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2008 Annual Report

Statement of Compliance Tuesday, 17 March, 2009 Honourable Peter Collier BA DipEd MLC Minister for Training 11th Floor, Dumas House 2 Havelock Street WEST PERTH WA 6005 Dear Minister PRESENTATION OF THE GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE ANNUAL REPORT 2008 The Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2008 has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of Section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006 and in accordance with the requirements of Section 54 of the Vocational Education and Training Act 1996.

Len Smith GOVERNING COUNCIL CHAIR 17 March, 2009

Lidia Rozlapa CEO/MANAGING DIRECTOR 17 March, 2009

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Great Southern TAFE

Contents Statement of Compliance ......................................................................................................................................................................1 Contents...........................................................................................................................................................................................................2 Section One – Overview.........................................................................................................................................................................4 Executive Summary.............................................................................................................................................................................4 Governing Council Chair’s Report .........................................................................................................................................4 Managing Director’s Report.....................................................................................................................................................5 Operational Structure........................................................................................................................................................................7 Great Southern TAFE at a Glance.........................................................................................................................................9 Governing Council.......................................................................................................................................................................10 Great Southern TAFE’s Strategic Directions...............................................................................................................13 Performance Management Framework .............................................................................................................................16 Government Goals: Better Planning, Better Futures ..............................................................................................16 The Minister’s Key Priorities for TAFEWA Colleges:................................................................................................22 Shared Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................................................23 Section Two – Agency Performance .........................................................................................................................................25 Report On Operations .....................................................................................................................................................................25 Sectional Highlights..........................................................................................................................................................................26 Business & Creative Industries............................................................................................................................................26 Social Sciences.............................................................................................................................................................................26 Research & Planning .................................................................................................................................................................27 Trade & Industry Skills...............................................................................................................................................................27 Primary Production & Natural Resource Management .......................................................................................28 Corporate Services.....................................................................................................................................................................28 Performance & Review.............................................................................................................................................................29 TAFE Business Centre...............................................................................................................................................................31 Section Three – Significant Issues and Trends ...................................................................................................................33 Skills Shortages .............................................................................................................................................................................33 Employment Trends....................................................................................................................................................................33 Information and Communication Technologies........................................................................................................33 Industry Developments ............................................................................................................................................................33 Indigenous Employment & Training..................................................................................................................................34 Section Four – Disclosures and Legal Compliance............................................................................................................35 Certification of Performance Indicators..............................................................................................................................35 Key Performance Indicators............................................................................................................................................................36 Effectiveness Indicators ...............................................................................................................................................................36 1.1 Annual VET College Profile Target Achievement .........................................................................................36 1.2 Overall Student Satisfaction ......................................................................................................................................38 1.3 Graduate Employment Status...................................................................................................................................40 1.4 Graduate Satisfaction ...................................................................................................................................................41 Efficiency Indicators........................................................................................................................................................................41 2.1 Overall Cost per Student Curriculum Hour (SCH) for Aggregate College Delivery ...................41 Certification of Financial Statements...........................................................................................................................................43 Independent Audit Opinion...............................................................................................................................................................44 Financial Statements.............................................................................................................................................................................46 Income Statement.............................................................................................................................................................................46 Balance Sheet.....................................................................................................................................................................................47 Statement of Changes in Equity ................................................................................................................................................48 Cash Flow Statement .......................................................................................................................................................................49 Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008..50 Appendix 1 – S40 Submission 2009 ..........................................................................................................................................73 Other Financial Disclosures ........................................................................................................................................................74 Page 2 of 79

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2008 Annual Report Governance Disclosures.............................................................................................................................................................. 74 Other Legal Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................... 75 Advertising ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 75 Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes ....................................................................................................... 75 Equal Employment Opportunities Outcomes............................................................................................................... 75 Compliance with Public Sector Standards and Ethical Codes ......................................................................... 76 Recordkeeping Plan.............................................................................................................................................................................. 77 Government Policy Requirements........................................................................................................................................... 78 Corruption Prevention............................................................................................................................................................... 78 Sustainability ................................................................................................................................................................................... 78 Energy Smart Government Program................................................................................................................................ 79

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Great Southern TAFE

Section One – Overview Executive Summary Governing Council Chair’s Report I would like to congratulate the staff of Great Southern TAFE on another very successful year which saw excellent outcomes for the College and its students. College staff continued to build on their professional and academic standards and their commitment to excellence. Major 2008 outcomes included meeting all key performance indicators within budget. The College has met the Delivery Performance Agreement and training targets, with only a 5% increase in costs, while implementing innovative and flexible enhancements to its delivery and assessment. These outcomes were due, in no small part, to a committed, skilled, and knowledgeable staff and a strong learning culture across the organisation. Great Southern TAFE again received clear internal audits for 2008, which provided the Governing Council with confidence in the internal controls for finance, human resources, facilities, information technology and the quality of delivery and assessment of training. Throughout the reporting year, the College responded proactively to the Minister for Education and Training’s priorities, particularly in addressing the skills and labour shortages in the Great Southern, increasing apprenticeships and traineeships, creating more pathways for 15-19 year olds, and improving Indigenous student outcomes. Our commitment to increasing workplace based learning was reflected in a 20% increase in apprentice enrolments, as employers used the training system to bolster the labour pool. In addition to these achievements, 2008 was a big year for awards for Great Southern TAFE staff and students:  The College won the 2008 Large Training Provider of the Year Award.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year 2008 – Finalist Sarah Hancox  WA Trainer of the Year 2008 – Finalist Andrew Nicholson My thanks go to the members of the Governing Council who, through their participation and commitment of time, demonstrate their interest in the overall welfare of our College and the wider community. Special thanks also to the College Managing Director, Lidia Rozlapa, for her determination and focus in driving the College forward and meeting its key objectives. In 2009, we look forward to a continued strong performance in the delivery of excellence in education and training for the Great Southern Region.

Len Smith CHAIR Great Southern TAFE Governing Council 10 February 2009

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Managing Director’s Report I take pleasure in reporting on the performance of Great Southern TAFE in 2008 - another successful year evident in our wide range of achievements. As a College, we have managed within all budget parameters, consistent with Section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006 . Our financial performance remained sound, with an operating surplus of $268,000 and a working capital ratio of 2:7 achieved. These results reflect the College’s ability to manage its financial resources and reserves prudently. During the reporting year, we continued to review and implement new business systems to meet the expectations of our internal and external clients. Our success in 2008 has largely been due to a team of dedicated and professional staff members committed to excellence in the delivery of training and education. Our Lecturer Professional Development Program for up-skilling and professional qualifications has been completed to schedule, and a majority of full-time lecturing staff have attained the Certificate 4 TAA qualification. The College is committed to a new streamlined approach to RPL for our clients and aims to increase Recognition of Prior Learning activity by 3%. Our partnerships with industry have grown as evidenced by the profile achievement of over 100% in 2008. Some major partnerships included:          

Trout Alliance and the Blackwood Basin Group Argyle Diamonds Hotels & Licensees (Responsible Service of Alcohol) Albany Regional Hospital Curtin University Plantagenet Health Centre Hall & Prior/Clarence Estate Activ Foundation Forest Products Commission AgWest International

During 2008, the College’s training extended beyond the region to other parts of the State, including the East Kimberley diamond mines and the shearing sheds of Esperance. Our TAFE Business Centre, in partnership with Kimberley College of TAFE, Curtin Vocational Training and Education Centre (VTEC) and Pilbara TAFE delivered Worksafe Occupational Safety and Health courses across the state. Over 900 students graduated from our Shearing and Wool Handling course and our External Studies Centre delivered courses to over 500 distance education students across the State. We also invested resources into training and services to international markets, exposing staff to new and challenging environments. This resulted in a 200% increase in International students studying at the College. Throughout the year, we continued to make significant progress towards achieving the goals laid out in our Strategic Plan 2005-2009. This stemmed from business improvement, investment in staff training, partnering with business and industry, and responding to customer needs with relevant, timely, and cost effective training. V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE This year has also seen strong improvements in our Indigenous student outcomes, with an increase in the number of Indigenous students enrolled in employment based outcomes (Certificate III and above). We also saw an improvement in Indigenous student retention rates which increased by 12% to 74%. Completion rates for students with a disability rose to 77%. During 2008, we provided more flexible and accessible pathways for our young people so they had more options to choose from, and were more likely to remain in the education system. We negotiated articulation with advanced standing to university undergraduate programs. We built on this initiative with a new TAFELink program which allows Year 11 and 12 students to combine school and TAFE subjects to gain a Certificate III and Certificate IV qualification by the end of Year 12. This gives school leavers more flexibility and greater choice when it comes to their study pathways. Completing a Certificate IV by the end of Year 12 gave eight Katanning students the option of applying for direct University entrance. The year 2008 also resulted in significant advances in infrastructure development for the College. The State Government provided $550,000 towards equipment for traditional trades training at the Albany campus, with the new items delivered in early 2008. A refurbishment of our Denmark Campus was carried out in 2008. In 2009 major capital works will take place in the Trades and Industry Skills section, beginning with the automotive area and the completion date is expected to be July 2009. Adapting to the changing economic climate, the College moved away from traditional forms of training to more innovative and collaborative training resulting in a 200% increase in workplace delivery. I would like to congratulate staff on an outstanding year and thank them for their effort and commitment to delivering a consistently high standard of training to our diverse student population in all parts of the region. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank our dedicated Governing Council, all of our industry partners, sponsors and key stakeholders, whose support of the College ensures a vibrant and prosperous future for our students. On behalf of Great Southern TAFE staff, I take pleasure in sharing this report with you, and look forward to an exciting and even greater year ahead.

Lidia Rozlapa CEO/MANAGING DIRECTOR 10 February 2009

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2008 Annual Report

Operational Structure Great Southern TAFE – Organisation Structure

GOVERNING COUNCIL

Managing Director Lidia Rozlapa

Director, Corporate Services Kevin Wilson

Director, Performance & Review Sue Bennet-Ng

Director, Research & Planning Chris Jones

Director, Business Development Jan Davidson

Director, Training Services: Business & Creative Industries Brendan Robb

Director, Training Services: Primary Industry & Natural Resource Management Neil Binning

Director, Training Services: Trade & Industry Skills Kathy Keay

Director, Training Services: Social Sciences Steph Tchan

Director, Regional Services Ian Billing

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Great Southern TAFE

Great Southern TAFE – Committee Reporting Structure

Governing Council

Managing Director Lidia Rozlapa

Performance & Review Governing Council Sub Committee

Audit & Finance Governing Council Sub Committee

Corporate Executive (including Resources Board)

Academic Board

Performance & Review

Consultative Committee

Business Innovation Group

Information Technology Committee

Sustainability Action Group

OHS Committee

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Great Southern TAFE at a Glance Established in 1974, Great Southern TAFE is the region’s largest training provider, covering an area of 40,500 square kilometres. The College’s capacity for training stretches right across the region with more than ten sites, including four major campuses. The primary campus is located in Albany, with additional campuses in Denmark, Mt Barker and Katanning. All hinterland campuses offer a broad range of qualifications, as well as professional and skills development courses to suit local community and business needs. Employing 350 staff, and with an annual budget of 21.2 million dollars, the College provides local employment opportunities, and skills development to enhance local enterprise. Each year, over 200 nationally accredited qualifications are offered, from Certificate to Advanced Diploma level, and university pathways. The College’s student population exceeds 6400, with student numbers steadily increasing over recent years. Great Southern TAFE’s qualifications are structured within five key delivery areas: Business & Creative Industries Social Sciences Trade & Industry Skills Primary Production & Natural Resource Management TAFE Business Centre Alternative study options are made available through the External Studies, delivery and assessment in the workplace, skills recognition, Recognition of Prior Learning and through a blended delivery approach that offers convenience and flexibility. The College manages and delivers approximately 1.05 million Student Contact Hours (SCH) throughout Western Australia. These hours are spread over programs won under competitive tendering arrangements, Western Australian Department of Education and Training “profile” funded programs, traineeships and apprenticeships, Vocational Education and Training (VET) in schools, and auspicing programs. Great Southern TAFE provides vocational education and training products within the Australian Qualification Framework (AQF), consisting of Training Packages and courses that are accredited with the Training Accreditation Council (TAC). The College offers a range of qualifications from Certificate to Advanced Diploma and University pathways and customised Fee for Service training. A Customer Service Centre operates at the Albany campus which amalgamates all student services into one centralised and easily accessible facility. Student services include:          V2.3

Well-equipped, modern facilities Professional career guidance Skills recognition/Recognition of Prior Learning Disability Liaison Officer Library Resource Centre Student café Student recreation area Accommodation services External delivery centre Page 9 of 79


Great Southern TAFE    

Free internet and email access Career and employment services Free counselling service Literacy and numeracy support for student success.

TAFE Business Centre Our TAFE Business Centre offers a specialised training consultancy service, while delivering an extensive range of customized training including industrial, workplace and lifestyle courses. The Business Centre also works closely with business and industry to deliver training to benefit and sustain regional businesses. The Business Centre has also successfully established International Student recruitment, placement and support services.

Additional Services Great Southern TAFE also offers a wide range of specialised services including:           

Assessment in the Workplace Risk Management Corporate Training Industry Consultancy Workplace-Based Training Apprenticeships & Traineeships Competency Based Training Modern Teaching Techniques Learner-Centred Training Training Needs Analysis for Productivity Job/Role Competency Assessment

Governing Council The College Governing Council consists of a Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson, the Managing Director, and ten other members, who are appointed by the Minister for Education and Training for their expertise in education and training, industry or community affairs and for their ability to contribute to the strategic direction of the College. Whilst the Managing Director has responsibility for the day to day operations, the Governing Council overseas the strategic and overall direction of the College through the execution of its statutory functions, within the Vocational Education and Training Act 1996, the Public Sector Management Act 1994 and the Financial Administration and Audit Act 1985. As at 31 December 2008, the Membership of Great Southern TAFE Governing Council was: Name

Position

Expiration of Term

Andrew Hammond Andrew is the Chief Executive Officer of City of Albany. His background prior to a CEO role within WA local government has been finance, administration and retail banking. His qualifications include an Executive Master of Business Administration from University of Western Australia and a Diploma of Local Government from TAFEWA.

Chair

Retired

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2008 Annual Report Name

Position

Expiration of Term

Len Smith Deputy Chair Len is the Owner and Manager of the Comfort Inn in Albany. He is a long term and significant contributor to the local community, particularly in his involvement with key tourism and training bodies.

31 Dec 2009

Catherine Jenkins Catherine is currently the National Forestry Management Accountant for Great Southern Limited, based in Albany. She has many years experience as a Management Accountant in Perth, and has held senior positions in a diverse range of industries from motor vehicle dealerships to the manufacture and retail of hand made chocolates.

Member

30 June 2009

Jane Trethowan Member Jane is the Deputy President for the Shire of Kojonup, initially elected to the local council in 2003, and farms 3,700 acres at Kojonup. Jane is the representative on the Governing Council from the Great Southern Zone of the Western Australian Local Government Association.

30 June 2009

Kimberley Krakouer Member Kimberley is a Noongar man from Mount Barker and is currently the Campus Co-ordinator for Great Southern TAFE at the Mount Barker Campus. In 2006 he was awarded the Great Southern TAFE's Indigenous Student of the Year and is acknowledged as an important Indigenous artist of the Great Southern Region.

Retired

Joan Cameron Joan is a Farmer at Rocky Gully and a Proprietor of a Retail business in Albany. She has a number of community and industry involvements at Local and Regional levels and formerly in a diverse range of Board memberships at State level. Until October 2007, when she retired from the position, Joan was a long-serving Councillor of the Shire of Plantagenet, served several terms as Deputy President and is a Freeman of that Municipality.

Member

31 Dec 2009

Graham Harvey Graham is the Chief Executive Officer of the Albany Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Graham is a bestselling author and a previous Western Australian Professional Speaker of the Year. His qualifications include a Bachelor of Commerce from Curtin University majoring in Tourism Management.

Member

30 June 2010

Owen Starling Member Owen is the Regional Manager Great Southern, which covers the Albany, Katanning and Narrogin Magisterial Districts, and is the Clerk of the Court at the Albany Magistrates Court. Owen has worked within regional Courts for 23 years and has gained extensive experience within the State Public Service. He is also an active member of the Army Reserve with 11/28 RWAR and is a senior umpire of Australian Rules Football within the region.

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Great Southern TAFE Name

Position

Expiration of Term

Scott Leary Scott is a Director of Albany City Motors which is a well established local Motor Dealer for Holden, Nissan and Isuzu. With 14 years experience in the motor trade and the previous 12 years in the Finance industry with Westpac and now as Financial Controller, Scott offers a working knowledge of management and processes.

Member

31 Dec 2010

Antony Smith Member Antony founded Plantagenet Wines in 1974 and although retired, still serves as Chairman of the Company Board. He served on Wine Industry bodies at Regional, State and Federal Levels, the Board of the Great Southern Development Commission and Chaired the Great Southern Area Consultative Committee and is on the Board of the Albany UWA Foundation (Vice Chairman) and Mount Barker Community College Farm Committee.

31 Dec 2010

Suzanne Seeley Member Suzanne is the Nurse Director for WA Country Health Service (WACHS) – Great Southern. She has many years of nursing and hospital management experience and has worked in both the public and private health sectors as well as representing WACHS on the WA Palliative Care Advisory Committee. Suzanne is committed to strengthening the integration of the health services within the region and in building a strong connection with the educational sector to build a strong local healthcare workforce.

31 Dec 2010

Murray Howson Member Murray is the Managing Director of Edenborn Pty Ltd, one of the region’s largest Tree Harvesting and Transport companies. His background is in industrial design and he also holds qualifications in the field of education (Diploma of Teaching) and possesses vast industry experience and knowledge. His company is a leader in innovation and systems management specific to commercial forestry.

31 Dec 2010

Lidia Rozlapa Lidia has held the position of CEO/Managing Director, Great Southern TAFE since 1993 and has a long history with TAFE in Western Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Education, Teacher’s Diploma, Diploma in Secretarial Studies and from the Joint Examining Board London, the Teachers Diploma in Pitman’s Shorthand and Teachers Diploma in Typewriting. Lidia is a past President of the Rotary Club of Albany, an active member of Variety Club of WA fundraising for sick, disabled and disadvantaged children. She is a member of the State Training Executive and Regional Managing Directors’ Network. Regional committee memberships include the Great Southern Human Services Managers’ Forum, the Great Southern Zone of WA Local Government Association, the Building and Construction Industry Training Fund Committee and the newly formed Local Government Industry Reference Group. Page 12 of 79

Member

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2008 Annual Report Resigned / Retired Details of 2008: Andrew Hammond (Chairperson) Kimberley Krakouer (Member)

Legislation Impacting on Great Southern TAFE’s Activities: State: Auditor General Act, 2006 Building and Construction Industry Training Fund and Levy College Act, 1990 Corruption and Crime Commission Act, 2003 Curriculum Council Act, 1997 Disability Services Act, 1993 Education Service Providers (Full Fee Overseas Students) Registration Act, 1991 Electronic Transactions Act, 2003 Equal Opportunity Act, 1984 Financial Management Act, 2006 Freedom of Information Act, 1992 Industrial Relations Act, 1979 Industrial Training Act, 1975 Library Board of Western Australia Act, 1951 Liquor Control Act, 1988 Minimum Conditions of Employment Act, 1993 Occupational Safety and Health Act, 1984 Public Interest Disclosure Act, 2003 Public Sector Management Act, 1994 School Education Act, 1999 State Records Act, 2000 State Superannuation Act, 2000 State Supply Commission Act, 1991 Vocational Education and Training Act, 1996 Workers Compensation and Injury Management Act , 1981 Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act, 2004

Commonwealth: Copyright Act, 1968 Education Services for Overseas Students Act, 2000 Education Services for Overseas Students (Registration Charges) Act, 1997 Trade Practices Act, 1974 Training Guarantee (Administration) Act, 1990 Workplace Relations Act, 1996

Great Southern TAFE’s Strategic Directions Our Vision To be recognised as a progressive TAFEWA College and major regional skills provider, integral to the social and economic growth of the region.

Our Mission To provide innovative learning opportunities that produce graduates with real skills sought after by industry and underpin a prosperous and sustainable region.

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Great Southern TAFE

Our Focus for Success    

Relationship with our Clients Excellent Training & Services Sustainable Business Staff Knowledge & Learning

Our Values      

Our Customers Partnerships & Alliances Our people Innovation & Creativity Ethical Practice Cultural & Social Diversity

Our Measures of Success     

Student Satisfaction Graduate Satisfaction & Outcomes Employer Satisfaction Staff Satisfaction Efficiency

Community Vision – Great Southern TAFE will be a College:  With integrity and commitment to all segments of the community, particularly our youth and lifelong learners.  That is affordable, accessible and accountable in its dealings.  Whose customers value the College and clearly see it as a key partner in the capacity building of the wider community.  Whose customers are supportive of new approaches to flexible delivery and assessment which they believe will enhance the relevance of training to industry, and the region’s access to training and education.  That is more innovative and energised as lecturers’ enthusiasm, skills and new ways of working emerge, and systems are streamlined to the customer’s needs.  That increasingly meets its customers’ needs through short course training and part qualifications as required. Timetabling will be at a time and place most suitable for the client and technology will support higher level skills and acquisition.  That is seen as a key source of advice for career paths and study which facilitate pathways across the TAFEWA network.

Staff Vision – Great Southern TAFE’s staff will:  Understand the need for new products, services and methodologies to meet the current and future expectations of their diverse clients and region. Be recognised for the excellence of their training and the success of their students.  Express high satisfaction with the College, which will be sustained by support for their continuous learning and the College’s investment in technology and training.  Understand the need for new ways of working and trusts that the College will maintain a commitment to their professional development, essential to support this. Access resources to innovate, project manage, develop capacity and commit to sustainable practices.  Demonstrate cross-sectional and cross-sectoral collaboration  Capture, retain, and share knowledge to maintain organisational learning and expertise  Exceed standards in service delivery in all areas of College business  Continue to expand external relationships with business, industry and our community. Page 14 of 79

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Great Southern TAFE’s Strategic Priorities 2005-2009 The following goals have been established for the College to 2009 and are aligned with the TAFEWA Network priorities: 1. Increase Client Service Goal 1.1 Great Southern TAFE will have coherent and consistent client service that provides accurate and timely information, advice and enrolment. Outcomes:  Improved student satisfaction with client services.  Improved retention and outcomes for students. 2. Contribute to Economic Development Goal 2.1 Great Southern TAFE will anticipate and respond to present, future and specialist industry needs. Outcomes:  Growth in employment based delivery including apprenticeships, traineeships and school based traineeships to meet the projected skills and labour shortages in the Great Southern.  Implementation of market driven flexible and alternative delivery and assessment arrangements across the region. Goal 2.2 Great Southern TAFE will participate in the global education and training market in areas of strategic advantage to Western Australia. Outcomes:  Opportunities developed beyond Great Southern Region. 3. Contribute to Community Development Goal 3.1 Great Southern TAFE will address the diverse needs of young people, as they make the transition from school to work. Outcomes:  Increased retention rates for 15-19 year olds in post-compulsory education and training.  Implementation of the Narrogin and Great Southern Districts Youth Advantage Strategy. Goal 3.2 Great Southern TAFE will contribute to improved education and employment outcomes for Indigenous people in Western Australia. Outcomes:  Improved Indigenous participation and retention in schools and TAFEWA.  Improved Indigenous participation at higher qualification levels.  Improved employment outcomes for Indigenous TAFEWA graduates. Goal 3.3 Great Southern TAFE will contribute to and is a valued member of a sustainable Western Australia. Outcomes:  Support for whole of State goals for equity and access.  Higher levels of community participation in learning. V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE  Efficiency and sustainability in the framework of Shared Services and College Business Planning. 4. Improve the Quality of Teaching and Learning Goal 4.1 Great Southern TAFE teaching and learning strategies will be recognised as being innovative, flexible and responsive to client learning needs. Outcomes:  Increased student satisfaction with quality of teaching, learning and assessment.  Increased module and qualification completions.  Implement innovative approaches to the design and delivery of training based on market need and workplace learning.  Excellence in performance, quality and relevance. Goal 4.2 Great Southern employees will be recognised as a high quality and capable workforce. Outcomes:  Improved staff knowledge and skills currency at industry standards.

Performance Management Framework Government Goals: Better Planning, Better Futures Our commitment to the implementation of national and state training arrangements and priorities is embedded within our corporate culture and is evident in our strategic documents, processes and practices. The range of projects and initiatives highlighted in this report and their subsequent outcomes, strongly reflect these priorities. Our strategic outcomes and services are aligned with the government’s goals and strategic outcomes articulated in the Better Planning: Better Futures document: Goal 1: Better Services: Enhancing the quality of life and wellbeing of all people throughout Western Australia by providing high quality, accessible services. Goal 2: Jobs and Economic Development: Creating conditions that foster a strong economy delivering more jobs, opportunities and greater wealth for all Western Australians. Goal 3: Lifestyle and the Environment: Protecting and enhancing the unique Western Australian lifestyle and ensuring sustainable management of the environment. Goal 4: Regional Development: Ensuring that regional Western Australia is strong and vibrant. Goal 5: Governance and Public Sector Improvement: Developing and maintaining a skilled, diverse and ethical public sector serving the Government with consideration of the public interest. BPBF Goal 1: Better Services BPBF Strategic Outcome: A world class education and training system that provides lifelong learning opportunities. Agency Level Outcomes  Improved student satisfaction with client services  Improved retention and outcomes for students

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2008 Annual Report     

Higher levels of community participation in learning Improved Indigenous participation and retention in schools and TAFEWA Improved Indigenous participation at higher qualification levels Increase student satisfaction with quality of teaching, learning and assessment Implement innovative approaches to the design and delivery of training, based on market need and workplace learning  Excellence in performance, quality and relevance TAFEWA Strategic Focus 1: Increase Client Service TAFEWA Strategic Focus 4: Improve the Quality of Teaching and Learning College Achievements: During the reporting year, Great Southern TAFE’s student satisfaction continued to be higher than the state average (93% in 2008). The average Module Load Completion Rate (MLCR) has improved by 4% in 2008 and remains a priority for support and outcomes achievement. In particular the MLCR for Literacy and Numeracy has improved by 18%. The College has an overall satisfaction level of 93.4% compared to the state average of 85.4%. The satisfaction with information and customer services that Student Services’ staff provided improved to 83% compared to a state average of 66%. In 2008, the College delivered over 105,000 Student Contact Hours (SCH) through the Vocational Education and Training in Schools (VETIS) programs under profile (40,000 SCH) and auspice arrangements (65,000 SCH) and supported 12 different schools across the region. 82 qualifications were added to the College’s scope and delivered in 2008, including quality auditing, off-site construction, interactive digital media and career development. In 2008 Great Southern TAFE was a finalist in the Disability Services Commission’s Count Us In Awards, the State Government category. The College was commended for using innovative technology and interactive learning activities to increase participation and access to training for people with a range of disabilities enrolled in the Certificates II and III in Clothing Production. Using the Learning Table has lead to independent students, successful learners and valuable employees. BPBF Goal 2: Jobs and Economic Development BPBF Strategic Outcomes: A strong research and development capacity; a level and mix of infrastructure that promotes economic growth. Agency Level Outcomes  Growth in employment based delivery including apprenticeships, traineeships and schoolbased traineeships to meet the skills and labour shortages in the Great Southern.  Implementation of market driven flexible and alternative delivery and assessment arrangements across the region.  Opportunities developed beyond Great Southern Region. TAFEWA Strategic Focus 2: Contribute to Economic Development College Achievements: The College continued to meet regional demands for apprenticeships and traineeships. There was a decline in the number of trainees in the last six months of the year due to changes in the labour

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Great Southern TAFE market which particularly affected existing worker traineeships. This was counteracted by workbased delivery and assessment which increased by 23% in 2008. We continued to build and expand industry partnerships between the College and our students. In 2008, we successfully positioned ourselves to be the Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for the Forest Products Commission, Clarence Estate Nursing Home, City of Albany and local dentists. These partnerships are the most cost effective way of skilling people in these industries through delivery and assessment in their workplaces. This value-adding is to provide just-in-time training to meet employers’ operational and strategic needs for industry entrants. Delivery of the Certificate III of Allied Health Assistant has provided local industry with skilled workers to support the work of physiotherapists, speech therapists and occupational therapists in the aged care industry. Training was delivered in the classroom and the workplace and forms a key part of the workforce development model of providing training services in the Social Sciences section. Our Workforce Development Strategy is being rolled out as a service to our local industry. This methodology will increase Recognition of Prior Learning activity and provide training based on needs in the time and place identified by industry. This model for institutional delivery is based on existing apprenticeship and traineeship models which have been working successfully across the region and refocuses some institutional delivery from classroom based in a time of high employment. The College was successful in winning two Enrolled Nursing tenders. There has been ongoing uptake of workplace development and training opportunities in the community services sector with traineeship numbers increasing over the year. Our partnerships with agencies such as the Lower Great Southern Community Living Association, Activ Foundation, Young House, Hall and Prior, Clarence Estate and Overton Lodge have been strong and fruitful. Some of the outcomes include a more highly skilled workforce and ongoing student employment outcomes. The strength and vitality of these partnerships is providing ongoing sustainability in the community services sector workforce. Great Southern TAFE participated in a number of industry and TAFEWA partnerships in 2008. The College provided OHS and WorkSafe training in the mining regions and worked with other TAFEWA providers (Pilbara and Kimberley TAFE and Kalgoorlie VTEC) to ensure increased coverage of these areas. Great Southern TAFE also worked with the Forest Products Commission to provide Certificate III level training for recruits, commercial short course training across the state and conducted Recognition of Prior Learning for existing staff at Certificate IV/Diploma level. A total refurbishment of the College’s Denmark Campus was completed. The College ran two Moordit Yakka (Solid Work) employment preparation programs in conjunction with Skill Hire, designed for abattoir employment at Fletcher International WA. Great Southern TAFE delivered hospitality training to the mining industry for Indigenous adults with labour hire company Compass in partnership with the William Angliss Institute of Victoria. The College also ran a range of ticketed training (e.g. WorkSafe Endorsed) designed for employment across a range of areas including mines, shires, building and construction. Great Southern TAFE delivered a series of wool handling/shearing schools across the region that led to employment and productivity improvements in the industry. Page 18 of 79

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2008 Annual Report BPBF Goal 3: Lifestyle and Environment BPBF Strategic Outcomes: Biodiversity and ecosystems that are well maintained; impacts on the environment are responsibly and sustainably managed. Agency Level Outcomes  Efficiency and sustainability in the framework of Shared Services and College Business Planning. TAFEWA Strategic Focus 3: Contribute to Community Development College Achievements: As a result of incorporating wildlife units of competency in our Certificate IV in Conservation and Land Management, our students were involved in a number of sea bird rescue activities which mainly involved pelicans and gulls with hooks in their beaks and necks or lines tangled around their feet. This program continues to provide much needed volunteer numbers to assist in the rescue of seabirds hooked and tangled by anglers whilst fishing. Great Southern TAFE is the only College in the southwest of Western Australia that is providing training in organic horticulture. This training continued in 2008 for its eighth year, allowing students to gain practical skills working in a NASAA-Certified commercial organic garden. Throughout the year, students worked closely with organic industry groups to support local growers and supplied fresh produce to local retailers and consumers. At a corporate level, the College’s Sustainability Action Group was instrumental in raising awareness amongst students and staff on issues regarding recycling and energy awareness with targets being met ahead of time. Operational measures include a water treatment strategy based on a state of the art re-circulation system to ensure ecologically sustainable effluent management, energy star rating on all computers, fluorescent lights replaced with triphosphorous lights and reduced numbers of lights on each block, all contributing to a more environmentally sustainable campus. In addition, much of our training delivery contributes to the environmental well being of the region, particularly in the area of primary industries, with ongoing economic and social benefits. The new College Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management Centre incorporate the latest sustainable principles of water recycling through specially designed catchment areas and tanks. In addition, careful choice of plants appropriate to the Great Southern climate and the requirements of the training environment have been taken into account. Students have been closely involved in the landscape design of the new site as part of training and assessment requirements of their programs. This has occurred in consultation with local contractors and lecturers and has provided valuable industry experience for the students. In 2008 the College increased its efforts in the area of Waste Management and Waste Avoidance. The recycling of paper and cardboard was a key project this year and the College now has eight recycling bins for all types of office waste and a dedicated cardboard skip to capture cardboard waste. To prevent co-mingling of recyclables and general waste before it goes in the main bins, there was a trial of 20 small office bins in the administration area that encourage the officers to separate waste. The success of this trial was established and the College is now providing every officer at a desk with a separator bin.

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Great Southern TAFE Great Southern TAFE staff were part of a Global Corporate Challenge aimed at encouraging a healthy lifestyle amongst staff – an initiative of the College’s Sustainability Action Group. Participating staff members were funded through the College’s Professional Development program. Staff reported feeling fitter, improved awareness of their health and a reduction in workplace stress due to the increased physical activity. BPBF Goal 4: Regional Development BPBF Strategic Outcomes: Regional communities that are educated, healthy, safe, and supportive; Government decision making that takes account of regional issues. Agency Level Outcomes  Opportunities developed beyond Great Southern Region.  Implementation of market driven flexible and alternative delivery and assessment arrangements across the region.  Improved employment outcomes for Indigenous TAFEWA graduates. TAFEWA Strategic Focus 2, 3 and 4 College Achievements: Great Southern TAFE delivered training to 507 Indigenous students in 2008. The number dropped slightly from 2007 due to changes to Community Development Employment Program and the focus on higher level qualifications. As a result of this focus, Indigenous student numbers at Certificate III and above increased from 140 to 178. Completion rates for Indigenous students are at an historic high, increasing by 12% from 2007 to 74%. The completion rate for students with a disability has risen to 77% in 2008 and the gap of 9% compared to the total student population is now the lowest on record. The Internet was increasingly accessed by regional and remote learners for training support and delivery and we continued to maintain a strong and ongoing partnership with the Telecentre Network. This allows the College to bring quality training to the region’s hinterlands and beyond, with partnerships with Training Centres, Regional Agents and Telecentres in Gnowangerup, Walpole, Tambellup, Cranbrook, Wellstead/ManyPeaks, Bremer Bay, Frankland, Jerramungup, Kojonup, Ongerup and Ravensthorpe. A range of nationally accredited programs was offered from entry level training to Advanced Diploma and university pathways. The College partnered with Curtin University to delivery its Bachelor of Fine Arts Program at the Albany campus. Students who complete a Great Southern TAFE Advanced Diploma of Visual Arts will be able to articulate straight into Curtin’s degree, with a year’s worth of credit. This allows students the benefit of gaining two qualifications on campus, without having to travel to Perth. Curtin will also be delivering its Bachelor of Education in Albany and has agreed to provide an articulation pathway from the College’s Diploma of Children’s Services into their Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood Education). Great Southern TAFE has come up with innovative ways to cater for changes in the school leaving age through forging a strong partnership with the Albany District Education Office. The College has increased delivery of VET in Schools, both under profile and auspice, and the proportion of VET enrolments at Certificate II or higher is now 30% of all VET in Schools delivery.

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2008 Annual Report The College has appointed a dedicated Indigenous Officer to work with Indigenous students undertaking VET in Schools to ensure they are enrolled in VET units that allow progression into full qualifications in areas of high industry demand. Great Southern TAFE initiated a Statewide Teacher Education program for Indigenous cadets in 2007 and completed the management of this in 2008. Ten colleges participated in this program with 13 Indigenous Cadets commencing the course and 7 completing the qualification. The TryTech program was developed and implemented in partnership with the District Education Office and the Local Community Partnership. This program provides Year 10 students with comprehensive hands-on career development experience in the trades. The College’s TAFELink program saw twelve year 11 students at Katanning Senior High School undertake a university pathway by completing a Certificate IV TAFE qualification. Eleven students completed their Certificate IV during Year 12 in 2008, enabling 8 students entry into university. The UniLink program continues to provide documented credit transfer for Great Southern TAFE students progressing to university. Scope applications for all diplomas and advanced diplomas offered at the College now include details of credit transfer arrangements with universities. In addition to improvements in unit completions, Indigenous students increased participation in qualifications at a Certificate III level or higher (170 students from a target of 148). This increase was primarily in workplace delivery and assessment. 2008 was an exceptional year for Shearing and Shedhand delivery. The College profile was fully reached with another 16,000 student contact hours delivered in the regional areas. Certificate III of Community Services (Youth Work) commenced part-time in Denmark in response to a request from the Denmark Healthy Community Project. BPBF Goal 5: Governance and Public Sector Improvement BPBF Strategic Outcomes: A skilled and capable public sector workforce; a public sector that is responsive to the evolving needs of the community. Agency Level Outcomes  Improved staff knowledge and skills currency at industry standards.  Improve the Quality of Teaching and Learning. TAFEWA Strategic Focus 4 College Achievements: At the beginning of each year, staff from all four major campuses came together for an All Staff Professional Development Day. The theme was Personal Wellbeing and staff were also informed about the College’s business strategies for the coming year. Collaborative group activities helped staff to gain a handle on the College’s collective vision and priorities. Specific feedback was obtained, as well as action plans which gave staff a sense of ownership and commitment to the College’s goals. Industry reference groups took place throughout the region as part of training delivery, which saw the College work with local businesses and agencies to improve the gathering, analysing, and sharing of information regarding current and future labour market trends and industry skills needs. Targeted investment in staff training placed the College in a strong position to meet a variety of challenges and opportunities. This included the implementation of new Training Packages, V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE changes in educational practice, the ongoing implications of the Raising the School Leaving Age legislation and the effective use of new technology within the training environment. A staff training calendar was compiled, reflecting the generic staff development needs identified within the College. Individual sections also had a staff development allocation within their budgets to cater for more specific needs. To ensure the quality and improvement of service delivery, the College has a Delivery Enhancement Officer to raise academic excellence, mainly through professional development of staff but also through mentoring. Professional development programs were provided throughout the year to maintain currency of knowledge and enrich staff learning, in line with the College’s People Plan. The development of this learning culture encouraged and supported staff to continuously be improving their skills and knowledge and to share that knowledge with one another. During the reporting year, the Delivery Enhancement Officer coordinated the delivery of a range of targeted workshops, work-based groups and individual programs which provided lecturing staff with skills in the following areas:  Increased skills and knowledge in dealing with challenging people and situations  Increased skills and knowledge about building relationships with local industry and other clients  Transforming the Trades initiative  OHS skills and knowledge relating to workplace, its processes and policies  Skill development in creating basic animations to develop learning resources  Digital Stories production skills  Council of Australian Governments direction towards streamlining RPL. It focuses on job roles, critical aspects of evidence, professional judgement, and how RPL can be done more effectively  Skills formation in the use of the technology i.e. Moodle software  Latest information on the availability of Training Packages and resources for their delivery  Inclusivity skills and knowledge aimed at students and colleagues  Skill development in creating basic animations to develop learning resources  A series of ten workshops developed to support the implementation of the self-paced Certificate IV in Training and Assessment for our staff  Development of resource materials to support self-paced delivery  Keeping pace with Industry developments/direction  One Diploma of Training and Assessment  Computing skills  First aid  Range of industry skills e.g. Elevated work platform.

2008 Priorities for the TAFEWA Network: 1.

Contribute to economic development with a focus on reducing industry skills shortages.

2.

Contribute to community development with a focus on increasing the effective participation of 15 to 24 year olds in TAFEWA.

3.

Improve the quality of teaching and learning with a focus on improving learning resources to support the implementation of Training Packages.

4.

Increase client service with a focus on making it easier for students and industry to access and navigate the TAFEWA Network.

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2008 Annual Report

Shared Responsibilities Shared Responsibilities with Other Agencies or Cross Agency Initiatives Social Sciences have a range of cross agency initiatives. These include active training partnerships in the community and health services area with Western Australian Country Health Service, Great Southern, Rainbow House, Hall and Prior Clarence Estate, Bethel Aged Care, Hawthorn House, Lions, Overton Lodge Mt Barker, Lower Great Southern Family Support Association, Albany Outreach and Activ amongst others. Our lecturers interact on a range of levels including the delivery of training to trainees and course based students as well as participating on various committees and boards in the community and health industries. This has resulted in ever increasing numbers of industry ready graduates to service local community needs. The Meat Industry Training Council (MINTRAC) provides limited funding under an MOU Contract for delivery of specific Diploma level units of competency for industry workers. Great Southern TAFE delivers all training to the annual recruit intake of the Forest Products Commission each year and acts as the Registered Training Organisation for all their short course delivery. Great Southern TAFE acts as the preferred Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for The Apprentice and Traineeship Company and Employfast in Agriculture, Horticulture and Viticulture Traineeship delivery. The College has also worked with the Indigenous Co-ordination Centre in funding Indigenous training programs in the region. Great Southern Development Commission (Aboriginal Economic Development) for project development work for Indigenous programs in the region. Shared responsibility with the District Education Office for managing the Individual Pathways Plans for TAFE students subject to the 'Raising of the School Leaving Age' legislation. Over 400 plans were completed in 2008. The Managing Director represented the College on the Great Southern Human Services Forum and the Strong Families Project. STRONG families is a unique program in terms of its level of across agency support and reinforces holistic and whole of government approaches to the provision of human services. Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Schools: Shared responsibilities for delivery of VET with nine schools in the region. Support from the District Education Office for the delivery of a blended school TAFE curriculum that will provide students with higher level VET qualifications and meet minimum entry requirements for university. Great Southern TAFE developed a customised program for staff in the Department of Housing and Works, tailored for the building and construction industry. This project assures stakeholders that the growing contracts and projects being taken on in the Great Southern will be effectively and efficiently managed by the Department's key staff. Workforce Capacity Building with the Albany Regional Hospital and the Department of Planning and Infrastructure: Customised training programs have been delivered in these two agencies to provide

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Great Southern TAFE skilling and knowledge to staff in areas of conflict management and resolution, meetings management, using information technology efficiently and effective presentations. City of Albany: Frontline Management training has been delivered in partnership with the City of Albany to ensure staff are meeting the workforce development plan implemented by the City of Albany. This key training program is delivered at three different levels and participants have a pathway to progress in their careers with the City.

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2008 Annual Report

Section Two – Agency Performance Report On Operations At the macro level, the College was guided by its five year strategic plan, developed through an inclusive and consultative process across the region with staff, clients, industry partners, community and the College Governing Council. Knowledge of our external environment underpinned College planning at all four campuses and within each level of the organisation -from strategic planning and decision making, to operational policies and processes. Throughout 2008, our work was underpinned by all legislative and public sector standards and accountabilities. Specifically, the College planned to the Better Planning, Better Services Framework. We successfully implemented government policy within the local context by providing regional advice to Department of Education and Training in setting our profile. This knowledge of our external environment fed further down Great Southern TAFE’s structure into our College business plans which guided the delivery of products and service within each portfolio area. Sectional business plans supported the CEO’s performance agreement which placed local issues within the goals of the government’s Strategic Planning Framework. Many of the issues that arose from our particular external environmental context were addressed by the College within the context of this Framework. Each of the priorities outlined in this framework allowed for the practical incorporation of the issues we face as a regional College and allow for a careful and well planned approach to service delivery. This synthesis of knowledge and planning allowed us to align our business processes to meet sector priorities and the needs of our clients. Our new courses gave students more options, with opportunities for on the job training and pathways to university. A range of programs from basic Certificate to Advanced Diploma level continued to support the diversification and sustainability of the regional economy. Extensive efforts have also been made in the area of youth training. They range from improving and strengthening the partnership between secondary schools and the College, researching innovative ways to expand the uptake of school based traineeships in consultation with employers, and providing seamless pathways to university through TAFE qualifications. The diversity of our programs supported sustained economic and employment growth and assisted in the reduction of industry skills shortages. In the calendar year 2008, Great Southern TAFE achieved 106.4% of WA Department of Education and Training’s training delivery with a 5% increase in costs, as reported in our Key Performance Indicators. This achievement was against a target range of 100 – 103%. In 2008, the cost of one hour of training was calculated at $18.65. The target reported in our Section 40 estimates is $15.89. The variation is largely due to an increase in employee costs, assets and contract and utilities expenses. Student satisfaction remains high at 93.4% exceeding the target range of 88 – 91%. This is partly due to the confidence interval of the survey but remains an outstanding result compared to the state average of 85%. In total 1.1 million hours of training were delivered within Australia with 6,596 as international Fee for Service.

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Great Southern TAFE

Sectional Highlights Business & Creative Industries Enrolments continue to be popular in 2008 for high school students wishing to combine TAFE with their senior schooling. Students from Albany Senior High School, Mt Barker Community College and other schools have negotiated an arrangement to attend Great Southern TAFE on a part-time basis. Both the College and high schools are working together in unprecedented ways to create the flexibility necessary to accommodate these arrangements. Popular areas are Information Technology, Media, Financial Services and Business Administration. A tour was arranged in partnership with Kimberley TAFE for our Denmark Certificate IV music students. This tour commenced in Broome and went throughout the top-end. Both students and lecturing staff benefitted enormously. Culturally the tour was a very rich learning experience for all involved. After a period of negotiation, exhibition space at the Vancouver Art Centre (VAC) was acquired on an ongoing basis for 2009 and beyond. This will provide significant benefits for students studying visual art and represents an excellent outcome from the partnership developing between the Vancouver Art Centre and Great Southern TAFE. Three new programs were developed and delivered during 2008: • Arts Administration (Denmark campus) trains students to enter the cultural industries

workforce with skills in events management, curating, grants and fundraising, general administration. • Financial Services - Bookkeeping provides tax-related and financial services training for people who work as bookkeepers for industry or themselves. • Photography (Denmark campus) has seen students gain skills (and employment) in not only capturing images but manipulating them for production and web. A new approach to providing visual arts training was developed in 2008. The website art@your.place builds a pathway to a visual art qualification based around a person’s existing art practise. This follows “on the job” methods of providing training and assessment services that are available in other industry training areas.

Social Sciences Tambellup Noongar training for a group of women from 17 – 70 in Certificate I Wider Opportunities for Work and Certificate III in Mentoring (Konga-Moya-Rang) demonstrates community partnerships at work. A successful youth camp was held in Semester 1, with Gaining Access to Training & Employment and Certificate of General Education for Adults students attending. The District Education Office, Participation Co-ordinators and Youth Pathways staff attended to strengthen partnerships. Health courses (including Diploma of Enrolled Nursing, Allied Health Assistant and Registered Nursing) were delivered with full numbers and positive student outcomes. Traineeships were approved in 2008 which will allow for delivery in 2009. Dental increased in work based students this year, with a number undertaking a combination of work based assessment, Recognition of Prior Learning and classroom workshops.

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2008 Annual Report The College led the way in getting the Certificate III in Nutrition and Dietetics approved for delivery in WA. Negotiations are underway to deliver the Certificate III in Nutrition and Dietetics in 2009. Employment based training continued to grow in the section with growth occurring in the disability and aged care sector in particular.

Research & Planning The UniLink program ensures that all graduates from Great Southern TAFE with a Certificate IV, Diploma or Advanced Diploma can articulate directly into a university degree program. College policy ensures that all new Diploma or Advanced Diploma qualifications include agreements with universities to provide advanced standing. This strategy has contributed to the growth in Diploma/Advanced Diploma graduands from Great Southern TAFE. Seven of the original thirteen cadets from the two year Indigenous Lecturing Cadetship program graduated in December 2008. Cadets were located at TAFE Colleges across the State. The first seven students from the TAFELink pilot program in Katanning graduated with both WA Certificate of Education and Certificate IV. Several students have used this qualification to enrol at university by using the Certificate IV to meet alternative entry requirements. TAFELink is now offered to three schools in the region. Curtin, Notre Dame and Murdoch universities have agreed to support the TAFELink program as an alternative entry pathway for regional students. 39,000 Student Contact Hours were delivered under the VET in Schools program with an additional 22,500 Student Contact Hours delivered to school students participating in the School Apprenticeship Link and School Based Traineeships. 67,000 Student Contact Hours of training delivery were also delivered by schools in this region under auspice by Great Southern TAFE. The TryTech program was developed and implemented in partnership with the District Education Office and the Local Community Partnership. This program provides Year 10 students with comprehensive hands on career development experience in the trades. In 2008 the college completed more than 400 Individual Pathways Plans for 16 and 17 year old students attending TAFE rather than attending school.

Trade & Industry Skills Hairdressing and Plumbing were successful in winning a fast track tender for the Certificate III Qualification in each area. This involves industry meetings and developing work place training schedules. The Automotive and Hospitality sections hosted rehabilitation (return-to-work) clients, both are trades people in their industry area and have become valued by their section. The Building and Construction section was awarded a Gold two star rating in the National Trades Excellence rating system. Appling for this award involved an extensive written self evaluation process and an on site evaluation by two industry board members from Sydney. The industry demand for Agricultural Plant Mechanics has increased with employer groups indicating support for this type of training, with more than 25 apprentices now in this industry. Diploma of Builders Registration qualification was delivered in 2008 with a total of thirty plus students registering to be part of this course. V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE A partnership between William Angliss and Great Southern TAFE saw the successful delivery of a program to train Indigenous students in skills to work in a mining environment. The students in this program were then offered employment with an employment agency. This type of training is in negotiations to continue in 2009.

Primary Production & Natural Resource Management Recognition of Prior Learning provided through the Forest Products Commission at Certificate IV and Diploma levels for existing staff members. External funding from Rural Skills Australia, and the Indigenous Co-ordination Centre, Commonwealth Government resulted in three Noongar shearing and shedhand courses being run at Gnowangerup Training Centre. The Nursery and Garden Industry Association of WA visited the section’s nursery centre and reaccredited the facility. (Quality Endorsed) Great Southern TAFE is highlighted in a publication by the Federal Department of Forestry, Science and Fisheries on conservation projects undertaken throughout Australia in 2008. Involvement in the City of Albany’s developmental plans to establish an ‘Environmental Recycling Centre’ at their commercial site. Availability of flexible learning to all state abattoir workers at Certificate III and IV via a two year Memorandum of Understanding with the Australian Training College.

Corporate Services The College Capital Infrastructure Master Plan commissioned by Department of Education and Training and coordinated by Howard & Heaver architects was completed and submitted to the Department. The plan detailed a $44m program over 14 years and it has been recommended by the College Governing Council. The College received clear internal audit reports for 2008, which provided the Governing Council with confidence in internal controls for finance, human resources facilities management and information technology. The College also received an excellent Procurement Capability Report from State Supply Commission. The College has agreed to the employment of a qualified Occupation Health and Safety (OHS) Coordinator who will be responsible for the increasing OHS reporting and operational requirements under the new OHS legislation. Site works have commenced for the new automotive workshops which is stage one of a $1.5m refurbishment of the trades workshops. This project will include expanding the carpentry and joinery workshops and some minor upgrade to the welding workshop. The College has nearly completed the purchase of trade’s equipment under the Transforming Trades banner to the value of $550,000. The majority of this equipment is for the refurbished workshops. A major auction was undertaken at the old college farm site on Mercer Road and over 95% of the items available for auction were sold which was a very successful outcome. With the trades refurbishment project the College has also installed a new five bay secure car garage for the College pool vehicles. Page 28 of 79

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2008 Annual Report The College has successfully transitioned to leasing vehicles from EasiFleet in accordance with Government policy. Currently we only have a few College owned vehicles remaining and they will gradually be replaced by lease vehicles. College records management have implemented an online record keeping awareness training program. This package will be rolled out to all staff in 2009. The College will also upgrade its records management system to Trim Context in 2009, which will enable all records to be electronically managed. A major refurbishment was undertaken at Denmark campus during 2008 which provided the facility with an additional two classrooms, access to all rooms off a new verandah and an increased soundproof music room. The College entered into an agreement with Department of Education and Training whereby the department will fund 50% of college ICT infrastructure refresh program for workstations, servers and switches. The College was commended in the State of the Service Report by the Commissioner for Public Sector Standards as one of six agencies achieving best practice in reporting and analysis of risk management in official conduct, human resource management and public interest disclosures. Expenditure In December 2008, the College achieved a level of expenditure consistent with estimates provided by the College under Section 42 of the Financial Administration and Audit Act 1985. The 2008 target was a Total Equity of $26,842,385 and the 2008 outcome resulted in a Total Equity of $29,978,715, the difference in value being primarily due to revaluation of assets (an increase of $1.77 million) and a capital works grant of $1.5 million for Trades facilities upgrade. Our People  Total number of staff as at 27 Dec 2008 was 274.  63% were permanent or contract employees, and 37% casual employees.

Performance & Review Student feedback in 2008 revealed a high satisfaction rating once again. As reported in the College’s Key Performance Indicators, Great Southern TAFE achieved 93% student satisfaction, higher than the state average of 85%. Satisfaction was very high across all segments, but lecturer performance rated particularly high in the 2008 survey, at 90% compared to a state average of 78%. The College also had a tremendous year in terms of students’ successful completion of units of study. The Module Load Completion Rate (MLCR) for 2008 was 86%, the highest level on record for Great Southern TAFE. Indigenous students and students with a disability also showed great improvements in completion rates. The measure for students with a disability has risen to 77% in 2008 and the gap of 9% compared to the total student population is also now the smallest on record. Indigenous students’ completion rates are also at an historic high, increasing by 12% from 2007 to 74%. Our Students  In 2008, 6407 students attended a course at Great Southern TAFE. The largest number of students was in the 15 to 19 year age group, with most students studying part time.

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Great Southern TAFE  On average across all age groups, 52% of students studying at Great Southern TAFE are female and 48% male.  The number of student contact hours delivered to international students tripled. Student Population by Age Group and Gender  Apprenticeships and Traineeships increased numbers were maintained, despite the impact of a slowing economy towards the end of 2008.  35% of all Indigenous students were enrolled in employment based outcomes.  Indigenous student completion rates were up from 62% in 2007 to 74% in 2008. Qualifications  70 % of the delivery in 2008 was in courses at Certificate III level and above compared to 64% in 2007. Choice of Provider:  Whether or not the training provider offers the type of course that students wanted to study (91%) and the quality of lecturers (89%) proved to be the two most important factors in Great Southern TAFE students’ choice to enrol.  Great Southern TAFE students were least satisfied with the availability and cost of public transport to the college (31% not satisfied). Experiences:  Students experiences with the College were very positive overall and satisfaction exceeded the state average across all measures.  In terms of lecturer performance, the highest performing attributes were lecturers treating students with respect (96%), lecturers had a thorough knowledge of course content (95%), lecturers provided opportunities to ask questions (95%) and were reliable in responding to requests for information or feedback (94%). All other aspects of lecturer performance were also rated highly and showed improvement from 2007.  All quality of assessment attributes were rated highly by more than 80% of students. Student Background: Employment related factors were the most common reasons students enrolled in their courses, with 65% of Great Southern TAFE students giving one or more employment reasons. The most common employment – related reasons were to upgrade or gain extra skills for their current job or to start a different career or occupation. The TAFE Student Outcomes Survey employment results are not available in 2008 (full details in the Performance Indicators) however, anecdotal evidence through lecturer networks suggests that students are being employed in their chosen industry area. Many, especially in financial services and retail, are employed before completion of their training. In 2008 we issued more certificates and delivered more hours with higher completions than ever before through Albany Regional Prison and Pardelup. Our training model for prisons has been adopted by the Department of Corrective Services and implemented throughout Prison Education Centres via a Memorandum of Understanding. Student Management continued to lower the amount of Student debt carried by the College External Delivery and implemented several new training packages covering 11 qualifications ready for delivery in 2009.

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2008 Annual Report The Award Night in 2008 was held on the 4th April at the PCYC. The College is extremely grateful for the huge number of sponsors who support awards for Great Southern TAFE students. The evening once again ran very smoothly, starting and finishing on time. Try Tech was reintroduced at the 2008 Great Southern Careers Expo held in August. This gave the participants a hands on opportunity to test their skills as they were rotated between bricklaying and plumbing. The positive feedback will ensure TryTech will remain on the agenda for future Open Days. The universities in attendance reported much more interaction with the prospective students than previously. Overall the Expo once again proved very successful. The College continued its provision of Employment Services and Career Guidance with the following outcomes in 2008: 136 students attended Employment Service Workshops; 142 students received individual help with Resumes, Selection Criteria, Application letters, interview skills, mock interviews and job search; and 36 students received help with Career Choices.

TAFE Business Centre The Business Centre continued to support the TAFEWA network through an expansion of its intrastate partnerships with the Colleges in the Kimberley, Pilbara and Kalgoorlie regions. Occupational Safety and Health training and WorkSafe licensing courses were delivered in Kalgoorlie, Broome, Kununurra, Derby, Newman and Karratha. Our partnership with Argyle Diamond Mines continued in 2008, with the provision of 8 blocks of training on-site at the mine and at the Kununurra campus of Kimberley TAFE. The focus of the training was OHS and WorkSafe licensing. The Business Centre was awarded a contract by Ravensthorpe Nickel for the provision of its 2009 computer training for staff at the Ravensthorpe mine. Preparations are under way for the commencement of delivery in 2009. Fee-for-service training targets for 2008 were exceeded as the Business Centre continued to increase business at a local, state and international level. Growth has again been boosted by the development of new products and a continuing emphasis on high quality training for the corporate sector. In its second year of targeting the international student market, the Business Centre, in partnership with Education and Training International, attracted 8 international students to study at the Albany campus. Students were spread across a variety of disciplines, including viticulture, commercial cookery and community services. Business Centre staff participated in the College’s re-registration audit in 2008, with audits conducted on some high risk and OHS training. Our training practices and procedures were identified by the auditor as “best practice”, indicating a successful transition from largely nonaccredited programs to accredited program delivery. The College partnered with William Angliss Institute in 2008 for the delivery of Indigenous specific hospitality training. Williams Angliss’ contractual arrangements with labour hire company Compass, who provide kitchen, cleaning and ground staff for BHP sites, means that course participants have the opportunity to gain employment with BHP following successful completion of the training.

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Great Southern TAFE The Business Centre, together with Indigenous Programs, was successful with a tender submission for the provision of pre-employment training services for Indigenous clients in the Great Southern region. The Business Centre successfully introduced its first fee-for-service external studies product to the market in 2008. Certificate IV in Training and Assessment attracted 16 external students in its first three months of availability. More than 2009 students were registered as receiving the Fee for Service Products in 2008.

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2008 Annual Report

Section Three – Significant Issues and Trends Skills Shortages Economic conditions suggest rising unemployment across the region as the resource sector sheds jobs and tourism and retail employment options dry up. Demographic factors are expected to drive regional demand for occupations in the service industries and in sectors such as health, community services, and education. These industries will be more able to select the most competitive and skilled workers. Overall demand for higher skills in Western Australia is likely to remain constant so the VET sector will increasingly focus on high-level qualifications. The competitive labour market highlights the need to increase participation rates – Indigenous participation rates continue to lag behind those of the non-Indigenous labour force. Strategies need to be developed to increase participation and training is likely to be integral to the mix of strategies adopted. As business contracts, a focus on improving productivity and profitability provides some training services opportunities. Flexibility and innovation will be required if the training system is to encourage people already in the workforce to continue developing their skills. In this environment young people need to be given every opportunity at school to begin developing vocational skills to provide a future career path.

Employment Trends Unemployment rates in the region follow Western Australian and will trend up after 2008. At between 4% and 5%, the regional unemployment rate is at its lowest level for more than 3 decades but regional employers are increasingly expecting a tightening of expenditure and contraction of markets. This will result in more part time enrolments from workers and more full time demand at lower qualification levels from displaced workers.

Information and Communication Technologies The rapid changes in and widespread use of information and communications technologies in the workplace require students to be technology smart and lecturers to be skilled in the use of technology in teaching. Access to affordable broadband to ensure the level of regional access required to meet the needs of students & lecturers continues to be a problem. The issue is multifaceted, requiring investment in computers, communications networks and software and ranges from the professional development of staff using technologies, online learning for students and access to online curriculum resources and business applications.

Industry Developments The Great Southern Region remains the second largest producer of agricultural commodities in Western Australia, accounting for almost 13 per cent of the State’s agriculture output. The main agriculture industries include broadacre cropping, livestock and wool. Other major industries include retail trade, manufacturing, tourism and construction. These industries have low wage

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Page 33 of 79


Great Southern TAFE rates and many of the skills needed by agricultural labour were also in demand by the resource industry. The sea/tree change trends continue to drive investments in the residential construction industry, with strong growth along the south coast, one result of which has been substantial growth in apprenticeship indentures. Currently the housing industry is maintaining this position. The falling commodity prices have delayed mining operations reaching proposed capacity in 2008 and the closure of the Ravensthorpe mine requires a training response. Plantation forestry represents a significant investment in the region with 135,000 hectares of blue gums having been planted for rotational harvesting. In 2008 the annual chip production for export reached 2.5M tonnes. Viticulture continues to grow in importance with the Great Southern producing around 25% of the State’s wine grapes. The Region has developed a reputation as a producer of premium quality red and white wine, for both the domestic and export markets. It is now the second largest wine grape producing region in the State and the annual crush is approaching 40% of the State’s annual crush and 40% of the value.

Indigenous Employment & Training Although the absolute Indigenous workforce status has continued to improve, the relative gap in key indicators has either stalled or reversed. Improvements in labour force status appear to have had little impact on income relativities, and therefore structural reliance of Indigenous people on state transfers benefits for income has remained largely unaltered. Year 12 graduation rates for Indigenous people remain significantly lower than for the rest of the population. A low graduation rate will continue to act as an impediment to successful participation in a more competitive labour force.

Page 34 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

Section Four – Disclosures and Legal Compliance Certification of Performance Indicators

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Great Southern TAFE

Key Performance Indicators DESIRED OUTCOME The provision of effective and efficient vocational education and training services to meet community and industry training needs.

Effectiveness Indicators The effectiveness indicators measure the achievement of vocational education and training in meeting community and industry needs via profile achievement, student and graduate satisfaction and labour force status of graduates.

1.1

Annual VET College Profile Target Achievement

This performance indicator shows the percentage of student curriculum hours (SCH) achieved for activities as contracted with the Department of Education and Training for vocational education and training delivery through the Delivery and Performance Agreement. The allocation of hours to Great Southern TAFE in specific industry areas is determined by the State Training Strategy which is developed in consultation with industry and the community. The ability of the college to fulfil planned delivery reflects its effectiveness in meeting industry and community needs. The planned figure reported in this indicator is the delivery agreed to in the initial Delivery and Performance Agreement and does not reflect changes to delivery targets agreed to in subsequent addenda to that agreement. Figure 1 Achievement of Profile (%)

Achievement of Profile (%) (GSTAFE Target: 100-103%) 110% 100% 90%

102.90%

106.40%

99.00%

100.40%

2005

2006

2007

2008

99.00%

100.40%

102.90%

106.40%

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Achievement %

Page 36 of 79

V2.4


2008 Annual Report 2005

2006

2007

2008

Planned SCH

842491

846528

838713

835713

SCH Achieved

834101

849517

862830

889,022

In 2008 the College achieved 106.4% of the planned delivery set in the Delivery and Performance Agreement for 2008. This increase over the targeted amount was due to insufficient SCH funded through the department at the start of the academic year compared to what the college anticipated. The table below shows historical allocations by industry group (based on the occupation or outcome qualifications are intended to serve) and highlights the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent performance in achieving industry delivery targets. Variations in the percentage of achievement show levels of lower or higher than expected demand. All industry group variations are within acceptable range of parameters set in the Delivery and Performance Agreement. The delivery targets for 2008 represent delivery agreed to in the initial Delivery and Performance Agreement and does not reflect changes to delivery targets agreed to in subsequent addenda to that agreement. Table 1 Profiled and Achieved SCH by Industry Classification

Industry Group 01A Recreation, Sports and Entertainment 01B Visual and Performing Arts 01C Design 02A Automotive 03A Building and Constructions 03B Surveying and Building 04A Community Service Workers 04B Education and Childcare 04C Health 04D Library Workers 05A Finance, Insurance Property Service 06A 07A 07B 08A 08B 09A 09B 10A 10B 10C 10D 11A 12A 12B 13A 13B 13C 13D 14A

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Workers Food Trades and Processing Clothing Footwear and Soft Furnishings Furniture Manufacture Communications Printing and Publishing Engineering and Drafting Metal and Mining Animal Care Forestry, Farming and Landcare Fishing Horticulture Process Manufacturing Personal Service Retail Cooking Hospitality Tourism Travel Agents Transport Trades, Storage and Associated

Actual 2005

Planned

Achievement

2006

2007

2008

11896 55127 8935 27257 27027 7140 65045 29610 24651

12663 56545 15600 25000 47667 10020 68710 37073 34112

20100 46535 18255 16669 57157 6760 77225 33015 32940

5065 52872 16930 25319 64816 9140 92410 40865 30558

19684 48667 17640 15650 53838 6740 66860 31145 35370

25.7% 108.6% 96.0% 161.8% 120.4% 135.6% 138.2% 131.2% 86.4%

1798

1226

2236

2566

1599

160.5%

35283 8190 6851

32154 17741 7643

32244 12059 12341

6757 8365 6721

26494 11010 11112

25.5% 76.0% 60.5%

3220 29087

2150 25621 131867

2700 25729 700 86118

79.6% 99.6%

63481

3124 26122 0 103111

28685

50892

54391

32214

47205

68.2%

22293 8978 9574 17667 3704 636

19327 8844 10444 10608 5610

31270 2444 8285 8771 6340

42593 846 13731 7471 4020

32725 1950 6730 7250 5460

130.2% 43.4% 204.0% 103.0% 73.6%

2065

1280

1190

107.6%

25815 1290 105633

153.1%

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Great Southern TAFE 15A 15B 16A 16B 16C 17A 18A 19A 19B 19C 19D 19E

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Electrical Trades Accounting and Other Business Services Management Office and Clerical Computing Science and Technical Workers ACE Adult Literacy/ ESL Languages Miscellaneous Targeted Access and Participation Courses

860 18581 50590

20140 42090

20519 42325

22000 48120

93.3% 88.0%

25620 44742 56249

14430 46515 56085 384

10560 57850 29351 3698

11205 63670 44120 3115

18019 55140 33013 10975

62.2% 115.5% 133.6% 28.4%

75120 6370

64540 7465 0 13677

43890 7920

62380 7480

70.4% 105.9%

19248

65910 5205 0 23290

28081

15020

187.0%

834101

849517

862830

889022

835713

106.4%

16932 56735

The Delivery and Performance Agreement (DPA) allows for flexibility in shifting delivery between industry groups within agreed tolerances. Items in bold in the table above are industry groups where actual results vary by 10% or more from the original planned SCH. These variations due to:  Raising of the School Leaving Age  the original SCH allocation from the Department of Training insufficient to meet local demand  increased targets for delivery in skills shortage areas All variations are within the tolerances set by the DPA.

1.2

Overall Student Satisfaction

The performance indicator of overall student satisfaction expresses the number of 'very satisfied' and ‘satisfied’ respondents, which is expressed as a proportion of the total survey respondents. It measures students’ perceptions of the effectiveness of the college’s vocational education and training services.

WA TAFE Student Satisfaction Survey Colmar Brunton conducted a student satisfaction survey on behalf of the Department of Education and Training and colleges in October 2008, with the summary of results being published in December 2008. The survey sought students' views on the quality of vocational education training being delivered. Students were asked about the quality of teaching and assessment, the suitability of teaching methods and the quality of the course experience. The 2008 survey was conducted using a sample of Great Southern TAFE students selected from populations of institution-based students and employment based students. Of the 2,367 potential population identified, 1,242 were surveyed and the response rate was 21.0% The overall satisfaction rate for 2008 was 93.4% with a relative sampling error of ±2.8% at a 95% confidence level. The relative sampling error is a measure of the accuracy of the sampling process in giving a correct estimate of reported items. As in previous years, the data was weighted to ensure that the sample that was achieved was representative of the student population. The data was weighted by college, IBS/EBS status and WADT group. A calculation is used to weight the data which involved dividing the percentage each student grouping which made up in the total student population, by the percentage of responses that that Page 38 of 79

V2.4


2008 Annual Report group made up in the total survey sample. The weighting uses industry group of study and whether students were involved in employment based or institution based study. Figure 2 Student Satisfaction Rate

Student Satisfaction Rate (GSTAFE Target: 88-91%) 100% 90%

89%

93% 85%

86%

90%

87%

93% 85%

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

2005

2006

2007

2008

GSTAFE

89%

93%

90%

93%

WA

85%

86%

87%

85%

The 2008 overall satisfaction rate for Great Southern TAFE is the best result in several years and is higher than the state satisfaction average of 86%. The result exceeds the target range and the college believes this is a reflection of changing work practices which ensure flexibility in meeting the training and assessment needs of students.

TAFE Student Outcomes Survey The aim of the national TAFE Student Outcomes Survey is to measure vocational education and training (VET) studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; employment, further study destinations and the opinions of the training undertaken. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conduct surveys with an appropriate sample design to produce statistically reliable College level data in alternative years. The College is unable to provide an update to this KPI as statistically valid College level data is not available in 2008. The 2007 Student Outcomes Survey was conducted by I-view Pty Ltd on behalf of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) and was funded by the Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST). The results were published in November 2007. The survey was administered to Great Southern TAFE students who undertook their studies at the College and graduated in 2006. The survey included all Great Southern TAFE students who completed a Certificate, Advanced Certificate, Associate Diploma, Diploma, Advanced Diploma or Bachelors Degree, and who had an Australian address as their usual address. Graduate Employment status was measured as at 27 May 2007 for each category (employed, unemployed and not in labour force), and the ratio of graduates in each category compared to valid respondents expressed as a percentage. Data from this survey was used to measure graduate employment status and graduate satisfaction.

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Great Southern TAFE

1.3

Graduate Employment Status

The proportion of graduates in employment is a key performance indicator that shows the extent to which the college is meeting industry and community need for training services that equip graduates for changing employment opportunities. Figure 3 Graduate Employment Status

Graduate Employment Status 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% GSTAFE

WA

Aust GSTAFE

WA

2004

Aust GSTAFE

2005 Employed

2004

Unemployed

Aust GSTAFE

2006

n/a

n/a

n/a

75.8%

Unemployed n/a

n/a

n/a

Not in Labour n/a Force n/a NS

n/a n/a

Aust

2007 WA Aust

GSTAFE WA

Aust

78.6% 80.0% n/a

n/a

n/a

79.2%

82.7%

81.3%

9.0%

8.4%

n/a

n/a

n/a

6.8%

6.0%

8.3%

n/a

15.2%

13.0% 10.8% n/a

n/a

n/a

13.9%

11.3%

10.4%

n/a

1.5%

1.8%

n/a

n/a

4%

2%

2%

9.3%

1.8%

GSTAFE

Aust

NS

2006

Aust GSTAFE WA

WA 2007

Not in Labour Force

2005

GSTAFE WA

Employed

WA

n/a

Note 1: Figure 3 is taken from Student Outcome Survey targeting years to 2007. The College is unable to provide an update to this KPI as statistically valid College level data is not available in 2008. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conducts surveys with an appropriate sample design to produce statistically reliable College level data in alternative years commencing from 2005. In 2007 the data for graduate employment outcomes did not include graduates who were enrolled in TAFE at the time of the survey. Note 2: There is no target specified for this measure as the employment of graduates is not under control of Great Southern TAFE and will vary externally depending on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; intentions and the condition of the labour market

The 2007 TAFE Student Outcomes Survey report for Great Southern TAFE indicated that the graduate employment rate for Great Southern TAFE was 79.2% is a significant improvement on the last reported measure of 75.8% in 2005 and there is a corresponding decrease in students declaring themselves unemployed as at 25th May 2007. The target for this indicator was not set at the time of the 2007 Student Outcomes Survey.

Page 40 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

1.4

Graduate Satisfaction

Graduate satisfaction is a key performance indicator that measures the extent to which Great Southern TAFE graduates had wholly or partly achieved their main reason for undertaking the course and is compared to the State average. It measures studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perceptions of training effectiveness. Figure 4 Graduate Satisfaction

Graduate Satisfaction (GSTAFE Target: 86-89%) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

2004

2005

2006

2007

GS TAFE

0

86.0%

0

86.6%

West Aust

0

83.8%

0

87.0%

Australia

0

84.5%

0

86.1%

Note 3: Figure 4 is taken from Student Outcome Surveys targeting years to 2007. The College is unable to provide an update to this KPI as statistically valid College level data is not available in 2008. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conducts surveys with an appropriate sample design to produce statistically reliable College level data in alternative years commencing from 2005.

The TAFE Student Outcomes Survey report for Great Southern TAFE, published in 2007 indicates that the overall graduate satisfaction for Great Southern TAFE has improved slightly 86.0% to 86.6%. The satisfaction measure is improving over the three years illustrated and in 2007 the college bettered the overall national result. The target for this indicator was not set at the time of the 2007 Student Outcomes Survey.

Efficiency Indicators 2.1 Overall Cost per Student Curriculum Hour (SCH) for Aggregate College Delivery The overall cost per SCH is an efficiency measure that shows the aggregate unit cost of delivery output per SCH, based on the delivery costs (Total Cost of Services) as detailed in the Financial Statements.

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Great Southern TAFE Figure 5 Cost per SCH for Aggregate College Delivery

Cost per SCH for Aggregate College Delivery (GSTAFE Target: $15.89) $19.00

$18.65

$18.50 $17.83

$18.00 $17.50 $16.96

$17.00 $16.50 $16.00

$15.79

$15.50 $15.00 $14.50 $14.00 2005

2006

2007

2008

The college’s 2006 total cost of services (including capital user charge) per student curriculum hour is $18.65 and exceeds the Section 40 estimate to Treasury. The increase of $0.82 (including capital user charge) is attributable to:    

Increase in employee costs due to salary award increases superannuation expense Increase in price of stock sold for both cafe and bookshop Increase in capital user charge, due to increase in net assets with following land and building revaluations  Increase in expenses for cleaning, gardening security & printing contracts  Increase in utilities expenses

Page 42 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

Certification of Financial Statements

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Page 43 of 79


Great Southern TAFE

Independent Audit Opinion

Auditor General INDEPENDENT AUDIT OPINION To the Parliament of Western Australia GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008 I have audited the accounts, financial statements, controls and key performance indicators of the Great Southern TAFE. The financial statements comprise the Balance Sheet as at 31 December 2008, and the Income Statement, Statement of Changes in Equity and Cash Flow Statement for the year then ended, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory Notes. The key performance indicators consist of key indicators of effectiveness and efficiency. Governing Council’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements and Key Performance Indicators The Governing Council is responsible for keeping proper accounts, and the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations) and the Treasurer’s Instructions, and the key performance indicators. This responsibility includes establishing and maintaining internal controls relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements and key performance indicators that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances; and complying with the Financial Management Act 2006 and other relevant written law. Summary of my Role As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements, controls and key performance indicators based on my audit. This was done by testing selected samples of the audit evidence. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion. Further information on my audit approach is provided in my audit practice statement. Refer "http://www.audit.wa.gov.au/pubs/Audit-Practice-Statement.pdf". An audit does not guarantee that every amount and disclosure in the financial statements and key performance indicators is error free. The term “reasonable assurance” recognises that an audit does not examine all evidence and every transaction. However, my audit procedures should identify errors or omissions significant enough to adversely affect the decisions of users of the financial statements and key performance indicators.

Page 1 of 2 th

4 Floor Dumas House 2 Havelock Street West Perth 6005 Western Australia Tel: 08 9222 7500 Fax: 08 9322 5664

Page 44 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

Great Southern TAFE Financial Statements and Key Performance Indicators for the year ended 31 December 2008 Audit Opinion In my opinion, (i) the financial statements are based on proper accounts and present fairly the financial position of the Great Southern TAFE at 31 December 2008 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year ended on that date. They are in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations) and the Treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Instructions; (ii) the controls exercised by the College provide reasonable assurance that the receipt, expenditure and investment of money, the acquisition and disposal of property, and the incurring of liabilities have been in accordance with legislative provisions; and (iii) the key performance indicators of the College are relevant and appropriate to help users assess the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance and fairly represent the indicated performance for the year ended 31 December 2008.

GLEN CLARKE ACTING AUDITOR GENERAL 18 March 2009

Page 2 of 2

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Great Southern TAFE

Financial Statements Income Statement Great Southern TAFE INCOME STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008 Notes COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits expense Supplies and services Depreciation and amortisation expense Grants and subsidies Capital user charge Cost of sales Loss on disposal of non-current assets Other expenses Total cost of services Income Revenue Fee for service Student fees and charges Ancillary trading Sales Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest revenue Other revenue Total revenue

2007 $

7 8 9 10 11 16 20 12

12,435,727 5,039,261 780,696 41,027 405,632 34,339 898,465 19,635,147

11,611,162 4,134,461 723,605 93,249 777,878 325,638 172,113 753,079 18,591,185

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

1,033,294 1,286,891 233,565 551,222 262,908 389,031 160,776 3,917,687 (34,339)

1,016,163 1,389,658 148,140 450,469 167,650 244,529 186,894 3,603,503

3,917,687

3,603,503

(15,717,460)

(14,987,682)

15,180,492 805,398 15,985,890

14,870,423 9,654 711,148 15,591,225

268,430

603,543

Total income other than income from State Government

NET COST OF SERVICES INCOME FROM STATE GOVERNMENT Service Appropriation Liabilities assumed by the Treasurer Resources received free of charge Total income from State Government

2008 $

21

SURPLUS FOR THE PERIOD

The Income Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Page 46 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

Balance Sheet Great Southern TAFE BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2008

2008 $

2007 $

39 22,39 23 24 22,25

317,960 1,725,247 50,426 463,554 2,757,294 5,314,481

691,202 979,482 46,009 346,649 2,288,272 4,351,614

26 22

26,997,092 134,649 27,131,741

25,422,441 143,465 25,565,906

32,446,222

29,917,520

28 29 30

453,039 1,329,078 106,443 1,888,560

299,945 1,215,778 32,134 1,547,857

29

578,947 578,947

523,987 523,987

2,467,507

2,071,844

29,978,715

27,845,676

2,509,407 11,785,726 15,683,582

2,415,898 10,014,626 15,415,152

29,978,715

27,845,676

Notes ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Restricted cash and cash equivalents Inventories Receivables Other current assets Total Current Assets Non-Current Assets Property, plant and equipment Restricted cash and cash equivalents Total Non-Current Assets TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Payables Provisions Other current liabilities Total Current Liabilities Non-Current Liabilities Provisions Total Non-Current Liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY Contributed equity Reserves Accumulated surplus

32

TOTAL EQUITY

The Balance Sheet should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Great Southern TAFE

Statement of Changes in Equity Great Southern TAFE STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008 Notes Balance of equity at start of period CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Balance at start of period Capital contributions Balance at end of period

32

RESERVES Asset Revaluation Reserve Balance at start of period Gains/(losses) from asset revaluation Balance at end of period

32

ACCUMULATED SURPLUS Balance at start of period Surplus for the period Balance at end of period

32

Balance of equity at end of period Total income and expenses for the period (a)

2008 $ 27,845,676

2007 $ 25,282,937

2,415,898 93,509 2,509,407

2,264,968 150,930 2,415,898

10,014,626 1,771,100 11,785,726

8,206,360 1,808,266 10,014,626

15,415,152 268,430 15,683,582

14,811,609 603,543 15,415,152

29,978,715

27,845,676

2,039,530

2,411,809

(a) The aggregate net amount attributable to each category of equity is: surplus $268,430 plus gains from asset revaluation of $1,771,100 (2007: surplus $603,543 plus gains from revaluation $1,808,266)

The Statement of Changes in Equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Page 48 of 79

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2008 Annual Report

Cash Flow Statement Great Southern TAFE CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008

2008 $

2007 $

14,182,791 14,182,791

13,933,717 13,933,717

Utilised as follows: CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Payments Employee benefits Supplies and services Grants and subsidies Capital user charge GST payments on purchases Cost of goods sold Other payments

(11,173,122) (4,197,882) (41,027) (473,135) (405,632) (898,010)

Receipts Fee for service Student fees and charges Ancillary trading Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest received GST receipts on sales GST receipts from taxation authority Sale of goods Other receipts Net cash used in operating activities

1,018,341 1,324,010 233,565 262,908 258,336 212,622 260,513 546,652 226,777 (12,845,084)

(10,483,480) (3,644,240) (93,249) (777,878) (471,054) (325,638) (733,733) 1,243,223 1,394,479 148,140 167,650 234,930 231,931 239,123 445,246 186,891 (12,237,659)

99,797 (625,243) (525,446)

13,023 (839,129) (826,106)

812,261

869,952

4,074,851

3,204,899

4,887,112

4,074,851

Notes CASH FLOWS FROM STATE GOVERNMENT Service Appropriation - Department of Education and Training Capital Contributions - Department of Education and Training Net cash provided by State Government

33

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sale of non-current physical assets Purchase of non-current physical assets Net cash used in investing activities Net increase in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at begining of period CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD

33

The Cash Flow Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 1

Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (a) General The College's financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2008 have been prepared in accordance with Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS) which comprise a Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements (the Framework) and Australian Accounting Standards (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations). In preparing these financial statements the College has adopted, where relevant to its operations, new and revised standards and interpretations from their operative dates as issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and formerly the Urgent Issues Group (UIG). (b) Early adoption of standards The College cannot early adopt an Australian Accounting Standard or Australian Accounting Interpretation unless specifically permitted by Treasurer's Instruction (TI) 1101 'Application of Australian Accounting Standards and Other Pronouncements'. No standards and interpretations that have been issued or amended but are not yet effective have been early adopted by the College for the annual reporting period ended 31 December 2008.

2

Summary of significant accounting policies The following accounting policies have been adopted in the preparation of these financial statements. Unless otherwise stated, these policies are consistent with those adopted in the previous year. (a) General statement The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial report which has been prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the AASB as applied by the TIs. Several of these are modified by the TIs to vary application, disclosure, format and wording. The Financial Management Act and the TIs are legislative provisions governing the preparation of financial statements and take precedence over the Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the AASB. Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. (b) Basis of preparation The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting using the historical cost convention, modified by the revaluation of land and buildings which are measured at fair value. The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements have been consistently applied throughout all periods presented unless otherwise stated. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest dollar ($). The judgements that have been made in the process of applying the College’s accounting policies that have the most significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial statements are disclosed at note 4 ‘Judgements made by management in applying accounting policies’. The key assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimation uncertainty at the balance sheet date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year, are disclosed at note 5 ‘Key sources of estimation uncertainty’. (c) Reporting entity The reporting entity comprises the College and entities listed at note 42 ‘Related bodies’. (d) Contributed equity UIG Interpretation 1038 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities’ requires transfers in the nature of equity contributions to be designated by the Government (the owner) as contributions by owners (at the time of, or prior to, transfer) before such transfers can be recognised as equity contributions. Capital contributions (appropriations) are designated as contributions by owners per TI 955 'Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly Owned Public Sector Entities' and have been credited directly to Contributed Equity.

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V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

Transfer of net assets to/from other agencies are designated as contributions by/distributions to owners to where the transfers are non-discretionary and non-reciprocal. See note 32 'Equity'. Repayable capital appropriations are recognised as liabilities. (e) Income Revenue recognition Revenue is measured at the fair value of consideration received or receivable. The majority of operating revenue of the College represents revenue earned from student fees and charges, fee for service, ancillary services, trading activities and Commonwealth grants and contributions. Sale of goods Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably. Rendering of services Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction. Interest Revenue is recognised as the interest accrues. Grants, donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions Revenue is recognised at fair value when the College obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions, usually upon their receipt. Other non-reciprocal contributions that are not contributions by owners are recognised at their fair value. Contributions of services are only recognised when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would be purchased if not donated. Where contributions recognised as revenues during the reporting period were obtained on the condition that they be expended in a particular manner or used over a particular period, and those conditions were undischarged as at the balance sheet date, the nature of, and amounts pertaining to, those undischarged conditions are disclosed in the notes. State funds The funds received from the Department of Education and Training in respect of the delivery of services forming part of the Delivery Performance Agreement are included in State funds, disclosed under 'Income from State Government'. They are the result of training successfully tendered for under competitive tendering arrangements. This revenue is recognised at nominal value in the period in which the College meets the terms of the Agreement. See note 21 'Income from State Government'. Gains Gains may be realised or unrealised and are usually recognised on a net basis. These include gains arising on the disposal of non-current assets and some revaluations of non-current assets. (f) Property, plant and equipment Capitalisation/Expensing of assets Items of property, plant and equipment costing $5,000 or more are recognised as assets and the cost of utilising assets is expensed (depreciated) over their useful lives. Items of property, plant and equipment costing less than $5,000 are recognised as an expense in the Income Statement (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). Initial recognition and measurement All items of property, plant and equipment and infrastructure are initially recognised at cost. For items of property, plant and equipment and infrastructure acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, the cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition. Subsequent measurement After recognition as an asset, the revaluation model is used for the measurement of land and buildings and the cost model for all other property, plant and equipment. Land and buildings are carried at fair value less accumulated depreciation on buildings and accumulated impairment losses. All other items of property, plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Where market-based evidence is available, the fair value of land and buildings is determined on the basis of current market buying values determined by reference to recent market transactions. When buildings are revalued by reference to recent market

V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 transactions, the accumulated depreciation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net amount restated to the revalued amount. Where market-based evidence is not available, the fair value of land and buildings is determined on the basis of existing use. This normally applies where buildings are specialised or where land use is restricted. Fair value for existing use assets is determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits embodied in the asset, i.e. the depreciated replacement cost. Where the fair value of buildings is dependent on using the depreciated replacement cost, the gross carrying amount and the accumulated depreciation are restated proportionately. Independent valuations of land and buildings are provided annually by the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate) and recognised on 31 December, 2008, with sufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount does not differ materially from the asset's fair value at the balance sheet date. The most significant assumptions in estimating fair value are made in assessing whether to apply the existing use basis to assets and in determining estimated useful life. Professional judgement by the valuer is required where the evidence does not provide a clear distinction between market type assets and existing use assets. Refer to note 26 'Property, plant and equipment' for further information on revaluations. Depreciation All non-current assets having a limited useful life are systematically depreciated over their estimated useful lives in a manner which reflects the consumption of their future economic benefits. Derecognition Upon disposal or derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment, any revaluation reserve relating to that asset is retained in the asset revaluation reserve. Asset Revaluation Reserve The asset revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of non-current assets as described in note 26 "Property, plant and equipment" Land is not depreciated. Depreciation on other assets is based on the straight line method over its useful life, using rates which are reviewed annually. Estimated useful lives for each class of depreciable asset are: Buildings

40 to 70 years

Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers

4 to 15 years

Plant, furniture and general equipment

5 to 15 years

Computing, communications and software (a)

4 to10 years

(a) Software that is integral to the operation of related hardware. (g) Impairment of assets Property, plant and equipment, and intangible assets are tested for any indication of impairment at each balance sheet date. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, the asset is considered impaired and is written down to the recoverable amount and an impairment loss is recognised. As the College is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified as a surplus asset, the recoverable amount is the higher of an assetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair value less costs to sell and depreciated replacement cost. The risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an assetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depreciation is materially understated, where the replacement cost is falling or where there is a significant change in useful life. Each relevant class of assets is reviewed annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation/amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of assets' future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs or a significant change in useful life. Intangible assets not yet available for use are tested for impairment at each balance sheet date irrespective of whether there is any indication of impairment. The recoverable amount of assets identified as surplus assets is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and the present value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Surplus assets carried at fair value have no risk of material impairment

Page 52 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

where fair value is determined by reference to market-based evidence. Where fair value is determined by reference to depreciated replacement cost, surplus assets are at risk of impairment and the recoverable amount is measured. See note 27 ‘Impairment of assets’ for the outcome of impairment reviews and testing. See note 2(m) 'Receivables' and note 24 'Receivables' for impairment of receivables. (h) Leases The College has entered into operating lease for printing and photcopying services and seven property leases through out Great Southern region for the delivery of training. For the photocopying and printing services lease the payments are expensed on a rate per copy and property leases are expensed on a straight line basis over the lease term as this represents the pattern of benefits derived from the leased properties. (i) Financial instruments In addition to cash, the College has two categories of financial instruments:  Loan and receivables; and  Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost these have been disaggregated into the following classes. Financial assets  cash and cash equivalents (including restricted cash and cash equivalents)  receivables  term deposits Financial liabilities  payables Initial recognition and measurement of financial instruments is at fair value which normally equates to the transaction cost or face value. Subsequent measurement is at amortised cost using the effective interest method. The fair value of short-term receivables and payables is the transaction cost or the face value because there is no interest rate applicable and subsequent measurement is not required as the effect of discounting is not material. (j) Cash and cash equivalents For the purpose of the Cash Flow Statement, cash and cash equivalents include restricted cash and cash equivalents. These are comprised of cash on hand and short-term deposits with original maturities of seven months or less that are readily convertible to a known amount of cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value, and bank overdrafts. (k) Accrued salaries The accrued salaries suspense account (see note 22 'Restricted cash and cash equivalents' consists of amounts paid annually into a suspense account over a period of ten financial years to largely meet the additional cash outlay in each eleventh year when 27 pay days occur instead of the normal 26. No interest is received on this account. Accrued salaries (see note 28 'Payables') represent the amount due to staff but unpaid at the end of the financial year, as the end of the last pay period for that financial year does not coincide with the end of the financial year. Accrued salaries are settled within a fortnight of the financial year end. The College considers the carrying amount of accrued salaries to be equivalent to its net fair value. (l) Inventories Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Costs are assigned by the method most appropriate to each particular class of inventory, with the majority being valued on a first in first out basis. Inventories not held for resale are valued at cost unless they are no longer required, in which case they are valued at net realisable value. See note 23 'Inventories'. (m) Receivables Receivables are recognised and carried at original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts (impairment). The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis and any receivables identified as uncollectible are written off against the allowance account. The provision for uncollectible amounts (doubtful debts) is raised when there is objective evidence

V2.3

Page 53 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 that the College will not be able to collect the debts. The carrying amount is equivalent to fair value as it is due for settlement within 30 days. See note 2(i) ‘Financial instruments’ and note 24 ‘Receivables’. A provision for impairment of receivables can only be raised if there is objective evidence of impairment. (n) Payables Payables are recognised at the amounts payable when the College becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services. The carrying amount is equivalent to fair value, as they are generally settled within 30 days. See note 2(i) ‘Financial instruments’ and note 28 'Payables'. (o) Provisions Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and/or amount and are recognised where there is a present legal, equitable or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at each balance sheet date. See note 29 ‘Provisions’. (i) Provisions - employee benefits Annual leave and long service leave The liability for annual and long service leave expected to be settled within twelve months after the balance sheet date is recognised and measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Annual and long service leave expected to be settled more than twelve months after the balance sheet date is measured at the present value of amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Leave liabilities are in respect of services provided by employees up to the balance sheet date. When assessing expected future payments consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels including non-salary components such as employer superannuation contributions. In addition, the long service leave liability also considers the experience of employee departures and periods of service. The expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the balance sheet date on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed four years of service. An actuarial assessment of long service leave undertaken by Price Waterhouse Actuaries at 2008 determined that the liability measured using the short hand method was not materially different from the liability measured using the present value of expected future payments. The shorthand method is compliant with AASB 119 'Employee Benefits'. All annual leave and unconditional long service leave provisions are classified as current liabilities as the College does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the balance sheet date. Superannuation Employees may contribute to the Pension Scheme, a defined benefit pension scheme now closed to new members or the Gold State Superannuation (GSS) Scheme, a defined benefit lump sum scheme also closed to new members. Both schemes are administered by the Government Employees Superannuation Scheme (GESB). The College has no liabilities for superannuation charges under those schemes, as the liabilities for the unfunded Pension Scheme and the unfunded GSS Scheme transfer benefits due to members who transferred from the Pension Scheme, are assumed by the Treasurer. All other GSS Scheme obligations are funded by concurrent contributions made by the College to the GESB. The concurrently funded part of the GSS Scheme is a defined contribution scheme as these contributions extinguish all liabilities in respect of the concurrently funded GSS Scheme obligations. Employees commencing employment prior to 16 April 2007 who were not members of either the Pension or the GSS Schemes became non-contributory members of the West State Superannuation (WSS) Scheme. Employees commencing employment on or after 16 April 2007 became members of the GESB Super (GESBS) Scheme. Both of these schemes are accumulation schemes. The College makes concurrent contributions to GESB on behalf of employees in compliance with the Commonwealth Government’s Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act 1992. These contributions extinguish the liability for superannuation charges in respect of the WSS and GESBS Schemes. The GESB makes all benefit payments in respect of the Pension Scheme and the GSS Scheme transfer benefits and is recouped by the Treasurer for the employer's share. See also note 2(p) 'Superannuation expense'. (ii) Provisions - other Employment on-costs Employment on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance, are not employee benefits and are recognised separately as expenses and liabilities when the employment, to which they relate, has occurred. Employment on-costs are included as part of

Page 54 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

'Other expenses' and are not included as part of the College's 'Employee benefits expense’. The related liability is included in 'Employment on-costs provision'. (See note 12 'Other expenses' and note 29 'Provisions'.) (p) Superannuation expense The following elements are included in calculating the superannuation expense in the Income Statement: (i) Defined benefit plans Change in the unfunded employer’s liability (i.e. current service cost and actuarial gains and losses) assumed by the Treasurer in respect of current employees who are members of the Pension Scheme and current employees who accrued a benefit on transfer from that Scheme to the GSS Scheme; and (ii) Defined contribution plans Employer contributions paid to the GSS (concurrent contributions), the West State Superanuation Scheme (WSS), and the GESB Super Scheme (GESBS). Defined benefit plans - For 2007 - the movements (i. e. current service cost and actuarial gains and losses) in the liabilities in respect of the Pension Scheme and the GSS Scheme transfer benefits are recognised as expenses directly in the Income Statement. As these liabilities are assumed by the Treasurer (refer note 2(o)(i)), a revenue titled ‘Liabilities assumed by the Treasurer’ equivalent to the expense is recognised under ''Income from State Government' in the Income Statement (see note 21 'Income from State Government'). Commencing in 2008, the reporting of annual movements in these notional liabilities has been discontinued and is no longer recognised in the Income Statement. The superannuation expense does not include payment of pensions to retirees, as this does not constitute part of the cost of services provided by the College in the current year. The GSS Scheme is a defined benefit scheme for the purposes of employees and whole-of-government reporting. However, apart from the transfer benefit, it is a defined contribution plan for agency purposes because the concurrent contributions (defined contributions) made by the College to GESB extinguish all of the College's obligations to the related superannuation liability. (q) Resources received free of charge or for nominal cost Resources received free of charge or for nominal cost that can be reliably measured are recognised as income and as assets or expenses, as appropriate, at fair value. (r) Comparative figures Comparative figures are, where appropriate, reclassified to be comparable with the figures presented in the current financial year. 3

Other policies not included in this Model No other polices have been included in these Statutory Accounts.

4

Judgements made by management in applying accounting policies No significant judgements have been made that would materially alter the current financial results of the College.

5

Key sources of estimation uncertainty The key estimates and assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimation uncertainty as at the balance sheet date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year include: Student receivables under 60 days due are considered collectable and a provision is made for the full value for those receivables which are doubtful. General receivables from other government agencies are considered risk free, no provision, and all others are by individual assessment with a provision to the full value if required. Inventory stocks ( bookshop and canteen) are ordered on a just in time basis to match current year requirements. Obsolescence is considered less than 5% of annual trading purchases and therefore no provision is made. The college has a policy of valuing land and buildings annually. The revaluations of the college's land and buildings is undertaken by Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate). Every year estimates of useful life of plant and equipment are provided to give guidance on depreciaton rates used in intervening years. No provision has been made for sick leave as the college's annual costs do not exceed the annual value of entitlements. Included in 'Current - other liabilities' is an Education Training Shared Services Centre (ETSSC) service charge for 2008.

V2.3

Page 55 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 6

Disclosure of changes in accounting policy and estimates Initial application of an Australian Accounting Standard The College has not applied any new Australian Accounting Standards and Australian Accounting Interpretations effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2008 as they have no financial impact on the college. Voluntary changes in accounting policy There were no changes in accounting policy. Future impact of Australian Accounting Standards not yet operative The College cannot early adopt an Australian Accounting Standard or Australian Accounting Interpretation unless specifically permitted by TI 1101 'Application of Australian Accounting Standards and Other Pronoucements'. Consequently, the College has not applied early the following Australian Accounting Standards and Australian Accounting Interpretations that have been issued and which may impact the college but are not yet effective. Where applicable, the college plans to apply these Standards and Interpretations from their application date: 1. AASB 101 'Presentation of Financial Statements'. This Standard has been revised and will change the structure of the financial statements. These changes will require that owner changes in equity are presented separately from non-owner changes in equity. The College does not expect any financial impact when the Standard is first applied. The Standard is required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2009. 2. Review of AAS 27 ‘Financial Reporting by Local Governments’, 29 ‘Financial Reporting by Government Departments’ and 31 ’Financial Reporting by Governments’. The AASB has made the following pronouncements from its short term review of AAS 27, AAS 29 and AAS 31: AASB 1004 ‘Contributions’ (December 2007). Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. AASB 1050 ‘Administered Items’ (December 2007). Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. AASB 1051 ’Land Under Roads’ (December 2007). Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. AASB 1052 ‘Disaggregated Disclosures’ (December 2007). Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. AASB 2007-9 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the review of AASs 27, 29 and 31 [AASB 3, AASB 5, AASB 8, AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB 116, AASB 127 & AASB 137] (December 2007). Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. Interpretation 1038 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities (revised) (December 2007).Required to be applied to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2008. The existing requirements in AAS 27, AAS 29 and AAS 31 have been transferred to the above new and existing topic-based standards and interpretations. These requirements remain substantively unchanged. AASB 1050, AASB 1051, and AASB 1052 do not apply to Statutory Authorities. The other Standards and Interpretations make some modifications to disclosures and provide additional guidance (for example, Australian Guidance to AASB 116 ‘Property, Plant and Equipment’ in relation to heritage and cultural assets has been introduced), otherwise, there will be no financial impact. Changes in accounting estimates There have been no changes in accounting estimates. 2008 $

7

Employee benefits expense Wages and salaries (a) Superannuation - defined contribution plans (b) Superannuation - defined benefit plans (c)(d) Long service leave (e) Annual leave (e) Other

11,181,604 882,637 115,063 87,245 62,498 106,680 12,435,727

2007 $

10,380,930 819,750 126,610 183,744 100,128 11,611,162

(a) Includes the value of the fringe benefit to the employee plus the fringe benefit tax component.

Page 56 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $

2007 $

738,640 109,999 260,223 2,129,582 1,035,081 39,688 155,345 334,792 140,516 95,395 5,039,261

649,686 118,308 245,048 1,894,746 465,331 47,487 105,452 355,554 174,741 78,108 4,134,461

521,173 75,295 103,609 80,619 780,696

468,288 78,183 72,247 104,887 723,605

(3,700) 44,727 41,027

62,196 31,053 93,249

-

777,878

188,467 (5,713) 689,111 3,103 17,331 6,166 898,465

142,984 (2,100) 572,247 300 18,202 21,446 753,079

767,605 206,694 3,145 55,850 1,033,294

633,316 292,516 70,385 5,590 14,356 1,016,163

(b) Defined contribution plans include West State, and Gold State and GESB Super Scheme (contributions paid). (c) Defined benefit plans include the Pension and the Gold State Scheme (pre-transfer benefit). (d) An equivalent notional income is also recognised (see note 21 'Income from State Government'). Commencing in 2008, the reporting of notional superannuation expense and equivalent notional income has been discontinued. (e) Includes a superannuation contribution component. Employment on-costs such as workers' compensation insurance are included at note 12 'Other expenses'. The employment on-costs liability is included at note 29 'Provisions'. 8

9

Supplies and services Consumables and minor equipment Communication expenses Utilities expenses Consultancies and contracted services Minor works Repairs and maintenance Operating lease and hire charges Travel and passenger transport Advertising and public relations Supplies and services - other

Depreciation and amortisation expense Depreciation Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total depreciation

10 Grants and subsidies Adult and community education organisations Payments to non-TAFE providers for VET service delivery Other

11 Capital user charge Capital user charge expense The charge was a levy applied by Government for the use of its capital. The final charge was levied in 2006-07 12 Other expenses Building maintenance Doubtful debts expense Employment on-costs (a) Donations Student prizes and awards Losses and write-offs (a) Includes workers' compensation insurance and other employment on-costs. The on-costs liability associated with the recognition of annual and long service leave liability is included at note 29 'Provisions'. Superannuation contributions accrued as part of the provision for leave are employee benefits and are not included in employment on-costs. 13 Fee for service Fee for service - general Fee for service - Department of Education and Training Fee for service - Government (other than Department of Education and Training) International division fees Fee for service - other

V2.3

Page 57 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $

2007 $

759,809 17,637 313,538 195,907 1,286,891

715,532 115,749 364,945 193,432 1,389,658

85,524 130,540 17,501 233,565

74,961 48,630 24,549 148,140

180,278

126,589

(40,088) (215,634) (255,722) (44,122) (211,600)

(46,382) (149,278) (195,660) (40,088) (155,572)

Trading profit/(loss) - Bookshop

(31,322)

(28,983)

(b) Cafeteria (non-training related) Sales

347,733

310,397

(5,921) (194,415) (200,336) (6,304) (194,032)

(5,034) (170,953) (175,987) (5,921) (170,066)

153,701

140,331

(c) Other trading Sales

23,211

13,483

Trading profit/(loss) - Other trading

23,211

13,483

145,590

124,831

262,908 262,908

167,650 167,650

389,031

244,529

29,216 28,926 26,763 75,871

24,999 79,578 16,170 66,147

14 Student fees and charges Tuition fees Enrolment fees Resource fees Other college fees

15 Ancillary revenue Live works (not a trading activity) Contracting and consulting Other ancillary revenue

16 Trading profit/(loss) (a) Bookshop: Sales Cost of sales: Opening inventory Purchases Closing inventory Cost of goods sold

Cost of sales: Opening inventory Purchases Closing inventory Cost of goods sold Trading profit/(loss) - Cafeteria

See note 2(l) 'Inventories' and note 23 'Inventories'. 17 Commonwealth grants and contributions Commonwealth specific purpose grants and contributions(a) (a) Commonwealth recurrent grants Commonwealth specific purpose grant (ANTA) Commonwealth specific purpose grant ( non ANTA) 18 Interest revenue Interest revenue (a) (a) Sources Cash at Bank Term Deposits 19 Other revenue Rental and facilities fees Other direct grants and subsidy revenue Sponsorship and donations revenue Miscellaneous revenue

Page 58 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $ 160,776

2007 $ 186,894

(153,682) (153,682)

(158,245) (99,132) (941) (258,318)

Proceeds from disposal of non-current assets Land Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total proceeds from disposal of non-current assets

119,233 110 119,343

5,450 80,455 300 86,205

Net gain/(loss)

(34,339)

(172,113)

12,201,513 997,700 1,981,279 15,180,492

11,707,866 936,706 1,447,973 777,878 14,870,423

-

9,654 9,654

643,706 49,121 30,307 82,264 805,398

604,462 8,255 95,094 3,337 711,148

15,985,890

15,591,225

20 Net gain/(loss) on disposal of non-current assets Costs of disposal of non-current assets Land Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total cost of disposal of non-current assets

21 Income from State Government State funds (received from Department of Education and Training): Delivery and Performance Agreement (DPA) Superannuation Other recurrent funds Capital user charge funding Total State funds The following liabilities have been assumed by the Treasurer during the financial year: Superannuation (a) Total liabilities assumed by the Treasurer Resources received free of charge determined on the basis of the following estimates provided by agencies (b): Department of Education and Training - Corporate systems support - Marketing and publications - Human resources, and industrial relations support - Other Total resources received free of charge (b) Total income from State Government (a) The assumption of the superannuation liability by the Treasurer is notional income to match the notional superannuation expense reported in respect of current employees who are members of the Pension Scheme and current employees who have a transfer benefit entitlement under the GSS Scheme. (The notional superannuation expense is disclosed at note 7 'Employee benefits expense'.) Commencing in 2008, the reporting of the notional superannuation expense and equivalent notional income has been discontinued. Where the Treasurer or other entity has assumed a liability, the Authority recognises revenues equivalent to the amount of the liability assumed and an expense relating to the nature of the event or events that initially gave rise to the liability. (b) Where assets or services have been received free of charge or for nominal cost, the College recognises revenues equivalent to the fair value of the assets and/or the fair value of those services that can be reliably measured and which would have been purchased if they were not donated, and those fair values shall be recognised as assets or expenses, as applicable. Where the contribution of assets or services are in the nature of contributions by owners, the College makes an adjustment direct to equity.

V2.3

Page 59 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $

2007 $

22 Restricted cash and cash equivalents Current Specific capital equipment and minor works (a),(b), ( c),(d) Non-current 27th Pay (e) Total restricted cash and cash equivalents

1,725,247 1,725,247

979,482 979,482

134,649 134,649 1,859,896

143,465 143,465 1,122,947

44,122 6,304 50,426

40,088 5,921 46,009

157,550 3,280 204,535 (2,887) 101,076 463,554

169,258 26,027 98,144 (8,600) 61,820 346,649

(8,600) 5,713 (2,887)

(10,700) 2,100 (8,600)

106,435 3,879 2,323 112,637

100,643 32,410 9,281 142,334

160,831 (2,887) 157,944

195,285 (8,600) 186,685

(a) DET IESIP Funding - $70,000 (b) DET Nursing equipment funding - $48,247 (c ) DET Transforming Trades Equipment grant - $107,000 (d) DET Automotive workshop - $1,500,000 (e) Amount held for the purpose of meeting the 27th pay that occurs every 11 years in 2016 - $134,649 23 Inventories Inventories held for resale: Bookshop (at cost) Cafeteria (at cost) Total See also note 2(l) 'Inventories' and note 16 'Trading profit/(loss)'. 24 Receivables Current Receivables - trade Receivables - students Accrued income Allowance for impairment of receivables GST receivable Total current Reconciliation of changes in the allowance for impairment of receivables: Balance at start of year Doubtful debts expense recognised in the Income Statement Balance at end of year Credit Risk (a) The College trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties. The College has policies in place to ensure that sales of products and services are made to customers with an appropriate credit history. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the College's exposure to debt is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk. (b) In respect of amounts receivable, the College holds no collateral as security or other credit enhancements. Ageing of receivables past due but not impaired based on the information provided to senior management, as at the balance sheet date: Not more than 3 months More than 3 months but less than 6 months More than 6 months but less than 1 year

Receivables individually determined as impaired as at the balance sheet date: Carrying amount, before deducting any impairment loss Impairment loss

See also note 2(m) 'Receivables' and note 39 'Financial instruments'.

Page 60 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $

2007 $

48,038 2,709,256 2,757,294

27,570 2,260,702 2,288,272

3,455,000 3,455,000

3,531,111 3,531,111

22,219,726 22,219,726

20,846,940 (71,877) 20,775,063

181,200 181,200

-

693,674 (265,235) 428,439

819,515 (334,258) 485,257

1,098,909 (599,438) 499,471

832,597 (495,830) 336,767

785,255 (571,999) 213,256

841,450 (547,207) 294,243

26,997,092

25,422,441

25 Other assets Current Prepayments Cash investments (a) Total current (a) short term deposits 30 to 217 days 26 Property, plant and equipment Land At fair value (a) Accumulated impairment losses Buildings At fair value (a) Accumulated depreciation Buildings under construction Construction costs Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers At cost Accumulated depreciation Plant, furniture and general equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Computer equipment, communication network At cost Accumulated depreciation

(a) Freehold land and buildings were revalued as at 31 December, 2008, by the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate). The valuations were performed during the year ended 31 December, 2008 and recognised at 31 December, 2008.. The fair value of all land and buildings was determined by reference to market values. See note 2(f) 'Property, plant and equipment'.

V2.3

Page 61 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $ Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of the reporting period are set out below. 2008 Land Buildings Buildings Motor Plant, Computer under vehicles, furniture and equipment, construction caravans general communicati and trailers equipment on network Carrying amount at start of 3,531,111 20,775,063 485,257 336,767 294,243 year Additions 118,625 172,158 266,313 Transfers 181,200 Disposals (153,681) (368) Revaluation increments (76,111) 1,847,211 Depreciation expense (521,173) (75,295) (103,609) (80,619) Carrying amount at end of 3,455,000 22,219,726 181,200 428,439 499,471 213,256 year

2007

Carrying amount at start of year Additions Transfers Disposals Revaluation increments Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year

Land

Buildings

3,321,111 17,520,046 - 2,283,284 (158,245) 210,000 1,598,266 (468,288) 3,531,111 20,775,063

Buildings under construction

Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers 1,620,181 532,370

(1,620,181) -

Plant, Computer furniture and equipment, general communicati equipment on network 395,009 144,140

130,203 (99,133) (78,183) 485,257

14,005 (72,247) 336,767

255,931 (941) (104,887) 294,243

2007 $

Total

25,422,441 557,096 181,200 (154,049) 1,771,100 (780,696) 26,997,092

Total

23,532,857 2,683,423 (1,620,181) (258,319) 1,808,266 (723,605) 25,422,441

(a) Recognised in the Income Statement. Where an asset measured at cost is written down to recoverable amount, an impairment loss is recognised in the Income Statement. Where an asset measured at fair value is written down to recoverable amount, the loss is accounted for as a revaluation decrement. 27 Impairment of assets There were no indications of impairment of property plant, equipment and intangibles as at 31 December 2008. The College held no goodwill or intangible assets with indefinite useful lifes during the reporting period and at balance sheet date there were no intangible assets not yet available for use. All surplus assets as at 31 December 2008 have either been classified as assets held for sale or written off. 28 Payables Current Trade payables GST payable Accrued expenses Accrued salaries and related costs Total current

4,302 54,592 225,767 168,378 453,039

3,731 44,067 180,414 71,733 299,945

See also note 2(n) 'Payables' and note 39 'Financial Instruments'.

Page 62 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $

2007 $

29 Provisions Current Employee benefits provision Annual leave (a) Long service leave (b) Superannuation Salary deferment Other provisions Employment on-costs (c) Other (provide details) Total current Non-current Employee benefits provision Annual leave Long service leave (b) Superannuation Salary deferment Other provisions Employment on-costs (c) Other (provide details) Total non-current (a) Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after balance sheet date. Assessments indicate that actual settlement of the liabilities will occur as follow: Within 12 months of balance sheet date

(b) Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after balance sheet date. Assessments indicate that actual settlement of the liabilities will occur as follows: Within 12 months of balance sheet date More than 12 months of balance sheet date

517,904 688,272

455,406 655,363

1,206,176

1,110,769

122,902

105,009

122,902 1,329,078

105,009 1,215,778

543,516 2,781 546,297

494,713 494,713

32,650

29,274

32,650 578,947

29,274 523,987

517,904 517,904

455,406 455,406

688,272 543,516 1,231,788

655,363 494,713 1,150,076

134,283 21,269 155,552

164,242 (29,959) 134,283

40,443 66,000

32,134 32,134

(c) The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on-costs including workers' compensation insurance. The provision is the present value of expected future payments. The associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is disclosed in note 12 'Other expenses'. Movements in other provisions Movements in each class of provisions during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below. Employment on-cost provision Carrying amount at start of year Additional provisions recognised Carrying amount at end of year 30 Other liabilities Current Income received in advance (a) Grants and advances (provide details) Money/deposits held in trust Other Total current liabilities

V2.3

106,443

Page 63 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $ (a) Income received in advance comprises: Department of Education and Training - curriculum grants Department of Indigenous Affairs Other Government (Commonwealth/Local) Fee for service Student fees and charges Other

2007 $

66,000 40,443 106,443

15,000 268 1,309 14,568 989 32,134

-

9,654 9,654

Contributions by owners Capital contribution (a) Total contributions by owners

2,415,898 93,509 2,509,407

2,264,968 150,930 2,415,898

Balance at end of year

2,509,407

2,415,898

10,014,626 (76,111) 1,847,211 11,785,726

8,206,360 210,000 1,598,266 10,014,626

15,415,152 268,430 15,683,582

14,811,609 603,543 15,415,152

31 Amounts due to the Treasurer Current Amount due to the Treasurer See also note 39 'Financial Instruments' 32 Equity Equity represents the residual interest in the net assets of the College. The Government holds the equity interest in the net assets of the College. The Government holds the equity interest in the College on behalf of the community. The asset revaluation reserve represents that portion of equity resulting from the revaluation of non-current assets. Contributed equity Balance at start of year

(a) Capital Contributions (appropriations) and non-discretionary (non-reciprocal) transfers of net assets from other State Government agencies have been designated as contributions by owners in Treasurer's Instruction TI 955 Contribution by Owners Made to Wholly Owned Public Sector Entities' and are credited directly to equity. Reserves Asset revaluation reserve Balance at start of year Net revaluation increments/(decrements) Land Buildings Balance at end of year Accumulated surplus/(deficit) Balance at start of year Result for the period Balance at end of year 33 Notes to the Cash Flow Statement

-

Reconciliation of cash Cash at the end of the financial year, as shown in the Cash Flow Statement is reconciled to the related items in the Balance Sheet as follows: Cash on hand Cash advances Cash at bank Short term deposits (Provide details of terms and conditions) Restricted cash and cash equivalents (refer to note 22 'Restricted cash and cash equivalents')

7,340 310,620 2,709,256 3,027,216 1,859,896 4,887,112

7,190 684,012 2,260,702 2,951,904 1,122,947 4,074,851

(15,717,457)

(14,987,684)

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash flows used in operating activities Net Cost of Services

Page 64 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $ Non-cash items: Depreciation and amortisation expense (note 9 ) Doubtful debts expense (note 12) Superannuation expense (note 7) Resources received free of charge (note 21) Cost of disposals for non -current assets (Note 20) Non - current assets - trade ins Losses and write-offs (excludes cash shortages / thefts of money) Capital User Charge (note 11) (Increase)/decrease in assets: Current receivables (a) Current receivables other Current inventories Prepayments Other current assets Non-current receivables Non-current inventories Non-current Assets Increase/(decrease) in liabilities Current payables (a) Capital User Charge Income received in advance /grants and advances Current provisions Other current liabilities Non-current Provisions Other non-current liabilities Net GST receipts/(payments) (b) Change in GST in receivables/payables (c) Net cash used in operating activities

2007 $

780,696 (5,713) 997,700 805,398 153,682 (19,545) (6,009) -

723,605 2,100 946,360 711,148 258,318 (73,182) (21,373) -

34,455 (106,391) (4,417) (20,468) (93,509)

(14,635) 5,407 (12,041) 55,072 -

570 74,309 113,300 141,999 54,960 46,484 (75,128)

(8,060) 30,272 64,517 (27,316) 75,931 17,753 16,149

(12,845,084)

(12,237,659)

723,134 82,264 805,398

707,811 3,337 711,148

1,500,000 1,500,000

-

1,500,000

-

114,513 204,504 319,017

119,753 294,468 414,221

(a) Note that the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) receivable/payable in respect of GST and the receivable/payable (b) This is the net GST paid/received, i.e. cash transactions (c) This reverses out the GST in receivables and payables 34 Resources provided free of charge During the year the following resources were provided to other agencies free of charge for functions outside the normal operations of the College: Education and training services General supplies and administration services

35 Commitments Capital expenditure commitments Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the financial statements, are payable as follows: Within 1 year The capital commitments include amounts for: Buildings Lease commitments Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the balance sheet date but not recognised in the financial statements, are payable as follows: Within 1 year Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years

V2.3

Page 65 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $ Representing: Cancellable operating leases Non-cancellable operating leases

2007 $

94,107 224,910 319,017

99,347 314,874 414,221

89,964 134,946 224,910

89,964 224,910 314,874

153,600 -

-

Non-cancellable operating lease commitments (a) Within 1 year Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years

Other expenditure commitments contracted for at the balance sheet date but not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows: (b) Within 1 year (a) The College has a significant non cancellable leasing arrangement with Best Office Systems for the provision of multifunctional devices and a bulk printing and copying service for a term of three years from 2006. The College has one, one year extension option exercisable at the absolute discretion of Great Southern TAFE. (b) The College has contracted to purchase in 2009 computers as part of its ICT Security Framework where all College computers are replaced over a four year cycle. These commitments are all inclusive of GST. 36 Contingent liabilities and contingent assets Contingent liabilities In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, there is the following Contingent liabilities: Contaminated sites Under the Contaminated Sites Act 2003, the College is required to report known and suspected contaminated sites to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC). In accordance with the Act, DEC classifies these sites on the basis of the risk to human health, the environment and environmental values. Where sites are classified as contaminated - remediation required or possibly contaminated - investigation required, the College may have a liability in respect of investigation or remediation expenses. The College reported the Katanning TAFE campus site to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) as a potentially contaminated site due to its previous land use. The site was formerly used as a works depot and a service station. To date there has been no indication of soil or groundwater contamination observed at the site. DEC are yet to inspect and report on the site, as such, the site is currently classified as 'report not substantiated'. Whilst the site has not been inspected by DEC, it remains not practicable to estimate the potential financial effect or to identify the uncertainties in relation to the amount or timing of any outflows. Contingent assets The College has no contingent assets. 37 Events occurring after the balance sheet date No events occurred after balance sheet date. 38 Explanatory Statement Significant variations between estimates and actual results for income and expense are shown below. Significant variations are considered to be those greater than 10% or $20,000

Page 66 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $

2007 $

Significant variations between estimated and actual results for 08

Expenditure Employee expenses Supplies and services Depreciation Grants and subsidies Loss on disposal of non- current assets Other Expenses Cost of sales

2008 Estimate $ 11,405,769 4,470,000 700,000 60,000 30,000 750,000 380,000

2008 Actual $ 12,435,727 5,039,261 780,696 41,027 34,339 898,462 405,632

Variation $ (1,029,958) (569,261) (80,696) 18,973 (4,339) (148,462) (25,632)

Variation % -9.03% -12.74% -11.53% 31.62% -14.46% -19.79% -6.75%

Income Fee for service Student fees and charges Sales Ancillary Trading Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest Other revenue

1,300,000 1,300,000 500,000 120,000 265,000 175,000 115,000

1,033,294 1,286,891 551,221 233,565 262,908 389,031 160,776

266,706 13,109 (51,221) (113,565) 2,092 (214,031) (45,776)

20.52% 1.01% -10.24% -94.64% 0.79% -122.30% -39.81%

13,600,000 2,000 625,000

15,180,492 805,398

(1,580,492) 2,000 (180,398)

-11.62% 100.00% -28.86%

Income from State Government State Funds Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Resources received free of charge

Expenditure Employee expenses Increase in employee costs due to higher than budgeted salary increases for lecturing staff, college achieving full profile, increase in superannuation and annual leave expense. Supplies and Services Increase in course consumable expenditure, contracted services for online training, external audit, cleaning printing & photocopying contracted services Depreciation Increase in building depreciation due to an increase value of buildings, increase in plant & equipment as result of increase in assets Grants & Subsidies Reduction in apprentice travel and accommodation as these subsidies are now paid direct from Department of Education and Training Loss on disposal of non - current assets Variation due to reduction in asset sales Other Expenses Increase due to higher payroll tax and workers compensation premium than estimated, and an increase in building repairs and maintenance than estimated Cost of sales Cost of bookshop stock higher than estimated and cafĂŠ purchases also increased dramatically compared with previous year Income Fee for Service Slight increase in lifestyle and short courses, but overall reduction in competitive tenders from Department of Education and Training Student Fees and Charges Less than expected student enrolment fees due to change in fee structure and less than estimated student enrolment fees. Sales Higher than expected sales of bookshop and cafĂŠ products Ancilliary Trading Higher than expected revenue from contracting and consultancy services Interest Increase over estimates due to increase in capital grants from Department of Education and Training Other Revenue Higher than estimated revenue from sponsorships and insurance recovery Income from State Government State funds

V2.3

Page 67 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $

2007 $

Higher than estimated delivery and performance revenue due to slight increase in profile, and an increase in capital grants Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Treasury have advised that Colleges are not required to report on Liability assumed by Treasurer Resources Received Free of Charge Higher than estimated cost of services from Department of Education and Training Significant variations between actual results for 08 and 07 2008 $ Expenditure Employee expenses Supplies and services Depreciation Grants and subsidies

2007 $

12,435,727 11,611,162 5,039,261 4,134,461 780,696 723,605 41,027 93,249

Variance Variation $ % 824,565 904,800 57,091 (52,222)

6.63% 17.96% 7.31% 127.29% 79,994 19.72% (137,774) 401.22% 145,383 16.18%

Cost of sales Loss on disposal of assets

405,632 34,339

325,638 172,113

Other expenses

898,462

753,079

1,033,294 1,286,891 233,565 551,221 262,908 389,031 160,776

1,016,163 1,389,658 148,140 450,469 167,650 244,529 186,893

17,131 (102,767) 85,425 100,752 95,258 144,502 (26,117)

1.66% -7.99% 36.57% 18.28% 36.23% 37.14% -16.24%

15,180,492 14,870,423 9,654 805,398 711,148

310,069 (9,654) 94,250

2.04%

Income Fee for service Student fees and charges Ancilary trading Sales Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest Other revenue Income from State Government State funds Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Resources received free of charge

11.70%

Expenditure Employee expenses Increase in employee costs due to higher than budgeted salary increases for lecturing staff, increase in superannuation and annual leave expense with reduction in long service leave expense Supplies and Services Increase in course consumables expenditure, slight reduction in postage and telephone, water and gas expense, with increase in contracted services such as training delivery, online training development, cleaning, printing and photocopying, and payments for shared services. Reduction in advertising with slight increase in software licence expense Depreciation Increase in building depreciation due to increase value of buildings, increase in plant & equipment as result of increase in assets Grants and Subsidies Reduction in non training service delivery payments, and subsidies for apprentices due to payment now being made by Department of Education and Training Cost of sales Increase of bookshop purchases and cafĂŠ purchases due to increase in prices of products. Loss on disposal of assets Variation due to sale of old farm assest having impact in 2007 and 2008 sales returning to normal annual program Other Expenses Reduction in write offs of bad debts and inventory, but incresae in payroll tax and risk cover premiums and increase in building maintenance and repairs Income Fee for Service Increase in lifesyle course fees, reduction in tender revnue and literacy funded program and increase in international student fee revenue Student Fees and Charges Slight increase in course fees with reduction in resource and enrolment fees Ancilliary Trading Increase in college livework and consultancy revenue

Page 68 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

2008 $

2007 $

2008 $'000

2007 $'000

2,838,707 2,048,405 463,555

2,951,904 1,122,947 346,649

453,039

299,945

Sales Substantial increase in bookshop, cafĂŠ sales and sales of other miscellaneous college products Commonwealth Grants and Contributions Increase in commonwealth recurrent and special purpose grants Interest Increase due to increase in capital grants from Department of Education and Training Other Revenue Slight increase in rental and facilities fees, increase in sponsorship and donations and insurance recovery Income from State Government State funds Increase in resource agreement revenue due to increase in delivery, increase in capital grants for automotive workshop, reduction in capital user charge due to cessation of initiative Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Colleges are not required to report on Treasurer's liability as advised by Treasury Resources Received Free of Charge Increased cost of services provided by Department of Education and Training in corporate systems support, marketing, and other with reduction in human resources support. 39 Financial instruments (a) Financial risk management objectives and policies Financial instruments held by the College are cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and cash equivalents, receivables and payables. The College has limited exposure to financial risks. The College overall risk management program focus on managing the risk identified below: Credit risk The College trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties. The College has policies in place to ensure that sales of products and services are made to customers with an appropriate credit history. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the College's exposure to debt is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk. Liquidity risk The College has appropriate procedures to manage cash flows including drawdowns of appropriations by monitoring forecast cash flows to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments. Interest rate risk The College's exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the longterm debt obligations The College's borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian Treasury Corporation (WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through portfolio diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than, as detailed in the Interest rate sensitivity analysis table at Note 39 (c ), the College is not exposed to interest rate risk because apart from minor amounts of restricted cash, all other cash and cash equivalents and a portion of restricted cash are non-interest bearing and it has no borrowings other than WATC borrowings and finance leases (fixed interest rate). (b) Categories of financial instruments In addition to cash and bank overdraft, the carrying amounts of each of the following categories of financial assets and financial liabilities at the balance sheet date are as follows:

Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables Financial Liabilities Payables (c) Financial instrument disclosures Credit risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk exposures The following table details the College's maximum exposure to credit risk, and the exposure to liquidity risk and interest rate risk as at the reporting date, based on information provided to senior management of the College. The contractual maturity amounts in the table are representative of the undiscounted amounts as at the balance sheet date. An adjustment for discounting has been made where material. The College does not hold any collateral as security or other credit enhancements relating to the financial assets it holds. The College does not hold any financial assets that had to have their terms renegotiated that would have otherwise resulted in them being past due or impaired.

V2.3

Page 69 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $

2008 Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables

Weighted Average Effective Interest Rate %

Variable Interest Rate

Within 1 year

1-2 Years

$

$

$

6.18%

317,960

7.52%

-

7.52%

-

Financial Liabilities Payables

$

$

NonInterest Bearing

Total

$

$

$

-

-

-

-

-

317,960

2,709,256

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,709,256

1,859,896

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,859,896

463,555

317,960

4,569,152

-

-

-

-

-

463,555 463,555

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

453,039 453,039

453,039 453,039

4-5 Years

More than 5 years

NonInterest Bearing

Total

$

$

$

$

Financial Liabilities Payables

2007 Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables

$

More than 5 years

-

-

Weighted Average Effective Interest Rate %

Contractual maturity dates 2-3 34-5 Year 4 Years s Ye ars

2007 $

Variable Interest Rate

Contractual maturity dates 1-2 23-4 Years 3 Year Ye s ar s $ $ $

Within 1 year

$

5.73%

691,202

6.59%

-

6.59%

5,350,667

-

-

-

-

-

-

691,202

2,260,702

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,260,702

-

1,122,947

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,122,947

691,202

3,383,649

-

-

-

-

-

346,649 346,649

346,649 4,421,500

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

299,945 299,945

299,945 299,945

Interest rate sensitivity analysis The following table represents a summary of the interest rate sensitivity of the College's financial assets and liabilities at the balance sheet date on the surplus for the period and equity for a 1% change in interest rates. It is assumed that the change in interest rates is held constant throughout the reporting period.

Page 70 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008

2008 Annual Report

Carrying amount $

Financial Assets Restricted cash and cash equivalent

4,887,112

2007

Carrying amount $

Financial Assets Restricted cash and cash equivalent

4,074,851

- 1% change Profit Equity $ $

(48,871)

(48,871)

- 1% change Profit Equity $ $

(40,749)

(40,749)

2008 2007 $ $ +1% change Profit Equity $ $

48,871

48,871

+1% change Profit Equity $ $

40,748.51

40,748.51

Fair values All financial assets and liabilities recognised in the balance sheet, whether they are carried at cost or fair value, are recognised at amounts that represent a reasonable approximation of fair value unless otherwise stated in the applicable notes. 40 Remuneration of members of the College and Senior Officers Remuneration of members of the College The number of members of the College whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are: $ $0 - $10,000 $160,001 -$170,000 $170,001 - $180,000 The total remuneration of the members of the College is:

2 1

4 1 -

176,010

165,028

1 4 1 3

2 4 1 3 -

990,684

965,675

43,000

49,800

Total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the College in respect of members of the College. Remuneration of Senior Officers The number of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the College, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are: $ $60,001 - $70,000 $90,001 - $100,000 $100,001 - $110,000 $110,001 -$120,000 $120,001 -$130,000 The total remuneration of senior officers is: The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the College in respect of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the College. No senior officers are members of the Pension Scheme. 41 Remuneration of auditor Remuneration payable to the Auditor General for the financial year is as follows: Auditing the accounts, financial statements and performance indicators The expense is included in note 12 'Other expenses'. 42 Related Bodies The College has no related bodies. 43 Affiliated Bodies The College has no affiliated bodies.

V2.3

Page 71 of 79


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008 2008 $

2007 $

44 Supplementary Financial Information Write-Offs Public property Bad debts Inventory Other (provide details) Loses through theft, defaults and other causes Losses of public and other moneys and public and other property through theft, default or otherwise Recoupment of cash collections

367 5,488 153

10,594 10,630

6,008

21,224

520 (264) 256 6,264

21,224

45 Schedule of Income and Expenditure by Service The college provides only one service (as defined by Treasurer's Instruction 1101 (9) and that is Vocational Education and Training Delivery.

Page 72 of 79

V2.4


Great Southern TAFE Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 31 December 2008

2008 Annual Report

Appendix 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; S40 Submission 2009 Great Southern TAFE S40 SUBMISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008 INCOME STATEMENT

2009 $ Estimate

COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits expense Supplies and services Depreciation and amortisation expense Grants and subsidies Capital user charge Loss on disposal of non-current assets Other expenses Cost of sales

12,055,163 4,471,892 710,000 60,000 0 15,000 700,000 450,000

Total Cost of Services

18,462,055

Income Revenue Fee for service Student charges and fees Sales Ancillary trading Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest revenue Other revenue

1,200,000 1,300,000 560,000 200,000 160,000 250,000 140,000

Total Revenue

3,810,000

Gains Gain on disposal of non-current assets Gain on disposal of other assets Other gains

0 0 0

Total Gains

0

Total income other than income from State Government

3,810,000

NET COST OF SERVICES

14,652,055

INCOME FROM STATE GOVERNMENT State funds Liabilities assumed by the Treasurer Assets assumed/(transferred) Resources received free of charge

14,180,000 2,000 0 625,000

Total income from State Government

14,807,000 SURPLUS (DEFICIT) FOR THE PERIOD

V2.3

154,945

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Great Southern TAFE

Other Financial Disclosures Fees & Charges The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and charges are set by the Department of Education and Training and indexed to CPI each year.

Future Capital Projects An Automotive Workshop re-development planned for 2009 and a refurbishment of the Denmark Campus was completed in 2008.

Governance Disclosures Treasurers Instruction 903 Part 5 (vii) Staff Employed by Great Southern TAFE (Includes Permanent, Contract and Casual Staff) 30/11/06 15/11/07 27/11/08 Fixed Pay 167 170 175 Casuals 104 130 99 (a) During 2008, work proceeded on formulation of our replacement Workforce Development Plan, which required extensive review following the changing economic climate. There were 40 recruitment transactions conducted during the year with no Public Sector Standards breach claims being lodged. A staff training calendar is compiled each year, reflecting the generic staff development needs identified within the College. Individual Sections also have a staff development allocation within their budgets to cater for more specific needs. During the year, engaging learning opportunities were provided to benefit individual staff and assist in the achievement of the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic and operational plans. Innovative professional development opportunities extended to staff during the year included our annual whole of College Professional Development Day, Indigenous Lecturing Cadetship program and Certificate and Diploma level qualifications offered to administrative staff which is directly related to the work they are involved with. Over the year, a total of $185,770 was spent on staff development. (b) There were no significant Industrial Relations issues during the year and no disputes which required arbitration proceedings before Industrial Tribunals. (c) There were 2 Workers Compensation claims made during the year. The administration of claims and return to work programs are now the responsibility of our Shared Services Centre, who have specific expertise in the field. The College appointed an OHS Co-ordinator in late 2008 to further improve our OHS outcomes. TI 903 Part 4 (x) There were no disclosable interests that any senior officers within the Agency were required to report during the year.

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V2.4


2008 Annual Report

Other Legal Requirements Advertising Great Southern TAFE Marketing Expenditure 2008 Advertising Agencies Marketforce Media Decisions

$7,278.72 $30,290.69 nil nil

b) Market Research c) Polling Organisation e) Media Advertising Organisations The Weekender Denmark Bulletin Great Southern Herald Orana Cinemas Total

$1,623.27 $569.91 $306.31 $2,763.65 $42,832.55

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes Great Southern TAFE continued implementation of its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2011 and has instigated and promoted strategies to ensure the inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of training delivered by the College. Planned outcomes for 2008 have all been achieved. Great Southern TAFE continues to adapt its service delivery and provide individualised support to students with disabilities undertaking a wide range of training courses at the College. In 2008 literacy and study skills software was installed across the College for use by all students. The College provides for the specific training needs of people with disabilities by conducting a number of classes that promote pathways to further education, training and employment including Certificate II and III in Clothing Production and Gaining Access to Training and Employment. In 2008 Great Southern TAFE conducted a Building Diversity Project, funded by the Department of Education and Training, using innovative technology to increase independent learning and successful participation for students in the Certificates II and III in Clothing Production. Accessibility improvements have been progressively implemented across the College, including installation of automatic doors at Denmark and Mt Barker campuses, accessible art facilities at Mt Barker campus and a review of accessible parking facilities at Albany campus. Great Southern TAFE provided information and training to staff to ensure quality service to all clients, including people with disabilities. Information on meeting the needs of students with disabilities is provided to staff at induction sessions and online. Workshops on supporting students with a mental illness were provided for staff in 2008. People with disabilities were encouraged to provide feedback on College accessibility and the services and training it offers through customer feedback forms, liaison with community agencies assisting people with disabilities into training and employment, and through the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaints and grievance procedures.

Equal Employment Opportunities Outcomes The College has submitted its EEO Management Plan which meets the requirements of Section 145 (2) of the Act. V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE The College continues to exceed most Public Sector targets in relation to specified diversity groups and achieved a Composite Equity Index of 111.5 during 2008, ranking us the sixth highest agency in the state.

Compliance with Public Sector Standards and Ethical Codes During 2008, a comprehensive review of the College Code of Conduct took place and the College was named in the State of the Service Report 2008, as being amongst the top six agencies in terms of best practice in reporting and analysis of risk management in official conduct, human resource management and public interest disclosures.

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V2.4


2008 Annual Report

Recordkeeping Plan Sections 12 & 61 of the State Records Act 2000 require all government agencies to have a Recordkeeping Plan (RKP) approved by the State Records Commission that describes how records are created, maintained, managed and disposed of in accordance with the Commission’s Standards and Principles. The Education and Training sector submitted a single RKP to the State Records Commission on 4 March 2004. The purpose of the sector’s RKP is to set out the manner in which records are to be created by the agencies and how those records are to be kept. In addition, a number of documents were jointly devised by TAFEWA College Records Management Officers in 2006 and all have been implemented by Great Southern TAFE. These documents include :     

Records Management Policy TAFEWA Retention and Disposal Schedule Records Management Standard Operating Procedures Manual TAFEWA Thesaurus Key Performance Indicators

State Records Commission Standard 2 Recordkeeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance Whether the efficiency and Great Southern TAFE’s recordkeeping systems are evaluated annually. All files effectiveness of the were reviewed in 2008 to ensure their titles match keywords from the TAFEWA agency’s recordkeeping Thesaurus. Considerable time has been spent ensuring appropriate retention and systems has been evaluated disposal timeframes are notated on every file as well as on our records database. or alternatively when such We have been working with the Department of Education and Training and an evaluation is proposed. TAFEWA Records Managers Network in regards to moving from TRIM Captura to TRIM Context and will have this project finished in 2009. The nature and extent of the Regular records management awareness training is delivered to all staff who have recordkeeping training responsibility of recordkeeping in their area. Group and individual training sessions program conducted by or for are provided on demand. External and specialised training is provided to records the agency. management staff as required, generally by attending relevant training in Perth provided by one of the records management training companies. Updates and information on recordkeeping and records management are relayed to staff as necessary. Whether the efficiency and Occasional reviews are conducted on recordkeeping awareness training, with a effectiveness of the thorough review being done in 2008. As part of this review, we have obtained recordkeeping training access to the Department of Education and Training’s online Records Awareness program has been reviewed Training Course and will be rolling it out to staff progressively in 2009. Once all staff or alternatively when this is have completed this course, reports will be completed to demonstrate the planned to be done. understanding of recordkeeping at Great Southern TAFE. Assurance that the agency’s Induction sessions for new staff are conducted biannually, early in semesters one induction program and two. Additional sessions are held as required. All new staff receive in their addresses employees’ roles induction kit a copy of the State Records Office 2006 publication “Recordkeeping and responsibilities in in Western Australia: Who is Responsible”. A tour of the College (including the regard to their compliance Records section) is given to all new staff. The Records Manager gives a brief with the agency’s presentation on records management, with topics covered including an overview recordkeeping plan. of individual recordkeeping responsibilities, the legislative framework and procedural documentation.

In accordance with Standard 2, Principle 6 of the RKP, all agencies are to ensure that their employees comply with the RKP. Great Southern TAFE has developed strategies to ensure its employees are aware of their responsibilities.

V2.3

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Great Southern TAFE

Government Policy Requirements Corruption Prevention Senior Officers of the College attended conflict of interest workshops during 2008 and the TAFE Sector is preparing a comprehensive Accountability and Ethical Framework toolkit - an initiative to be rolled out to staff during 2009.

Sustainability Great Southern TAFE is committed to ensuring a better quality of life for everyone through the integration of environmental protection, social advancement and economic prosperity. The College also accepts that it has a responsibility to conduct all aspects of its business in an ethical and sustainable manner. The Sustainability Action Plan encourages and empowers our staff to support the sustainability of our organisation which in turn contributes to the State’s goals and Code of Practice for government agencies. The Plan underpins College planning, decision making and reporting and is managed by a Sustainability Action Group to ensure that the College community embraces the principles of sustainability. Firstly, Great Southern TAFE will continue to deliver the training that underpins community capacity building that is inherent in sustainability. Secondly, Great Southern TAFE accepts that it has a responsibility to conduct all aspects of its business in an ethical and sustainable manner. The Sustainability Action Group met regularly throughout the year and outcomes included:  The formation of Water Efficiency Team (WET), responsible for a Water Audit of the College with a number of initiatives underway including the proposed installation of waterless urinals at the Albany Campus and the phasing out of single flush toilets.  Incorporation of sustainability statements in section business planning pro-formas.  Establishment of a computer recycling program and the recycling of College printer cartridges continue.  A visit to a waste recycling facility to deepen understanding of sustainable action that may be taken to further reduce waste on campus.  Attendance at a sustainable living conference from which a report was presented detailing the range of environmentally friendly products appropriate to the workplace to be considered when purchasing items.  Endorsement of policy that the College moves towards a fuel efficient vehicle fleet.  Paperless meetings for the Sustainability Action Group to test the viability of minimising paper wastage through the use of electronic tools.  Ensuring Sustainability Action Plan and linked documents available on College Intranet and circulating minutes and actions from each meeting to all staff.

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V2.4


2008 Annual Report

Energy Smart Government Program In accordance with the Energy Smart Government policy the Great Southern TAFE has continued with a plan to manage energy in non-transport related energy use by with a 14.5% reduction targeted on 2004/05 on the baseline data. Energy Smart Government Program

Baseline Data

2006/2007 Actuals 4,859 $172,983 900

Energy Consumption (GJ) 5,497 Energy Cost ($) $165,792 Greenhouse Gas Emissions (tonnes of 1,101 CO2) Performance indicators MJ/sqm 465 319 MJ/FTE 2,610 1,821 Etc. During the year the following energy saving initiatives were undertaken:      

V2.3

2007/08 Actuals 4,700 $182,733 959

Variation % 14.5%

321 1,466

All student computers turned off after 1 hour of not in use. Staff awareness and education ongoing. Continued with new energy saving stickers throughout College. Regular whole of agency emails reiterating energy management initiatives. Staff computers are automatically turned off at 9pm each evening. Timers installed on large gas boilers that heat college buildings.

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Annual report 2008098bc8eb84fb