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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Inside march Vol.21 Number 3

our camp issue

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Teens Head to Camp what it takes to be a camp counselor

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Day Camp

Preparing for adventures close to home

31-65

Summer Camp & Activities Guide

in this issue

feature articles

6|R  ocParent.com On the Web in March

12 Then, Now & The Future //

8 | Editor’s Note 24 | Book Nook 20 Books for the Past 20 Years - Part 1

four rochesterians share where they were 20 years ago and where they see themselves in 20 years

26 | Parenting Teens & Tweens Hooked on the Hookah: Teens Experiment with an Old World Smoking Method 64 | Calendar of Events • Family-Friendly Events • Library Events • Ongoing Events & Exhibits • March Maple Madness

this month's contributors

DRESDEN ENGLE is Dresden Engle is a Rochester-based writer and PR professional as well as the mom of two second graders and a comedian and singer. [Page 12]

on the cover OUR CAMP ISSUE What it Takes to be a Summer Camp Counselor 16 Day Camp: Preparing for Adventures Close to Home 20 Summer Camp & Activity Guide 29 120 Things to do this March 64 20 Years of Books for Kids Part: 1 24 Maple Madness 68

Susan Henninger is a contributing writer to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine and the mother of three teenage boys. She lives in upstate NY. [Page 16]

Denise Yearian is a former parenting magazine editor and mother of three children. [Page 20] Deena Viviani is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian

who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. [Page 24] Myrna Beth Haskell is a monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who

lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you. [Page 26]

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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[ what’s online ]

Visit us online!

Scan this code with your smart phone to view this content and more on our website!

march // what you can find this month at www.RocParent.com

online content + editorial 4 Mom and Dad Blogs We Like

We enjoy these and think you will, too. mtmommy.com “Mostly Together Mommy” is a blog about all things family-related, including life, recipes, crafts, and giveaways. Dadarocks.com An RIT grad living in his native NYC shares adventures, product reviews, and how much loves his family. mikeadamick.com/ blog-posts/ A dad who rocks craft-making and DIY fun and games. A fave recent post tells how to make a zip line for stuffed animals. Cynicalmother.com This Western New York mom, who appears Weds mornings on WARM 101.3, is possibly the country’s funniest mommy blogger. Recent adventures (hilariously detailed in her blog) include perforated-valentine ripping, trying her son’s Mine-craft games, and her daughter’s wintertime indoor beach Have a blog you love to read? Tell us at Comunity@gvparent.com

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Face-to-Face on Facebook Hang with us on our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ GeneseeValleyParent

Through March we’ll share posts on Facebook for simple yet important ways families can “go green,” with an eye on St. Patrick’s Day and also looking to next month’s Earth Day. Tip: Wait for full loads to accumulate before using the dishwasher or washing machine, to save water, power, and money. If you wash two fewer loads of clothes and one fewer load of dishes a week and save up to 4,500 gallons of water a year.

Eat Right!

March is National Nutrition Month. Check out tips for creating kid-friendly, fruit- and veggie-packed meals. With a little planning and creativity, you can ensure your child will eat foods you can feel good about serving throughout the day.


Virtual Camp Fair

Time to think about camps and summer programs for the kids! No way that kids will say "I'm bored!" when they view our list of programs. Visit www.rocparent.com/camp

Giveaways Spring into family fun with giveaways from Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent. Museum passes, concert tickets, stage shows …. oh my!  Enter to win at www.RocParent.com/giveaways


Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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[ editor’s note ]

By Jillian Melnyk

dream big

Staff

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his month is all about looking forward – looking ahead to the summer, and looking ahead to twenty years from now. Where were you twenty years ago? It seems like so long ago, but twenty years can pass in a flash as we grow, learn, and explore. This month, we asked four Rochesterians where they were twenty years ago and what they hope for their next twenty years.

what’s on your mind?  I would love to hear from you! send me an email to editor@GVParent.com

While you fight off the final days of winter and look toward spring, take a moment to reflect and share with your children where you were twenty years ago, and where you all hope to be twenty years from now. Looking for an activity? Pull out an old shoebox and have kids fill it with their hopes and dreams for the next twenty years – it will be an awesome keepsake for them to look back at in the future. Encourage them to make goals and include information about how they will achieve those goals. (Go ahead and make a box for yourself, too!) What do you hope to achieve? What

CORRECTION to our february issue

do you want to change? Where do you want to be? WHO do you want to be? Writing down your hopes and dreams is one step forward in making them a reality.

Here's to dreaming big! Cheers,

Jillian

Please note that Kim Condon, Executive Director at Daystar for Medically Fragile Children, would like to correct a statement that was inaccurately paraphrased in the Daystar article in the February issue. For the record, Condon does not believe that “private, 24/7 nursing….can hurt the child’s growth or development.” What she said was that is private, 24/7 nursing, can limit the child’s exposure to the benefits and learning experiences found in working and playing alongside a group of peers.

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publisher Barbara Melnyk mail@GVParent.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jillian Melnyk editor@GVParent.com Account Executives Cynthia Goldberg Ken Stevens Magazine layout & design Jillian Melnyk graphics@GVParent.com CALENDAR EDITOR Katherine Nevin calendar@GVParent.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sandy Citarella Basic subscription rate: $25/year. Send subscription inquiries and changes to address below. Copyright 2014, by GVP, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not necessarily constitute an endorsement or necessarily reflect the opinions of this publication.

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine P.O. Box 25750 Rochester, NY 14625 p: 585-348-9712 f: 585-348-9714 www.RocParent.com

member of parenting media association


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four rochesterians share where they were 20 years ago & what they see for their next 20 years By Dresden Engle

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he year was 1994 — 10 years too late to be made famous by George Orwell and six years before Y2K. But, yet, it was a big year for families in the Rochester area (aka the Genesee Valley) because that is when our magazine first hit the stands. And, now two decades later, it’s an anniversary worth celebrating … because parents and children are worth celebrating. We've grown a lot in the past 20 years – our magazine, our city, and ourselves. We asked a few Rochesterians about their past, present, and hopes for the future.

Lovely Warren,

Mayor of the City of Rochester What memories do you associate most with 1994? In 1994, I was a junior at Wilson High School. Like many young women, I was on the precipice of change. As is typical with most 17 year olds, one minute I was thinking and acting like the woman I would become; and in the next, reacting and behaving like the girl I still was. It was a time where I was struggling with some personal challenges, and coming to understand that to a great

extent, what path my life and my future would take was all up to me. Twenty years ago, what did you think you would be “when you grew up”? Since I was a young girl, I knew I wanted to be in public service. After my grandfather was shot while working as a security guard at Wegmans, I made up my mind that I wanted to be an attorney so that I could help others.

where do you see yourself in 20 years? Twenty years from now, my little daughter Taylor will be a young adult —spreading her own wings and preparing to fly. I hope that by that time we will have achieved great things for the City of Rochester so that Taylor, and all the other

children of Rochester, will want to settle right here to live, work, contribute to their neighbors and neighborhoods, and raise their children in a city that will be as good to them and their children as it can possibly be.

continued >>>

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Stacey Pensgen,

Meteorologist/Reporter, News 8 - WROC TV Stacey, a nationally competing figure skater, was interviewed in the inaugural year of Genesee Valley Parent. She skated in the Senior Nationals with Michelle Kwan when she was 16 and shared a coach with Todd Eldridge and Tara Lipinski. What memories do you associate most with 1994? I was 8 years old and what I remember most is the Junior Nationals in Indianapolis. It was the first time I had ever been at Nationals and the first time I was competing against people from the West Coast. I knew it was a big deal but at the time I didn’t know how big. Oh my gosh, it seems so long ago, but it’s all on video. My parents videotaped every single competition, even if they had to sneak the camera in. Somewhere in my mom’s house, there is a video of every competition I’ve ever been in. My mom also vividly remembers when I was interviewed for Genesee Valley Parent when I was 8.

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Twenty years ago, what did you think you would be “when you grew up”? I just knew I wanted to skate. But by age 12 I learned I also loved the weather. I was a nerd and always watched the weather channel when I got home from school. From then on I knew I wanted to be a meteorologist.

where do you see yourself in 20 years? I am very lucky since I am from Rochester and this is home. So I’m in a lucky place. I’m absolutely fine staying here and being close to my family. I truly love what I do and the people I work with, the station I’m at, and my hometown. If I was here in 20 years or 50 years from now I would be perfectly happy.


Scott Spezzano,

morning radio show host, WPXY Scott Spezzano and Carly Rae Jepsen

What memories do you associate most with 1994? I was working in radio. Actually, I started in radio when I was in high school, interning at the SUNY Geneseo radio station. I then worked at Magic 92, WDKX, WCMF, and two years at a Boston station. But 20 years ago I was doing the morning show at WPXY, and how lucky am I that this is exactly where I still am today? In 1994 I was kid-less and single and DJ-ing at a ton of high school dances and clubs like Heaven and Karma. WPXY was big-time Top 40 radio and our street presence was huge and our events were huge like our Summer Jam at the Downtown Festival Tent behind Geva Theatre. It’s awesome people were listening to me when they were growing up, a whole generation that is now coming up and telling me their kids are listening to me. How cool is that? Twenty years ago, what did you think you would be “when you grew up”? Well, I never thought I’d grow up so I kind of stayed in that mode. I was afraid if I did grow up it wouldn’t be fun any more. where do you see yourself in 20 years? I hope to continue to be on the radio and just be a part of everybody’s morning for the next 20 years. My wife, Jill, and I are having the best time ever. I have one son in high school and one son in college, who is studying culinary arts at Johnson & Wales and also a DJ spinning at parties like I used to do. I have been so fortunate and have done so many wonderful things in my life that my bucket list has been checked off… and then some. I just took a selfie with Fall Out Boy and on the other end of the spectrum I got to introduce Lionel Hampton at the Jazz Festival. I’ve hung out with so many music stars, from Joan Jett and the Go Go’s to Dave Matthews. I even played dueling lobsters with Phil Collins backstage at the Blue Cross Arena; we were literally throwing lobsters at each other. I met U2 when they came to the country on their first American tour and every time we cross paths, Bono always remembers me. He ven brought me backstage in Toronto. Amazing experiences!

continued >>>

continued >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Norma Holland,

Anchor, 13WHAM TV and Member of EstroFest Comedy Troupe What memories do you associate most with 1994? I was in my second semester as a freshman at SUNY Geneseo, eating cold pizza from Mama Mia’s, performing in an on-campus comedy troupe, working at the campus TV station and drinking coffee so I could stay up late to study. I was trying to figure out what to do with my academic career and was going back and forth between studying public relations or journalism. I guess you can figure out which one I went with!

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Twenty years ago, what did you think you would be “when you grew up”? I did envision myself working as a journalist in some capacity. I knew that I had to write or I would never be happy. Mostly, I just wanted to be free to choose my path. My mother didn’t have the choice to go to college and didn’t feel that certain careers were available to her.

where do you see yourself in 20 years? I’d love to write a book (topics have been tossed around for years), work on a documentary, travel and wear my curly hair kicked up and out! I’d also love to raise a child to be a good human being. Dresden Engle is a Rochester-based writer and PR professional as well as the mom of two second graders and a comedian and singer.


Do you know an area youth who deserves recognition for his or her achievements?

Recognizing outstanding youths in our community in arts, sports, community service, and innovation.

Nominations are now open! Visit www.RocParent.com/20under20 for more information! Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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teens head to camp what it takes to be a camp counselor By Susan Henninger

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any teenagers have fond memories of their summer camp experiences, but what can they do once they outgrow being a camper? Becoming a counselor-in-training (CIT) or a camp counselor is a great option for camp-loving teens who are interested in working with children, gaining leadership experience, and learning new skills… all while having fun. 16

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“My Mom jokes that she dropped me off at Camp Cory when I was ten and I never left,” says Pat Foster, Associate Executive Director and Camp Director for the YMCA-affiliated camp situated on the shores of Keuka Lake. Pat, who has indeed spent more time at the popular summer camp than the average camper, calls being the director of Camp Cory “the best job in the world.” He adds that the variety of camp-related tasks and the constant contact with youngsters and teens mean that he’s rarely


bored. Over the years, camps have become more businesslike, he says, with many of them now offering “extras” to make a better overall camp experience for families. Pat has also seen a significant decrease in the number of teens who apply for a counselor job simply for the opportunity to hang out with other teens. So what does it take to be a camp counselor?

Getting the Gig

Having cheerfully and enthusiastically worked his way up the chain of command from camper to counselor to administrator, Pat has a pretty good idea of what he’s looking for in a Camp Cory summer counselor. He usually conducts the hiring process in three steps, beginning with a phone screening where he tells the potential hiree the camps expectations and the pay scale. For Pat, the make or break question in this stage is, “Why do you enjoy working with kids?” According to Pat, how the teen answers tells him whether he or she would be a good fit among the campers and other counselors. Answers like, “It seems like an awesome job” are not what he’s looking for. “What I want to hear is that they’re hoping to be a positive role model or they want to have a real impact on kids’ lives," he says. "Little kids watch and absorb everything they see you do or say, so this is crucial.” From personal experience Pat adds, “After all these years, I can still tell you the names of the two camp counselors in my cabin my first year at camp!” The next step is the paper application, followed by an interview, either in-person, by Skype, or by phone. There are a few things that Pat likes to see when someone applies for a job working with children and families. A professional appearance is a must, he notes, beginning with the interview. “Dress for the job like you want it!” he says, adding that he once had a teen re-interview after the boy showed up in jeans and a t-shirt the first time. Pat’s not a huge fan of piercings, tattoos, and skimpy clothing, and he advocates strongly for general cleanliness and not giving the impression that you just rolled out of bed. “All of us on staff need to look, as well as act, professional at all times,” he asserts. What other types of personal qualities does he look for when hiring counselors? Stamina may top the list. “I need young people who can be strong and committed all day and still wake up in the night if a child wets the bed and deal with it,” he says bluntly. “At camp, you’re living with, and working with, campers and other staff 24-hours a day.” Time management is another indicator of how well a counselor will do over the long haul. It’s important to be where you’re supposed to be when you’re supposed to be there, Pat notes. He’s also looking for teens that can be team players, as well as function independently. If they play sports or are involved in collaborative extracurricular activities and clubs then they usually have developed skills like the ability to compromise, to trust others, and to work together to achieve common goals, he observes.

Leadership Experience

Like Pat, many of Camp Cory’s senior counselors began their career as campers. However, evolving from being a charge to becoming the person in charge is a process that doesn’t happen overnight. Pat explains, “Many of the younger teens want to skip the whole Leadership-in-Training or Counselor-in-Training step but I don’t encourage that. To be a good counselor they need some solid experience interacting with all types of kids. Working in a camp like ours is more than just babysitting.” The camp season starts with a one-week mandatory training session during continued >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Little kids watch and absorb everything they see you do or say, so

this is crucial. After all these years, I can still tell you the names of the two camp counselors in my cabin my first year at camp!” – Pat Foster, Associate Executive Director and Camp Director for YMCA's Camp Cory

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which time the teens are encouraged to adopt the values of that year’s theme (last year was “Superheroes”), take part in workshops such as water safety and warning signs of abuse, and bond with each other through teambuilding activities like laser tag. Once camp is in session, counselors are expected to supervise various activities with campers, such as archery or fishing, allowing them to develop an individual expertise in these as well as teaching others how to do them. Besides bedwetting, there are a few other common issues that teenage counselors should expect to deal with, including a child not listening to instructions and homesickness. When a frustrated counselor comes to Pat saying that a child is refusing to pay attention or follow directions, he prefers to offer the teen suggestions for coping with the situation or behavior themselves. “Learning from your mistakes is the best way to grow,” he says. The same goes for homesickness. “I tell the counselors that the best way they can handle this is by focusing on the positives of the camp experience, rather than what the child is missing at home." He urges the staff to talk to the child about all the fun things the child did that day. However, one place Pat takes a more proactive role is in what he calls “childsickness” – when parents are missing their child desperately. Based on years of experience, Pat reassures

mothers and fathers that this is a natural feeling when parents and children are separated, and he gives the adults his cell phone number, encouraging them to call him with any questions or even to just check in and make sure their son or daughter is having fun. He also recommends that parents and camp counselors read the book, Homesick and Happy, by child psychologist Dr. Michael Thompson, for more suggestions on how to cope with these feelings. Despite all this, summer camp jobs definitely aren’t all work and no play. Since electronics aren’t allowed, the overall camp experience for counselors is a simple kind of fun, with a focus on nature and activities. “You can try new things without worrying about looking cool or stupid," says Pat. "It’s amazing how quickly young people of all ages become independent when they’re in a judgment-free zone!” Susan Henninger is a contributing writer to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine and the mother of three teenage boys. She lives in upstate NY. Contact her at sue@ fingerlakeswriter.com or online at www.fingerlakeswriter.com.


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preparing for adventures close to home By Denise Yearian

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ummer day camp is a place where children can stretch their minds, exercise their bodies, develop new interests and forge lasting friendships. For young children, it is a good introduction to the camp experience. For older ones, it is a way to enjoy the activities without the overnight option. 20

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Day camp programs vary from one setting to the next. So how can you help make the most of your child’s day camp experience?


Consider interests. Day camps offer a host of options that include everything from one centralized activity to a variety of traditional camp fun. Talk with your child about his interests and what he would like to gain from the experience. Would he enjoy an assortment of activities or does he want to concentrate on one skill, such as soccer or art?

Ponder program length. Day camps range from several hours to a full day and can run from one week to an entire summer. How long your child should participate in a program will depend largely upon his age, developmental level and previous camp experience. First-time campers would do well starting in a partial- to fullweek program. Experienced campers may enjoy one that runs throughout the summer. Even if your child decides to stay at camp all summer, consider allowing a few weeks break between school and camp (and vice versa) for down time.

Look at location. If you choose a day camp close to home, commute time will be less and your child may already be acquainted with some of the other children. A day camp near your employer, however, would give you quick access to your child, in the event of an emergency. But if your child needs additional morning or afternoon childcare, you may want to consider a program close to your sitter.

Ask about staff. Find out what the camper-to-counselor ratio is. Ideally it should be six campers to one counselor, as recommended by the American Camping Association. What experience and/or training do the counselors have? How are they selected? What is the camp’s discipline policy? Are they trained to take care of health concerns such as asthma, allergies and dispensing medicine?

Focus on the facility. Ask about indoor and outdoor facilities. Is there ample indoor space for children to play during inclement weather? What do they do if it rains all week? Is the outdoor equipment and grounds well maintained and safe? Are the children’s swimming skills tested before they are allowed to enter the water? Are staff certified in lifesaving and present during water activities?

Cue in on cost. Inquire about additional fees. Some day camps have a base price but charge extra for trips, special events and activities. If the camp you want to send your child to costs more than you can afford, find out if there is a scholarship program. Also ask about a refund policy, in the event of an illness or family emergency.

Arrange a pre-visit. Many day camps have open houses prior to season start up. Find out if the camp you have chosen has one. If not, make other arrangements to introduce yourself to those who will be caring for your child. Since open houses are a good time to gather information, jot down any questions you have before leaving home. If they are not addressed during this time, ask to speak with someone before securing your deposit. continued >>> Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE CHOOSING A CAMP • Is it licensed by the state or does it hold an accreditation or certification? What exactly does that credential mean? •W  hat kind of background, training and experience do counselors and staff have? How are they chosen? •W  hat is the counselor-to-camper ratio? How many students are in each group? How often are the groups together?

• Are lunches and/or snacks provided? • Does it offer before- and after-care? Will it be the same staff caring for my child? • How often are the facilities cleaned? • What are alternative plans for inclement weather? • What does the camp fee cover? What extra fees will I be required to pay?

•W  hat kind of medical response is on hand? Does it have a fulltime camp nurse or CPR and first-aid certified staff?

• Does it offer scholarships or financial aid?

• Is it able to administer medicine?

• What is the policy regarding cell phones and other technology items brought to camp?

• What is a typical day like? •H  ow often will the campers take field trips? Where do they go? Is there increased supervision in a populated setting? •W  hat other resources are available to campers, such as a pool, ice arena, farm, hiking trails, ropes course, archery, etc.? How often will my child be able to participate in these?

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• What is the refund policy and rules regarding transfer of weeks?

• How are homesickness and other adjustment issues handled? • What is the discipline policy? • How is bullying handled? • What are the drop-off and pick-up policies? • Can references be provided?

Fill out forms. During your pre-visit, you may receive forms to fill out. When it comes to medical forms, be thorough and specific. If your child was on a medication during the school year but will be taken off of it for the summer, make sure the camp is aware of this as it could cause an extreme change in behavior. Insect and food-related allergies should be listed too. Equally important is to share other concerns, such as if your family is going through a divorce or has experienced a recent death, as this may affect how your child interacts throughout the day. Remember, camps look out for the physical and emotional needs of your child, so the more information you provide, the better equipped they will be. You will also be asked to fill out an emergency contact form, which lists another designated individual to call if you cannot be reached in the event of an accident or illness. While it is imperative to have an appointed individual, equally important is that the person knows she is designated as such. Every year camps contact the emergency person listed and she was not informed she was “on call.” The best advice? Check with that individual before writing the name down.


Peruse policies & procedures. Camp should give you materials on camp policies, procedures and planned activities. If you and your child know what to expect and what is expected of you, camp will run smoother. Most camps have a weekly schedule so parents know what the upcoming activities are. Talk with you child about what is planned. If she cannot participate due to health reasons, make sure you (not your child) inform the camp. In recent years, many day camps have developed strict policies about leaving technology items – cell phones, handheld games and other tech toys – at home. Their philosophy is day camps are designed to be enriching experiences and the children should be engaging in these activities rather than playing with electronics. If restricted items are brought to camp, they may be confiscated and returned at the end of the day in hopes the child gets the message.

Keep the line of communication open. Talk about camp before it even starts. Reassure your child of the positive experience he will have. At the end of each camp day, find a block of uninterrupted time where you can listen as he shares his adventures. Ask what he liked about camp and if there were any things he didn’t like. If he is having a hard time articulating what happened, break it down by activities —“What crafts did you do?” “Did you play any outdoor games that involved balls or running?” “Who did you play with at the pool?” “Who did you sit with at lunch?” Above all, encourage your child to always do his best, obey the rules and be respectful of others, and chances are, he’ll have a great time.  Denise Yearian is the former editor of two parenting magazines and the mother of three children.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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[ book nook]

By Deena Viviani

Twenty Years of Best Books for Kids and Teens part 1 - 1994-2003

a

lot can happen in twenty years – including the publication of hundreds of children’s books. Need help deciding which ones to revisit? The children’s librarians at the Brighton Memorial Library recommend these titles and authors with staying power!

1996

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse By Kevin Henkes, Greenwillow, hardcover, $17.99, Ages 3-6

It can be hard to sit quietly in school, especially when you have a special favorite show and tell that you want to share with everyone – even if it gets you in trouble. A real gem that’s great for kids starting school. Caldecott Award Winner Kevin Henkes could not be left off this list.

1994

Good Night, Gorilla

By Peggy Rathman, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, hardcover, $15.99, Ages birth-3

When it’s time for lights out at the zoo, a sneaky gorilla takes the zookeeper’s keys and lets the other animals out of their cages! This classic bedtime book cannot be missed.

1995

Math Curse

Written by John Scieszka & Illustrated by Lane Smith, Viking, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 6-8

Our narrator has been cursed by his math teacher and now sees everything in life as a math problem! Scieszka was the first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and while he is well known for his newer Truck Town books, his talent spans decades.

1997

Rapunzel

Retold & Illustrated by Paul O. Zelinksy Dutton, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 5-8

Fans of Disney’s Tangled may enjoy this version of the original German folk tale. Known for his fairy tale retellings, Zelinsky’s beautifully detailed illustrations are highly recommended for your viewing pleasure.

1998

No, David!

By David Shannon, Blue Sky Press, hardcover, $15.95, Ages 2-5

David’s mom always says no…except when it really matters. Time and time again David Shannon proves that he totally gets kids.

1999

The Gruffalo

Written by Julia Donaldson & Illustrated by

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more reads

Some beloved household names got their starts in the last twenty years. How many has your family read? Picture Books Olivia tales By Ian Falconer 2000-present

Middle Grade Captain Underpants By Dav Pilkey 1997-present

How Do Dinosaurs… Written by Jane Yolen & Illustrated by Mark Teague 2000-present

Harry Potter By J. K. Rowling 19982007

Bear Snores On and more Written by Karma Wilson & Illustrated by Jane Chapman 2002-2012 Skippyjon Jones By Judith Schachner 2003-present The Pigeon books By Mo Willems 2003-present early reader Mr. Putter & Tabby Written by Cynthia Rylant & Illustrated by Arthur Howard 2002-present

Judy Moody Written by Megan McDonald & Illustrated by Peter Reynolds 2000-2012 The Warriors By Erin Hunter 2003-present Young Adult Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants By Ann Brashares 2001-2007 Alex Rider By Anthony Horowitz 2001-present Naruto Masashi Kishimoto 2003-present


Axel Scheffler, Dial, hardcover, $16.99, Ages 3-5

Mouse outsmarts predators in the woods with threats of the Gruffalo who of course isn’t real…. Fun, sing-songy rhymes makes this tale a great read aloud that will get stuck in your head for hours.

2000

Hope Was Here

By Joan Bauer , G. P. Putnam’s Sons, paperback, $7.99, Ages 10-16

Sixteen-year-old Hope helps her aunt run a local diner that becomes a hotbed of political activity as its previous owner runs for mayor. Award winning Joan Bauer always offers tweens and teens good old fashioned storytelling at its best.

2001

A Single Shard

By Linda Sue Park, Clarion, hardcover, $15, Ages 10-16

Tree-ear, a thirteen-year-old boy in medieval Korea, has a chance to prove himself to a skilled potter despite his orphan status. This local author writes thoughtful books across the spectrum of children’s literature, winning awards along the way.

2002 I Stink!

Written by Kate McMullan & Illustrated by Jim McMullan, Joanna Cotler Books, paperback, $6.99, Ages 3-6

What is it like to be a garbage truck? Travel along with one tonight and find out! The McMullans team up again and again to bring vehicles to life.

2003

The City of Ember

By Jeanne DuPrau, Random House, 2003, paperback, $6.99, Ages 8-13

Lina searches for answers in her underground city where the lights are threatening to go out for good. Don’t judge this book based on the film version – this stunning debut is worthy of all its praise.  Deena Viviani is a Rochester-based Young Adult Services Librarian who writes reviews for VOYA and the RACWI Newsletter. Read more reviews on her blog www.deenaml.livejournal.com or send her a note at DeenaViviani@hotmail.com – she loves to hear from readers! Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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[ parenting teens & tweens ]

By Myrna Beth Haskell

hooked on hookah

teens experiment with an old world smoking method

i

f you are a parent of a teenager and you’ve never heard of hookah, you need to start educating yourself on the topic. Hookah is an ancient method of smoking that has been catching on in the US, and teenagers have been quick to pick up on this new trend. Although cigarette smoking has declined due to education about the many health risks and more stringent laws regarding usage, hookah smoking is on the rise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports, “In 2010, the Monitoring the Future survey found that among high school seniors in the United States, about 1 in 5 boys (17%) and 1 in 6 girls (15%) had used a hookah in the past year.” Unfortunately, there is a prevailing misconception that hookah smoking is a fairly safe alternative to cigarette smoking. Make no mistake, hookah smoking is detrimental to your health. Therefore, it’s imperative that parents learn the truth about hookah and start talking to their teens about the dangers.

Why Hookah? Hookah smoking was commonplace in ancient Persia and India. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of hookah use around the world, and it is becoming particularly popular among high school and college students who consider it a fun,

social pastime. Hookahs (or water pipes) are used to smoke specially-made tobacco that comes in different flavors, such as apple, mint, and cherry. Hookah smoking is typically done in groups, with the same mouthpiece passed from person to person. Brian A. Primack, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, pediatrics and clinical translation science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, explains that one of the reasons hookah has caught on so dramatically is due to its aesthetically pleasing tastes and environments. “Hookah smoking is commonly done in ‘hookah lounges,’ which are often dimly lit and beautifully decorated.” He points out that the act itself is more aesthetic as well because the tobacco is flavored, sweetened, and cooled by the water, which makes it less harsh than cigarette smoking. “I have a number of patients who would be horri-

fied to smoke a cigarette, but they wholeheartedly embrace hookah tobacco smoking. They express disbelief when I show them data on what they are actually inhaling.” Erin L. Sutfin, PhD, a developmental psychologist and assistant professor in the department of Social Sciences and Health Policy at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, NC, agrees with Dr. Primack. “It is well documented that teens are attracted to flavored tobacco products and use them at much higher rates than adults,” she says.

The Risks “It takes a long time to do studies that accurately quantify health risks, and the hookah phenomenon is relatively young in the Western world,” explains Primack. “That being said, we do have data that show that hookah smokers are heavily exposed to hazardous toxins.”

Dr. Primack reports that one hookah smoking session, which lasts about forty-five to sixty minutes, exposes the user to about 100 times the smoke volume of a single cigarette. “It also seems to expose the user to about forty times the tar, ten times the carbon monoxide, and two times the nicotine.” Sutfin warns, “Hookah smoking also carries the risk of infectious disease transmission, such as tuberculosis, influenza, and mononucleosis, due to the shared hoses and mouthpieces.” The burning process itself poses risks as well. Dyan Hes, MD, FAAP, medical director of Gramercy Pediatrics in Manhattan and clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, explains, “There are as much or more carcinogens in hookah smoke, particularly since the tobacco is burned at a higher temperature than in a cigarette.”

Want to share your ideas? Upcoming topic: Tips for staying connected with your teen even though her friends are her universe. Send your full name, address, & brief comments to: myrnahaskell@gmail.com or visit: www.myr-

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nahaskell.com www.RocParent.com


tips for you and your teen Tips are provided by Alexander V. Prokhorov, MD, PhD, professor of behavioral science at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Do not use tobacco products yourself. Kids model their behaviors and lifestyle after their parents. Create a tobacco-free policy in your household. Make sure that relatives and guests don’t feel free to use tobacco products around your children. Hookah is not a safe tobacco product. It generates a very large amount of smoke that contains toxic chemicals, just like the smoke from cigarettes and other combusted

Safe Hookah Products? Some products boast that they are tobacco-free, hence safe. Sutfin informs, “Smoking herbal shisha (a non-tobacco alternative) is still dangerous. Although there is not the risk of addiction since there is no nicotine, there is still exposure to high levels of carbon monoxide and other toxins.” “Most hookahs involve the lighting of a piece of charcoal in the hookah bowl,” Primack describes. “Therefore, even if there are no other substances, the user will be exposed to the combustion products of the charcoal, which include carbon monoxide.” He reports that hookah smokers have landed in emergency rooms with carbon monoxide poisoning. Besides carbon monoxide, the charcoal used to heat the products produces smoke containing metals and cancer-causing chemicals.

The Law Laws have not caught up with this new trend. Although many states have enacted bans on smoking in enclosed public places (e.g. New York’s Clean Indoor Air Act –

forms of tobacco. If you learn that your teen uses tobacco, show that you are disheartened by your teen’s tobacco use. If you have a story about a relative or friend who suffered or died from tobacco-related disease, tell your child this story. Refer your child to reputable resources which help young people adopt tobacco-free lifestyles. One such program is ASPIRE (A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience). Find out more about it at www.mdanderson.org. Free apps, including the Tobacco Free Teens app developed by experts at MD Anderson, are also available.

CIAA), hookah lounges may be excluded from these laws because they claim to qualify for the same exemptions offered to cigar bars, retail tobacco shops, and establishments that sell non-tobacco smoking products. Dr. Primack states, “Federal laws recently restricted youth-oriented flavorings in cigarettes [FDA regulation, 2009]. However, these laws do not apply to hookah tobacco.”

Knowledge is the Best Antidote “Parents need to emphasize that hookah smoking, including using herbal products, carries many of the same health risks as cigarette smoking,” urges Sutfin. “Parents should show their teens the statistics of the carcinogens found in hookah smoke,” adds Hes.  Myrna Beth Haskell is a freelance writer and monthly contributor to Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent Magazine who lives in Salt Point, NY. She is the author of LIONS and TIGERS and TEENS: Expert advice and support for the conscientious parent just like you (Unlimited Publishing LLC). Visit www.myrnahaskell.com. Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Generations Child Care • 41 Genesee Country Village & Museum • 41 RIT - Girls Engineering & RoboCamp • 52

Camp Stella Maris • 30 Genesee Waterways Center • 42

RIT - Margaret's House • 52

4-H Camp Bristol Hills • 31 Girl Scouts of Western NY • 42

RIT - Kids on Campus Academy • 53

A Magical Journey Thru Stages • 31 Greece Community Education • 43

Rochester Fencing Club • 54

Alfred University Summer Programs • 32 Harley School • 43 Hidden Valley 4-H Camp • 44

Rochester Museum & Science Center • 54

Hochstein School of Music & Dance • 44

Rock Ventures • 55

JCC Camps • 45

Ruckus Dance Alliance • 55

Lollypop Farm • 45

Seneca Park Zoo • 56

Camp Hickory Hill • 35

Making Friends through American Sign Language (ASL) • 46

Seneca Waterways Council Boy Scouts of America • 57

Camp Invention • 35

Mary Therese Friel Modeling Camp • 46

Summer Write @ Writers & Books • 57

Centauri Summer Arts Camp • 36

Master Kim's Taekwondo • 47

Swing Kingdom Playsets • 58

Child Care Council, Inc • 36

Mathnasium of Penfield • 47

Trinity Montessori School • 58

City of Rochester • 37

MCC - Summer College for Kids • 48

Timothy Draper Center for Dance Education • 59

Cornell University Sports School • 37

Midtown Athletic Club • 49

Created By Us • 38

Nazareth College Science Camp • 48

Doodle Bugs! Children's Centers • 38

Patty Flowerday School of Fitness & Dance • 50

Allendale Columbia School • 32 Banners Childcare • 33 Bears Outdoor Play Products • 33 Best Foot Forward • 34 Camp Haccamo • 34

Turin Swim and Sports Club • 60 Twelve Corners School Age Program • 60 U of R - Summer Sports Camps • 61

Drama Kids International • 39 Pittsford Dance Studio • 50

VistaTeach Instructional Services • 62

Eastman Community Music School • 39 Fitzsimmons Dance Factory • 40

Railroad Junction Summer Day Camp • 51

Wegmans Teen Culinary Camp • 62

Friendship Children's Center, Inc • 40

RBTL - Summer Stars • 51

YMCA of Greater Rochester • 63

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Calendar

march events

Activities • Exhibits • Theater • Storytelling • Shows • Family Fun • Outdoor Adventures Parenting Programs • and lots more for families to do in & around Rochester!

Rochester Model Railroad Club Annual Open House

S

//

March 8&9

ee as many as ten model trains running simultaneously on the 350-foot double track mainline, including Thomas the Tank Engine or one of his friends! The layout is loosely based on the route the Lehigh Valley Railroad took from Buffalo to Jersey City in the 1950s. There is even a trolley line with cars running under overhead wire. Added attraction - model railroad equipment sale on Saturday. This year the club, which is dedicated to the preservation, expansion, and education of railroading (both model and full size), is celebrating its 75th anniversary! Where: Basement of the First Universalist Church, 150 South Clinton Ave. (at the corner of Court St.), Rochester 14604.

When: Saturday, March 8, 10am-5pm & Sunday, March 9, 1-5pm. Cost: $3/Adults; $2/Ages 6-12; Free/Under 6; Family maximum of $10. For More Info: Call 454-2567 or visit www.rocmrrc.com.

sun

sat

8

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Celebrate St. Patrick's Day a wee bit early with an afternoon of family fun! Join in a scavenger hunt to find the fabled pot of gold and take a ride on the carrousel with a leprechaun. Watch Irish dancers kick up their heels in a lively reel or two. Enjoy crafts, snacks and learn all about St. Patrick's Day. $6/person. 12-4pm. The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson Street, North Tonawanda, 14120. (716) 693-1885. www.carrouselmuseum.org

Oh no - the composer is missing and the RPO needs your help to solve the mystery! Along the way discover the instruments of the orchestra and the music that they play. Lemony Snicket’s The Composer is Dead presents the engaging music of Nathaniel Stookey. Michael Butterman conducts. 2pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave., Rochester 14614. Purchase tickets online at www. rpo.org, by phone at 454-2100, or visit any Rochester-area Wegmans.

St. Patrick's Day at RPO presents: the Carrousel Museum Lemony Snicket’s "The Composer is Dead"

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march april

29 - 6

TYKEs Presents: Disney's My Son Pinocchio Follow Pinocchio’s journey from an awkward wooden puppet to a real, live boy while Geppetto learns how to be a real, live father. Join the Blue Fairy, Stromboli and a lively cast of characters as Geppetto journeys beyond his toy shop to discover what really makes the “perfect child.” This family-friendly musical is best enjoyed by ages 4 and up. JCC Hart Theatre, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester 14618. 461-2000. www.tykestheatre.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities calendar guide: Maple Madness��������68 April ������������������������67 Library����������������������66 Ongoing������������������68

FREE *GGH Kids: Grow Shamrocks Just in time for St.

Patrick’s Day - plant your own pot o’shamrocks. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Ages: 4-12 Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. http://www.grossmans.com/

Montezuma Birding Van Tour

FREE *Storytime with Skippyjon Jones Join beloved character

Hop in the Audubon Center’s van for a tour of Montezuma’s birding hotspots where hundreds of thousands of waterfowl can be seen! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm. $8/child; $13.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

FREE *Telethon for Lollypop Farm Celebrate the 18th year of this telethon, which is largest fundraising event for homeless and abused animals in the Rochester community. Live from Eastview Mall on WHAM Channel 13. 3-9pm. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. www.lollypop.org

Royal Ball All ye Lords and Ladies come to this fairy-tale ball and meet the Queen of Play. Dress up in your finest courtly attire. Games and crafts. Sat. only at 11am, 1 & 3pm see “The Happy Prince,” a one-act opera by Rochester Lyric Opera for the whole family. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

01 * Saturday Skippyjon Jones as he tells his story, all the while prancing in high style with his big ears flapping. 7pm. Barnes and Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave., Rochester, 14618. barnsandnoble.com

The Science of Building Mix your own batch of concrete, or try your hand at building a bridge and learn what Civil Engineering is all about. Meet local civil engineers and see local projects. Presented by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Rochester Section. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

02 * Sunday PeaceArt Concert Described as

a concert to bring awareness to the ideas that world peace is achieved through the coming together of individuals and communities sharing, caring and supporting the emotional physical, spiritual and socio-economic development of all. 4-6pm. Free - please bring non-perishable food item and winter clothing to be donated to local charity. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester,14614. www.hochstein.org

Royal Ball See Saturday, March 1,

2014 1-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

01 * Saturday Fossils of NYS Learn about what

might be in the rocks right under our feet. Presented by the Fossil Section of the Rochester Academy of Sciences. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

05 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the

Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

06 * Thursday Montezuma Backcountry Hike

A 3-mile guided hike over uneven terrain through the backcountry of Montezuma is a great way to welcome back our birds! 10am-12pm. $4/child; $6/adult; $20/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. ny.audubon.org/montezuma

07 * Friday Canandaigua Academy Players Musical: Titanic The curtain rises

on this year’s Musical...Titanic! “It’s big. It’s good. It’s ill-fated...but unsinkable.” 7:30pm. Academy Auditorium, Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www.canandaiguaschools.org

FREE *Corning Museum of Glass: Family Night Enjoy a free night at

the Museum with the whole family. This fun-filled event includes live entertainment glassmaking, crafts, and more! 6-8pm. Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, 14830. www.cmog.org

RAIN - A Tribute to the Beatles

Direct from Broadway and celebrating

march 9: GVP's 20th Annual Camp Summer Activity Fair

Wondering what your kids are going to do this summer? Camp organizers locally and nationally of all kinds - from preschool day camps to teen sleep away camps, from math and music to sports and scout camps - will be on hand to answer your questions about the best options for your child's summer at GVP's annual camp fair. 11am-5pm. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd, Victor. 348-9712. www.rocparent.com the 50th Anniversary of the Beatles appearing on the Ed Sullivan show! Hailed as “the next best thing to seeing The Beatles.” From their early hits to later classics, it is like seeing the legendary foursome live. 8pm. $35-$55. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. ticketmaster.com, www.raintribute.com, or www.rbtl.org

School of the Arts Dance Concert 2014 SOTA Dance

Department faculty and Dance majors deftly weave together an unforgettable evening of creative choreography, magic, music, and motion. Variety of dance styles including: modern, jazz, tap, ballet, hip-hop, swing and musical theatre. 7pm. $5-$9. Allen Main Stage, School of the Arts, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

08 * Saturday 20th Annual Skyway Open

Miniature golf featuring a Roaring 20s theme. Eighteen holes, including several with animated robotics, and 2-hole kiddie course. Fun for the whole family! Proceeds benefit The Mental Health Association. 9am. $10/player; $40/foursome;$5/ player kiddie course. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. www.mharochester.org FREE *An Afternoon of Winter Fancies - Part 1 Creative

Movement Workshop with live music accompaniment by the Hochstein Dance Dept. Join Hochstein students and faculty as they lead families

through an improvisational hour of movement for dancers and non-dancers alike. 3-4pm. Ages: 3+ Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 14614. www.hochstein.org FREE *An Afternoon of Winter Fancies - Part 2 “Flights of

Winter Fancy” Dance Performance: Hochstein’s dance faculty, students and friends perform a variety of dances including “Nutcrackering” inspired by The Nutcracker. Headline performer is Mariah Maloney. 4:155pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 14614. www.hochstein.org

Canandaigua Academy Players Musical: Titanic See Mar. 7. 7:30pm. Academy Auditorium, Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www. canandaiguaschools.org

FREE *Fairytales Around the World Hear Hansel and Gretel

and other fairytales from Germany. Enjoy hot chocolate and crafts after the reading. 10-11am. Ages: 3-10 Writers and Books, 740 University Ave., Rochester, 14607. www.wab.org FREE *GGH Kids: Creature Creations Create your own creature at this week’s fun, free event. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Ages: 4-12 Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. www.grossmans.com

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march 14-16: Sesame Street Live Presents "Can't Stop singing!" When Elmo gets his furry fingers on Abby Cadabby's magic wand, there's something in the air - and Sesame Street becomes a nonstop, all-singing, all-dancing musical montage! Grover and Baby Bear sing their highs and lows, Cookie Monster sings fast and slow, Bert and Ernie converse in song and Murray makes mouth music for all to sing along! Learn why it feels good to sing a song, but why it feels good to stop, too! What will Elmo learn about the power of musical magic? Join the conga line of fun to find out! six performances. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St., Rochester. 222-5000. www.rbtl.org. Rochester Model Railroad Club Open House See the 350-foot

double track mainline depicting scenes of the Lehigh Valley Railroad of the 1950s with a trolley line and cars. Thomas the Tank Engine & friends will be running too. Refreshments available. Model railroad equipment sale Saturday only. 10am-5pm. Donation: $3/adult; $2/youth 6-12; Free under 6; $10/ Family maximum. First Universalist Church, 150 South Clinton Ave., Rochester, 14604. www.rocmrrc.com

School of the Arts Dance Concert 2014 See Mar. 7. 7pm.

$5-$9. Allen Main Stage, School of the Arts, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

St. Patrick’s Day at the Carrousel Museum Enjoy an

afternoon of crafts, games, history and much more! Take a ride on the carrousel with a lucky leprechaun and search for that fabled pot of gold! 12-4pm. $6 per person ($5 Carousel Society members; sorry no other coupons accepted). The Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson Street, North Tonawanda,14120. www.carrouselmuseum.org

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09 * Sunday Canandaigua Academy Players Musical: Titanic See

Mar. 7. 2pm. Academy Auditorium, Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www.canandaiguaschools.org

Finley Meet and Greet Come out and meet Finley, the mascot for the Rochester Razorsharks basketball team. 1-3pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org FREE *GVP’S 20th Annual Camp & Summer Activity Fair

Sponsored by Genesee Valley Parent Magazine, the Fair has the best options for your child’s summer. Meet Camp Organizers from the Greater Rochester area and national camps--from preschool day camps to teen sleepaway camps. 11am-5pm. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. www.rocparent.com

MAG: Second Sunday Family Tour Our youngest friends and their

families are invited to enjoy a story and a short tour of the Gallery. 2pm. Included with admission. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. mag. rochester.edu


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Rochester Model Railroad Club Open House See Saturday, March

8, 2014 1-5pm. Donation: $3/adult; $2/youth 6-12; Free under 6; $10/ Family maximum. First Universalist Church, 150 South Clinton Ave., Rochester, 14604. www.rocmrrc.com

Rochester Theater Organ Society Concert Jonas Nordwall will present

a concert on the mighty Wurlitzer theater organ. 2:30pm. $15/adult (free for RTOS members);Free/12 and under and students with ID. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. rtosonline.org

School of the Arts Dance Concert 2014 See Mar. 7. 5pm.

$5-$9. Allen Main Stage, School of the Arts, 45 Prince St., Rochester, 14607. www.sotarochester.org

10 * Monday Storytime Club: Silly Seuss Stories Readings of classic chil-

dren’s tales - two sittings. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book! This month: Silly Seuss Stories. 10:30 and 11:30am. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

12 * Wednesday

14 * Friday

Book and Beast It’s story time at the

Canandaigua Academy Players Musical: Titanic See Mar. 7.

Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

13 * Thursday Montezuma Birding Van Tour

Hop in the Audubon Center’s van for a tour of Montezuma’s birding hotspots where hundreds of thousands of waterfowl can be seen! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. 9am-12pm. $8/child; $13.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

The Chieftains Ireland’s Musical

Ambassadors and six-time Grammy winners share their beautiful Irish music just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. You won’t want to miss this world famous Irish band! 7:30pm. $32 $62. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. ticketmaster. com, www.thechieftains.com, or www.rbtl.org FREE *The Romance of Richard Strauss Hochstein faculty present a 150th Birthday Tribute to Richard Strauss. 7pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester, 14614. www.hochstein.org

Sesame Street Live Presents: Can’t Stop Singing When Elmo

7:30pm. Academy Auditorium, Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www.canandaiguaschools.org

Global Collaboration Sankofa African Drum & Dance Ensemble and the Rochester Oratorio Society join together for this multicultural concert. The energy of Latin and African music for choir, dance and drums makes for irresistible enjoyment! 7:30pm. $20/advance; $25/at door;$10/students(at the door with ID). Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester, 14614. Midlakes Theatre Spring Musical - Curtains 7pm. Midlakes High

School Auditorium, 1554 State Route 488, Clifton Springs, 14432 www.midlakes.org

PI Day3 Come calculate with us

during a fun-filled celebration of math! Play fun mind games, learn cool math tricks, have fun with the mathematics of baking (“pie” of course) and and meet professional who use math in their jobs. Special extended hours Friday. 3:14-6:28pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

gets his furry fingers on Abby Cadabby’s magic wand, there’s something in the air - and Sesame Street becomes a nonstop, all-singing, all-dancing musical montage. 7pm. Ticket price TBD. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

15 * Saturday Canandaigua Academy Players Musical: Titanic See Mar. 7. 2

& 7:30pm. Academy Auditorium, Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www.canandaiguaschools.org

Challenger Learning Center of Greater Rochester Embark

on a virtual voyage of discovery to the planet Mars at the Challenger Center, a high-tech, hands-on facility for space flight simulations located at Strasenburgh Planetarium. Reservations required. Ages 7 +; Ages 7-10 with adult. 10:30am-12:30pm. $16/adult; $13/child ($2 discount for members). Strasenburgh Planetarium, Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

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march maple madness M

arch is for…maple sugar! This year March 22-23 and 29-30 are designated as the official Maple Weekend dates when more than 140 maple producers from across New York State are inviting folks to come visit their farms and experience first-hand how real, mouth-watering maple syrup and other maple delicacies are produced. Enjoy fun, family-friendly activities, sample fresh maple syrup and stock up on maple products at any of these local sugarbushes. Maple Weekend activities run typically from 10am-4pm. Check with individual farms if you have any questions. Entrance to farms is free unless otherwise noted. You can check www.nysmaple.com to find even more places to visit.

Day Brothers Dairy & Maple Farm 2292 County Road 6, Phelps 14532. (315) 789-0883. Maple Weekend activities include wagon rides into the woods to see how the sap is collected and a visit to the sap house where the wood-fired evaporator will be bubbling. Enjoy samples of maple syrup and maple cream. Packard Valley Farm 438 Macedon Center Rd., Macedon 14502. (315) 986-2539. Maple Weekend activities include an allyou-can-eat pancake breakfast, horsedrawn and tractor wagon rides, sap house tours, petting zoo, craft sale, kid activity zone, and a bird’s-eye-view of the sugarbush. Free samples of syrup and other delicious maple products as well as maple and baked goods for sale. Schiek’s Maple Products 873 Ridge Rd., Penn Yan 14527.

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(315) 536-6393. Take a hayride to the woods to see some modern tapping techniques and visit the sugarhouse to see them boiling sap to syrup during Maple Weekend. Variety of maple products for sale. Schoff’s Sugar Shack 1064 Willis Hill Rd., Victor 14564. (585) 924-3769. www.schoffssugarshack. com. In addition to being open 10am-4pm during Maple Weekend, the farm will be open March 8, 9, 15 and 16. Call ahead on these dates for sap conditions and activities. Trout Brook Sugarhouse & Alpacas 296 Taylor Rd., Honeoye Falls 14472. (585) 624-5648. www.troutbrooksugarhouse.com. Maple Weekend activities include demos and tours, syrup tastings and molded maple sugar samples. Stock up on custom

Fun Maple Syrup facts

• Maple syrup is a completely natural product with no additives or preservatives. • Maple syrup has the same calcium content as whole milk. • According the New York Agricultural Statistics Service, in the year 2013 it took almost 46 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup! • Maple sap becomes maple syrup when boiled to 219 degrees Fahrenheit, or 7 degrees above the boiling point of water. • A maple tree needs to be about 40 years old and have a diameter of 10 inches before tapping is recommended. • Maple syrup is characterized and graded according to clarity, color, density and strength of maple flavor. • Sap collected at the beginning of the tapping season is clearer and lighter in taste while syrup made from sap at the end of the season is darker and more caramelized in flavor. • Maple syrup will not freeze.


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities all-natural oatmeal pancake mix to go with the tasty syrup. Don’t forget to visit the alpacas! Trout Creek Farm 10045 Mattoon Rd., Prattsburgh 14873. (585) 346-6889. During Maple Weekend, you can tour the sugarhouse and take a wagon ride to the woods to see the tubing, collection and vacuum systems that gather the sap. Variety of maple products available including maple syrup, maple peanuts, maple BBQ sauce, maple mustards and maple pancake mix. Pancake and sausage breakfast (donation requested) each day to benefit the Prattsburgh American Legion. Wohlschlegel’s Naples Maple Farm 8064 Coates Rd., Naples 14512. (585) 775-7770. www.wohlschlegelsnaplesmaplefarm.com. During Maple Weekend, tour the modern sugarhouse and walk through the sugarbush (snowshoes may be required!).

Sample moxilicious gourmet maple cream (their specialty), syrups, maple mustard and more. Pancake Breakfast ($7/adults; $5/children 8-12; $3/children 3-7) served 8am – 1pm each day. Check out these places for additional Maple Madness… Cumming Nature Center 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples, NY 14512. (585) 374-6160. www.rmsc.org. March 22-23 & 29-30 from 9am4:30pm. Cost: $3/person; $10/family. Explore the science of maple syrup production along the center’s Pioneer Trail. Learn how a tree makes sap and how it is processed into different products. Pancake breakfast 9am – 3pm. (Extra charge for breakfast.)

4pm. Cost: $9.50/adult; $7.50/youth (4-16); Free/children under 3 & members ($2 Wegmans Shoppers Club Discount with card). Follow your nose and the aroma of simmering maple syrup as you hike into the nature center’s sugarbush and discover the 19th Century Maple Sugar Camp. Bring the family to learn all about tapping, boiling down and how maple syrup was made in the 1800s. Sample maple treats. Enjoy a pancake breakfast at the Meeting Center from 9am-1pm each day. (Extra charge for breakfast.) Each day at the Flint Hill Store from 12-4pm, meet author Nina Raqueno as she signs copies of her book Pancakes for Piggies.

Genesee Country Village & Museum, Maple Sugar Festival & Pancake Breakfast 1410 Flint Road, Mumford, 14511. (585) 538-6822. www.gcv.org March 15-16 & 22-23 from 9:30am-

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities Get Animated! Cartoon Weekend

FREE *Rochester St. Patrick’s Day Parade Celebrating 40 years as a

Visit with some of your favorite cartoon characters including Ben 10 and Bugs Bunny. Talk with local animators, create your own motion animation, see “Americano: The Movie” and meet the director. In conjunction with the “Animation” exhibit. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

2 & 5:30pm. Ticket price TBD. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

FREE *GGH Kids: Made from Scratch Remember how much fun it is

16 * Sunday

to make things from scratch? Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Ages: 4-12 Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. http://www.grossmans.com/

Mount Hope Cemetery Winter Tour Experience the beauty of Mount Hope Cemetery in the winter on a guided walking tour along flat, plowed roads. Learn about the notables buried there and visit the 1912 Chapel. Tour lasts 60-90 minutes depending on the weather. Refreshments available. 1-2:30pm. $5/person. Free to members and children under 16. Mount Hope Cemetery 1133 Mt. Hope Ave., Rochester, 14620South Entrance. fomh.org

PI Day3 See Mar 14. 12-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

Rochester tradition! Parade starts at East & Alexander and ends at Main & Plymouth. 12:30pm www.rochesterparade.com

Sesame Street Live Presents: Can’t Stop Singing See Mar 14. 10:30am,

Families Explore: Color Learn more about color through hands-on activities at the Corning Museum. Explore nanotechnology and how it relates to glass & color, create a key ring with beads that change color, make a “stained glass” window, watch a Hot Glass Show and more. 12-4pm. Included with admission (check out $8/special resident rate). Kids 19 & under are free. Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, 14830. www.cmog.org Get Animated! Cartoon Weekend See Saturday, March 15, 2014. 1-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

Lemony Snicket - The Composer is Dead This RPO concert is engaging fun for the entire family. Lemony Snicket’s The Composer is Dead presents the

March 15: 40th Annual Rochester St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Get your green on! 12:30pm. Downtown Rochester from East Ave. to Main St. www.rochesterparade.com

Please Note:

Dates and times for all calendar and ongoing events are subject to change. Please call the numbers provided or visit their website to confirm event information.

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities winning music of Nathaniel Stookey as the audience and orchestra solve the mystery about the missing composer. 2pm. Varies by seat. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave. Rochester, 14614. www.rpo.org

Maple Sugar Festival & Pancake Breakfast See March 15.

9:30am-4pm. $9.50/adult; $7.50/ youth (4-16); Free/children under 3 & members ($2 Wegmans Shoppers Club Discount). Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford, 14511. www.gcv.org

PI Day3 See Mar 14. 12-4pm.

Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

FREE *Rochester National College Fair An opportunity for

students and parents to meet face to face with college admissions representatives from over 150 colleges and universities from across the country. Sponsored by National Association for College Admission Counseling. 1-3:30pm. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, Empire Hall, 123 E Main St., Rochester, 14604. collegefairs@nacacnet.org or info@ nacacnet.org. www.nacacnet.org FREE *Schoff’s Sugar Shack See March 8. 10am-4pm. Schoff’s Sugar Shack, 1064 Willis Hill Rd., Victor, 14564. www.schoffssugarshack.com

Sesame Street Live Presents: Can’t Stop Singing See Mar 14.

11:30am & 3pm. Ticket price TBD. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

17 * Monday FREE *Rochester National College Fair See Sunday, March

16, 2014 9am-12pm. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, Empire Hall, 123 E Main St., Rochester, 14604. collegefairs@nacacnet.org or info@nacacnet.org. www.nacacnet. org

Storytime Club: Silly Seuss Stories Readings of classic chil-

dren’s tales - two sittings. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book! This month: Silly Seuss Stories. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

18 * Tuesday RBTL presents ONCE Award-

winning origial Broadway experience where actors play their own instruments onstage. The tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs. 7:30pm. $32.50 and up. Auditorium Center,

885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

19 * Wednesday FREE *Around the World Cobblestone Dayhab Students perform traditional dance and music and display art work from Italy, Ireland, China, Japan, Africa and more. 12:30-2pm. The Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 Rt.332, Farmington, 14425. www.CobblestoneArtsCenter.com

Book and Beast It’s story time at

the Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

RBTL presents ONCE See Tuesday, March 18, 2014 7:30pm. $32.50 and up. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

20 * Thursday FREE *Bach Birthday Party Ensembles and performances to honor the composer’s birthday followed by cake. 7pm. Hilda D. Taylor Recital Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 14614. www.hochstein.org

Home School Nature Series Migration Mania Explore the world

of migrating birds and welcome them back to Montezuma! Indoor and outdoor activities will help children learn how birds migrate. 10am-12pm. $8/child. Ages: 5-12 Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

Planning to Plant for Birds Workshop It’s the first day of spring

- time to think about foliage and our fine feathered friends! Learn tips on how to plan for your bird-friendly garden and landscaping. 6:30-7:30pm. $4/child, $6/adult, $20/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

RBTL presents ONCE See Tuesday, March 18, 2014 7:30pm. $32.50 and up. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

21 * Friday Home School Nature Series Migration Mania Explore the world

of migrating birds and welcome them back to Montezuma! Indoor and outdoor activities will help children learn how birds migrate. 10am-12pm. $8/child. Ages: 5-12 Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www.audubon.org

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

library 03 * Monday FREE *Music & Movement for Preschoolers Fun, interactive music program incorporating musical instruments (bells, shakers, rhythm sticks, boomwhackers...) and creative movement. Registration required. 10:15-10:45am. Ages: 2-5 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org FREE *Teen Writing Group Calling all teens in grades 7-12 -- do you like to write? Join us on the first and third Monday of every month to write, share, edit, laugh, and write. Registration required. 6-7:30pm. Ages: 12-18 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

06 * Thursday FREE *St. Patrick’s Day Party Hunt for gold coins that the leprechan left at the library. Turn them in for a prize! Lucky crafts and games and green St. Patty’s Day snacks. Registration required. 6:30pm. Ages: 2-8 Irondequoit Public Library-Evans Library, 45 Cooper Rd., Rochester, 14617. www.irondequoitlibrary.org

08 * Saturday FREE *Teen Volunteer Program Do you have community service hours to complete? Register to help at the library and earn 2 hours of community service requirement.

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You must register in order to attend and receive credit for the volunteer hours. 12-2pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

10 * Monday FREE *American Girl Club Celebrating all things American Girl! Hear a reading from an American Girls book, make a craft and more! Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Ages: 7-12 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org FREE *Storytime with Miss Anne at Wegmans Join Miss Anne at the Calkins Road Wegmans for a special storytime! This program will include stories, songs, rhymes, and simple sign language. Designed for children of all ages and their caregivers. No registration required. 10am. Market Café, Calkins Road Wegmans, www. hpl.org

12 * Wednesday FREE *Books & Bites Teen Book Club Enjoy pizza and discuss books! The group meets at Great Northern Pizza (640 Jefferson Rd.) on the second Wednesday of each month. Registration required. 6:30-7:30pm. Great Northern Pizza 640 Jefferson Road, Rochester. www.hpl.org

programs & activities 15 * Saturday

Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

FREE *ACT Practice Test Take an official, full length practice test from College Board, the makers of the ACT. Offered by Chariot Learning. Registration required. 10am-2pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

27 * Thursday

17 * Monday Teen Writing Group Calling all teens in grades 7-12 -- do you like to write? Join us on the first and third Monday of every month to write, share, edit, laugh, and write. Registration required. 6-7:30pm. Ages: 12-18 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

18 * Tuesday FREE *Lego Club Love legos? Have fun building with Lego at the library! Bricks provided , you provide the creativity. Registration required. 4:15-5pm. Ages: 6-12 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www. hpl.org

FREE *Swing Dance Lessons Join us for the third (of four) monthly party dance lessons taught in a fun, relaxed atmosphere. It’s not too late to start! You can join us with or without a partner. Families welcome. Come back on April 24 for our dance party! Registration required. 7-8:30pm. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

29 * Saturday FREE *Preschool SCIENCE-time Explore the world of science at our science-themed storytime. We’ll read stories and do exciting hands-on science activities! For preschoolers and their caregivers. Registration required. 11-11:45am. Ages: 3-6 Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

26 * Wednesday

FREE *Toddler Dance Party Bring your little ones and dance your sillies out to your favorite tunes! For toddlers and caregivers. No registration required. 10:15-10:45am. Ages: 18mos-4yrs. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. www.hpl.org

FREE *Teen Game Night Hang out with your friends at HPL’s monthly Teen Game Night! Play games and enjoy refreshments. No registration required. 6:30-8pm. Henrietta Public

Find lots more Library events online...


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities RBTL presents ONCE See Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8pm. $32.50 and up. Auditorium Center, 885 E. Main St., Rochester, 14605. www.rbtl.org

22 * Saturday Making Tracks with the Animal Teachers and Anne Meade Every

animal leaves tracks and signs behind them that can tell a story about who they are and what they did. You can learn how to read them! 11am-3pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. http://animalteachersannemeade. com and www.rmsc.org

Finger Lakes Concert Band Doug

Kane directs this community ensemble. 7pm. $5/adult; Free/18 & under. Canandaigua Academy Auditorium, 435 East St., Canandaigua, 14424. www.hochstein.org FREE *GGH Kids: Wheatgrass Worms These worms may not be

pleasant to look at but they can be a big help in composting. Learn all about them at this free event. Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Ages: 4-12 Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. www.grossmans.com

Silly Seuss Stories. 10:30 &11:30am. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

26 * Wednesday Book and Beast It’s story time at the

Zoo! Bring your little ones to the Zoo for a cuddly story and special animal visitor each week. 11am. Included with admission. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St., Rochester. www.senecaparkzoo.org

Derby Hill Hawk Watch Trip Visit

Lake Ontario for the spectacular spring raptor migration. Travel with other birders in our van to view thousands of bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, sharpshinned hawks, turkey vultures and more! Bad weather date: Mar 27. Pack a lunch. 10am-4pm. $17.50/child, $22.50/adult. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. ny.audubon.org/montezuma

FREE *Hochstein Percussion Ensemble Jim Tiller directs high

school percussionists. 7:30pm. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 14614. www.hochstein.org

ly demonstration presented by Dr. Duje Tadin, University of Rochester Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. 11am & 12:15pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

‘JAWS’ Revisited Marine Fisheries Scientist & Author Gregory Skomal, PhD, presents new insights into the ecology of the white shark in the North Atlantic. He has been featured on Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week.” Tickets from rescheduled Feb 5 lecture honored. 7:30pm. $15/adult; $8/ student (through grade 12 or college with valid college ID). Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

23 * Sunday

28 * Friday

RBTL presents ONCE See Tuesday, March 18, 2014 2 & 8pm.

Visual Illusions Reveal Mysteries of the Brain Come see this live-

Disney Live! Mickey’s Music Festival Mickey Mouse and all his

friends will rock the world with Disney hit songs remixed in a lively concert featuring hip hop, pop, swing, reggae, rock, country and more! More than 25 Disney stars in this jam session for the entire family! 2 & 5pm. Varies by seat. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square, Rochester. www.bluecrossarena.com

TAO: “The Art of the Drum”

Athletic bodies and exquisite costumes meet explosive Taiko drumming and innovative choreography in a spectacle that has entertained more than five million at sold out shows worldwide including the Vancouver Olympics. 7pm. $55-$70. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, 14618. artscenter.naz.edu

24 * Monday Storytime Club: Silly Seuss Stories Readings of classic children’s tales two sittings. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book! This month:

Stargazing with Barefoot Bob

Enjoy telescopic views of the late winter skies and see some of the brightest examples of visible star clusters and nebulae in the northern hemisphere. Jupiter and Mars will be in ideal viewing positions for the year. Back up date: Sat., Mar 29. 7:30-9:30pm. $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savanna, 13146. www. audubon.org

29 * Saturday FREE *Edgerton Model Railrod Club Layout Tour Historic preserva-

tion in miniature. The last Saturday of each month the P.A.L. Model Railroad Heaven is open for visitors. Since 1950 the four O Gauge train layouts, depicting each season in Rochester, have been meticulously updated & maintained. 11am-2pm. Edgerton Recreation Center, 41 Backus St., Rochester, 14608. edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com

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calendar of events • local family-friendly activities NanoDays Celebration! Bond with us as we explore the world of nano through various hand-on activities and demonstrations. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www. rmsc.org TYKE’S Theatre: Disney’s My Son Pinocchio A light-hearted spin

on the classic Pinocchio story, this family-friendly musical is appropriate for all audiences with its magical mix of heartwarming fairytale and actionpacked adventure. 2pm. $16. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

30 * Sunday NanoDays Celebration! See Mar 29. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org Science Saturday at RMSC: Birds Paul and Megan from Birds

Unlimited will introduce you to some of their favorite feathered friends parrots. Learn all about these colorful birds and how to care for them. 11am-3pm. Included with admission. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. www.rmsc.org

TYKE’S Theatre: Disney’s My Son Pinocchio See March 29. 11am & 2pm. $16. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

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31 * Monday Storytime Club: Silly Seuss Stories Readings of classic chil-

Experience, 880 Elmgrove Rd., Rochester, 14624. www.managingautism.org

dren’s tales - two sittings. Have your Storytime Club passport stamped once during each visit. Collect five stamps and receive a free children’s book! This month: Silly Seuss Stories. 10:30 & 11:30am. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

FREE *GGH Kids: Garden Markers Think spring and make markers for your future garden at this week’s fun, free event . Suggested for ages 4-12, but “kids” of all ages are welcome! 11am. Ages: 4-12 Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Route 250 (1 mile north of Route 441), Penfield, 14526. http://www.grossmans.com/

April

FREE *Storytime with Special Guest Curious George Friday, April 4, 2014 11am. Barnes and Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave., Rochester, 14618. store-locator.barnesandnoble. com/store/2790

04 * Friday FREE *Storytime with Special Guest Curious George Join beloved storybook character Curious George for a fun storytime. 7pm. Barnes and Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave., Rochester, 14618. store-locator. barnesandnoble.com/store/2790

05 * Saturday FREE *Autism Spectrum Connection Fair A community event to connect parents and caregivers who have children with Autism Spectrum Disorder with the agencies, businesses and organizations in the area that provide support. 9am-1pm. Unity Health System Total Sports

Superheroes Weekend Come

meet two official Marvel Comic superheroes - Iron Man and Thor! Budding cartoon artists are invited to a how-todraw session with comic book artists. 11am-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

TYKE’S Theatre: Disney’s My Son Pinocchio A light-hearted spin

on the classic Pinocchio story, this family-friendly musical is appropriate for all audiences with its magical mix of heartwarming fairytale and actionpacked adventure. 2pm. $16. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

06 * Sunday Picardy Penguin: Let’s Build the Tower of Music In this multi-me-

dia interactive RPO concert, Picardy Penguin shows you how music is built from the ground up, with popular classics by Beethoven, Strauss, and Bizet. 2pm. Varies by seat. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 North Plymouth Ave., Rochester, 14614. www.rpo.org

Superheroes Weekend See

Saturday, April 5, 2014 1-4pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org

TYKE’S Theatre: Disney’s My Son Pinocchio See April 5. 11am & 2pm. $16. Hart Theater at the JCC, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Rochester. www.tykestheatre.org

07 * Monday Monday Kicks: Animal Pals

Playful, learning activities designed especially for 2-6 year olds, one Monday each month. This month’s theme is Animal Pals. 10am-2pm. Included with admission. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan Sq., Rochester, 14607. www.museumofplay.org


calendar of events • local family-friendly activities

Ongoing

events & exhibits Math Midway Step right up to interactive Math Midway, a carnival-themed, traveling exhibition dedicated to the hands-on amazement of mathematics. A tour of mathematical concepts, Math Midway features exciting and surprising activities that illustrate the principles of math. Rochester Museum and Science Center 657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. Included with admission during regular museum hours, through March 17. For more info visit www.rmsc.org or call 271-4320

STRASENBURGH PLANETARIUM

ROCHESTER MUSEUM & SCIENCE CENTER

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org/ StrasenburghPlanetarium/ Check website or call for prices and hours

657 East Ave., Rochester 14607. 271-1880. www.rmsc.org Check website or call for prices and hours

MY PLANETS. For children ages 3-5 and the adults with them, this friendly introduction to the planetarium features worlds in our solar system. Saturdays at 10am. $8. Ages: 3-5yrs.

ADVENTURE ZONE. Dive to the bottom of Lake Ontario in the Deep Submergence Vehicle simulator. Experiment with wind currents, stream erosion, and more.

SATURDAY NIGHT LASER SHOW. Intensely colored beams from argon and krypton lasers fill the planetarium dome with dazzling color patterns that spontaneously dance to classic rock music. Shows change monthly. 9:30pm. $9-$10. Ages: 5+.

AT THE WESTERN DOOR. The hundreds of objects displayed show the Seneca’s and Haudenosaunee’s creative response to new technologies and materials introduced following European Contact.

SATURDAY SUN, MOON AND STARS. This relaxed, enjoyable family show presents prominent constellations and takes the audience on a quick trip to the moon. Show Times: confirm at rmsc.org. $8-$10. MYSTERIES OF THE DARK UNIVERSE Journey though some of the many puzzling parts of the universe that emit no visible light. Explore cutting-edge astronomical research while enjoying stunning images in the dome. A high-resolution video system surrounds audiences with magnificent images Saturdays, 1pm. Ages: 6yrs to adult. $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, college students, and ages 3-18, and free for RMSC members.

DISCOVER OUR WEATHER. Make a cloud, measure the wind, and marvel at the power of lightning! Energize it. What powers our bodies, cities and planet, and is neither created nor destroyed? ENERGY. ENERGIZE it brings you through a multi-sensory, highly physical experience where YOU hold the power! EXPEDITION EARTH. Explore your connections to the natural world in this interactive natural science exhibition. FLIGHT TO FREEDOM. Rochester’s Underground Railroad. Explore stories of courageous African Americans who traveled through Rochester on their way from slavery to freedom.

HOW THINGS WORK. Through fun, hands-on investigation, find out how mechanisms such as light switches, thermostats, and traffic signals work. KEVA Planks. Construct your own wooden masterpiece with KEVA Planks--identical, stackable construction blocks. Blending science with art, KEVA planks bring out the designer, architect and engineer in each of us. LIGHT HERE-LIGHT NOW. Have hands-on fun with light, color, & optics with mirrors, lenses & lasers. ERIE CANAL LOCK EXHIBIT. The new permanent exhibit features several enhancements made to the Museum’s previous Eric Canal Lock exhibit. Enhancements include six computers to control the system, a new tugboat, improved lighting, new plumbing and electrical systems and more.

National Museum of Play at The Strong

One Manhattan Sq., Rochester 14607. 263-2700 or TDD 423-0746, www.museumofplay.org Check website or call for prices and hours GAME TIME! Move like a piece on a giant game board through three centuries of American games, puzzles, and public amusements.

American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil. Climb up the side of a building, make your own cape, test your superhero skills, pose for pictures with Spiderman and learn more about your favorite comic book hero. NATIONAL TOY HALL OF FAME. The prestigious hall features historic examples of toy inductees and play stations. Berenstain Bears: Down a Sunny Dirt Road. Step into the playful world of the Berenstain’s including Main St, Bear Country School, Brother & Sister Bear’s Club Houses, and the Family Tree House. Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street? See yourself on TV with the Muppets, drive Elmo around Sesame Street in a big yellow taxicab, sell movie tickets at the Circle in the Square Cinema ticket booth, and more. Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden®. The team has raised the bar by introducing a variety of birds and animals into the garden to create a lively ecosystem that they have dubbed “butterfly garden 2.0.” eGameRevolution. An original, highly interactive exhibit that explores the history of video games and their impact on the way we play, learn, and relate to each other. One History Place. Amid original artifacts and reproductions, children explore mini-environments and get a taste of life as it was a century ago.

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Party Planner – Everything to get the party started!

2/15/13

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Are you planning a party? check our party & celebration guide and articles online for great party ideas!

www.rocparent.com

Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent • March 2014

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Rochester & Genesee Valley Parent March 2014  

Rochester's Premier award-winning Parenting Publication for the Rochester NY area.

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