 14120. carrouselmuseum.org

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The Play Ball Enjoy a fun-filled evening as the museum is transformed into an adult-friendly playground featuring great entertainment, fun games, live and silent auctions, delicious food and cocktails, and all the playtime you like! 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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Women of Distinction Leadership Breakfast The keynote speaker is Dr. Ainissa Ramirez, an impassioned believer in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education, former professor of mechanical engineering at Yale, and science adviser to NOVA and other science programs. 1-888-837-6410. Riverside Convention Center, 123 East Main Street, Rochester 14604. gswny.org

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20 * Saturday Beyond the Bump Baby Fair The Ultimate Expo for Moms and Momsto-be. DoubleTree Hotel Rochester, 1111 Jefferson Rd, Rochester 14623. Beyond-the-Bump.com Cinderella Performed by Ballet JÖRGEN An innovative take on the classic fairy tale, Jörgen’s choreography balances the fairy tale elements of the story with a contemporary treatment of Cinderella and her family relationships. 315-781-5483. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca Street, Geneva 14456. www.thesmith.org

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Elephant Awareness Day Part of the zoo’s Animal Conservation Series, aimed at raising awareness about the plight of some of our planet’s most threatened species.Learn about the elephant, the threats to its habitat and ways to protect this species. 336-7200. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org

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Finger Lakes Fiber Arts Festival Exhibits, competitions and workshops on a wide variety of fiber arts are featured at the Festival. Free demonstrations include handspinning, knitting, crocheting, weaving, felting, lacemaking, rug hooking and basket-weaving. 607-522-4374. Hemlock Fairgrounds, 7370 Water St, Hemlock 14466. www.GVHG.org/fiber-fest

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Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes subject to change, please confirm at rmsc. org. 271-4320. Rochester Museum

Little Beard Encampment Group View the past as members of the Little Beard Encampment Group camp near the Pioneer Homestead to illustrate what life was like for settlers and soldiers in the late 1700s and early 1800s. 271-4320. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. rmsc.org

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Mischief, Murder and Mayhem This tour includes those that are interred including bad guys, good guys, and a collection of people involved in bizarre and quirky events in Rochester, and U.S. history. $7/ person, FOMH members and children under 16 years are free. 461-3494. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester 14620. fomh.org

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21 * Sunday Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train Enjoy a 2-mile round trip trolley excursion that connects to a diesel train, linking the New York Museum of Transportation (NYMT) with the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum’s country depot and railroad equipment collection. 533-1113. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush 14586. nymtmuseum.org Finger Lakes Fiber Arts Festival Exhibits, competitions and workshops on a wide variety of fiber arts are featured at the Festival. Free demonstrations include handspinning, knitting, crocheting, weaving, felting, lacemaking, rug hooking and basket-weaving. 607-522-4374.. Hemlock Fairgrounds, 7370 Water St, Hemlock 14466. www.GVHG. org/fiber-fest

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GGH Kids: Seed Matching Learn about the secrets of seeds. Gratis, no charge. Sign-up appreciated, but not required. Recommended for ages 4-11, but all “kids” welcome. 3771982. Grossmans, 1801 Route 250, Penfield 14526. grossmans.com

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Go Green Recycle Rally Go Green! Recycle Rallies give members of the community the opportunity to recycle larger items such as televisions, computers, monitors, DVD players, microwaves and video game systems. 336-7219. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org Lehigh Valley Railroad Open House A large collection of historical artifacts from the Lehigh Valley Railroad is on display at the museum. The gift shop will be open. Rail historians will give presentations at some of the open houses. Admission is free; donations are welcome. 289-9149. Lehigh Valley Railroad Museum, 8 East High Street, Rochester 14548. lvrrhs.org

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Little Beard Encampment Group View the past as members of the Little Beard Encampment Group camp near the Pioneer Homestead to illustrate what life was like for settlers and soldiers in the late 1700s and early 1800s. 271-4320. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. rmsc.org

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Sunday Walks The approximately 1.5-mile walk will last 60-75 minutes. Hiking boots and binoculars are recommended. Meet at the Flint Hill Admission area to begin your adventure. Free with museum admission. 374-6160. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. rmsc.org

22 * Monday Storytime Club Hear children’s stories all about friendship and have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book. Included with museum admission. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org R

24 * Wednesday Food Truck Rodeo Dozens of food trucks converge at the Rochester Public Market for an evening of local food, local brew and local music. Kick up your heels to Country sound of Hootn’Anges. 428-6907. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester 14605. R

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25 * Thursday MAG Highlights Tour This docentled tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu

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Rochester/Monroe Recovery Network - Celebration of Recovery Luncheon The 25th annual Recovery Month theme, “Join the Voices for Recovery: Speak Up,

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Reach Out,” encourages people to openly discuss – or speak up about – mental and substance use disorders and the reality of recovery. Free event. 328-8230. Frederick Douglas Resource Center, 36 King Street, Rochester 14608. R

26 * Friday Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org Civil War Encampment Experience 1860’s camp life with cannons, period costumes, infantry drills & hands-on activities. What better way is there to learn about history than to participate in it? 394-1472. Granger Homestead & Carriage Museum, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua 14424. grangerhomestead.org

27 * Saturday Barktober Fest 2014 For Lollypop Farm Festival - Pet Walk - Obstacle Run...all to benefit pets in our community! The annual festival, walk, and race will be the biggest and best yet. 223-1330 x 236. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. www.lollypop.org/bfest Cinderella Weekend Meet artist and book illustrator Nancy Wiley and learn about her creative process. Meet and have your picture taken with Cinderella, her evil step-mother, and her ugly step-sisters. Included with general museum admission fees. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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Fantastic Findings Garage Sale Don’t miss this “next to new” sale featuring china, crystal, silver, lamps, jewelry, linens, art, toys and other fantastic treasures hosted by the Women’s Council. Located at the Eisenhart Auditorium. 271-1880. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Innovation Celebration Experience the power of photons and the wonder of watts during an energetic evening event benefiting the Rochester Museum & Science Center. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Tails and Tales These popular story times, which feature stories and a surprise animal visitor will be held every Friday at 11 a.m. through September. 377-3276. Wickham Farms, 1821 Fairport Nine Mile Point Road, Penfield 14526. wickhamfarms.com R

WeePeats Childrens and Tween Event WeePeats is NOT a store. It’s a seasonal event for you to buy and sell QUALITY, NAME BRAND, likenew Children’s Items from OVER 1700 registered consignors. If your child uses it, we sell it! Dome and Expo Center, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Henrietta 14467. weepeats.net R

Civil War Encampment Step back to a time in U.S. history when the country was divided. Experience 1860’s camp life with cannons, period costumes, infantry drills & hands-on activities. What better way is there to learn about history than to participate in it? 3941472. Granger Homestead & Carriage Museum, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua 14424. grangerhomestead.org

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Fantastic Findings Garage Sale Don’t miss this “next to new” sale featuring china, crystal, silver, lamps, jewelry, linens, art, toys and other fantastic treasures hosted by the Women’s Council. Located at the Eisenhart Auditorium. 271-1880. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Fringe Live Music Event Saturday’s free activities for kids will include Chalk Art from 12 – 3 p.m., and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Interactive Movie and Costume Parade from 2 – 4pm. 274-1110. Eastman Community Music School, 26 Gibbs Street, Rochester, Rochester. rochesterfringe.com R

Ganondagan’s Early History Event Visit with Iroquois and Colonial people - French, Jesuit priests, Seneca, and Dutch traders - dressed in authentic 17th Century clothing. Test your skills at colonial games, and participate in other hands-on activities. 924-5414. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 State Route 444, Rochester 14564. ganondagan.org

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NOTEWORTHY

in our community raising funds while having fun

When Ella Schilling (featured in our story Therapy Animals Work Wonders on page 10) was born, she had no significant complications. However, in the hospital the doctors noticed some anomalies which led them to suggest genetic testing. Initially nothing was identified, but after her first few months and some additional blood tests to look further into her chromosomes and genes, it was confirmed that she has a very rare genetic syndrome called Pitt Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS). On Sunday, September 28th, Ella and her family are hosting a fundraiser at Total Sports Experience to benefit Pitt Hopkins Syndrome research. The event will include music, bounce houses, raffles, sports activities, crafts, performances and loads of family fun. All donations will help fund research of this rare syndrome. To learn more information about Pitt Hopkins Syndrome, visit the www.pitthopkins.org LOCATION: Total Sports Experience, 880 Elmgrove Road, Rochester. DATE: Sunday, September 28th. 4-6pm. FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.ellasevent.com

volunteers needed

Many adults are waiting for a tutor to help them to learn to read, write, or speak English, or to improve their math skills. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester has several one-hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. After attending a preview, you may participate in one of the training workshops. To become a tutor, it is not necessary to have prior teaching experience or knowledge of a foreign language. For more infomration, call 473-3030, or visit www.literacyrochester.org. LOCATION: 1600 South Avenue LVR PREVIEWS DATES: Wednesday, September 3, 12:30-1:30pm Saturday, September 6, 10-11am Thursday, September 11, 12:30-1:30pm Saturday, October 18, 10-11am Saturday, November 15, 10-11am

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES George Eastman House Photo Finish 5K This unique event allows dozens of organizations to raise funds for their own causes. More than 3,000 runners and walkers have participated since the inaugural run/walk in 2010, raising over $800,000 total for these organizations. 271-3361. George Eastman House, 900 East ave., Rochester 14607. eastmanhouse.org German Day Through food, performances and a look at our shared history, Genesee Country Village & Museum salutes our German ancestors. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford 14511.

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Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk Exhilarating river-rafting action, the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, and family fun combine to tell an engaging story of how ordinary people can make a difference for our parched planet. Showtimes subject to change, please confirm at rmsc.org. 271-4320. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. rmsc.org

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Naples Grape Fest You’ll find arts and crafts, reviewed by a jury of independent artists, for every taste and budget. Festivals and great food go together! You’ll have a marvelous selection of edibles to choose from. Naples High School, Route 21 South, Naples 14512. naplesgrapefest.org

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Sensory Friendly Films: Dolphin Tale 2 Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other disabilities a special opportunity to enjoy their favorite films in a safe and accepting environment. 671-0941. AMC Webster 12 Movie Theatre, 2190 Empire Blvd., Rochester 14580. www.amctheatres.com/movie-theatres/amc-loews-webster-12

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Smithsonian Museum Day The purpose of Museum Day is to make museums more accessible to visitors across the country, celebrating culture, learning and the dissemination of knowledge. Free with Museum Day Admission Card. 716-693-1885. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda 14120. carrouselmuseum.org

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WeePeats Childrens and Tween Event WeePeats is NOT a store. It’s a seasonal event for you to buy and sell QUALITY, NAME BRAND, like-new Children’s Items from OVER 1700 registered consignors. If your child uses it, we sell it! Dome and Expo Center, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Henrietta 14467. weepeats.net

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28 * Sunday

Cinderella Weekend Meet artist and book illustrator Nancy Wiley and learn about her creative process. Meet and have your picture taken with Cinderella, her evil step-mother, and her ugly step-sisters. Included with general museum admission fees. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org Community Garage Sale & Super Flea Market Whatever you are looking for, you have a good chance of finding it at the Community Garage Sale and Super fleas. There will be over 100 different vendors with an astonishing variety of items for sale at bargain prices. 428-6907. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester 14605. cityofrochester.gov

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train A diesel locomotive with two cabooses will meet the trolley each day for the continuation to the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum. Trolleys depart every half-hour starting at 11:30, and no reservations are required. 533-1113. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Rd, Rush 14586. nymtmuseum.org R

Fall Golf Classic to benefit EquiCenter The golf classic plays an essential role in the EquiCenter’s ability to raise funds to help people with special needs achieve their full potential. Register Monday, Sept. 22. 624-7772. Equicenter, 3247 Rush Mendon Road, Rochester 14472. equicenterny.org GGH Kids: Harvest Place Cards Learn how to make harvest place cards. Gratis, no charge. Signup appreciated, but not required. Recommended for ages 4-11, but all “kids” welcome. 377-1982. Grossmans, 1801 Route 250, Penfield 14526. grossmans.com

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Naples Grape Fest You’ll find arts and crafts, reviewed by a jury of independent artists, for every taste and budget. Festivals and great food go together! Naples High School, Route 21 South, Naples 14512. naplesgrapefest.org

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Sunday Walks The approximately 1.5-mile walk will last 60-75 minutes. Hiking boots and binoculars are recommended. Meet at the Flint Hill Admission area to begin your adventure. Free with museum admission. 374-6160. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples 14512. rmsc.org R

Taste of Lori’s: Harvest Festival The festival will include vendors, free samples, product info. raffles, prizes and more. There will be a $1 admission fee and all proceeds will be donated to All 4 Pets WNY.

424-2323. Lori’s Natural Food Center, 900 Jefferson Road, Rochester 14623. store.lorisnatural.com WeePeats Childrens and Tween Event WeePeats is NOT a store. It’s a seasonal event for you to buy and sell QUALITY, NAME BRAND, like-new Children’s Items from OVER 1700 registered consignors. If your child uses it, we sell it! Dome and Expo Center, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Henrietta 14467. weepeats.net

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29 * Monday Storytime Club Hear children’s stories all about friendship and have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book. Included with museum admission. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

BARKTOBER FEST

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Saturday, September 27: 9am-4pm The 17th annual Barktober Fest is here to help homeless and abused animals. Come by yourself, with family and friends, or form a Tail Waggin' Team to celebrate together. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Road, Fairport. 585-223-1330. www.lollypop.org

01 * Wednesday Balloons Around the World Be amazed as local balloon artists, including Larry Moss and Kelly Cheatle of Airigami, create a large balloon sculpture to help celebrate the 15th annual Balloons Around the World event. Included with general museum admission fees. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org R

180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda 14120. carrouselmuseum.org R

Guided Museum Tour Get the inside scoop on the museum’s collection by joining one of these public tours. Led by a museum staff member or docent, these fun-filled, fact-filled tours are a great way for visitors of all ages to discover the museum’s treasures. 716-693-1885. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum,

02 * Thursday MAG Highlights Tour This docentled tour of the collections is included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu

03 * Friday Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org R

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PLEASE NOTE:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT IN PRINT & ONLINE?

To submit an event to our calendar e-mail: calendar@GVParent.com NEW:  Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

LIBRARY PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES

04 * Thursday

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Pajama Story Time Join us for stories, songs, activities and a snack. A family program for all ages; pajama wear is optional! 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

Tween Tech Lab Tween Tech Lab - Digital Light Painting. Kids ages 7-12 can join in creating digital paintings! We’ll turn off the lights and ‘paint’ in the air using glow sticks and flash lights while we take digital photos. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

06 * Saturday Polymer Clay Woodland Creatures For ages 9 - 18, Deb Coller shows how to create a variety of woodland creatures. Registration is required. 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

Preschool Science-Time Enjoy a science themed storytime and hands-on activities. Designed for ages 3-6. Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Toddler Dance Party Kids 18 months-4 years old - Come with your caregiver and dance your sillies out to your favorite tunes! 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

08 * Monday Buried Lego Treasure Dig through real dirt and other gross stuff to find the special Lego pieces needed to create a Lego masterpiece. The team with the most creative Lego masterpiece will win the grand prize! Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Preschool Story Time Preschool Story Times, every Monday 10:3011:00 am for children ages 3-5 with an adult. Includes books, songs, finger plays and a fun craft. No registration is necessary for storytime. 225-8951. Greece Public Library R

Story time with Mary Jo Ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Stories, songs,

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time will be followed by 15 minutes of play and socialization. No registration required. 359-7092 Henrietta Public Library R

Legos Club! Hear a story, then build with our Legos! For ages 5 - 12, and registration is required. 247-6446. Gates Public Library

fingerplays, circle games, toys and a snack are all part of this program. No registration required. 429-8294. Gates Public Library R

Toddler Story Time Toddler Story Times are every Monday from 9:3010:00 am for children ages 15 months to 3 years old with an adult. Includes books, songs, finger plays, musical instruments, parachute activities and a simple craft. No registration for storytime. 225-8951. Greece Public Library R

12 * Friday Babies Love Books- Infant Story Time Babies Love Books, every Friday from 9:30-10:00 am for children ages birth through 15 months old (pre-walkers) and an adult. It is never too early to share books with your baby. No registration is necessary for storytime. 225-8951. Greece Public Library R

Preschool Dance Party Dance up a storm at our fun Friday party! For ages 1 to 5 with a caregiver. 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

09 * Tuesday Baby Storytime For newborn to 18 months with a caregiver. Babies will experience books, nursery rhymes, songs, fingerplays, and simple sign language. Fifteen minutes of storytime will be followed by 15 minutes of play and socialization. No registration required. 359-7092 Henrietta Public Library R

Stories and More Stories and More for children of all ages with an adult. Every Tuesday from 9:4510:15 am. Includes books, songs, dancing, finger plays and parachute activities. No registration is necessary for storytime. 225-8951. Greece Public Library R

Story time with Hannah Ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Stories, songs, fingerplays, circle games, toys and a snack are all part of this program. No registration required. 429-8294. Gates Public Library

10 * Wednesday Preschool Storytime Designed for 3 year olds - Kindergartners. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes, and sign language. Registration not required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library

13 * Saturday SAT Practice Test Each student should bring a calculator and 2 #2 pencils. This class is offered by Chariot Learning. For students in grades 9-12. Please register. Henrietta Public Library R

Sign Up Saturday September is Library Card Sign Up month! Come to the library today for a presentation by Rochester Kung Fu and Fitness, giveaways and more! 247-6446. Gates Public Library

17 * Wednesday Preschool Storytime Designed for 3 year olds - Kindergartners. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes, and sign language. Registration not required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Time For Tots Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Forty minutes of free play with toys, followed by a short story time. No registration. 429-8294. Gates Public Library R

18 * Thursday R

Come Home to Yourself Jackie McCullough, author of Kathy Said, You’re Not Lost to Me, encourages you to give yourself back to yourself by learning to love and trust who you are. Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Toddler Storytime Designed for 18 months - 3 years old with a caregiver. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes and sign language, and more! No registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

19 * Friday Talk Like a Pirate Story Time Arrrgh! For ages 2 - 6, we be celebrating “Talk Like A Pirate Day” at the library with songs, stories, a craft and giveaways! No registration, matey. 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

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15 * Monday Storytime with Miss Anne at Wegmans Wegmans Storytime with Miss Anne Monday, September 15 at 10:00 am Join Miss Anne at the Calkins Road Wegmans for a special storytime! This program will include stories, songs, rhymes, and simple sign language. Designed for children of all ages. 359-7092 Henrietta Public Library

20 * Saturday Science Saturdays-Fossils and Minerals Ward’s Science resident geologist will bring along their favorite specimens! This is your opportunity to get hands-on with many fossils and minerals. For ages 10-18. Limit 20. Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

22 * Monday

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Foil Leaf Decoration For ages 8 -13, registration is required. 2476446. Gates Public Library

Story time with Mary Jo Ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Stories, songs, fingerplays, circle games, toys and a snack are all part of this program. No registration required. 429-8294. Gates Public Library R

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11 * Thursday Baby Storytime For newborn to 18 months with a caregiver. Babies will experience books, nursery rhymes, songs, fingerplays, and simple sign language. Fifteen minutes of story-

Lego Club The library will provide the bricks and challenge participants to be as creative as possible! For ages 7-12. Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library

Tween News Tonight New programs will be discussed and posters will be made. Food will be offered and games will be played at the end of each night. Registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R


CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 23 * Tuesday R

Toddler Storytime Designed for 18 months - 3 years old with a caregiver. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes and sign language, and more! No registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library

Story time with Mary Jo Ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Stories, songs, fingerplays, circle games, toys and a snack are all part of this program. No registration required. 429-8294. Gates Public Library R

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24 * Wednesday American Girl Club Kids ages 7-12 are invited to celebrate all things American Girl! Read an excerpt from a book, make a craft, and learn! Registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Preschool Storytime Designed for 3 year olds - Kindergartners. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes, and sign language. Registration not required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

Teen Game Night Hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night! Play games and enjoy refreshments. No registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library

Pom Pom Creatures For ages 9 18, registration is required. 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

Toddler Storytime Designed for 18 months - 3 years old with a caregiver. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes and sign language, and more! No registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

October 01 * Wednesday Preschool Storytime Designed for 3 year olds - Kindergartners. This program includes stories, songs, rhymes, and sign language. Registration not required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

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Time For Tots Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Forty minutes of free play with toys, followed by a short story time. No registration. 429-8294. Gates Public Library R

25 * Thursday R

K - 2nd grade Stories and Crafts Ages 4 - 8, Stories, games, activities and a craft just for you. Registration is required. 247-6446. Gates Public Library R

27 * Saturday Human Library Henrietta Public Library will host its first Human Library as part of Human Library Weekend. A Human Library promotes conversations between people who would not normally come into contact with each other. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

29 * Monday PJ Storytime This program will include stories, songs, fingerplays, and puppets. Kids are welcome to come in their PJ’s and bring a stuffed animal! For all ages. No registration required. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library R

02 * Thursday Baby Storytime For newborn to 18 months with a caregiver. Babies will experience books, nursery rhymes, songs, fingerplays, and simple sign language. Fifteen minutes of storytime will be followed by 15 minutes of play and socialization. No registration required. 359-7092 Henrietta Public Library R

Tween Tech Lab: LED Robots We’re making mini robots using toothbrush batteries and LEDs. Come get creative and experiment! For ages 8-12. Please register. 359-7092. Henrietta Public Library

Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624 gateslibrary.org || 247-6446 Greece Public Library 2 Vince Tofany Blvd., Rochester 14612 greecepubliclibrary.org 225- 8951 Henrietta Public Library 455 Calkins Road, Henrietta 14607 hpl.org || 359-7092

Find more Library Events at www.RocParent.com Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES 04 * Saturday Fall Festival featuring the Agricultural Fair Gather the family, cook up your famous fruit preserves, make your shopping list and head to the fair—the highlight of the harvest season. 538-6822. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford 14511. gcv.org

inspired crafts and enjoy an amazing display of LEGO trains, buildings, and detailed scenes. Included with general museum admission fees. 2632700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org R

06 * Monday

Genesee Trail Day The Zoo’s docents will share the history of the Genesee River, the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) and Seneca Park. Friends from Ganondagan will be there with their impressive display of Seneca Nation artifacts, too. Free with admission. 336-7200. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org

Storytime Club Have your Storytime Club passport punched once during each visit. Collect five punches and receive a free children’s book! This month: Autumn Adventures. Included with general museum admission fees 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

LEGO Castle Adventure Exhibit Opening Explore the majestic castle and sit upon the royal throne. Opening weekend only, make LEGO inspired crafts and enjoy an amazing display of LEGO trains, buildings, and detailed scenes. Included with general museum admission fees. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

08 * Wednesday

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05 * Sunday 2014 Kidney Walk The walk will take place at Frontier Field. Registration starts at 9:30 AM and the walk starts at 11:00 AM. The walk will be a fun, non-competitive event with raffles and family activities. . Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way, Rochester 14608. kidney.org Community Garage Sale & Super Flea Market Whatever you are looking for, you have a good chance of finding it at the Community Garage Sale and Super fleas. There will be over 100 different vendors with an astonishing variety of items for sale at bargain prices. 271-3361. The Rochester Public Market, 280 North Union Street, Rochester. cityofrochester.gov

Hispanic/Latino Heritage Family Day These events for all ages feature hands-on art activities, music and dance demonstrations, storytelling, and a variety of cultural displays. Suggested donation $5 per family. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu LEGO Castle Adventure Exhibit Opening Explore the majestic castle and sit upon the royal throne. Opening weekend only, make LEGO

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Drama Kids International proudly presents an Interactive Outdoor Movie and Costume Parade. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Event occurs on Gibbs St. Main Stage at the Rochester Fringe Festival. Bring the whole family and your lawn chairs to this FREE Outdoor Movie Event, and come prepared to sing as the 1971 movie is shown with words on a giant screen! A Costume Parade kicks off the fun, so come dressed as your favorite character from the movie. Please bring a gently used children’s book and/or a backpack to be donated to a student in need.

Books & Bites Teen Book Club Enjoy pizza and discuss books! The group meets at Great Northern Pizza on the second Wednesday of each month. 359-7092. Great Northern Pizza, 1918 Monroe Ave., Rochester 14618. hpl.org R

10 * Friday Animal Tales - Drop-In Storytime Snuggle up on a fluffy pillow and enjoy an animal-themed story or two and a humane education component. Great way to introduce the wonder of animals to the little ones of the family. Held every Friday in the Learning Center. 223-1330. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd., Rochester 14450. lollypop.org R

Columbus Day Castle Play Construct a magical kingdom using gigantic castle blocks, dress up as a king or queen, enact a story of adventure with royal court puppets, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. Materials generously provided by HearthSong®. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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Saturday, September 27 at 2 pm

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Fall Festival featuring the Agricultural Fair Gather the family, cook up your famous fruit preserves, make your shopping list and head to the fair—the highlight of the harvest season. 538-6822. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford 14511. gcv.org

FRINGE FEST EVENT

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11 * Saturday Annual Scarecrow 5k RESOLVE is a nonprofit organization that develops and delivers innovative, community-centered solutions to eradicate domestic and sexual violence. Admission: $5-$25. Box Factory Parking Lot, E. Liftbridge Lane, Fairport NY 14450 425-1580 x1206. Fairport Village Landing, Fairport 14450. Columbus Day Castle Play Construct a magical kingdom using gigantic castle blocks, dress up as a king or queen, enact a story of adventure with royal court puppets, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. Materials generously provided by HearthSong®.

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263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org R

ZooBoo Halloween Event A MerryNot-Scary Halloween in a one-ofa-kind setting. Families will enjoy costumed characters and trick-or-treat stations. Tickets are $8.50 each and available at the Zoo’s Front Gate on any ZooBoo day. 336-7200. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org R

12 * Sunday Columbus Day Castle Play Construct a magical kingdom using gigantic castle blocks, dress up as a king or queen, enact a story of adventure with royal court puppets, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. Materials generously provided by HearthSong®. 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org Community Garage Sale & Super Flea Market Whatever you are looking for, you have a good chance of finding it at the Community Garage Sale and Super fleas. There will be over 100 different vendors with an astonishing variety of items for sale at bargain prices. 271-3361. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester 14605. cityofrochester.gov

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Second Sunday Family Tour Young friends and their families are invited to

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enjoy a story and a short tour. Included in Gallery admission. 276-8900. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester 14607. mag.rochester.edu ZooBoo Halloween Event A MerryNot-Scary Halloween in a one-ofa-kind setting. Families will enjoy costumed characters and trick-or-treat stations. Tickets are $8.50 each and available at the Zoo’s Front Gate on any ZooBoo day. 336-7200. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Street, Rochester 14621. senecaparkzoo.org

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13 * Monday Celebrate Holistic Living Month with HMN Celebrate Holistic Living Month with the Holistic Moms Network at our October Monthly Meeting! Holistic Living Month is an annual celebration to honor holistic lifestyle choices and to raise awareness for natural health and green living. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 South Main Street, Pittsford 14534. hmnrochester.homewebs.com/ Columbus Day Castle Play Construct a magical kingdom using gigantic castle blocks, dress up as a king or queen, enact a story of adventure with royal court puppets, and more. Included with general museum admission fees. Materials generously provided by HearthSong® 263-2700. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq, Rochester 14607. museumofplay.org

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS • LOCAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES

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2/15/13

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Are you planning a party? CHECK OUR PARTY & CELEBRATION GUIDE AND ARTICLES ONLINE FOR GREAT PARTY IDEAS! WWW.ROCPARENT.COM

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • September 2014

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FIVE

PLACES

By Rachel Blum

apple picking FIVE AREA PLACES TO PICK APPLES

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s fall approaches, enjoy an afternoon of apple picking! The whole family will love the gorgeous trees in full bloom with ripe fruit ready to pick, and maybe to snack on, along the fun journey! Additionally, many area orchards offer picnic areas, pony rides and special weekend activities that include games, rides and mazes. Your family will go home after a day of fun with memories and great tasting locally grown apples. What could be better than that?

The Apple Farm

1640 State Route 444, Victor NY 14564 585-924-3420, www.thevictorapplefarm.com Open 10am to 6pm daily. There you will find organic and natural foods, including gluten-free items. The Apple Farm grows 11 varieties of apples, each variety ripens at a different time of the season allowing them to offer Pick Your Own from late August through the end of October. Pick your own apples and enjoy a great game of disk golf! The Farm's most popular items? Paula Red apples and, of course, donuts!

Whittier Fruit Farm 219 Whittier Road, Rochester, NY 14624 585-594-9054, www.whittierfruitfarm.com Monday- Friday, 12-7pm, Saturday-Sunday, 10-5pm

At Whittier Fruit Farm you and your family can pick up to 32

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varieties of apples on trees! Just grab a container that the farm offers at no extra charge, and you can have fresh, delicious, apples at your fingers in no time! Also at Whittier, find your ideal pumpkin for jack-olanterns, pies or decorations. Catch a tractor and wagon ride wide to the patch on Saturdays and Sundays all through October. The farm's most popular items? Their delicious “pick your own” apples, sweet cherries, donut peaches, and blueberries! Also check out their pumpkins that are ready to pick and take home during the fall.

fun. You also don’t want to miss the fall fun activities the farm has to offer for your young ones.

Schutt’s Apple Mill 1063 Plank Rd. Webster, NY 14580 585-872-2924 Monday-Friday, 9am-6pm, Saturday-Sunday, 9am-5pm

6895 Lake Avenue, Williamson, New York 14589 315-589-4899 www.lagonerfarmscsa.com

Schutt’s offers 70 acres of locally grown fruit, with their specialty being apples. Take the whole family on a fall fun trip to pick up to 30 different varieties of your favorite apples.

During the months of September and October, Lagoner Farms invites you and your family to pick apples all weekend long! Step into a decorated backyard and onto a hayride to begin your journey of family

You don’t want to miss the Apple Mill’s fresh apples, baked goods, cider, best NYS cheeses, preserves, spices and unique gifts. After picking all the apples you can carry, grab a freshly made pie and

Lagoner Farms

some cider from the mill and bring it home to share.

Green Acre Fruit Farm

3460 Latta Road, Rochester, NY 14612 585-234-0252 www.greenacreupick.com Starting Tuesday after Labor Day, daily from 9am-5pm. Twenty-two varieties of apples at your fingertips, ready to be picked! Check out their website to see the ratings of your favorite apples for eating, in salads, in sauces, for baking and for storing them! Green Acre Fruit Farm doesn’t just offer delicious, ready-to-be-picked apples, they also offer blueberries, raspberries, gooseberries, and stone fruits, all for you to pick. Check out their website to find out specific pick dates.


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