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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Inside october

Vol.20 Number 10

look for this badge to find articles about tweens & teens inside this issue

in this issue 6|R  ocParent.com

On the Web in October

8 | Editor’s Note 10 | Buzzworthy 

Newsworthy & Notable

22 | Y  our Family –

activities 10 Unique Ideas for Pumpkin Decorating

24 | P arenting – Teens & Tweens Halloween Options for Teens & Tweens

26 | P arenting – Teens &

Tweens Why You Should Consider Getting Your Tween a Cell Phone

28 | P arenting

Healthy Growth and Independence for All Ages

30 | Y  our Family –

activities Ideas for Halloween Fundraising

32 | C  alendar of Events

Family-Friendly Events Library Events Ongoing Events & Exhibits Halloween Events

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Gap Year // when your teen doesn't choose college: a parent's perspective

more feature articles

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Veggie Love // when your child goes vegetarian or vegan

on the cover OUR tween & teen ISSUE 101 Things to Do This Month 32 Gap Year: When Your Teen Doesn't Choose College 12 Veggie Love: Vegetarian and Vegan Kids 16 Our Teen & Tween Issue 12, 16, 24, 26, 28 Halloween Ideas for Teens 24 Getting Your Tween a Cell Phone 26 Parenting Through the Stages 28 Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

october // what you can find this month at www.RocParent.com

Did you Know for october.. October is National Dental Hygiene Month, National Pizza Month and National Popcorn Poppin’ Month!

5 Tweeters to Watch Our picks for great tweets:

@NationalPTA - National PTA / The largest volunteer child advocacy association in the nation, Parent Teacher Association (PTA). @CeliacAwareness Celiac Central / National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. Follow for #GF recipes, product reviews, #celiac news, tips, and more. @safekidsusa - Safe Kids Worldwide / They work globally to prevent accidental injury in kids under 19. @AllergyEats - Allergy Eats / Your online guide to allergy-friendly restaurants. @rochesterhealth - Rochester Health / RochesterHealth.com is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) community-centered website serving as a connection to Rochester-area healthcare resources.

online content & editorial screen alternatives

Are you worried that your family has too much screen time? We'll share some easy ways to unplug and get back to bonding the old fashioned way -- face to face.

good eats

In celebration of Pizza and Popcorn month, we'll be sharing some fun, unique recipes that will have you tasting your favorites in ways you never imagined! We even have a recipe for Grab and Go Pizza Popcorn!

More Recipe Ideas

If our article on going vegetarian or vegan piques your interest, consider trying one of many veg-friendly recipes and meat alternatives. We'll be sharing recipes and ideas all month long for our animal-friendly readers.

Don’t forget to follow us at @RocParent

Giveaways Upcoming Giveaways: A special Halloween book giveaway, My Little Pony DVD's, Fairy Garden set and more!!  Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

crucial support

Staff publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com

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n the fourth grade I decided to become a vegetarian. The main reason for my decision was compassion for animals… and that I was considerably disgusted when I learned exactly what was in the pepperoni that topped my pizza.

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what’s on your mind? 

i would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@GVParent.com

We were never a big meat-eating family, definitely not the type of family that ate meatloaf or rump roast for dinner, so my transition wasn't too difficult. But I couldn't have done it without the crucial support of my parents. They purchased tofu and gave me a vegetarian cookbook for Christmas (a cookbook I still have to this day and make meals from.) It was their support that allowed me to explore my new food choice in a healthy manner. It took me almost 10 years to add meat back into my diet – and now when I do so, I opt for grass-fed and free-range. Your first instinct may be to panic if your child announces that he wants to live a new food lifestyle. Like any new lifestyle change, I encourage you to take some time and talk to your teen about his decision. In this issue, writer Angela Cannon-Crothers,

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shares what she learned when her own 13-year-old daughter decided to go veg. Raising teens and tweens can sometimes be a rocky road. This October issue addresses some of the concerns and questions parents have about raising their older children. Teens and tweens are at an age where they're exploring new choices and freedoms − offering your advice and understanding is essential. Communicate and listen. Offer support. And try (though it may be hard!) to understand when he turns down your famous meatloaf and opts for tofu.

Best,

Jillian

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com COMMUNITY EDITOR Natalee Kiesling Natalee@GVParent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Natalee Kiesling Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella contributing writers Susan Henninger Malia Jacobson Pam Molna Myrna Beth Haskell Angela Cannon-Cruthers Kerri McLoughlin Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2013, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

member of parenting media association


Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[ buzzworthy ]

newsworthy + notable did you know...

your words

Candy corn has been around for 100 years. Since it was introduced in the 1880s, the Halloween favorite has remained unchanged.

healthy food tips It can be easy to pack on pounds and gorge on calories during October when Halloween candy, caramel apples, and cider donuts are a-plenty! Make sure your family doesn't slack when it comes to eating healthy − Franci Cohen, personal trainer, certified nutritionist and exercise physiologist, shares her tips on keeping your kids on a healthy path.

Do Play With Your Food

Be creative! Kids often choose unhealthy snacks because they come in shiny bags with bright colors and pictures. Every day after school, try to have an interesting fruit/ veggie combo ready and waiting. For example, use cookie cutters to cut fun shapes out of melons and put them on skewers. Serve your fruit kabobs with several dipping sauces such as yogurt or peanut butter.

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"I was at Wegmans with my daughter and as we were leaving, she exclaimed 'Wait! We need the magazine!' and ran right over to GVP to get a copy. I can't believe she recognized it!"

Know About Vitamins

Teach your children about the importance and functions of various vitamins and minerals, and make themes in your kitchen. For example, designate a week as "Vitamin C Week." Encourage your children to eat as many healthy foods that are high in Vitamin C, and reward them for identifying foods high in the vitamin, and for sharing info on Vitamin C with other friends and family.

Use Visual Reinforcement

Create a nutrition chart listing each child’s name on the refrigerator. When your child comes home from school, ask him if he ate all the yummy, nutritious snacks you packed in his lunch or if he took advantage of a “swapportunity” with a classmate. For example, you packed some orange slices but he decided to have a banana instead, or he declined an extra dessert

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offered by a friend. If he eats his healthy snack or makes a healthy swap for the day, he receives a sticker on the chart. Offer (healthy) rewards for earning 10 stickers.

Get Fit

• Give your children pedometers. They can be purchased for as little as $5, and are so motivating! Your children will love tracking how many steps they take each day, and will develop a healthy competitive edge with each other as well! • Skip the car ride, and walk your children to and from school each day. It's a healthy way to start and end the day, and will give you some quiet quality time to chat about the day!

Have photos of your kids or family enjoying GVP? Submit them to Community@gvparent.com and you could see them in a future issue!

Last month was Roald Dahl's birthday − we asked our fans on Facebook which Dahl book was their family's favorite. You said: "Love The BFG. So clever, so loving, so funny, so sweet." — Carol C. "My son had a blast reading The BFG with me." — Christine P. "We love Matilda." — Teresa Y. "I loved Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator." — Beth B.


Celebrating 19 years of excellence! YOUR FAVORITE

award-winning FAMILY MAGAZINE & WEB SITE

• Gold Award WINNER for the design of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • SILVER Award WINNER for the editorial in our Special Parent Section (featured in our September 2012 issue) • SILVER General Excellence Award for our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide • B  ronze GENERAL EXCELLENCE award for Genesee Valley Parent’s website RocParent.com • FINALIST for overall writing of our magazine’s annual Rochester Baby Guide

www.RocParent.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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gap year when your teen doesn't choose college: a parent's perspective By Susan Henninger

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ot every seventeen or eighteen year old is ready to head off to college − something parents, guidance counselors, and often teens themselves, are keenly aware of. But what’s the alternative? Some students may want to work for a year or two. Others may choose to enroll in a community college program to get their required credits out of the way at a lower cost. A third group of students will decide to take a less traditional path -- the gap year. This is an option that can be controversial for those around them; but it can be a life-changing experience for the teens that make up their mind to go for it. Here, one local family shares their gap year story.

“Since Samantha was born, we always thought she’d go to college right from high school,” says her mother, Lori Jones of Pittsford. Samantha started her junior year at Pittsford Mendon High School like many of her classmates: preparing for standardized tests, looking at colleges, and talking about potential career paths. However Lori notes, “As her mother, I sensed a resistance right away. We pressed on but the junior year, with all the testing, can be really difficult for kids and soon Sam started unraveling; we could see the joy was disappearing from her eyes.” Describing Samantha as a people-pleaser, with a creative, “artsy personality,” Lori says her daughter was never one for acting out and had always needed to work hard to “keep her nose above the water.” Unsure of what else to do, Lori, her husband Michael, and Sam continued on with the college application process right up until the day it was literally time to hit the “send” button. It was then that Samantha balked, telling her parents, “I can’t do it. I’m not ready, I don’t know what I want to do but I don’t want to go to college yet.” Lori recalls her first reaction as being, “Holy crap!” She explains that she had been mentally preparing herself to be an “empty nester” for months and Sam’s declaration threw her for a loop. Not sure what to do, she forced herself to step back and think about how she wanted to respond. Parents of teens frequently find themselves coming from different places on certain is-

sues, and Lori and Michael are no exception. Lori says Michael’s parents forced him to go to college, when he really wanted to learn a trade. Halfway through his sophomore year, he ended up withdrawing from school and working towards becoming an electrician, a job he still holds today. Based on this, Michael’s perspective is that “If Sam doesn’t want to go to college yet we won’t make her,” Lori explains, noting that he hasn’t deviated once from his view that his daughter is doing the right thing. “He’s our rock,” she says. “Silent, steady, and supportive.” Education was not a priority in Lori’s family, and she found herself living independently by age seventeen. “I come from a dysfunctional, inner-city background,” she shares candidly. “I can’t tell you how important it was to me for my kid to go to college.” Sam’s revelation meant that Lori would need to face the loss of this dream, at least temporarily. Somewhat reluctantly, she also came to the realization that, after raising her daughter to be independent, she had to allow her to be so. “Be careful what you teach your children,” she says ruefully. “The words may come back to haunt you. If you try to raise an independent kid then you better expect her to be independent!” Lori admits that there are days when she silently asks herself, “Why can’t she be like everyone else?” but the feeling never lasts. Instead she’s overcome with pride that she and Michael have a daughter who is willing to follow her own instincts and continued >>>

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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We fully support her but she needs to be doing something to further her education in some way, even if she's working. She can do an internship or shadow someone in a career she's interested in. We're treating this year similarly to a college year in terms of both learning and experience."

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heart. “Often I’m blown away by her inner wisdom,” Lori says. “It’s the best path for her and I’m relieved she’s on it.” Once the family agreed that Samantha would be taking a year off, they needed to set up a few ground rules. Samantha has to come up with a plan as to how she wants to best use her time to figure out what she wants to do with her life. She knows she wants to travel, both in America and overseas, and she also expresses interest in helping others. Ideas she has been researching and exploring include working with Native Americans, farming (perhaps through a program like World Organization for Organic Farming), and programs like the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, NY where she could volunteer and practice yoga, something that’s very important to her. Samantha and her parents agree that finding her passion first will help compel Samantha to take on the workload and responsibilities of college life later. Lori and Michael feel their job is to give her space, but with parameters. They’ve told Sam that a gap year isn’t just a year off, so she needs to have a firm plan in place by October. “We fully support her but she needs to be doing something to further her education in some way, even if she’s working,” Lori says. “She can do an internship or shadow someone in a career she’s interested in. We’re treating this year similarly

to a college year in terms of both learning and experience.” Sam also has to pay for any gap year pleasure travel she does with her job savings (she’s worked at Tim Horton’s since age 16) and graduation money. Not everyone has been as understanding and supportive about Samantha’s choice as her parents. Describing Pittsford as an upscale, homogenous community where there’s not a lot of deviation from the “success plan,” Lori notes that the responses they’ve received from others have run the gamut. “It’s been an absolute journey,” she admits. As a parent, and the owner of MB Booktique in Fairport, she hears different opinions about Sam’s decision every day. Some people, including friends, teachers, guidance counselors, and Sam’s peers that they’ve talked to about her gap year are very judgmental Lori says, so much so that at times that she’s been left speechless. “This decision has definitely taught me and Sam about how it looks and feels to be on the receiving side of judgment,” Lori notes. “I’m really proud of her for standing firm with her choice. She’s withstood pressure from others with absolute grace.” Others they’ve talked to say they wish they’d been encouraged to take a year to travel and explore their interests. Students (and adults) who have done a gap year will tell the family, “It’s the best thing to do and everyone should


do it!” Lori has also been shocked by the number of young people that she’s talked to recently who are accruing a huge amount of college debt and still have no idea what they want to do once they graduate. “To me, this is confirmation that Sam is doing the right thing!” she asserts. Lori acknowledges that, in the US, the notion of a gap year isn’t part of the culture. She also observes that, though our society is certainly intrigued in hearing, or reading, about those who take to the road to discover themselves, many people are fearful to take that step into uncharted territory themselves. "Our job as parents is to guide our kids, but we have to be able to let them go too," she adds noting, “I want to open people’s ideas to the concept of a gap year, to help others see it as a viable option. I think it should be part of the conversation and that we shouldn’t be afraid of it. If I could do one thing over again, I wish I had presented a gap year as an option right from the start. It could have saved Sam from all that anxiety.”  Sue Henninger is a freelance writer, a frequent contributor Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She is the mother of three musicians, and an avid music lover. Contact her at www.fingerlakeswriter.com

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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veggie love /

when your child goes vegetarian or vegan

By Angela Cannon-Crothers

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hen my 13-year-old daughter said she wanted to go vegetarian, I told her that I thought a little meat would help keep her strong and healthy. Her main reason for going vegetarian was compassion for how animals are raised, so I told her we would raise our own meat birds, with love and care, and purchase meats from all-natural, grass fed local farmers. Getting to know the animals we were raising for food was a total backfire, as you might have guessed. She now wants a strictly vegetarian diet, and I must admit, with her evolving knowledge, I see veganism on the horizon.


Vegan or Veg? The difference between a vegan and vegetarian is that vegetarians often eat eggs, dairy products, and sometimes fish. Vegans consume only plant-based foods.

I want to be supportive of my child’s healthy and thoughtful food choices, after all, some parents should be so lucky, right? So I attended a Vegan and Vegetarian workshop with local vegans Carol and Ted Barnett, MD, parents of three, now grown, vegan children, and coordinators of the Rochester Area Vegetarian Society since 1995. “Ted and I became vegan more than 22 years ago,” says Carol whose youngest child was a vegan pregnancy and is still vegan today. The difference between a vegan and vegetarian is that vegetarians may eat eggs and dairy products while vegans consume only plant-based foods. Both dietary choices are based on compassion, and often environmental views, but vegans choose not to use any animal products or ingredients of any kind. I learned that reasoning for a vegan diet goes beyond compassion but has health benefits as well. Carol informed me that “a vegetarian diet − by which I mean an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet, including eggs and dairy − is not safe in the way that a vegan diet is because eggs and dairy products can bring with them pronounced risks. For example, cow's milk contains no iron and actually can cause loss of iron from the small intestine. It is also a suspected trigger for type 1 (juvenile) diabetes.” Like any parent, I am concerned about my child getting all the proper nutrients for growth and development, as well as having the financial resources to purchase different foods. I also want to make hardy meals and offer school lunches that will have appeal. Here's how I am approaching meal-time with a new vegetarian in the house:

Getting all the Nutrients

A vegetarian diet has some great pluses in the vitamin department – dark leafy greens, colorful vegetables, and fresh fruits of all kinds supply most of what a healthy body needs. If your child decides to go veg or vegan, be careful she doesn’t just skip the meat and substitute junk foods like fries and milkshakes or empty calories from white flour and white rice. A nutrient rich diet should come from a variety of whole grains, legumes (soybean, nuts, and others), fruits, and plenty of root and leaf vegetables on a daily basis. One comment I kept hearing at Carol and Ted's workshop was to stop worrying about the protein! Ted reminded us that calcium, magnesium, Vitamin K, iron, and the necessary nutrients we need are all available in plants we consume. The two supplements most recommended for vegan and vegetarian diets are Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D − both are easy to find in fresh foods or taken as part of a regular multi-vitamin. "Some experts argue that we should also supplement with DHA, an end-chain omega-3 fatty acid," says Carol. "You must decide whether to supplement with DHA or just to serve foods rich in omega-3's like soy, walnuts, continued >>> Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Carol’s ROASTED MARINATED TOFU •1  lb firm or extra-firm tofu (not silken) •1  or 2 T soy sauce or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos •1  or 2 T rice vinegar or cider vinegar • ½ t garlic powder •½  t ground ginger (optional) • 1 t toasted sesame oil Dice the tofu or cut it into strips. Lay the tofu on a lightly-oiled cookie sheet. In a separate small bowl, mix together the sauce ingredients, and pour them over the tofu. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake the tofu 10-12 min. on each side, turning once. Cooked strip-style, you can serve Roasted Tofu with rice or potatoes and a green vegetable to make a “balanced” meal. It can be a versatile addition to all sorts of meals, including pasta or grain salads.

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and greens.” Ted adds, since Vitamin D is obtained from sunlight, “eat whole foods and go outside and run around!”

Fun Foods for the School Lunchbox

• Rev up the old peanut butter and jelly standby with other nut butters like almond, sesame (Tahini), sunflower, or Nutella (chocolate and hazelnut). Substitute honey or thinly sliced apples for jelly. • Include hummus spread in a container with a separate dipping package of sliced carrots, cucumbers, zucchini sticks, black bean chips or pita chips. • Young kids enjoy traditional foods gone vegan such as not dogs, veggie burgers and veggie chicken nuggets. • Add a container of mixed nuts, trail mix, or seasoned pumpkin seeds (look for low salt). • For a warm up on cold days, include a thermal container of steamed, whole edamame, vegetable soups and stews, brown rice, or pasta. • Include real yogurt -- not the candy kind in a tube or other high sugar variety. Note: yogurt is not vegan. • Pack fruit of any kind – sliced melons, berries, grapes, apples, chunks of pear and peach. Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron!

• I nclude containers of whole grain pasta in fun shapes, lightly seasoned with olive oil or soy sauce. •A  dd chunks of baked or raw tofu, seasoned to taste or with a separate dipping sauce like tamari, sweet n’ sour, or honey mustard. •W  rap up bean tortilla with lettuce, avocado, and tomato slices.

Cafeteria Talk

My daughter is fortunate in that she is able to set an example -- other kids in the lunchroom comment on how healthy her lunches look! Sometimes they ask about what she is eating because they’ve never heard of edamame or tempeh. She also tells me that she feels energized after lunch and not groggy, which is important because she’s in accelerated classes and plays on the soccer team every day after school. Your child might experience a variety of responses from other children in the lunchroom. Most kids will be mildly curious about what your child is eating and others may curl up their noses. Encourage your child to answer questions about her lunch matter-of-factly, without judgment regarding what foods other students are eating. If your child is asked about why she is are eating this way she may choose to answer that she wants to eat healthy, continued >>>


GVP

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Fake Chicken Salad – delicious! • 2 T soy sauce or Bragg’s Aminos • 2 T mirin vinegar (or maple syrup) • ½ c water • 8 oz tempeh • ½ c chopped celery • ½ c shredded carrots • ¼ c chopped red bell pepper • ½ c thawed frozen peas • ¼ c green onion • ½ c vegan mayonanaise • 1 T umeboshi vinegar (or rice vinegar with a dash of sugar) • 1 t Healthful Seasoning Blend (mix of nutritional yeast, salt, garlic powder, turmeric, onion powder, paprika and thyme) • ½ c toasted pumpkin seeds Mix soy, water, and mirin in a skillet. Add tempeh, cover and simmer for 10 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Cool tempeh and grate into a bowl. Add vegetables. In a separate bowl mix mayo, vinegar, and seasoning. Add to tempeh-veggie mixture. Stir in toasted pumpkin seeds. Serve on lettuce, with crackers, or in sandwiches.

that she doesn't eat animals, or simply that this is how her family eats. It’s important that vegetarian and vegan children demonstrate peace toward other living things by example; peers who truly want to know more will ask for details about going vegetarian or vegan. And keep in mind that most kids these days are familiar with dietary differences due to religion, allergies, and lifestyle choices. Who knows, maybe compassionate or health-minded kids will set such a good example that other students, parents, and teachers will begin to expect the school cafeteria to do the same. There are hundreds of books and websites on vegetarian cooking! Carol Bennet, co-coordinator of the Rochester Area Vegetarian Society suggests Jack Norris, a Registered Dietitian with Vegan Outreach for more information on children’s nutritional needs at www.veganhealth.org and his book, Vegan For Life. For more information on the Rochester Area Vegetarian Society visit their website at www.rochesterveg.org  Angela Cannon-Crothers is a contributing writer to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine. She is an an educator at Herb Haven in Crystal Beach as well as a writer and author. You can visit her website at angelacannoncrothers.webs.com

Rrecipes, tips + more

Find our round-up of blogs and websites for a vegetarian and vegan lifestyle this month at www.rocparent.com

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[your family activities ]

By Kerrie McLoughlin

pumpkin time //

10 unique ideas for pumpkin decorating

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fter the candy and the dressing up, one of the best parts of Halloween is turning a pumpkin into something cool, crazy or scary. The traditional way to do that is to carve out a face or other neat design, but you just can’t hand a kid a sharp knife. So how do you get little ones involved in the creation of their dream pumpkins? Here are ten unique ideas sure to delight kids of all ages!

1.

Colored markers are the perfect way to draw whatever image you like onto a pumpkin. Younger kids can scribble (or color in pictures you draw), while older kids can write words, draw cats, witches… whatever!

2.

Break out some stencils, glitter, sequins and glue to bedazzle any pumpkin. The pumpkin itself embodies Halloween, so stencils can be any shape or size. Why not make some glittery green pine trees or pink hearts on that nice orange canvas?

3.

For something completely different, but in keeping with the holiday, first have your child paint his pumpkin white. Then glue on store-bought black cobwebs (or create them using yarn). The final step is to attach some plastic spiders for a creepy, crawly pumpkin!

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4.

Paint a pumpkin black and decorate using white paint to make a witch’s face, a family of ghosts, a skeleton or just the word BOO! You can also look for glow-in-the-dark paint!

5.

Paint a pumpkin gold or silver and let your child have fun gluing on candy corn, jelly beans, and other treats in assorted colors. See if he can make a pattern or his initial on the pumpkin using these sweet treats.

6.

Your child’s pumpkin can match her costume! Mr. Potato Head pumpkin decorating kits are all the rage these days and can be found at practically any store that sells Halloween decorations. If you can’t locate any, check Amazon.com. Kits are sold

in many different types, like witch, vampire, pirate, fireman, princess and more! An added bonus is that these kits are reusable, so they are friendly to the environment.

7.

For the 5 and up crowd, try out another pumpkin decorating kit such as a wooden pumpkin decorating kit. Mix and match the pieces for even more fun. This one would be a big hit at a Halloween party or an October birthday party.

8.

Create your own pumpkin family. You can buy a mini pumpkin to represent a baby in your family, a large one for a dad or mom and medium-size pumpkins for children. Raid the craft drawer and let the kids go to town gluing on cut-out felt and yarn for clothing and hair, buttons and

ribbon for additional decorations.

9.

Have a ball! My youngest son is in love with any sport that involves a ball. I’m thinking he would be thrilled to help paint a pumpkin white like a baseball then draw on some red stitching. You can also make a basketball or soccer ball out of a pumpkin – just don’t throw it!

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Cut out shapes from sponges, put some washable paint in small bowls and let your little one have some stamping fun on a pumpkin. 

Kerrie McLoughlin is the homeschooling writer mom of 5 who blogs about the controlled chaos at TheKerrieShow.com.


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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

BOOhoo // too old for trick-

or-treating? great halloween options for teens & tweens

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hen I was a child, the anticipation of Halloween night was unbearable for me. I would sprint from the bus, shove some food down only because my mom insisted, and then spend what was left of daylight getting into a costume I had planned for months. Once darkness enveloped the neighborhood, we headed out in groups. By the time junior high school started, it was no longer cool to go door-to-door asking for candy.

However, we didn’t want to give up the tradition of dressing up and venturing out on Halloween night, so we armed ourselves with shaving cream instead of candy bags, and searched for other teen groups to sneak up on. By high school, most of my friends were assigned to doorbell management. Sigh! I lucked out, however, because I still got to dress up and chaperone my little sister. Forgive me for the pun, but I never got Halloween out of my blood. Today, I still dress up to answer the door, and I hold an annual haunted bash. Teens don’t have to give up the holiday either. There are plenty of ways teens can celebrate Halloween – without a can of Gillette!

Volunteer Opportunities Halloween is a great time to get teens into the spirit of giving to others. There are dozens of volunteer opportunities, and making the world a better place for others is always a satisfying endeavor.

Annie Fox, MEd, character educator, advisor to teens, and author of Teaching Kids to Be Good People (Electric Eggplant, 2012) says, “Teens are about finding their power to make a difference. Combining philanthropy with trick-or-treating is fun and altruistic. Trick-or treating for UNICEF is cool.” Lynne Kenney, PsyD, a pediatric psychologist, author of The Family Coach Method (St. Lynn’s Press, 2009), and co-author of Bloom: Helping Children Blossom (Comprehensive Counseling & Consulting, LLC, 2013) explains, “Being a teen during Halloween is fabulous, and you don't have to miss out on the fun! The key is to get creative.” Kenney suggests that teens give back to their local neighborhoods. “Many parents prefer being out in the neighborhood with their own children, so helping mind the door while families trick-or-treat is a helpful and practical neighborhood gift.” Kenney also suggests teens hold a lemonade stand for the younger trick-or-treaters. Teens should also check with their school, town, and church to see if they can lend a hand.

safety tips for licensed teens

• When driving to work or a party in costume, be sure to remove any type of head gear, long cape, shoe covering, or anything else that might interfere with your vision or ability to operate the vehicle. • Take it slow: Young trick-ortreaters will be out on roads and may not be equipped with sufficient gear to be easily seen. • Be extra cautious: Studies show that driving at night is more dangerous for teens, and Halloween night is also an evening where celebrations may include alcohol. Take particular care, and steer clear of erratic vehicles. • Abide by curfews.

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//

party time There’s nothing like planning a Halloween bash to get into the spirit. It’s best for teens to plan a party on a weekend night when getting homework done isn’t an issue. A theme-within-a theme party is fun for the teen crowd, such as “Evil Roaring Twenties” or “Dead Rock Stars.” Creative snack and dessert ideas: http://spoonful.com/halloween/halloween-parties Game ideas: http://www.punchbowl.com/p/halloween-party-games-for-teens General tips, decorations, etc.: www.ehow.com/topic_3735_teen-halloween-party-ideas.html

Here is a quick list: • Volunteer at a community haunted mansion or Halloween festival. • Group idea: Create a neighborhood “haunted mansion.” Send fliers inviting the younger crowd. Charge a nominal fee and donate the proceeds to a favorite charity. • Non-profit blood drive: Volunteers can dress like Dracula and post an entrance sign which reads: I vant to draw your blood. • Some hospitals allow teens to hand out treats/small gifts to young patients who can’t celebrate the holiday due to illness. This is a great way to give back.

The School Connection Even though showing off their costumes at the elementary Halloween parade is a distant memory, there are still plenty of opportunities for middle school and high school students to share their passion and excitement for the holiday at school. Here are some options: • Bake Halloween treats for group fundraising events. • Volunteer at an elementary school Halloween festival. • Organize a “Monster Mash Bash” or “Deadly Dungeon Dance” to raise money for the Senior Class Trip. • Suggest a Halloween themed concert to the music director. Musicians can dress the part.

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(Music selections: Phantom of the Opera, the Adams Family Theme, songs from the Rocky Horror Picture Show, etc.). • Art clubs and National Honor Society chapters: Members can create monster-themed t-shirt designs with catchy phrases such as, “It’s cool to be a ghoul.” Sell to classmates and donate proceeds toward an art scholarship for students in need.

Get into Costume Teens can spread their love of the holiday by donning a costume at an after school or weekend job. Many business owners allow their employees to dress for the occasion. Teens should always ask first, but the mood is often contagious and other employees might opt to dress in spooky garb as well. Is your teen into theater? Perhaps he can direct a mini play for trick-or-treaters at your door. Teens love to put on skits with friends. Younger kids will get a kick out of it when they ring the bell.  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of the newly released book, LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). For more information visit www. myrnahaskell.com.

Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: Do you tell another parent about her teen’s bad behavior? When to tell…not tell…

Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myrnahaskell.com Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Pam Molnar

ring it up //

6 reasons you should consider getting your tween a cell phone

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hen my oldest daughter was in 5th grade, she started asking about cell phones. Evidently, some of her friends had recently got a cell phone of their own. My first reaction was to assume that their parents were crazy and were simply giving in to the wants of a spoiled tween. Why did a 5th grader need a cell phone?

According to a report from the National Consumer League, conducted by ORC International in 2012, nearly six out of ten parents of tweens (ages 8 to 12) got cell phones for their children. The good news: the majority of the parents did not take their decision lightly. The report showed parents taking the steps to phone ownership slowly by reading articles, talking with other parents and comparing cellular service before taking the plunge. The result was a better understanding of the benefits of buying a cell phone for their tween.

Peace of mind. The most obvious reason to get a cell phone for your tween is the security in being able to reach them when they are not at home. Many middle school kids prefer to walk to their school bus stop alone. As your children get older, their activity level increases, taking them away from home more often. It is a comfort to a parent to know that they can call their children to see if they arrived safely or to

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inform them of a change of plans to pick them up.

Comfort for your child. While it is reassuring for parents to be able to reach their children, the kids also feel more secure. Your tween is trying to spread his wings and gain a little independence, but he may still find comfort in the fact that his parents are only a phone call away. When my son (and youngest child) got a phone, he felt better knowing that if he didn’t see me the moment practice got out, he could call to see if I was on my way. He is also able call to ask for permission to go home with a friend after school, knowing I would worry if I didn’t see him by 3:45.

A way to communicate with friends. A cell phone is very handy to use as a phone, but most of the communication from your child’s phone will be in the form of texting. “We got our son a cell phone for safety reasons first, but also because using technology to commu-

nicate, learn and play has become the way of the world,” explains Tamara Ortegel, mother of three. Unlike our generation, our children don’t have to wait in line to use the kitchen phone to get the math assignment from a friend. Your tweens can simply send their friend a text. As a parent, you can monitor who they are texting by periodically checking the old messages when the phone is left in the charger at night.

Teaching responsibility. Having a cell phone gives your tween the chance to try a little responsibility. Letting your child out the door with their cell phone does not guarantee that it will come back in working condition, or at all. Tell your tween that they get

before you take the plunge

• Do your research. Decide what plan is best for your tween and your family − consider if your tween should have texting, a data package for games, web browsing, etc. • Set ground-rules for usage, including researching what rules your child's school has regarding cell phones. • Talk about safe phone usage including proper phone conduct.


one phone and they have to take care of it. My oldest child is notorious for losing and breaking her phone, but I refuse to carry insurance on it. Her punishment for irresponsibility is to use grandma’s old phone with the antenna and no key board.

Strengthen relationships with family. One of the benefits that you may not expect is better communication with extended family. Lisa Yore, mother of four, says her son has become more connected to family members. “My son has the phone numbers of aunts, uncles and his grandmother," says Yore. "They have had conversations and told him that if he ever needs to talk or needs anything, he shouldn’t hesitate to call them.” Getting a simple, “Good luck at your game” text from Grandma tells the kids that she is thinking of them.

Save money. With the addition of cell phones in your house, your landline will become obsolete. “We got Jack a phone because we switched our TV/internet provider and got rid of the land line because no one used it except him,” explains Stacy Bella, mother of four. “His sisters all had cell phones and it was cheaper to do that than it was to keep the land line.” With the addition of each new cell phone in the house, the few calls that come into your home phone are telemarketers. To balance the increasing cell phone bill, many eliminate their landline completely. As the parent, it is up to you to set the rules regarding limits and expectations. Teach your tween about the responsibility that goes with owning a phone and explain the repercussions for losing or damaging the phone. Above all, remind your tween that having a phone is not a right, it is a privilege.  Pam Molnar is a freelance writer and mother of two busy teenagers and an active tween. While their activities often keep them away from home, it is a comfort to all to know that they are only a phone call (or text) away.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[parenting through the stages ]

By Malia Jacobson

onward, upward //

from first steps to first apartment, here’s a guide to healthy growth and independence

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oaxing a baby to use a spoon for the first time, teaching a kindergartener to tie his shoe, or practicing parallel parking with a teen — these routine parenting tasks aren’t merely milestones for the scrapbook. They’re part of guiding a child toward independence, a process that often involves more than a few pitfalls along the way. Experts say preparing children to become happy, successful adults starts long before kids leave the nest; in fact, children start learning self-confidence and self-reliance in infancy. Here’s how to foster your child’s budding independence, starting today.

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BIRTH THROUGH PRESCHOOL YEARS 0-5: Skill building Even before a child takes her first wobbly steps, she’s moving toward independence. “Babies begin to understand themselves as separate from others around

ELEMENTARY YEARS 6-11: Give and take Building independence is a two-steps-forward, one-stepback dance, particularly during the elementary years, when children may ask for more independence than they’re ready for, notes Allen. But parents can help children build confidence and self-reliance by honoring a child’s requests when

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six months, sometimes a little earlier. That is typically the first sign in independence,” says board-certified parenting coach Kimberly Allen, PhD, assistant professor at North Carolina State University. Encouraging independent play by allowing

appropriate. For example, a child who asks to make the two-block trek to a friend’s house alone may be up for the challenge. Consider a child’s developmental abilities in everyday contexts — for example, has your child demonstrated good judgment in public places? Does your child understand and obey basic pedestrian safety rules? If all signs point to yes, it may be time for a

infants to entertain themselves for short periods (up to 15 minutes or so) can build the foundation for more sustained creative play during toddlerhood. Babies may enjoy sitting in a swing or bouncer, listening to music, peering at images of faces or bold patterns, or simply gazing out a window. A toddler’s quest for independence boils down to four words: “I do it myself!” When your child utters this familiar phrase, allow him to try the activity he’s angling for, whether it’s pulling on a t-shirt or pouring a glass of milk. To determine the amount of guidance your little one needs, try “scaffolding,” a tactic often used by educators that involves showing a child how to do something, then stepping back and letting the child try the new skill. Sometimes, parents just need to “move out of the way,” says Allen. “The more children try, the better they’ll get.”


trial run, with the understanding that you’re always only a few doors (or a phone call) away. Allowing kids to take a few calculated risks is key, says Michelle P. Maidenberg, Ph.D., MPH, a psychotherapist in New York City. Perpetually cautioning a child against risk communicates doubt about a child’s competence or trustworthiness. These damaging messages can thwart self-esteem, confidence, and a child’s burgeoning independence, says Maidenberg.

TWEEN AND TEEN YEARS 12-18: Growing wings Tweens and teens are moving toward independence daily, says Allen. Though it may be tough for parents to swallow, spending time with peers instead of parents is developmentally appropriate for teens. “Parents shouldn't take it personally, as a move away from us, but rather as a move toward independence,” she notes. Don’t wait until your child starts packing for college to impart important life skills, like financial responsibility, time management, and cooking, that can take years to master. “As with most lessons, the earlier parents start teaching these skills, the more successful youth will be,” says Allen. Setting up a checking account for your teen, turning over laundry duty, or asking him to prepare one family dinner each week are great ways to start practicing for life after high school. “Research shows that parents who allow teens the freedom to learn by doing have the best outcomes,” says Allen. “With guidance, youth can learn to manage their finances, care for themselves, and move toward independence.  Malia Jacobson is a nationally published health journalist and mom. Her latest book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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[your family activities ]

the fun in fundraising // how to give back this halloween season

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ith brightly lit jacko-lanterns, frightening costumes and treats, Halloween is a highly-anticipated time of the year. But while kids are making the rounds, gathering goodies from neighbors and friends, there is something they can do (individually or with schoolmates) to give back to their community during this exciting holiday. Ghoulish Giving at School This Halloween season, talk to your kids about helping their peers around the world by supporting the Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF campaign. The organization is launching its first nationwide “Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF School Challenge,” designed to help elementary school educators teaching children about the needs of their peers in other countries. Winners will get the opportunity to travel abroad to see programs for children in action. “Teachers play an essential role in supporting UNICEF’s work each year through the Trickor-Treat campaign,” says Caryl Stern, president and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. “This year, the campaign’s partners also include HSN, Inc., Key Club International, American Airlines and Coinstar. We want to recognize teachers and our partners for their tremendous efforts in helping to positively impact children’s lives around the world.” Beyond the classroom, there are many ways for kids to get involved.

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Here are some other ideas for children to help out with causes important to them:

Hold a Seriously Spooky Bake Sale Encourage your kids to whip up some creepy treats for a bake sale to benefit a local charity. Make it a monstrously fun time by inviting school buds together to bake Halloween-themed delights for the sale. Collect Donations While Trick-orTreating Teach kids to give back this Halloween through the Kids Helping Kids campaign. While going house-to-house, invite your kids to Trickor-Treat for UNICEF. The campaign raises money to provide medicine, nutrition,

clean water, education and more to children around the world who don’t have access to these basic needs. For more information on how to participate in this Halloween tradition, visit www.trickortreatforunicef.org. Host a Creepy Crawly Car Wash Who wouldn’t want to get their car washed by a prince or princess? Invite others over to raise money for their school, sports team or library with a car wash. The kids will have a blast seeing each other in their costumes, while helping out their community at the same time. Host a Bone-Chilling Chili Cook-Off Have kids sign-up to make a pot of their favorite chili and serve over their lunch break.

Those who don’t want to cook can bring in all the fun toppings. All money will go directly to the cause of their choice. Purchase Halloween-themed Items to Benefit UNICEF From tote bags to nail polish to jewelry and more, multichannel retailer HSN will offer kids and parents Halloween-themed products that help kids. From September 1st through October 31st, HSN will donate a minimum of 10 percent of the purchase price to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF for each item purchased in Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF stores at HSN.com, GrandinRoad.com and Chasing-Fireflies.com to support lifesaving programs for children. 


Join our Team! Interested in working for an award-winning company that cares about Rochester’s families? Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is looking for an Account Executive to work with area businesses who focus on the parenting community for both our print and growing web products.

For information on this and other positions at GVP, go to www.RocParent.com/employment Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Calendar

october events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

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Al Sigl Community Walkabout

October

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alk, roll, and cheer for abilities! Help raise funds for the Al Sigl Member Agencies which serves tens of thousands of children and adults with special needs each year. This family-friendly event has been a Rochester tradition for over two decades. The indoor walk route features free Halloween candy and giveaways, complimentary face painting, costume contest, live entertainment and the good feeling that comes with helping others. Where: Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd (Route 96)

When: Sunday, October 27, Registration 8:30am, Walk 9:30am, Costume Contest, 10:30am For More Info: Call 223-4420 or visit www.alsigl.org

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sun

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Nov. 1 & 2

17th Annual Buddy Walk

The Mysterious World of Bats

RPO Presents: Disney's Fantasia

This event is Flower City Down Syndrome Network's largest annual fundraiser. Form a team, donate a prize, or become a sponsor. 11am. Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Road Webster. 662-9585. www.fcdsn.com

Do you like bats? Are you afraid of bats? Join bat enthusiast Liz Thompson as she shares her knowledge and passion for bats. 10-11am. $5/person, $10/family. Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany. 344-1122.

Walt Disney's timeless masterpiece is an extravaganza of sight and sound. See scenes from the classic 1940 animated film starring Mickey Mouse, in addition to its 2000 counterpart, with the music performed live. 8pm. Varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: November����������������37 Library ��������������������39 Halloween Events ����40 Ongoing������������������42

02 * Wednesday Balloons Around the World. Be amazed as local balloon artists create a large balloon sculpture to help celebrate the 14th annual Balloons Around the World event. 10am-4pm. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

04 * Friday FREE *Flower City Down Syndrome Network Photo Gallery Exhibit. Help spread awareness about Down Syndrome by viewing photos of some of the members. Black Radish Studio Village Gate, 272 N. Goodman St, Suite 501, Rochester, 14607. 662-9585. www.fcdsn.com MIDTOWN MEN SING HITS FROM THE ‘60’S. Four stars from the original cast of Broadway’s Tony–Award winning musical Jersey Boys sing your favorite ‘60s hits from The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Motown, the Four Seasons, and more. 8pm. Price varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

05 * Saturday FREE *Aladdin and Other Enchanting Tales. Aladdin and Other Enchanting Tales is a modern telling of the classic stories of Aladdin, Sinbad, and Ali Baba- with dragons, wizards, princesses, and exotic creatures that will delight children and parents alike. 2pm & 4pm. Nazareth College Arts Center 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, 14618. 389-2170. www.artscenter.naz.edu ANIMAL BIRTHDAYS AT THE ZOO. Celebrate the birthday of your favorite zoo animals! “Happy Birthday” song & treats for the birthday animal, a docent-run touch table station. If you want to bring a gift see the website for ideas! Today’s Birthday: Spotted hyena Lou. 1-3pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE PHOTO FINISH 5K. Raise funds for both George Eastman House & all the cultural, educational, community, & health organizations that make Rochester a great place to live, and to create an event that embodies both his philanthropic spirit and his ideals of wellness & health. 8am. See website for registration cost. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 14607. 271-3361. www.photofinish5k.eastmanhouse.org

MIDTOWN MEN SING HITS FROM THE ‘60’S. See Oct 4. 8pm. Price varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

06 * Sunday 17th Annual Buddy Walk. This event is Flower City Down Syndrome Network’s largest annual fundraiser. Form a team, donate a prize, or become a sponsor. 11am. Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Road Webster, 14580. 662-9585. www.fcdsn.com COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET. Get outside while you browse for bargains. Take advantage of values on treasures that have made their way to market from other people’s basements, attics & garages. 8am-2pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St., Rochester. 428-6907. www.cityofrochester.gov/garagesales FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY AND TRAIN. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 80-year-old electric trolley car. Trolleys depart every half-hour no reservations are required. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org The Flower City Down Syndrome Network’s 2013 Buddy Walk. A one-mile walk in which anyone can participate. There will also be mutiple food vendors on-site and a wide range of activities for all age groups. Includes a field house for activities, ample parking for all with plenty of handicap parking. Check in at 9:30am, walk at 11am. Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Rd, Webster, 14580. 568-7421. www.wp.fcdsn.com

Wildlife Festival Sunday, October 6, 12–3pm. RMSC Cumming Nature Center

08 * Tuesday

12 * Saturday

YWCA EMPOWERING WOMEN LUNCHEON. Keynote Speaker: Susan L. Taylor- As the soul of Essence magazine for over three decades, she was the driving force behind one of the most celebrated African American owned business success stories. Hear more of her inspiring story at the event. 12pm. $60 per ticket, $600 for a table of 10. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Rochester, 14604. www.ywcarochester.org

FALL SWAP ‘N’ SHOP- TACK SALE AND FLEA MARKET. Food Concessions-Baked goods - Crafts - Holiday Gifts -Buy & Sell tack. Live auction at 11:30am. 10am-2pm. High Quest Acres, 679 Bangs Road Churchville, 14428. 293-3163. www.purplepony.org

09 * Wednesday

Wildlife Festival. Learn about amazing animals and inspiring stories from the Wildlife Defenders- a wildlife education and conservation outreach group. Its members are certified to handle and house more than 37 species of exotic and native wildlife. 12-3pm. RMSC members free; General public: donation requested, $3 per person; $10 per family. Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Road Naples, 14512. www.rmsc.org

Senior Sojourn. An informative and easy hour-long walk to experience the spectacular sights and sounds of the changing outdoors. 9:30-10:30am. RMSC members free; General public: donation requested, $3 per person; $10 per family. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

07 * Monday

FREE * SPECIAL NEEDS SYMPOSIUM. More than a dozen local agencies will attend this symposium designed to help families with children who have developmental disabilities plan for changes in the Medicaid system, meeting their child’s goals and future financial needs. Open to parents, educators and human services professionals. Carol Blessing, who has spent more than a decade on the faculty with Cornell University's Employment and Disability Institute, will be the featured speaker. 8:15 am-2:30pm. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way, Henrietta.

MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Build It! 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

10 * Thursday

Identification Series- Autumn Trees. Discover the wonders of nature during a two-part journey. Shariee Edersheim guides visitors into the natural world. Edersheim also provides a brief explanation of the use of field guides. 10am-12pm. RMSC members free; General public: donation requested, $3 per person; $10 per family. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org Rochester Robotics. Explore the amazing world of robotics. Meet high school students from FIRST Robotics teams across the Finger Lakes region. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org SIGN LANGUAGE TOURS AT THE GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE. Tour the historic George Eastman House with a signed and spoken guide from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. This tour will cover the same information covered during the museum’s daily guided tour. 11am. Included with regular museum admission George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 271-3361. www.eastmanhouse.org

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

MEMORIAL ART GALLERY BIRTHDAY PARTY The public is invited to celebrate the Memorial Art Gallery’s 100th birthday with hands-on art activities, storytelling, guided tours, music and dance performances, birthday cake and more. Bring the whole family! Sunday, October 13, 12-5pm. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. www.mag.rochester.edu

13 * Sunday 3rd ANNUAL TOWPATH BIKES BREAST CANCER AWARENESS RIDE. Towpath Bikes 3rd Annual Breast Cancer Awareness Ride, will raise needed awareness and funds for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. 10am. Mendon Ponds Park, Clover St. and PittsfordMendon Center Road Pittsford, 14534. 381-2808 www.towpathbike.com COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET. See Oct 6. 8am-2pm. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907. www.cityofrochester.gov/garagesales FREE *Fall Festival at Bristol Mountain Games, live music, wine and beer tasting, activities for the kids and more. Sky Rides available for a fee. 10am-5pm. Bristol Mountain & Winter Resort, 5662 Route 64, Bristol. 374-6000. www.bristolmt.com FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY AND TRAIN. See Oct 6. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush. 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Feathers in the Fall. Photographers of all ages and

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experience levels will have a chance to photograph 9 species of birds of prey in the beautiful outdoor setting of Braddock Bay Park. 2 sessions offered. 11am & 1pm. Donation requested is $60/photographer for non-members, $40 for BBRR members. Braddock Bay Park, 199 East Manitou Rd Rochester 14612. www.bbrr.org FREE *Memorial Art Gallery birthday party. The public is invited to celebrate the Memorial Art Gallery’s 100th birthday with hands-on art activities, storytelling, guided tours, music and dance performances, birthday cake and more. Bring the whole family! 12-5pm. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. www.mag.rochester.edu Rochester Robotics. See Oct 12. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org THE ORCHESTRA GAMES. Explores the personalities of various orchestral instruments while acquainting you with basic musical elements. It sprints through an Olympic array of events including the low note limbo, the fast note dash, and the marathon in a friendly competition.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 2pm. Price varies by seat. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester 14614. 454-4596. www.rpo.org

14 * Monday Discover the Silk Road. Participate in the interactive workshop “Aurora Over the Silk Road,” where you can enjoy expressive dance and drumming as you explore the cultural diversity of the Silk Road (a historic route that connected parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa) and more. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org Fall Fair Fun. Try your hand at popular midway games, and make some fair-themed crafts to take home. The museum’s outdoor Kiddieland Testing Park rides will be operating, weather permitting. 12-4pm. Included with paid admission ($6 adults; $5 seniors; $3 students ages 2 -16). Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda. www.carrouselmuseum.org Rochester Robotics. See Oct 12. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

18 * Friday RBTL Presents: Jerry Seinfeld. America’s premier comedian, Jerry Seinfeld, will be performing his signature stand-up routine. Seinfeld has been hailed for his uncanny ability to joke about the little things in life that relate to audiences everywhere. 7pm. $49.50- $89.50. The Auditorium Theatre, 875 East Main St., Rochester. www.rbtl.org

19 * Saturday Serendipity Walk (Moderate Pace). Explore areas of the property not typically accessible to the public. Explore a pioneer cemetery and an 18th century house foundation. Versatile footwear is encouraged, as you will experience different types of terrain including wet areas. 9:3011:30am. RMSC members free; General public: donation requested, $3 per person; $10 per family. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org SIGN LANGUAGE TOURS AT THE GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE. See Oct 12. 11am. Included with regular museum admission George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, 271-3361. www.eastmanhouse.org

20 * Sunday

FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY AND TRAIN. See Oct 6. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush. 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org

21 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Budding Builders. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org

23 * Wednesday FREE *Moms Club of Webster/ Ontario Open House. Annual Open House with ZOO BOO activities and fun! . Moms Club offers support and social opportunities for moms and their children. Email for more details. 10:15am. momsclubofwebsterandontario@ yahoo.com

26 * Saturday Edgerton Model Railroad Open House Edgerton Model Railroad Club is holding an open house and train show (admission extra for the show, open house is free. 11am-2pm. Donations accepted. Edgerton Recreation Center, 41 Backus St., Rochester. 14608. 428-6769. www.edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com Focus on Trees. Featuring WitchHazel, Dogwood, Moose Maple. Join Dave Gotham, director of the CNC, this fall for a continuation of this past summer series of woodland walks, highlighting trees. 9:30am-12pm. RMSC members free; General public: donation requested—$3 per person; $10 per family. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org LITERATURE LIVE: BUNNICULA. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and enjoy related story readings. Meet Bunnicula. 10am-8pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org The Mysterious World of Bats. Do you like bats? Are you afraid of bats? Join bat enthusiast Liz Thompson as she shares her knowledge and passion for bats. 10-11am. $5/person, $10/family. Genesee County Park & Forest Interpretive Nature Center, 11095 Bethany Center Rd., E. Bethany. 344-1122.

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities YWCA EMPOWERING WOMEN LUNCHEON

Keynote Speaker: Susan L. Taylor- As the soul of Essence magazine for over three decades, she was the driving force behind one of the most celebrated African American owned business success stories. Hear more of her inspiring story at the event. Tuesday, October 8, 12pm. $60 per ticket, $600 for a table of 10. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St., Rochester, 14604. www.ywcarochester.org

27 * Sunday FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY AND TRAIN. See Oct 6. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush, 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Hispanic/Latino Heritage Family Day Family-friendly activities that include hands-on art activities, storytelling, guided tours, music and dance performances, and more. 12-5pm. $5 suggested donation. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. www.mag.rochester.edu LITERATURE LIVE: BUNNICULA. Each Literature Live weekend offers the opportunity to meet, greet, and pose for photos with some of the most popular storybook characters of all time and

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enjoy related story readings. Meet Bunnicula. 1-4pm. Free with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org

28 * Monday Storytime Club. Readings of classic children’s tales. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book. This month: Budding Builders. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with museum admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 2632700. www.museumofplay.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 30 * Wednesday Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons A once in a millennium event that honors The Year of the Dragon. Circus performers from the farthest reaches of the earth have assembled to showcase their astounding acts of bravery and astonishing athleticism. 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com

31 * Thursday Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons See Oct 30. 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com

November 01 * Friday

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons A once in a millennium event that honors The Year of the Dragon. Circus performers from the farthest reaches of the earth have assembled to showcase their astounding acts of bravery and astonishing athleticism. 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com RPO PRESENTS: DISNEYS FANTASIA. Walt Disney’s timeless masterpiece is an extravaganza of sight and sound. See scenes from the classic 1940 animated film starring Mickey Mouse, in addition to its 2000 counterpart, with the music performed live. 8pm. Price varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org

02 * Saturday ANIMAL BIRTHDAYS AT THE ZOO. Celebrate the birthday of your favorite zoo animals! “Happy Birthday” song & treats for the birthday animal, a docent-run touch table station. If you want to bring a gift see the website for ideas! Today’s Birthday: Polar bear, Aurora, Zero. 1-3pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org FALL FAMILY DAY. See the woodcarvers at work, and then try making your own carved masterpiece. A variety of crafts and hands-on activities will examine the historical, scientific, and artistic qualities of wood and how it was transformed into carrousel animals. 12-4pm. $6. Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St. North Tonawanda, 716693-1885. www.carrouselmuseum.org Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons See Nov 1. 11am, 3pm & 7pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester, 1-800-745-3000. www.ringling.com

ZOOBOO Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-ortreat in safety during “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts, and entertainment for all ages. Saturday, October 12, Saturday, October 19, Sunday, October 20, Saturday, October 26, Sunday, October 27, 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

RPO PRESENTS: DISNEYS FANTASIA. See Nov 1. 8pm. Price varies by seat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Rochester. 274-1110. www.rpo.org TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING. Meet nine-year-old Peter Hatcher, whose life would be perfect if it weren’t for Fudge, his impossible little brother. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing is a hilarious look at family life and the troubles that can only be caused by a younger sibling. 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING- SENSORY FRIENDLY. The beloved story brought to life, with modifications to make it sensory-friendly including: allowing kids to move around, lower volumes, Gluten-free snacks, two intermissions, a quiet room available during the performance and more. 4:30pm. $15 Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester. 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

03 * Sunday FALL FOLLIAGE BY TROLLEY AND TRAIN. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn in western New York State from the window of an authentic 80-year-old electric trolley car. Trolleys depart every half-hour no reservations are required. 11:30am. $5-$8. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, Rush. 533-1113. www.nymtmuseum.org Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey® Presents: Dragons See Nov 1. 1 & 5pm. $15-25. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square, Rochester. 1-800-7453000. www.ringling.com TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING. See Nov 2. 11am & 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 7236080. www.tykestheatre.org

Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 2632700. www.museumofplay.org

09 * Saturday TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING. See Nov 2. 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

10 * Sunday TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING. See Nov 2. 11am & 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 7236080. www.tykestheatre.org

04 * Monday MONDAY KICKS FOR AGES 2 TO 6. Playful learning activities designed for 2- to 6-year-olds, one Monday a month. This month: Let’s Create! 10am-2pm. Free with admission. Ages: 2yrs-6yrs. National

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

TYKE’S THEATRE PRESENTS: TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING Meet nine-year-old Peter Hatcher, whose life would be perfect if it weren’t for Fudge, his impossible little brother. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing is a hilarious look at family life and the troubles that can only be caused by a younger sibling. Saturday, November 2, 2pm; Sunday, November 3, 11am & 2pm; Saturday, November 9, 2pm; Sunday, November 10, 11am & 2pm. $15. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Avenue, Rochester, 723-6080. www.tykestheatre.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Library // programs & activities 01 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Spider Web. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30- 7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446 www.gateslibrary.org TEEN ADVISORY BOARD. Come and be a part of the Teen Advisory Board. Grades 7-12. No registration. 6-7pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

03 * Thursday Talking with My Mouth Full: A Conversation with a Local Chocolatier Chocolatier and Ice Cream Maker will discuss life in the chocolate shop: where chocolate comes from, how it is made into confections, and the philosophy of being an artisan food producer. The program will include a guided tasting. 6:30-8:30pm. $2 supply charge. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org Thursday Night Story Hour. Children ages 5-10 can join in for stories and a themed craft. No registration required. 6:45-7:30pm. Hamlin Public Library, 422 HamlinClarkson Townline Rd., Hamlin, 14464. 964-2320. www.hamlinny.org/Library

05 * Saturday Toddler Dance Party Dance your sillies out. Toddlers and their caregivers will have a blast listening and dancing along to some of their favorite tunes. No registration. 10:15-10:45am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

07 * Monday Munchkin Monday Story Hour. Stories, songs, rhymes and crafts for children ages 2-5 with their caregiver. Free program. No registration required. 10:30-11:15am. Hamlin Public Library, 422 HamlinClarkson Townline Rd., Hamlin, 14464. 964-2320. www.hamlinny.org/Library

Potty Party This program is designed to get your little one excited to use the potty. Stories, songs and more. For children and their caregivers. Registration required. 10:15-10:45am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org Teen Writing Group Do you like to write? Looking for a place to share your writing with other teens? Teens in grades 7-12 meet on the first and third Monday of every month from 5-6:30pm to write, share, edit, laugh, write. Please register. 5-6:30 pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

12 * Saturday Preschool SCIENCE-time A science themed storytime. Read stories and do hands-on science activities! For ages 3-5. Registration required for each program. 11-11:45am. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

14 * Monday Be More Than a Bystander: You Can Help Stop Bullying Watch parts of the movie Bully and discuss ways you can help stop bullying in school. Share your experiences with other teens and learn what to do if you witness someone being bullied. Pizza and pop will be provided. Registration required. 4-6pm. Ages: 12-18yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 3597092. www.hpl.org

15 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Spider Door Decoration. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30- 7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446. www.gateslibrary.org Lego Club Have fun building with Lego at the library! They will provide the bricks and challenge participants to be as creative as possible! Registration required. 4:155pm. Ages: 6-12yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

19 * Saturday

25 * Friday

Teen Volunteer Program Do you have community service hours to complete? Register to help at the library and earn 2 hours of community service requirement. 12-2pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

Teen Fright Fest Halloween Party The Fright Fest will be held after library hours because we don’t want to scare the patrons!! Scary Costumes are encouraged. For ages 12-18. Registration required. 6-8pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

21 * Monday Teen Writing Group Do you like to write? Looking for a place to share your writing with other teens? Teens in grades 7-12 meet on the first and third Monday of every month from 5-6:30pm to write, share, edit, laugh, write. Please register. 5-6:30 pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

22 * Tuesday Introduction to Creative Writing Explore the basics of creative writing through a variety of activities. Participants will read and discuss a short story, respond to writing prompts, and have the opportunity to share their efforts in a safe, friendly workshop setting. Registration req. 6:30-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

23 * Wednesday American Girl Book Club: Julie Celebrate all things American Girl! Read an excerpt from a book, make a craft, and learn! Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

24 * Thursday Introduction to Creative Writing See Oct 22. 6:30-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org Monster Mash v. 2.0. Halloween party. Wear a costume and enjoy crafts, games, and activities. Registration is required. 6:30pm. Irondequoit Public Library - Evans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. www.libraryweb.org Tween Tech Lab: Digital Light Painting When the lights go out, the fun begins! Use flashlights and digital cameras in the dark to create original pieces of art. Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

26 * Saturday Stories for Sheepdogs. Practice your reading with Emmie, the Shetland Sheepdog. No registration required. 10:30am. Irondequoit Public LibraryEvans Branch 45 Cooper Road Rochester, 14617. www.libraryweb.org

28 * Monday PJ Storytime This program will include stories, songs, fingerplays, and puppets. Kids are welcome to come in their PJ’s and bring a stuffed animal! For all ages. No registration required. 7-7:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org The History of Halloween Examine Halloween’s Celtic origins, trace it through the Middle Ages, and visit Halloween revels in 18th and 19th century Ireland and Scotland. Finally, we’ll see how this odd festival emigrated to America to become one of our most beloved holidays. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. www.hpl.org

30 * Wednesday Teen Game Night Hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night. No registration. 6:308pm. Ages: 12yrs+. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7093. www.hpl.org

November 05 * Tuesday Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Craft: Pumpkin Wreath. This is a craft project that can be completed in the allotted time. All materials for the crafts will be provided free of charge. Class size is limited to 20 people, so register early. 6:30-7:30pm. Gates Public Library 902 Elmgrove Road, Rochester, 14624. 247-6446 www.gateslibrary.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

halloween events and activities

05 * Saturday Monsters and Magical Creatures Weekend. Have your photo taken with an assortment of fantastical creatures. Meet artists and their imaginary creations and construct your own monster from pipe cleaners. Transform yourself into a creepy creature at the Monster Mash, and more. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester. 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org The Town of Kendall Scarecrow Festival Contest theme is: Nursery Rhymes. Activities include: Farmer’s Market Vendors,, Storytelling, Balloon Artist, Stilt Walking, Magician, Kids craft table, Seed spitting contest, Hay Ride, Police & Fire truck tour and more. 10am-3pm. Town of Kendall Community Park. www.townofkendall.com/ ScarecrowFestival.htm

06 * Sunday Monsters and Magical Creatures Weekend. Have your photo taken with an assortment of fantastical creatures. Meet artists and their imaginary creations and construct your own monster from pipe cleaners. Transform yourself into a creepy creature at the Monster Mash, and more. 1-4pm. Included with

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admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org

12 * Saturday ZOOBOO. Children dressed in costume can enjoy a non-scary Halloween atmosphere as they trick-or-treat in safety during “Zoo Boo”, which is scheduled during daylight hours. Games, crafts, and entertainment for all ages. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

13 * Sunday FREE *KIDS PUMPKIN PAINTING WORKSHOP. Choose your pumpkin and kids decorate for free. Materials and design consultation provided. Adult supervision required. 2-4pm. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford Palmyra Road Macedon, 14502. 223-1222, x100 www.waysidegardencenter.com Make a Scarecrow. Celebrate this spooky time of year by making your own scarecrow. Bring old clothes to dress your scarecrow, and a pillowcase for a head. We provide the stuffing and instructions to make your farmer’s friend. Pumpkin included! 1-3pm. Program fee: $4 per scarecrow/$2 RMSC members. Rochester Museum & Science Center,

657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org ZOOBOO. See Oct 12. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

18 * Friday HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR. Non-scary party for young families, with games, crafts, and treats. Halloween magic and clown show, “Charlie & Checkers”, at6 and 7pm. Enjoy rides on 2 carousels and music from a 1923 band organ, as well as exhibits. 5:30-8pm. $6 Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 716-693-1885. www.carrouselmuseum.org SPIRITS OF THE PAST - THEATRICAL TOURS. An all-new 75 min. tour will visit scenes from many of the spooky stories & novels that Western New Yorkers were reading some 150 years ago. Guides will reveal frightening scenes of terror, superstition. Reservations required. 6-9:30pm. $16/$14 members. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

19 * Saturday GRAND TORCH LIGHT TOURS. The finale to the tour season with a special tour path lighted by torches.

Learn about local history, horticulture, symbolism and more. 6pm. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. Mt. Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Ave, Rochester, 14620. 461-3494. www.fomh.org SPIRITS OF THE PAST - THEATRICAL TOURS. See Oct 18. 6-9:30pm. $16/$14 members. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org ZOOBOO. See Oct 12. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

20 * Sunday ZOOBOO. See Oct 12. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 336-7123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

22 * Tuesday GRAND TORCH LIGHT TOURS. See Oct 19. 6pm. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. Mt. Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Ave, Rochester 14620. 461-3494. www.fomh.org

24 * Thursday SPIRITS OF THE PAST - THEATRICAL TOURS. See Oct 18. 7-9pm. $16/$14 members. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum,


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org

25 * Friday SPIRITS OF THE PAST THEATRICAL TOURS. See Oct 18. 6-9:30pm. $16/$14 members. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www. gcv.org THE HAUNTED JAIL AND CELL BLOCK TERROR. The ever popular scream-fest returns! Come walk through the haunted jails of the Museum of Wayne County History, you just never know what spirits will be lurking in the old cells, if you dare. Free cider and donuts to those who make it through! 6-9pm. $5. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut Street, Lyons. 315-946-4943. www.waynehistory.org

26 * Saturday PUMPKINS IN THE PARK. Celebrate fitness with your family and friends while supporting city youth sports. 5K race begins at 9am. Youth race starts at 9:45am. Registration 7:30am. 7:30-10:30am. $18-$22. Kids races free. Cobb’s Hill Lake Riley Lodge, Norris Drive off Culver Rd., Rochester. www.yellowjacketracing.com SPIRITS OF THE PAST THEATRICAL TOURS. See Oct 18. 6-9:30pm. $16/$14 members. Ages: 12yrs+. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org Spooky Science Weekend. Enjoy blazing jack-o-lanterns, face painting, and pumpkin chucking. Get messy with glowing slime. Get up close with some of the RMSC’s creepy crawly animal friends. Get wowed by lightning bolts and launch pumpkins with a trebuchet (weather permitting). 9am-5pm. Children in costume free with paid adult admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester, 14607. www.rmsc.org FREE *Tails & Treats at Lollypop Farm. A Spooktacular evening of Trick-or-Treating around the farm and Howlingly-fun games and activities! Trick-or-treat with the animals, pumpkin patch picking, create your own animal mask, fall treats and drinks, and more. 3-7pm. Lollypop Farm 99 Victor Road, Fairport 223-1330 x139. www.lollypop.org/tailsandtreats THE HAUNTED JAIL AND CELL BLOCK TERROR. See Oct 25. 6-9pm. $5. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut Street, Lyons. 315-946-4943. www.waynehistory.org

TRICK-OR-TREAT AT EASTVIEW. Children can dress up and enjoy trick-or-treating at participating stores. Event starts in the soonto-be Von Maur Wing with cider and donuts and live entertainment by Nik Lite. Treat bags will be provided. 11am-1pm. Eastview Mall, Route 96, Victor. www.eastviewmall.com ZOOBOO. See Oct 12. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 3367123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

27 * Sunday AL SIGL COMMUNITY WALKABOUT. Indoor walk route features free Halloween candy and giveaways, complimentary face painting, costume contest, live entertainment and the good feeling that comes with helping others. Registration 8:30am, Walk 9:30am, Costume Contest, 10:30am. Donations appreciated. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford-Victor Rd (Route 96), 223-4420. www.alsigl.org Spooky Science Weekend. See Oct 26. 11am-5pm. Children in costume free with paid adult admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester, 14607. www.rmsc.org TRICK OR TREATING IN THE VILLAGE. Don your Halloween costume and beg for treats from the townspeople in the safety of the historic village. Warm yourself by the campfire, hear spooky stories and enjoy other family-fun activities on a colorful autumn afternoon. 12-4pm. Children (1 to 16) $5/$3 members; Adults $5; Infants & adults with trick-or-treaters are free. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822. www.gcv.org ZOOBOO. See Oct 12. 10am-4pm. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 3367123. www.senecaparkzoo.org

31 * Thursday TODDLER TRICK OR TREAT. Halloween activities and goodies for the littlest trick-or-treaters. Meet favorite storybook characters, dance to Halloween tunes, and play games. 10am-2pm. Included with admission. National Museum of Play at The Strong, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 263-2700. www.museumofplay.org Trick-or-Treating. Enjoy trickor-treating throughout the exhibit galleries. Explore craft stations, special live science performances and take part in a costume parade around the Museum! 10am-2pm. Children in costume free with paid adult admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester 14607. www.rmsc.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing events & exhibits Little Builders at the National Museum of Play at the Strong The excitement is building! Slip on a construction vest, grab some orange rubber cones, and become a mover and shaker in the new Little Builders exhibit! Budding builders are invited to create, play, and learn as they explore concepts of construction, motion, and simple machines at more than 20 interactive stations designed especially for them. The exhibit runs thru January 5, 2014 and free with museum admission. National Museum of Play at the Strong, One Manhattan Square, Rochester 14607. For more info visit www.museumofplay.org or call 263-2700

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs. Ends Aug 31.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+.

AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact.

SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10.

DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning!

AMAZING JOURNEYS. Embarking on impressive treks across thousands of miles, the creatures featured in the film exemplify astonishing feats of stamina and perseverance in their efforts to ensure survival of their offspring. See website for full details. $3-7.

Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

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HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. K’NEX. Be an engineer! Build trucks, towers- anything you can imagine with this colorful construction toy. RACEWAYS. Experiment with momentum, friction, gravity, and acceleration as you send wooden balls looping and racing over ramps. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers.

National Museum of Play at The Strong One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities READING ADVENTURELAND. Step into a life-sized pop-up book and follow the Yellow Brick Road into five literary landscapes from children’s books. Super Kids Market. Cruise the aisles and fill your cart with a selection of colorful produce that looks so real, you can almost taste it. Departments are filled with highly interactive stations for dramatic role-playing. THE ELAINE WILSON AND STRONG EXPRESS TRAIN. Experience the thrill of old-fashioned train travel as the mini locomotive chugs down the track surrounded by scenic postcards from across America.

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS CUMMING NATURE CENTER: A 900acre preserve located 40 minutes south of Rochester. $3 per person/$10 family. 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, www.rmsc.org WHEM ANKH: THE CIRCLE OF LIFE IN ANCIENT EGYPT. Travel back into the past at a time when everything from birth to death revolved around the seasons and the river of life - the Nile. The Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Pkwy, Buffalo. 716-896-5200 www.sciencebuff.org Cultures for Kids. Learn about kids from all over the world. $5. Explore & More children’s museum, 300 Gleed Ave., E. Aurora. 716-655-513. www.exploreandmore.org Tour the Riedman Robotic Milking Center. Tours available MonSat 11am-2pm. $2-$3. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby Street, Spencerport. 349-2090 www.heritagechristianservices.org The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum. Operates two historic carousels. 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda, 14120. 716-693-1885 www.carrouselmuseum.org A Step Into Africa. This state of the art exhibit, focusing on the Ngorongoro Crater region of Tanzania, is the only one of its kind in the country. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St, Rochester, 14621. 336-7200. www.senecaparkzoo.org Genesee Country Village & Museum. Meet and chat with the village potter, storekeeper, printer, tinsmith and blacksmith. Speak with re-enactors and townsfolk about the clothing styles of the period and visit select pieces from the museum’s historic clothing collection. 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538.6822. www.gcv.org. Corn Hill Navigation. All aboard the Sam Patch & Mary Jemison! These authentic tour boats embark from Pittsford and Rochester, and provide unparalleled opportunities to experience history and enjoy relaxing getaways that showcase the beauty and ingenuity of America’s celebrated Erie Canal. For details please call 585-662-5748 or visit www.SamandMary.org.

Please Note:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

To submit an event to our calendar

e-mail: calendar@GVParent.com

NEW: Submit your calendar events online at www.RocParent.com/calendar/ calendar-submit All entries must be received by the 10th of the month prior to publication in order to be considered. Events printed as space permits.

Join our Team! Interested in working for an award-winning company that cares about Rochester’s families? Genesee Valley Parent Magazine is looking for an Account Executive to work with area businesses who focus on the parenting community for both our print and growing web products.

For information on this and other positions at GVP, go to www.RocParent.com/employment Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started!

2/15/13

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Diamonds Limo Presents “Pizza By Limo”

Featuring Mark’s Pizzeria receive a 2-hr limo cruise, stop at a point of interest, a 2-liter of Pepsi and the best pizza in town! Only $99! (Sunday-Thursday)

www.diamondslimo.com

533.9050

Fri. & Sat. packages, larger limos, and service outside of Monroe County are available at an additional charge.

Are you planning

a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Rochester Area & Genesee Valley Parent • October 2013

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Genesee Valley Parent - October 2013  

Rochester's Premier Parenting Resource

Genesee Valley Parent - October 2013  

Rochester's Premier Parenting Resource