Page 171

A History of the Guam Farmer’s Market

!

By Elyssa Santos Undergraduate in Chamorro Studies and History University of Guam elyssajsantos@gmail.com

! !

Abstract: This presentation examines the history of Guam farmers’ markets during the American Naval Era (1898-1949). Canonical histories generally present the development of markets as benevolent acts of American naval governors who sought to instill the capitalist value of profit among Chamorros. However, such descriptions mask the role of Chamorro agency in the development of these markets and pay little attention to how these markets were understood by the farmers on which they depended. This presentation situates these markets in the context of anthropologist Nicolas Thomas’ “colonial project,” a concept which allows for the exploration of the complex dynamics of cultural exchange and resistance that mark many such transformative colonial impositions. This presentation asserts that, despite the navy’s intentions to change the value system of the Chamorro farmer, Chamorro farmers utilized these markets in ways that were compatible with the value system known as kustumbren Chamorro. Editor’s Note: This paper, presented at the Marianas History Conference, was not made available for publication.

! !

--Elyssa Juline Santos, a Junior at the University of Guam, is pursuing a BA in Chamorro Studies and History under the Guam Merit Scholarship. She enjoys spending time at the Micronesian Area Research Center, searching through Spanish and American Naval Era archives. Eventually, she plans to pursue an MA in Micronesian Studies. Coming from a long line of educators, her dream is to become a curator at the Guam Museum, educating younger generations about Guam’s rich history.


2nd Marianas History Conference 2013 ・ !161

Profile for Guampedia

MHC2: Art, Culture and Science  

MHC2: Art, Culture and Science  

Profile for guampedia

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded