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Copyright 2015 by Gutfreund Cornett Art. The book author and each artist here, retains sole copyright to their contributions to this book. This catalog is documentation of What’s Right, What’s Left: Democracy in America, an exhibition created by Gutfreund Cornett Art, www.GutfreundCornettArt.com, and shown at the Phoenix Gallery, New York City, January 7—30, 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means without prior permission in writing from Gutfreund Cornett Art. About: Gutfreund Cornett Art specializes in creating exhibition opportunities for artists on themes of “art as activism” to stimulate dialog, raise consciousness and create social change. With backgrounds in national and international projects, advocacy, non-profits, government, corporate art and a successful history in DIY Blockbuster shows on feminist issues, Gutfreund and Cornett have combined these skills to provide unique opportunities for artists, communities and our relevant non-profit collaborators to come together around social and environmental themes. Catalog designed and edited by Gutfreund Cornett Art Cover Design by: Rozanne Hermelyn, Arc and Line Communication and Design. www.arcandline.com


Presented by Gutfreund Cornett Art at The Phoenix Gallery New York City In Conjunction with Vote Smart and New York City Youth Poet Laureate Program January 7-30, 2016


Note from: Gutfreund Cornett Art We are very pleased to have collaborated with the Phoenix Gallery for this important exhibition and opportunity to exhibit the work of activist artists with What’s Right, What’s Left: Democracy in America, with works selected by Dr. Kathy Battista, Founder and Director of the MA Contemporary Art program at Sotheby's Institute of Art, New York and Senior Research Fellow of the Centre for Global Futures in Art, Design and Media at the Winchester School of Art University of Southampton. Dr. Battista selected twenty-three works from twenty-one artists to be installed in the gallery with sixty-one additional works from forty-two artists selected to be shown together on a monitor in the gallery in order to accommodate as many viewpoints as possible and expand the conversation beyond the physical limitations of the gallery. This exhibition portrays art that spoke on themes of democracy, women’s rights, LGBT issues, privacy and surveillance, the 1% and money, race, gun rights, immigration, environment, and other political issues and processes. Gutfreund Cornett Art asked artists to share their voices in this art-based conversation about democracy and sought art that addressed and interpreted the following prompt: In the upcoming election year, what does democracy mean in the United States? It's time for artists to get on their soapboxes – whether it is a conceptual soapbox or direct Statement Art and tell us what you think about democracy in America. What is happening within our borders with the increasing polarization of our political parties and how do our views of democracy affect those outside our borders when we try to spread the American Dream? Have we made progress or are we going backwards? Whether you lean to the right or lean to the left, tell us what you think about the current state of affairs. How does increasing surveillance affect the tenets of democracy? We have both freedom and a lack of privacy in this digital and Patriot’s Act world as drones and wiretaps are commonplace and virtually unquestioned and unopposed; but do we have a voice in any of this Big Brother culture and with voting restriction laws being passed across the country to silence particular demographics of the American public. How does the media portray democracy -- truth vs. spin? What is actually news versus entertainment in bombastic, biased editorials? Consider democracy in relation to civil, personal and political rights, economic gain, and the debate over freedom of speech, freedom of choice and freedom to choose to live as you wish. What did our forefathers intend in the Constitution with the freedom of speech, the right to bear arms, the pursuit of happiness, etc. To whom do these tenets apply in a racially, religious and politically divided country? With each exhibition, we highlight the work of a non-profit and for What’s Right, What’s Left: Democracy in America we chose Vote Smart, a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the U.S, and the New York City Youth Poet Laureate program, which is a voting-themed teen competition designed to energize youth voters through spoken word poetry. Art can be a powerful, productive force instrumental in sparking change or critical thinking. Gutfreund Cornett Art is committed to supporting local, national, and global art activism to help us to understand what is happening in our society, who we are, where we come from and where we’re going. We specialize in creating exhibition opportunities for artists on themes of “art as activism” to stimulate dialog, raise consciousness and create social change. We would like to thank the Phoenix Gallery and Director, Linda Handler, Dr. Kathy Battista, our participating artists and our curatorial assistant intern Amelia Lewis for their parts in broadening the conversation about democracy in America. Karen Gutfreund and Sherri Cornett


ABOUT THE GALLERY From its origins as a prestigious artist co-operative in New York, celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2008, the Phoenix Gallery has evolved into a community-oriented center for all the arts. Founded in 1958, during the “Tenth Street� days, the gallery now has artist-members from around the world, all dedicated to the highest level of professionalism. Each brings his/her own unique style and vision to the diverse group that makes up the Phoenix Gallery. These artists, all carefully chosen for membership by Phoenix artist peers, work in all media and create art that encompasses and reflects wide cultural and ethnic interests. In addition to providing artist-members elegant space to exhibit, the gallery reaches out to the members of the community, scheduling juried competitions, dance programs, poetry readings, book signings, plays and lectures. A special exhibition space, The Project Room, has been established for guest-artist exhibits. The Phoenix Gallery is a nonprofit 501-(c) (3) organization. The Phoenix Gallery has a full time director who runs the gallery and promotes and develops contacts with private individuals, art consultants and corporations. The director also promotes sales and encourages visibility of artist members. PHOENIX GALLERY MISSION STATEMENT In continuous operation since 1958, the Phoenix Gallery represents a committed artist community that runs a non-profit public exhibition space for fellow professional and emerging artists. In addition, it awards fellowships, hosts juried exhibitions, and promotes the work of all its members.


ABOUT THE JUROR: Dr. Kathy Battista

Dr. Kathy Battista is the Founder and Director of the MA Contemporary Art program at Sotheby's Institute of Art, New York and Senior Research Fellow of the Centre for Global Futures in Art, Design and Media at the Winchester School of Art University of Southampton. She is a writer, curator and educator. She is author of New York New Wave: The Legacy of Feminist Art in Emerging practice 2015 and Re-negotiating the Body: Feminist Artists in 1970s London (IB Tauris, 2012), which won the Choice Book Award for 2013. Her essays have appeared in the following edited collections: Drawings in the 21st Century: Papers on Contemporary Practice (Ashgate, 2015); Ladies and Gents: Public Toilets and Gender (Temple University Press, 2009); Arcade: Artists and Placemaking (Black Dog, 2006); Surface Tension: Supplement 1 (errant bodies, 2006) and Surface Tension: Problematics of Site (errant bodies, 2003); as well as many exhibition catalogues. Kathy is currently curating a major retrospective of the work of E.A.T. (Experiments in Art & Technology), which opens July 25th 2015 at the Museum der Moderne Salzburg, Austria and will be accompanied by a full scale book. Recent curated exhibitions include Linea: Katie Holten and Mariatheresa Sartori; Marta Jovanovic: Republika; and Shony Rivnay: Soft Corps (Bosi Gallery, New York, 2014); Syri-Arts Benefit (Beirut Exhibition Centre, 2013); Royal Academy Encounter (Katara Arts Centre, Doha, 2012); Sweethearts: Artist Couples (Houldsworth Gallery, London, 2012). Kathy has taught at Cornell University; Birkbeck College; The London Consortium (University of London); Kings College; the Ruskin School of Art, Oxford University; and Tate Modern. Kathy was founder of the Interaction education and events program for the UK-based public art agency Artangel. She received a PhD and was a Postdoctoral Fellow of The London Consortium, University of London; a MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art; and a BA from Fordham University.


Democracy in America—Juror’s Statement When invited to jury this exhibition, I was excited about the possibilities as well as the challenges that it presented. I cannot think of a topic that is more important today. Democracy, a fundamental ideal of the United States constitution, is a contested term as of late. Democratic elections and governance are the hallmarks of an emancipated, first world nation. In the so-called West we look at nations that live under dictators and despots as uncivilized and barbaric; however, we live in a nation of contradictions, a few of which I detail below. The United States has one of the highest statistics of incarceration in the world including the infamous Guantanamo Bay detention center, which some argue has defied laws established by the Geneva convention; a battle over freedom of choice, thought to have been resolved in the 1973 Roe vs Wade case, still wages, with the family values right recently eliminating Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood in Texas; gun crime is at endemic levels, including random mass shootings in public spaces; and police brutality against the African American community is the topic of daily news. How does one find elation living in the midst of such turmoil? How do we understand and differentiate our nation from others that we consider less civilized? Is democracy the key to the well being of all citizens? In the call for submissions to this exhibition the artists were asked “What is right and what is left in America?” The double entendre in the title, which I unfortunately cannot take credit for, was hiding in plain sight. Right and left in the political conception are traditionally understood as a conservative, Republican viewpoint versus a liberal, Democratic stance; of course, this binary seems antiquated at present in the increasingly centrist elision of the left and the new extremism in the right. However, if we ask ourselves what is “right” in terms of moral aptitude, it lacks the discrete boundaries of a fixed position. What is “right” is subjective, the subject of debate, and stands for different things depending on who is asked and who answers the question. Is it right to tell women how they can control their bodies? Is it right that guns are so easily accessible in this country? Is it right that we incarcerate more people than any other democratic, civilized nation? But there is also what is right FOR America—how should we behave as a world superpower and how should we support as well as discipline our citizens? We can also ponder what is left? In political terms it has become increasingly centrist in its views, veering close to conservative viewpoints at times. Alternatively, “what is left?” also means what remains. If we ask ourselves what remains we are left with both disparities and inconclusive ideals. We are left with a second amendment that many find outdated, a leftover from a time when bearing arms was not related to gang, youth, and random mortality. We are sadly not left with a conclusive stance on reproduction. So what is left in America? How far are we as a nation from what we were originally founded as? The works in this exhibition cover a range of these issues with visual acuity and insight, as well as humor and playfulness. Looking at the works that were submitted, I was reminded of the ability of art to transcend political party or message through the assertion of universal concepts and truths. Making a selection that would fit into the intimate proportions of the Phoenix Gallery required discipline. I had the luxury of a plethora of works to choose from, many of which were significant to me for several reasons. There were works that had huge visual impact, which I wanted to include for their sheer physical presence. This was difficult given the confines of the space and the fact that I wanted to be as inclusive as possible regarding the amount of featured artists. There were pieces that dealt with political issues through abstract aesthetics, which were magnificent in their subtlety and nuances. I could have selected, and considered doing so, an entire exhibition of abstract work. This would have been a completely different show than what one sees at Phoenix Gallery.


In the editing process, the works that prevailed represent a wide use of media and techniques. There are videos that use straightforward editing, found and created footage, as well as digital enhancement. There are sculptures that contain found objects as well as those finely crafted traditional materials. There are paintings, drawings, photographs and prints that use figuration and text to portray individual and universal messages. There are also installations (one of which is performative and interactive for the duration of the exhibition) that were important for me to include for the challenging nature of these works. I am particularly excited about the range of works in the gallery exhibition as well as the digital display. They read as a time capsule of 2015 in the United States. I hope that I have the luxury of looking back at this work in decades to come, to see how contemporary artists have progressed or returned to these debates. Hopefully what is right for our nation, in a moral rather than political sense, will prevail and that we will be left with ideals and policies that we are proud of. The concept of democracy, albeit difficult to adjudicate or predict, assures one thing: that in a civilized nation people can agree to disagree, debates can be waged and that people will continually revise and update their positions. Citizens, and especially artists, need to keep talking, keep creating and continue to propose different viewpoints. Although we may not like a viewpoint, being part of a democracy means allowing every opinion, left or right.

Dr. Kathy Battista


As a nation we have succeeded, not because we struggle with one another, but because we somehow have learned to recognize that the single issue that will always call us to arms is one that requires the defense of each other—a defense against the aggression that strikes at the heart of the American experience and endangers our freedom and ability to selfgovern. At Vote Smart, Americans young and old volunteer their time, take no money from special interest groups, and have committed themselves to an extraordinary effort that, if successful, will provide their fellow citizens with the tools for a reemergence of political power not known for half a century. Their idea is one you may have thought of yourself. It is a deceptively simple concept but enormously difficult to achieve and would not be possible without the collaboration of citizens willing to lay their partisan differences aside for this one crucial task. Begun in 1986 by a combination of conservatives and liberals, this project is an historic undertaking. Citizens come together, not in selfish interest or to support one candidate over another, but to defend democracy. It is an extraordinary gathering of people committed to one purpose: to strengthen the most essential component of democracy—access to information — even as it suffers grave attacks from candidates and political parties, many who are now willing to manipulate information and deceive voters. To do this, they have created many readily-accessible tools, such as the Voter's Self-Defense System, where every candidate and elected official from President to local government can be easily and instantly accessed—their voting records, issue positions, interest group ratings, public statements and campaign finances. Website: votesmart.org Facebook: Vote Smart


The New York City Youth Poet Laureate program is a voting-themed spoken word poetry competition aimed at increasing youth voter turnout by educating NYC students about their power to decide the leadership and direction of the city. Coordinated by NYC Votes and its partner Urban Word, YPL has reached over 100,000 youth across the city since its inception. By providing youth with a platform for creative expression, the YPL program promotes critical thinking of self, and by extension, a critical analysis of one’s role in one’s community and government. The program provides the platform for youth to voice their opinions about their elected representatives and community issues and, through peer-to-peer engagement, encourage those around them to become civically engaged. YPL winners serve as leaders in the NYC youth community, championing the voice of the youth vote, performing and speaking at events, and conducting peer-to-peer voter engagement activities. www.nyccfb.info/nyc-votes/programs/ypl#sthash.A3PAWmfQ.dpuf Websites: www.nyccfb.info/public/VRC/youthPoetLaureate.aspx www.nyccfb.info/nyc-votes/programs/ypl#sthash.A3PAWmfQ.dpuf On Twitter: @NYCYPL On Facebook: NYCYouthPoetLaureate


Artists Exhibited in the Phoenix Gallery Nic Abramson, Ransom Ashley, Michael D'Antuono, Cat Del Buono, Justyne Fischer, Lindsay Garcia, Shawna Gibbs, Ruthann Godollei, Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch, Emily Greenberg, Gracie Guerrero-Bustini, Shreepad Joglekar, Monika Malewska, Victoria Helena Mihatovic, Kate Negri, Gina Randazzo, Sinan Revell, Nick Hugh Schmidt, Laura Sussman-Randall, Dan Tague, and Eike Waltz


Nic Abramson Shady, New York www.nicabramson.com

Or Do They Mixed media 82 x 72 x 30 inches 2015 Or Do They is a work that stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter Movement in remembering those innocent, unarmed, black civilians murdered by the government’s police force, whose very purpose is to serve and protect. The work raises questions about white culpability, as well as asks viewers to question what they actually mean when they say that “black lives matter.”


Ransom Ashley Shreveport, Louisiana www.ransomashley.com

Love Not Greed Archival pigment print 12 x 18 inches 2012 These images were taken during the Occupy Wall Street Protests of 2011-2012. I think they represent an important moment in history because they illustrate the power we hold as people to assemble for a cause that we believe should be heard.


Michael D’Antuono Beacon, New York www.ArtandResponse.com

Blood Money Oil on canvas 48 x 24 inches 2013 In the wake of Newtown and in order to ensure campaign contributions from the NRA, 44 senators put innocent lives at risk and disregarded the will of 90% of Americans by blocking a bill expanding background checks for gun sales. This remains the most blatant and egregious example of special interests subverting democracy with great sums of money. The blood of thousands of gun violence victims stain the hands of the NRA, gun and ammo manufacturers and the politicians who take their money.


Cat Del Buono Brooklyn, New York www.catdelbuono.com

Ms. Conception Video, edition 1/10 5:54 minutes 2013 Ms. Conception comments on the disregard for women’s reproductive rights and how the subject of rape needs to be taken more seriously. Using the internet to find actual clips of politicians speaking as well as rape scenes from movies, I created this piece to remind viewers of a scary reality: These men—some of whom are running for president—are in positions of power and are turning back the clock on women’s progress and equality.


Justyne Fischer Washington, DC www.justynefischer.com

Loosie Law Woodcut on Voile 50 x 34 inches 2015 Fischer’s recent explorations feature ‘Social Memorials’ of unjust events involving unarmed black men and boys. Each piece is meant to highlight the absurdity of each event while memorializing the human being beyond a one day headline. Loosie Law represents a wild west, mentality where severe and irreversible punishment does not match the petty crime. Selling loose cigarettes illegally should not result in Death.


Lindsay Garcia Richmond, Virginia www.lindsaygarcia.com

Spiraling Representation No. 2 Single-channel video, edition of 3 5:41 minutes 2015 Anthropogenic climate change comes as the result of poor political choices that undoubtedly are made by those in power on both sides of the globalized/American/androcentric/patriarchal political arena. In some areas of the country, floods persist. In others, drought creates challenging conditions for many. This video addresses an apocalyptic American ‘manifest destiny’ which visualizes climate change in the face of the changing landscape by juxtaposing Hudson River School paintings of the West with Spiral Jetty (1974).


Shawna Gibbs Claremont, New Hampshire www.shawnagibbs.com

Jackie and Shar, San Francisco Engineer Print., printed in halftone black and white ink on 20lb bond paper 30 x 24 inches 2003-2015 Promotional poster from a series of photographs made during the 33rd Annual Pride Parade in San Francisco on June 28, 2003. The parade theme was ‘You’ve Gotta Give Them Hope!’ Twelve years later on June 26, 2015 the United States Supreme Court ruled same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states. The decision was 5-4. Using relevant postage stamps, this poster will be folded and mailed to the gallery without an envelope via the United States Postal Service to give the piece a symbolic stamp of approval by the US government.


Ruthann Godollei St. Paul, Minnesota www.macalester.edu/art/facultystaff/ruthanngodollei/ra.html

See No Evil Ink on paper 22 x 28 inches 2014 My prints pursue the vein of social commentary. Words and images float in the darkness of the imagination, questioning the current state of democracy. The mono-print See No Evil depicts a drone in flight. Americans permit the use of remote controlled machines for gathering information and proxy soldiering. What happens to the massive information collected and who is responsible for life and death decisions made at a cool remove? To drone operators, police and surveillance personnel, perhaps everyone looks like the enemy.


Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch Needham, Massachusetts www.IGBStudio.com

Stop The Flow Of Violence. Period. Photograph of tampon sculpture printed on plastic 4 x 8 feet 2015

Creating an AK-47 from tampon applicators began as a study using unexpected materials in new and surprising ways. Stop The Flow Of Violence. PERIOD. Speaks for itself. Through a play on words and the use of a gun made out of surprisingly unconventional materials, I hope to draw viewers into conversations around the politics of gun control/violence and the social taboos surrounding menstruation. My goal is to have this image be the face of an anti-gun/anti-violence campaign. I hope this banner can be displayed publically in cities throughout the US. My intent is this image will inspire the public to engage in conversations surrounding violence in America Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch draws upon the traditions of fiber arts and assemblage when creating her mixed media sculptures. Hardware store finds, street debris, and stumbled upon items are the inspiration for many of the mixed-media sculptures she creates.


Emily Greenberg Brooklyn, New York www.emilygreenberg.net

Metadata Hotline Telephone, speakers, micro-controller, LED, sound Collaboration with Andrew Kagen (voice actor) and Sam Bobra (programmer) 7 x 5 x 9 inches, 12 sound clips variable 2013-2015 Metadata Hotline informs listeners about government surveillance, reclaiming the telephone as a site of communication. By using a vintage land line phone, this interactive work references a time before cell phones and GPS tracking, when the metadata from a phone call might reveal only where you live but nothing more. Photo by Andy Johnson


Emily Greenberg Brooklyn, New York www.emilygreenberg.net

The Trial (Benghazi) Video 4: 04 minutes 2013 Appropriating found footage from both legal dramas and Hillary Clinton’s Senate testimony on Benghazi, The Trial challenges notions of a singular, stable Benghazi narrative. Video still from The Trial (Benghazi) with original footage from “Hearing on Benghazi: The Attacks and Lessons Learned,” United States Senate Committee Channel. January 23, 2013.


Gracie Guerrero-Bustini Grandvaux, Switzerland www.portedazur.com

To the 19 Democrats Hard ground etching with aquatint and roulette printed on cotton paper 16 x 16 inches 2015 I was inspired by a photo, taken by Anne Paq, of a young Palestinian boy being forcefully held by an Israeli soldier. This photo accompanied a news article about a letter co-signed by 19 Democrat Congressmen and addressed to Secretary of State John Kerry urging an end to Israel’s abuses of Palestinian children. The borders surrounding the Congress seal in my engraving come from design elements taken from the kuffiyeh which is a scarf worn by Palestinians and international supporters for Palestinian freedom and dignity.


Shreepad Joglekar Manhattan, Kansas www.aabhaa.com

Seven Steps (Saptapadi) Single channel video 5:07 minutes 2014 The American immigration system till 2015 did not allow the spouses of H1-B (work visa) holders to work. Forcing them to be finically dependent on the primary visa holder. America boasts personal independence, gender equality, on the world stage, while at home hypocrisy runs amok. The selected work explores and performs the effects of institutionalized disparities in the immigration process that make even the idea of democracy and equality irrelevant to legal immigrants, until they are allowed to become citizens.


Sinan Revell Pacific Palisades, California www.sinanrevell.com

DoppelgANGER Archival inkjet print 16 x 20 inches 2005 The DoppelgANGER series are self-portraits which show how we are all connected and have the potential to be either victim or aggressor. These are staged dioramas, some drawn from famous media images, others commenting on our anaesthetized responses to police brutality, mass shootings or other scenes which we witness all too often—such as ‘Homeless and Hungry.’


Monika Malewska Huntingdon, Pennsylvania www.monikamalewska.com

Stress Positions Paints on paper 22 x 18 inches 2010-2015 Unlike the traditional paint-by numbers subject matter—typically picturesque, my images portray unflattering glimpses of reality that bring to question what does democracy mean in the United States? My paint-by-numbers images call attention to the process of their construction, but in doing so they also engender a deconstruction of the image—one that ultimately illustrates the ways in which shocking and disturbing imagery can be made to seem normal or banal.


Victoria Helena Mihatovic Santa Rosa, California www.victoriahelena.com

This Is What Democracy Looks Like Found object, trophy case 6.5 x 6.5 x 6.5 inches 2015 This sculptural piece consists of a discharged CS Grenade (Tear Gas), that the artist acquired while participating in a nonviolent demonstration during the Occupy Movement. The slogan that is etched on both sides of the trophy case, This Is What Democracy Looks Like, is a widely used call to action as citizens attempt to voice their grievances to their government in the form of protest. The slogan and discharged grenade are visible in a case usually reserved for a baseball, symbolic of America’s favorite pastime.


Kate Negri Portsmouth, Virginia www.katesfiberart.com

United We Stand Wool 6 x 5 x 18 inches 2015 This depiction of two men kissing not only represents the need for our country to come together on such issues as gay rights, but also expresses the artist’s desire for politicians to ‘kiss and make up’. While the pedestal they stand upon represents the lofty separation of politicians from the average American, the loosely held scroll, marked as a ‘Congressional Bill’, represents our country’s inability to pass laws due to partisan politics.


Gina Randazzo Hastings-on-Hudson, New York www.ginarandazzo.com

Fine Print Series I, Thirty-six Women Have Served As U.S. State Governors Archival inkjet print 11 x 8.5 inches 2015 In Fine Print Series I portrait photography is utilized to introduce a character and the passage of time suggests expectation regarding her future. Fine print text underlines the contract that young girls and women live with in American society— they are told that they may choose any career or path, yet they see discrimination and bias that prevents equal opportunities.


Gina Randazzo Hastings-on-Hudson, New York www.ginarandazzo.com

Fine Print Series I, In The 114th Congress Women Hold 19.4% Of The Seats Archival inkjet print 8.5 x 11 inches 2015 In Fine Print Series I portrait photography is utilized to introduce a character and the passage of time suggests expectation regarding her future. Fine print text underlines the contract that young girls and women live with in American society— they are told that they may choose any career or path, yet they see discrimination and bias that prevents equal opportunities.


Nick Hugh Schmidt Brooklyn, New York www.nickhughschmidt.com

Unlocked Boundaries iPhone 6s, 64GB, - Gold, Lighting to USB Cable, beanbag chair 3 x 3 feet 2013-2015 With out question, one of the greatest fears we face today is an invasion of our privacy, which is why, we guard our cell phones so closely. Our public and personal lives could be destroyed if it fell into the wrong hands. To be true to himself and observers, Nick Hugh Schmidt's response is to relinquish his phone for anyone to look through. Pointing out that Reality TV shows are actually scripted, and so too our lives on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, Schmidt can only maintain the actual by offering up-to-the-moment access to his phone without altering, censoring or editing his device.


Laura Sussman-Randall Mint Hill, North Carolina www.laurasussmanrandall.com

Torn VI Charcoal, pastel, and carbon 48 x 60 inches 2015 In 2011 I returned to the practice of drawing. Working in charcoal on a large scale reintroduced an immediacy to my work which quickly lent itself to expressing my increasing anger about the effects of greed, obstructionism and prejudice on our country. The Torn Flag drawings are part of a larger body of work titled American Dream which began during this period. The flags represent the battered state of our American Dream as well as our state of being torn apart from one another by the current political climate.


Dan Tague New Orleans, Louisiana dtague@gmail.com

Not For Bribing Politicians Archival inkjet print 40 x 40 inches 2015 What’s Right, What’s Left? the fact of the matter is that all politicians can be bought, so democracy seems a bit unrealistic for those with out a lot of money.


Eike Waltz Aptos, California www.f-artstatements.com

Political Pleasure Bronze 7 x 5 x 4inch (2 pieces) 2006

Two US political parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party dominate American politics since the American Civil War they make sure that it stays this way. The result is a political love-hate incestuous relationship. Who enjoys more of the pleasure, the viewer may decide.


Artists Exhibited in the Slideshow at the Phoenix Gallery

Gary Aagaard, Linda Andrei, Jay Burton, Jane Caminos, Michael Carlebach, Michael D'Antuono, Sarah Dillon, Sally Edelstein, Johnny Everyman, Michael Fischerkeller, Colleen Sweeney Gahrmann, Christine Giancola, Ruthann Godollei, Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch, Maeve Grogan, Gracie Guerrero-Bustini, Sheila Halligan-Waltz, Lidia Hasenauer, Chris Hopkins, Shreepad Joglekar, Debbie Johnston, Debbie Johnston, Marky Kauffmann, Yuri Kadamov, Glenn Lieberman, Billi London-Gray, Monika Malewska, Penny Mateer, Carol-Anne McFarlane, Dawn Nakashima, John Nieman, Maxine Olson, Kate Patsch, Sinan Revell, Bridget Rountree, Amy Siqveland, E. F. Stilwell Brechtel, Nette Thomas, Prince Varughese Thomas, Robert Thurlow, Margi Weir, Zachary Williams, and Youxin Yang


Gary Aagaard Tucson, Arizona www.garyaagaard.com

March of the Lunartic. Oil on canvas. 24 x 18 inches. 2012 March of the Lunartic explores Newt Gingrich's obsession with Moon colonization including making it the 51st state. He also suggested placing huge mirrors on its surface to capture the Sun's light & reflect it onto the dark side of the Earth thus making crime fighting easier. As a result, Newt's lunar longings and other controversial statements had fellow Republicans fleeing en masse.


Gary Aagaard Tucson, Arizona www.garyaagaard.com

The Real Thugs. Oil on canvas. 24 x 18 inches. 2015 The Real Thugs addresses the media & politician's tendency to call young minorities who commit minor offenses “thugs� while celebrating the so-called heroes of capitalism. Featured are 4 of the key architects of the 2008 financial meltdown who were never prosecuted for their massive (and thuggish) misdeeds. From left to right.... Joe Cassano (AIG), Lloyd Blankfein (Goldman Sachs), Sandy Weill (Citibank) and Stanley O'Neil (Merrill Lynch).


Linda Andrei Ithaca, New York lindaandrei@twcny.rr.com

From There to Here. Oil on linen. 48 x 38 inches. 2014 We all see the world through the prism of our unique experiences. This variety and diversity of perception leads to the rich messiness of democracy.


Linda Andrei Ithaca, New York lindaandrei@twcny.rr.com

See Hear. Oil on linen. 28 x 36 inches. 2014 We all see the world through the prism of our unique experiences. This variety and diversity of perception leads to the rich messiness of democracy.


Jay Burton Alvin, Texas www.jayburtonphotography.com

Red State Woman 3. Wood-framed photographic paper. 17.5 x 31 inches. 2015 The recent past has been terrible for women living in the “red� states, where legislatures are controlled by right-wing misogynistic ideologues. There has been severe curtailment of reproductive rights, systematic voter suppression targeting women and minorities, refutation of equal pay for women, and virtual institutionalization of a rape culture. This series illustrates expectations of the red state woman, every aspect of whose life is controlled by a man and whose proper role is one of subservience.


Jay Burton Alvin, Texas www.jayburtonphotography.com

Red State Woman 4. Wood-framed photographic paper. 17.5 x 31 inches. 2015 The recent past has been terrible for women living in the “red� states, where legislatures are controlled by right-wing misogynistic ideologues. There has been severe curtailment of reproductive rights, systematic voter suppression targeting women and minorities, refutation of equal pay for women, and virtual institutionalization of a rape culture. This series illustrates expectations of the red state woman, every aspect of whose life is controlled by a man and whose proper role is one of subservience.


Jane Caminos Watchung, New Jersey www.janecaminos.com

Grenade. Oil on linen. 24 x 30 inches. 2015 Grenade: the newest of my series, On Women Bound which exposes violence against women and girls across all cultures. ‘Grenade’ explores the reality of rape toward women members of our armed forces. Despite ‘sensitivity training’ offered to men in service, women who have been victimized remain afraid to report these crimes to superior officers (primarily men); they’re advised ‘not to make trouble’. By doing so, they risk additional violence from fellow soldiers. We are a democracy of rape with voiceless victims.


Michael Carlebach Asheville, North Carolina www.michaelcarlebach.com

Asheville, North Carolina. Exhibition fiber paper. 17 x23 inches. 2015 Living in the South it is practically impossible to ignore the partisan divide.


Michael D’Antuono Beacon, New York www.ArtandResponse.com

The Truth. Acrylic on canvas. 54 x 30 inches. 2009 This painting questions the objectivity of truth and how it is distorted by our political prejudices.


Sarah Dillon Renton, Washington www.sarahdillonstudio.com

More Courage.... Graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, ink, gesso, acrylic medium, china marker, collage, power sanding. 26 x 26 inches. 2015 This series of work can be aggressive and all at once graceful. The art making process itself feeds into the concept of this work: being in the moment; aggressive scourging and reinvention. This work was made out of frustration about partisan politics, and a hope at some point the proud will fall and the real work can begin.


Sally Edelstein South Huntington, New York www.sallyedelsteincollage.com/

American Diversity: Whitewash. Vintage ad, paint chips. 16 x 18 inches. 2015 We are an America whose identity has been forged by myths that no longer hold true. Calcified remains of Post war myths of American exceptionalism linger still. Racism and denial run deep in our culture a fact we can’t seem to whitewash away. We have long prided ourselves on democracy and diversity that is as long as you were white, Protestant and middle class Carrying the mantle as peacekeeper of the world, we would spread democracy and the American Way all over the world certain we would be welcomed wherever we went.


Johnny Everyman Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania www.johnnyeveryman.com

Obama Wants You #2. Oil on canvas. 36 x 48 inches. 2012 Obama Wants You mimics the legendary Uncle Sam recruiting poster, with text referring to the hypocrisy of advocating action to stall climate change, yet still authorizing oil drilling in the Arctic and ignoring the Keystone XL Pipeline.


Michael Fischerkeller Upper Marlboro, Maryland www.michaelfischerkeller.com

Best Laid Plans Leave Us Naught but Grief and Pain. Acrylic spray paint on archival paper and canvas. 36 x 48 inches. 2014 In the last several years the U.S. government has been an exemplar of a dysfunctional organization. One wonders how deep would be the disappointment of the Founding Fathers were they to witness how far from their idyllic plans for governance Washington has strayed. This thought is captured in a composition that appropriates figures from Evelyn Pickering De Morgan’s 1910 painting entitled “The Kingdom of Heaven Suffereth Violence and the Violent Take it by Force”. The poses and expressions of these figures in De Morgan’s painting struck me as representative of grief and pain.


Colleen Sweeney Gahrmann Spotswood, New Jersey cgahrmann2000@yahoo.com

One % Tax Man 2. Digital photography. 16 x 20 inches. 2013 Sarcasm and humor are evident in One % Tax Man. I took this photograph in a traditional working class neighborhood. It captures the humor of the moment as well as the dignity and pride of this man. It was a quick exposure I motioned to him could I take his photo, a thumbs up and he was gone. It is ironic that he works a low paying temporary job during the tax preparation season to make ends meet while the top 1% frequent tax exempt investments.


Christine Giancola Florissant, Missouri www.christinegiancolaphotography.com

All Men Are Created Equal. Digital print. 16 x 20 inches. 2014 All men are created equal. During the summer of 2014 in Ferguson Missouri, an unarmed black teen was shot and killed by a white policeman. This image was taken during a protest on the streets of Ferguson Missouri.


Christine Giancola Florissant, Missouri www.christinegiancolaphotography.com

Your Privacy Has Been Deleted. Digital print. 16 x 20 inches. 2015 Your Privacy has been Deleted was a banner hung in the subway in New York City during the summer of 2015.


Christine Giancola Florissant, Missouri www.christinegiancolaphotography.com

Banks Own Your Money. Digital print. 16 x 20 inches. 2015 Banks own your Money was a banner hung next to the revolving exit doors of the subway in New York City during the summer of 2015.


Ruthann Godollei St. Paul, Minnesota www.macalester.edu/art/facultystaff/ruthanngodollei/ra.html

Reasonable Doubt. Ink on paper. 8.25 x 12.5 inches. 2015 My prints pursue the tradition of social commentary. Words and images float in the darkness of the imagination, questioning the current state of democracy and considering the consequences of callously ignoring pressing concerns. Austerity measures disproportionally affect poorer populations. To drone operators and government surveillance personnel, perhaps everyone looks like the enemy. Whose behavior is suspect once police lines are drawn in particular communities and not others?


Ruthann Godollei St. Paul, Minnesota www.macalester.edu/art/facultystaff/ruthanngodollei/ra.html

Austerity. Ink on paper. 30 x 36 inches. 2013 My prints pursue the tradition of social commentary. Words and images float in the darkness of the imagination, questioning the current state of democracy and considering the consequences of callously ignoring pressing concerns. Austerity measures disproportionally affect poorer populations. To drone operators and government surveillance personnel, perhaps everyone looks like the enemy. Whose behavior is suspect once police lines are drawn in particular communities and not others?


Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch Needham, Massachusetts www.IGBStudio.com

Gun Ad? Tampon Ad? Print. 18 x 24 inches. 2015 Gun Ad? Tampon Ad? Is an image that lends itself to multiple interpretations. Why is it that tampon applicators and menstrual blood are considered offensive, where as images of guns and violence are acceptable? Our cultural norms surrounding “bloodshed” are highly distorted. Gun Ad? Tampon Ad? is a projective test (like the Rorschach inkblot test) that allows the viewer to examine their own views & comfort level of menstruation, power, protection, violence and guns. Ingrid Goldbloom Bloch draws upon the traditions of fiber arts and assemblage when creating her mixed media sculptures. Hardware store finds, street debris, and stumbled upon items are the inspiration for many of the mixed-media sculptures she creates. The AK-47 made out of tampon applicators in her “Ad Campaign” began as a study of materials and quickly became a focal point for additional art pieces.


Maeve Grogan Bend, Oregon www.maevegrogan.com

Fair Play 2. Acrylic paint on vintage magazine pages. 14 x 11 inches. 2015 The democratic process is an evolutionary process. What was considered obscene fifty years ago, has been challenged by the democratic process and now, new challenges to fair play, equality, are in the crosshairs this election. These pieces are not about sexualizing anyone, they are about engaging the freedom that keeps moving us forward toward equality for all.


Maeve Grogan Bend, Oregon www.maevegrogan.com

Fair Play 1. Acrylic paint on vintage magazine pages. 11 x 14 inches. 2015 Democracy is an evolving experience. I re-image old, popular, magazine images in an attempt to explore how our collective ideas around what is fair, and, what is not, evolves over time. An ever changing portrayal of equality is what I hope to tease out of these works.


Gracie Guerrero-Bustini Grandvaux, Switzerland www.portedazur.com

Liberty and Justice for All. Acrylic plate with dry point printed on cotton paper. 17.25 x 15 inches. 2015 I came up with this print when I was working on my other engraving which also uses the kuffiyeh as a design element. The kuffiyeh is a scarf worn in Palestine to symbolize the struggle for freedom against Israeli occupation but is also worn by international supporters for Palestinian freedom and dignity. I took the design elements of the kuffiyeh and placed them to mimic the American flag. Since our flag represents liberty and justice for all, I thought this should also be true for all people even Palestinians.


Sheila Halligan-Waltz Aptos, California www.f-artstatements.com

Legitimate Rape. Oil on canvas. 60 x 72 inches. 2015 During 2012 Senator Akin’s comments (Legitimate Rape) had a far-reaching political impact, changing the focus of political campaigns across the country to the War on Women. Additional controversies arose around similar remarks made by various Republican politicians such as Rape is something that God intended. Separation of Church and State, the foundation of any Democracy went on shaky grounds.


Lidia Hasenauer Scotts Valley, California www.LidiaStudio.com

Is Peace Black and White? Digital print on maple. 20 x 16 inches. 2015 Step Right Up! You are viewing the digital posters from a series called Circus Real Surreal! The performers today are Peace—the high dive act, Justice—the sharp shooter, and Panacea - who offers you her elixir of health. The posters feature a figurative narrative illustration. Below is advertising copy for the act. All of the acts at Circus Real Surreal affect democracy today. Democracy in America! It is indeed, the show of shows!


Lidia Hasenauer Scotts Valley, California www.LidiaStudio.com

Panacea. Digital print on maple. 20 x 16 inches. 2015 Step Right Up! You are viewing the digital posters from a series called Circus Real Surreal! The performers today are Peace—the high dive act, Justice—the sharp shooter, and Panacea - who offers you her elixir of health. The posters feature a figurative narrative illustration. Below is advertising copy for the act. All of the acts at Circus Real Surreal affect democracy today. Democracy in America! It is indeed, the show of shows!


Chris Hopkins Los Angeles, California www.ChrisHopkinsStudio.com

Corporate Logo Prototype B. Resin, fabric and wood. 17 x 20 x 4 inches. 1996 Although I made this piece almost 20 years ago, I feel it is quite relevant today as we face the possibility of a selfproclaimed billionaire running against a self-proclaimed democratic-socialist in the upcoming presidential election. Has the general public had enough of 35 years of the ‘Reagan Revolution’ and is ready for a ‘Bernie Revolution?’ This piece is about the paradox of how people tend to resent and disdain while simultaneously admiring and envying the rich and powerful. The text is meant as a double-entendre.


Shreepad Joglekar Manhattan, Kansas www.aabhaa.com

Routine With H-4 Wife. Pigmented print. 20 x 25 inches. 2014 The American immigration system till 2015 did not allow the spouses of H1-B (work visa) holders to work. Forcing them to be finically dependent on the primary visa holder. America boasts personal independence, gender equality, on the world stage, while at home hypocrisy runs amok. The selected work explores and performs the effects of institutionalized disparities in the immigration process that make even the idea of democracy and equality irrelevant to legal immigrants, until they are allowed to become citizens.


Debbie Johnston Centereach, New York elfsong@optonline.net

The Other One Percent. Photography. 10.5 x 13 inches. 2015


Debbie Johnston Centereach, New York elfsong@optonline.net

Rebel Yell. Photography. 10 x 11.5 inches. 2015


Yuri Kadamov Los Angeles, California www.yurikadamov.com

God Particle. Graphite and colored pencils on Stonehenge 100% cotton paper and mixed media. 30 x 22 inches. 2012 I am a Lithuanian citizen on U.S. death row. My perspective of democracy is influenced by the U.S. and the European Union. Democracy means every citizen has a right to live, and one result of this fundamental right should be the abolition of the death penalty in the U.S. Recent polls show a significant number of U.S. citizens agree with this humane stance. This artwork is from a God Particle series in my ‘Art Against Death’ project.


Marky Kauffmann Shirley, Massachusetts www.markykauffmannphotography.com

Million Dollar Pay Day. Digital archival pigment print. 23.5 x 17 inches. 2015 As the rich get richer, I ask, why don’t we revolt? Author Chris Hedges believes it’s time. He says, “A tiny global oligarchy has amassed obscene wealth, while the engine of unfettered capitalism plunders resources; exploits cheap labor; and creates pliable, corrupt governments that abandon the common good to serve corporate profit.” And he extols us to revolt. Yet we do not. This work is about a silent opiate. Not a drug, but the one strewn on our city streets. The one that gives us false hope, that keeps us sedated—lottery tickets.


Glenn Lieberman New York, New York liebermang@aol.com

DC. Cotton rag paper . 17.25 x 11.5 inches. 2013 The first amendment of the Constitution of the United States maintains, in part, that the congress shall make no law curtailing the right of the people to peaceably assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Protest is comprised of a series of photographs taken at different times in different places, documenting American citizens engaged in their first amendment right of free speech so that they may help form a more perfect union.


Glenn Lieberman New York, New York liebermang@aol.com

NYC (1). Cotton rag paper. 17.25 x 11.5 inches. 2011 The first amendment of the Constitution of the United States maintains, in part, that the congress shall make no law curtailing the right of the people to peaceably assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Protest is comprised of a series of photographs taken at different times in different places, documenting American citizens engaged in their first amendment right of free speech so that they may help form a more perfect union.


Glenn Lieberman New York, New York liebermang@aol.com

NYC (2). Cotton rag paper . 17.25 x 11.5 inches. 2014 The first amendment of the Constitution of the United States maintains, in part, that the congress shall make no law curtailing the right of the people to peaceably assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Protest is comprised of a series of photographs taken at different times in different places, documenting American citizens engaged in their first amendment right of free speech so that they may help form a more perfect union.


Billi London-Gray Dallas, Texas www.billilondongray.com

Preserve, Protect and Defend. Archival pigment print on aluminum (from digital scan of coin painted and elongated by the artist). 12 x 12 inches. 2013 Introduced in 1909 as a commemorative coin for Lincoln’s centennial, the Lincoln cent stuck around because of its popularity. Now people throw pennies away, and Lincoln has become a vampire slayer and visual punchline. These elongated pennies embody my questions about larger societal shifts. What moves a culture to devalue its symbols? Do pop culture transformations of once-sacrosanct national icons belie our disregard for democracy’s ideals or a free irreverence that we should celebrate as a result of such ideals?


Monika Malewska Huntingdon, Pennsylvania www.monikamalewska.com

Caskets. Paints on paper. 22 x 18 inches. 2010-2015 Unlike the traditional paint-by numbers subject matter--typically picturesque, my images portray unflattering glimpses of reality that bring to question what does democracy mean in the United States? My paint-by-numbers images call attention to the process of their construction, but in doing so they also engender a deconstruction of the image—one that ultimately illustrates the ways in which shocking and disturbing imagery can be made to seem normal or banal.


Penny Mateer Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania www.pennymateer.com

(For God’s Sake) We Got To Get More Power To The People #12 Protest Series. Commercial and vintage fabric. 76 x 76 inches. 2014 “Cut this jive an’ see who’s got the power to kill the most. When they run out of power, the world’s gonna be a ghost. They know we’re not satisfied, so we begin to holler. They give us a promise an’ throw in a few more dollars” The lyrics written by the Chi-Lites in their tune For God’s Sake We Got to Give More Power to the People challenged affluence and privilege by echoing the refrain to “give” more power to the people. Forty-seven years later time to “get” more power to the people.


Carol-Anne McFarlane Lauderhill, Florida www.cmcfarlaneart.com

Target #15. Digital print on paper. 51 x 36 inches. 2015 “Nice nipples.� This comment was made towards me after I exited my car, less than 15 feet from my studio. In the blink of an eye, as unprepared as one can imagine, it happened. Although this is not the first time, I have experienced street harassment, solely based on my gender; it is another reminder of why I make my work. I strive to create a space for dialogue. I use aspects from these experiences in my work.


Dawn Nakashima Berkeley, California www.nakfinearts.com

Fifty Fifty. Mixed Media. 48 x 58 inches. 2009 This piece is called Fifty Fifty. It is a piece that consists of fifty small paintings that combine to create one larger one. It was created in fifty days in 2009. “50/50” means that there are equal chances of something happening—as in a flip of a coin. It also can represent opposites or opposing views. Viewing a glass half empty or a glass half full is the classic example of whether a person is an optimist or a pessimist—the same occurrence viewed differently. Two words were chosen daily to represent a current event.


John Nieman Dobbs Ferry, New York www.johnnieman.com

Whoppers and White Lies. Watercolor on paper. 27 x 18 inches. 2006 I have created very many pieces that feature everyday objects, along with a list. Whoppers was a natural. White lies just makes it more relatable to every one of us who stretches the truth.


John Nieman Dobbs Ferry, New York www.johnnieman.com

Conspiracy Theories. Watercolor on paper. 24 x 36 inches. 2010 It was my dear daughter’s idea. We are a political family and tend to get in a ton of arguments about the crazy theories that tend to dominate the news. The puppet image seemed irresistible, especially since the strings are pulled by more than one person.


John Nieman Dobbs Ferry, New York www.johnnieman.com

Wanted Gloria. Paper. 24 x 30 inches. 2015 I admire people who have courage and vision. Gloria Steinem is such a person. I remember hearing a lecture from her in my 20’s, and thinking it would make the world a better place—not just for women, but for men—anyone of any age who does like the straightjacket of a stereotype.


John Nieman Dobbs Ferry, New York www.johnnieman.com

Missing Innocence. Cardboard. 6 x 6 x 11 inches. 2014 This is one example of the milk carton exhibit I have completed. I wish kids still had the chance to be goofy, laugh at nonsense, play ball in the back yard (or god forbid, down the street). Instead, modern society seems to put pre-school age kids in front of a live stream of a TV or computer downloads. Too soon. Too much. Too early.


John Nieman Dobbs Ferry, New York www.johnnieman.com

What is Missing? Wood, metal, individually produced original milk cartons (approximately 50), milk crates. 10 x 10 feet variable. 2014 I remember those missing milk cartons when I was a kid. I have artistically interpreted it as missing American values. The idea? What do we value that we no longer have (or is at least on the endangered list). Caveat: I have always loved living in the USA. No place on earth is as flexible, as diverse, as young-thinking, as entertaining, as entrepreneurial, as mobile, or as absolutely surprising every day when the sun comes up. However, that does not make me a moonie. I realize that we live in the most malleable country on this planet. America is the opposite of a static nation. Everything changes, sometimes at warp speed. That’s part of our uniqueness and exceptionalism, but also part of our challenges for the days ahead.


Maxine Olson Kingsburg, California www.maxineolson.com

One Way. Oil on canvas. 42 x 42 inches. 2010


Maxine Olson Kingsburg, California www.maxineolson.com

The Carpenter. Digital print on canvas. 49 x 29 inches. 2012 The man in the print did some work on my house. When I walked out to his pickup, I was quite surprised by his license plate: ‘My Boss is a Jewish Carpenter.’ Kingsburg is mainly Protestant; often bigoted, and biased against various religions, including Catholics, Muslims, and Jews, and cultures as well. The main reason for capturing that moment was that he is a very descent man; excellent carpenter, and he looks like the images of ‘Jesus’ that have been portrayed in books and movies.


Kate Patsch Alexandria, Virginia katepatsch@gmail.com

Procession. Aluminum metal print. 12 x 18 inches. 2014 Heads Up, Eyes Front, Weapons Holstered, You do it for your brother All around is the failed architecture of a City in Decay The only Force protecting you is an arm’s reach away When we walk through the Looking Glass to find our strength We reinforce our belief that we slow the atrophy, With our Heads Up, With all eyes to the Front, With our Weapon holstered, We are the City Our unflinching belief in our power to cause change, is so very necessary His Head Up, Eyes to the Front, His Service Weapon... Retired Written by my father, Thomas Patsch


Sinan Revell Pacific Palisades, California www.sinanrevell.com

Homeland Security Blanket/ Los Desparecedos. 100% cotton woven throw. 54 x 72 inches. 2007 The function of blankets is to provide warmth and protection. These Homeland Security Blankets are designed to bring discomfort, to prevent us from falling into a smug, somnambulistic state. They remind us that smallpox-carrying blankets were given to the Native Americans and contributed to their genocide. We cannot wrap ourselves in the luxury of political subterfuge. We need to look at the ugly truths behind such political actions as illegal wars, racial profiling, police brutality. These “Blankets� record the things we wish to ignore or deny happened.


Bridget Rountree San Diego, California www.bridgetrountree.com

A Dream of Something Better. Found images, paper, glue. 15 x 17 inches. 2014 Juxtaposing social and political historical imagery to question perceived value and generate discussions of content within a visual language. By challenging dualistic representations of the savior and saved, winner and looser, victim and rescuer, the artist queries the ideas and philosophies that lead to hierarchical structures of thought. Simultaneity of perspectives can occur by reading one image through the other. Portraits are dissociated from their original context, questioning the system in which they function.


Amy Siqveland Minneapolis, Minnesota www.amysiqveland.com

No Funding. Photography, black frame. 10 x 15 inches. 2014 A closed auto plant reflects the loss of the middle class and secure jobs; the vandalized school classroom shows what happens when city bankruptcy stops education funding; the shot of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran demonstrates our complicated history, regional policies and relationship. With such limited room, I think this quote by R. Steves precisely echoes my current view: “Holding our country to a high standard and searching for ways to better live up to its lofty ideals is not ‘America-bashing.’ It’s good citizenship.”


Amy Siqveland Minneapolis, Minnesota www.amysiqveland.com

Closed Auto Plant -- Loss of American Jobs. Photography, black frame. 10 x 15 inches. 2014 A closed auto plant reflects the loss of the middle class and secure jobs; the vandalized school classroom shows what happens when city bankruptcy stops education funding; the shot of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran demonstrates our complicated history, regional policies and relationship. With such limited room, I think this quote by R. Steves precisely echoes my current view: “Holding our country to a high standard and searching for ways to better live up to its lofty ideals is not ‘America-bashing.’ It’s good citizenship.”


Amy Siqveland Minneapolis, Minnesota www.amysiqveland.com

Complicated Relations with Iran. Photography, black frame. 10 x 15 inches. 2015 A closed auto plant reflects the loss of the middle class and secure jobs; the vandalized school classroom shows what happens when city bankruptcy stops education funding; the shot of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran demonstrates our complicated history, regional policies and relationship. With such limited room, I think this quote by R. Steves precisely echoes my current view: “Holding our country to a high standard and searching for ways to better live up to its lofty ideals is not ‘America-bashing.’ It’s good citizenship.”


E. F. Stilwell Brechtel Hot Springs , South Dakota argylesd@gmail.com

Hole Power=Whole Power. Acid free paper, acrylic paint, permanent marker, household spray paint. 10 x 8 inches. 2015 This piece addresses a myriad of social, economic and political observations. It is meant to arouse questions especially regarding those seeking unhealthy unethical control of people particularly through body and gender shaming, bodyfunction shaming, autonomy shaming and of utmost importance arouse questions concerning the brain changing power of persuasion via all human holes. It clearly is meant to demand attention, and once gotten, to encourage enlightenment concerning these issues’ complexities and apparent hypocrisies. This piece is reminiscent of my previous protest art in media, technique and purpose.


Nette Thomas Maplewood, New Jersey www.nettefornethomas.com

FREE TO CHOOSE MY PERSONAL RIGHT (chained to a bed of roses is still chained) . Valentine box, acetate. 12 x 12 inches. 2012 FREE TO CHOOSE MY PERSONAL RIGHT (chained to a bed of roses is still chained) relates to a woman's right to prioritize her life’s commitments. The dictations of the status quo may be subliminally sugar coated to compel acceptance. However, if a woman’s priorities are not of her own volition, she has not been accorded the freedom to choose her “personal right”.


Prince Varughese Thomas Houston, Texas www.princevthomas.com

Letter from Congress. Giclee Print on Metalic Warm Paper Face mounted to Plexi. 35 x 55 inches. 2014 Letter from Congress is a reproduction of a letter that I acquired from the United States Congress Library addressed to the President of CNN. In the initial stages of the First Gulf War, CNN’s reporters were the only eyes and ears on the ground and the world was a captive audience to the first “live” televised war. Later representatives from the U.S. Congress would accuse Reporter Peter Arnett and CNN of, in essence, unpatriotic journalism during their coverage of the war.


Robert Thurlow Dracut, Massachusetts robphotos@yahoo.com

Eternal Democracy. Digital photograph. 16 x 20 inches. 2015 These images are from a series of artworks that question the relationship of democratic equality to racial, ethnic and economic minorities in the time of a new presidential election. The series makes use of the design language of the political or propaganda poster to draw attention to issues of inequality and the powerlessness that accompanies under representation. Issues of social, cultural and legal power are explored as they relate to humanitarian rights.


Margi Weir Detroit, Michigan www.margiweir.weebly.com

Homeland. Vinyl on wall. 33 x 28 inches. 2009 Through decorative patterning, the work of art draws the viewer into a slowly unfurling image that invites a discussion about ecology and/or sociopolitical realities of the contemporary world around us. Meaning is implied by the juxtaposition of images not stated in narrative fashion. Conclusions are left to the viewer in the hope that a continued questioning will be inspired by the work of art.


Margi Weir Detroit, Michigan www.margiweir.weebly.com

Homeland 2. Vinyl on wall. 45 x 28 inches. 2012-2015 Through decorative patterning, the work of art draws the viewer into a slowly unfurling image that invites a discussion about ecology and/or sociopolitical realities of the contemporary world around us. Meaning is implied by the juxtaposition of images not stated in narrative fashion. Conclusions are left to the viewer in the hope that a continued questioning will be inspired by the work of art.


Zachary Williams Chicago, Illinois www.zacharyjwilliams.com

Crazy for God. Oil on canvas. 64 x 80 inches. 2012 Crazy for God is my reflection on the religious and economic motivations underlying aggressive American nationalism, verging on jingoism. With a limited palette, I embellish the figure with symbolic elements to show a perverse extremism that hides behind the flag, directly addressing a manufactured conservative faith that is the blunt instrument fragmenting our nation’s democracy.


Youxin Yang Cambridge, Massachusetts www.oilpastelsociety.com/yang-youxin.html

PEACE-IV. Oil, Chinese watercolor on canvas. 48 x 60 inches. 2013 In this painting, calligraphy was experimented with as part of the color and composition. Chinese watercolor and ink were applied as background to emphasize the theme: pacify the world through you, me, and ourselves.


THANK YOU—to our Curatorial Assistant! Amelia Lewis http://amelia0987.wix.com/amelial-1

Amelia is a working artist and aspiring curator with background in visual art and art history. Her experience includes working as art education research assistant with Artcorp, curatorial and event production for the Women's Center; Raphael House as well as a studio assistant for the Crocker Museum. She attended the Academy of Art University and will be pursing a second degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Sacramento State University.

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1. Endangered, Mixed Media on wood, 6 x 6 inches, 2012 2. Illegal 2, Mixed Media on wood 6 x 6 inches, 2012 3. Arabella 2, Acrylic on Canvas, 24 x 48 inches, 2010

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Profile for Gutfreund Cornett Art

What's Right, What's Left: Democracy in America  

Gutfreund Cornett Art, a curatorial team with a mission to “Change the World through Art”, announces What’s Right, What’s Left: Democracy in...

What's Right, What's Left: Democracy in America  

Gutfreund Cornett Art, a curatorial team with a mission to “Change the World through Art”, announces What’s Right, What’s Left: Democracy in...