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The Climate Crisis: Envisioning A Green New Deal In The Hudson Valley The Hudson Valley Regional Studio Fall 2019


URBAN DESIGN PROGRAM Kate Orff, Director David Smiley, Assistant Director

FALL SEMESTER STUDIO

Kaja Kühl, Studio Coordinator Anna Dietzsch, Justin G. Moore, Jerome Haferd, Liz McEnaney, Shachi Pandey, Raafi Rivero, David Smiley and Dragana Zoric, Studio Faculty Shivani Ajaykumar Agarwal, Greg LeMaire, Research Assistants

THE HUDSON VALLEY INITIATIVE Kaja Kühl, Director

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4 INTRODUCTION 13 PHOTOS OF EVENTS AND SITE VISITS

POST-INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE

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Building Cradle to Cradle Victoria Vuono, Laszlo Kovacs, Sophie Lee, Ritchie Ju

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Green It, Clean it! Anai Perez, Danwei Pan, Pratibha Singh, Zixuan Zhang

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Quarryscape Zhou Wu, Palvasha Sophia Khan, Nikita K, Ashwin Nambiar

URBAN FABRIC

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Collaborative Main Street Chris Zheng, Hatem Alkhathlan, Einat Lubliner, Sushmita Sheker

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Drive-Less Life Shuo Han, Isabella Zhang, Yao Yao

PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL SYSTEM

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Dispersing Wellness Mansoo Han, Niharika Shekhawat, Shailee Shah, Ting Zhang

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What’s On Your Plate? Food as Knowledge Annie Wu, Moneerah Alajaji, Vasanth Mayilvahanan, Wei Zhang

SUBURBAN LIVES

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Unboxed Hala Abukhodair, Scott Guo, Xinuye Liu, Stuti Ganatra

FARMS AND FORESTS

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Migroculture German Bahamon, Claudia Kleffmann, Nina Lish, Nina Ndichu,Angus Palmer

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71

91

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Good(s) Shift Antonia Medina Abell, Hugo Bovea, Tal Fuerst, Sharvari Raje

Social Carbon You-Chiao Wu, Mary Elizabeth Allen, Minjung Lee, Candelaria Mas Pohmajevic

A Sentence Rewritten Aasiya, Zhen Hua, Yuan Qin, Alvi Khan

These Routes Are Made For Walking Yile Xu, Jaime Palacios, Kunal Mokasdar, Lino Caceres

Carbon Sequestration Menghan Zhang, Tian Hao, Kuan-I Wu, Eleni Stefania Kalapoda

116 THANK YOU 3


Urban Design at Columbia The Urban Design Program at Columbia GSAPP investigates social, spatial, and climate change in order to help communities learn and shape their own futures. Wherever we work, students and faculty collaborate with local institutions, government officials, professionals, non-profit organizations, and community groups. Urban Design can act as a bridge among these many actors but, just as important, we believe that Urban Design must be an activist practice. Our design work addresses multiple scales, varied needs, and different stakeholders, and we value the shared struggle to create alternatives to present conditions.

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The Climate Crisis: Imagining a Green New Deal in the Hudson Valley Working in the Hudson Valley, the Fall Urban Design Studio at GSAPP operates at the regional scale and asks students to enter the discourse of urbanization beyond cities to engage unevenly dispersed socio-spatial ecosystems at multiple scales. The Hudson Valley, a region defined by multiple systems, histories, and geographies, touches the lives of millions and has deep connections to New York City, the global metropolis at its southern edge. For this studio, region is defined neither by a political boundary nor a physical area but, in the tradition of Patrick Geddes1, the region is understood as the integration of settlements, modes of production and consumption, and the topographic and biological contexts in which they take place. Specifically, the Fall 2019 studio explored the region’s rural/urban socio-spatial ecosystems as the site for intervention to address the global climate crisis. As part of a GSAPP-wide collaboration “Public Works for a Green New Deal,” students worked closely with local stakeholders, elected officials, organizations, non-profits, community groups, and planning and design professionals to envision just and equitable pathways towards decarbonizing the region. The Climate Crisis The 2018 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found that limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require “rapid and far-reaching transitions in the use of land, energy, industry, buildings, transport, and cities” to make significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 and avert the worst effects of climate disruption.

1

Daniel Christian Wahl (2017) Design and Planning for People in Place: Sir Patrick Geddes (1854–1932) and the

Emergence of Ecological Planning, Ecological Design, and Bioregionalism, Medium, 2017

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Climate change is a crisis of unevenly experienced and systemic injustices that challenges scientists, practitioners, and community members alike. At the start of 2019, the US House of Representatives passed Resolution H.R.109 calling for a Green New Deal to substantially reset climate and social policy of the Country. In June 2019, the New York State legislature passed the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act, a legally binding legislative act to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions in New York State by 2050. These efforts complement the global challenge of anthropogenic change, ranging from acts of resistance such as the #fridaysforfuture school strikes to the startling clarity of subsequent IPCC reports, all of which highlight the limited time frame for us to act. They shift our vocabulary from merely acknowledging climate change to embracing the need for systemic action to confront the crisis. Such changes are structural: We need to change the way we live, work, organize, and govern ourselves as a society. Not only do we need to transition to a decarbonized future, however, we must also address the systemic inequalities integral to the globalized urbanization that has brought us to this dire condition. To urban designers, the Green New Deal reads like a call to action. “Building resilience against climate change-related disasters”, “Upgrading infrastructure”, “Building more sustainable food systems” or “Restoring and protecting threatened, endangered and fragile ecosystems” are but a few of the stated goals in the document that sound familiar to urban designers accustomed to thinking in systems and envisioning built and natural environments to support these goals.

The Hudson Valley They also sound familiar to practitioners working in the Hudson River Valley, a region of watersheds, forests, farms, small cities and rural hamlets. Narratives of the Hudson River Valley often begin with the histories of pioneering European settlers who started making their marks

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on the landscape over 400 years ago, supplanting indigenous peoples, or of the American revolutionaries who did the same 175 years later, and of course, of the prosperous Empire State. In the early 19th century waterpower from tributary streams yielded new factories with new residents and dramatically changed life in the Valley. Transportation infrastructures – the Erie Canal in 1812, the Hudson River Railroad in 1849, and the evergrowing network of roads and bridges brought industry and economic prosperity to the region. Each of the region’s resources is in some way marked by its proximity and accessibility - or lack thereof - to New York City, a global metropolis. The prosperity of the region, its small cities and villages, however, was and remains precarious. After decades of industrial growth in the Valley, early and mid-20th century changes to transport, industry, and demographics have decimated Main Streets and farming districts. Cities such as Newburgh, Kingston, and Poughkeepsie slowly shed population, jobs, investment, and the social networks necessary for community well-being. Mid-century responses to change were often equally destructive, when struggling neighborhoods –typically low-income and minority communities– were demolished in the name of “renewal”. At the same time, local farms struggled to compete with factory farms and nationally-scaled agribusiness. Other large corporate employers like IBM closed manufacturing plants and office parks, leaving gigantic scars of asphalt and concrete with little prospect for a second life. While some places have managed to stage “comebacks,” income, employment, education, and real estate data show that disparities continue to increase, both in the Valley, and nationally (EIG Distressed Communities Index, 2016). These challenges are set against the backdrop of one of the most revered landscapes in the American Northeast. Designated in 1996 as a National Heritage Area, its natural beauty inspired one of America’s great art movements, the Hudson River School. Home to America’s wealthiest

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families across the 19th and into the 20th century, the Valley’s estates, vistas, lakes and flora were idealized as timeless places of beauty and virtue -- even as emerging industry was already tarnishing that image. The beauty of the Hudson Valley, real and increasingly threatened, also gave birth to environmental activism and the conservation movement, setting precedents for national legislation on protecting the environment from development, pollution and resource extraction.

Designing The Rural

“As they mobilise their capacities to shape this emergent terrain of intervention, designers confront an important ethical choice – to help produce maximally profitable operational landscapes for capital accumulation; or alternatively, to explore new ways of appropriating and reorganising the non-city geographies of urbanisation for collective uses and for the common good.”

Neil Brenner, The Hinterland Urbanized

For several decades, architects and planners have focused primarily on the growth of cities and the threshold of more than 50% of the world’s population becoming city dwellers. Rural spaces, on the other hand, are often associated with economic decline, stagnation and political isolation. The Fall Urban Design Studio at Columbia GSAPP brings into focus the territories and places where the other 50% live: Small towns, villages, rural landscapes and farmland. It discusses the relationship between country and city - not as in opposition, of “rural” and “urban” but as a relationship between people and nature, between settlement and landscape, and society and its resources. With the steady advance of technology, the antithetical distinctions between city and countryside, center and periphery, culture and nature have increasingly dissolved. Flows of material, food,

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water and energy from the region to the city are countered with flows of people, investment, culture and waste. The often cited “Brooklynization” of the Hudson Valley –a growing number of city-dwellers moving north– is one of many flows between the city and countryside that dissolve this distinction. Simultaneously, romanticizing rural space as a site of the natural and authentic, as a victim of industrialization and urbanization, is coming into question. Rural regions – small towns, villages, landscapes, farms, hinterlands – can no longer be understood as places “left behind” by cities but instead are sites of production, inhabitation, knowledge as well as conflict. As designers, we play a critical role in envisioning the future of these territories. Central to the studio discussions and the work presented here are the unique relationships and dependencies between individual places, the larger region and its relationship to the metropolis at its southern tip, New York City. The valley offers lessons for urban design intervention at various scales, interpreting varied perceptions, and challenging the geography of decision-making. While each of the projects aims to be site-specific, they respond to a regional investigation of systems, infrastructure, networks or recurring phenomena. Several projects interrogate the post-industrial landscape of the region. Sited primarily along the Hudson River at a time when water-based travel was the most efficient, the revered landscape is now dotted with hundreds of acres of abandoned sites. Student projects explore a variety of narratives for these sites from potential for future economic opportunity to utilizing the scarred land for clean power generation and reforestation. Another series of projects focussed on the small cities and towns as sites for systemic intervention. Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, and Kingston have historically played a significant role as urban centers on the Hudson River. Plagued by a declining manufacturing base, decreasing populations, compounded by urban renewal in the 20th century, these cities are facing new and old challenges. How can existing urban spaces such as urban

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waterfronts and decaying main streets be reactivated and invigorated, reduce its residents carbon footprint while offering opportunities for affordable housing, economic growth and jobs? Within cities, public and institutional buildings constitute a separate important spatial category for intervention. Hospitals, prisons, government offices, and schools are important employers throughout the region. Their outdated facilities and operations are often the worst offenders when it comes to Greenhouse Gas emissions and environmental practices. Yet, the idea of “Public Works� could not be more directly applied in several of the projects that address public institutions and their ability to innovate greenhouse gas reduction, while better serving the public. Many of the cities in the region lost population and businesses to its suburban surroundings in the 20th century, seen as the superior alternative for living then. These spaces now too are ripe for innovation. Several projects question the car-dependency and excessive use of asphalt and concrete generated by suburban communities, shopping malls and office parks. Lastly, a category of projects seeks to identify opportunities for sequestering carbon emissions using nature as a tool. Both, agriculture as well as forests have a long history in the region. These projects expand the repertoire of urban designers with a focus on the unbuilt systems that can contribute to addressing the climate crisis. All of the projects are intended to spark conversation, inform and promote collaboration with and between those who are passionate about a just transition to a clean and equitable future for all communities across the Hudson Valley region. We are grateful for the many conversations, for feedback and comments along the way.

Columbia University Urban Design Fall Semester Studio Faculty Team

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LEARNING AND SHARING Site Visits And Workshops

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STUDENT WORK

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POST-INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPES

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ALBANY

HUDSON

KINGSTON

PORT OF NEWBURGH

PORT OF NY - NJ

HUNTS POINT

PORT OF NEWARK

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GOOD(S) SHIFT REVITALIZING THE PORT OF NEWBURGH Antonia Medina Abell, Hugo Bovea, Tal Fuerst, Sharvari Raje

Trucks are one of the largest contributors to air pollution in the Hudson Valley, and function within an unbalanced system. 84% of the freight transported in New York State is moved by truck while other modes of transportation such as railways and waterways are underutilized. Among the goods transported in the region, food is a top carbon emitter. Yet, many small and medium-sized farmers lack processing infrastructure and cannot reach production capacities. GOOD(S) SHIFT is a working waterfront that joins two vital segments of the Hudson Valley’s agricultural operations: processing and distribution. The port will become one of a series of hubs that integrates diverse and intermodal operations, employs local residents, and models the transition towards a less carbon intensive transportation infrastructure for the Hudson Valley. See the project’s video here: https://vimeo.com/380162308

[ PA C K A G I N G FA C I L I T Y ]

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Hudson River Valley Building Industry Post War Industrial Decline

Population and Industry

1875

Material Extraction

1900

1925

1950

Tech & Service

1975

2000

Local Extracted Materials Stone

Brick

Cement

Gravel

Site

Digging

Carving

Heating

Sorting

Heating

New York City Metropolitain Area

State Waste and Recycled Material Manufacturing Potential Construction and Demolition Waste

What if we recycled that?

970,000 Tons of Waste

200 150

Recycled Material Manufacturing Can Save:

844,000 Tons of C02

Legend

100

Suburban

50

30

Thousands of Tons

Wasted During Construction

Demolition Debris

250

600 Jobs in Production

230 Jobs in Recycling

4x the Demolition Jobs

Urban Freight Rail Mine


The Tech City Co-Op Victoria Vuono, Laszlo Kovacs, Sophie Lee, Ritchie Ju

The building industry in the United States accounts for 30% of global carbon emissions, with 40% associated with construction and 60% with the operations and energy consumption of buildings. The Green New Deal calls for the country’s building stock to be upgraded to reduce emissions but we also need to ask how the production of building materials can become less carbon intensive? The Hudson River Valley has a long history of building material production utilizing local resources, yet, in recent years, these industries have shifted abroad, dramatically increasing carbon intensive building processes. TECH CITY CO-OP is a building material production facility that uses recycled materials collected from the region. Using new technologies as well as a cooperative labor and production organization, the project facilitates symbiotic building-industry relationships to reshape regional construction and to lower carbon emissions in the region.

See the project’s video here https://vimeo.com/380161031

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Tech City Industrial Co-Op

Truck Dependant Industry

Warehouse & Distribution

Incubator

Solar Power Plant

Modular Industrial Park Recreation Center

Material Research Center

Bus Stop-Bike Share-Parking

Construction & Demolition Training

Parking Lot

Administration Hub Wetland Park

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Solar Panels: Modular Industrial Park

Solar Energy Plant Parking Lot

Solar Power Network

Warehouse & Distribution

Pedestrian Loop to Creek Truck Route

Existing Freight Rail Automobile

Freight Trolley System

Pedestrian Car & Bus Route

Freight Trolley

Pedestrian Loop to Creek

Circulation Network

low

erf

Ov

to

k

ree

sC

pu

o Es

Storm Water Management Wetland

o

erfl

Ov

us

sop

E w to

ek

Cre

Storm Water Network

WAREHOUSES

UTILITIES

INNOVATION

TRUCK DEPENDANT INDUSTRIES

FLEXIBLE TROLLEY DEPENDANT INDUSTRIES

CONSTRUCTION TRAINING COMMUNITY SPACE

MATERIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH

CONSTRUCTION TRAINING ADMIN & COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Industrial Network

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Bus Stop-Bike Share-Parking

Truck Dependant Industry / Recycler

Tool Rental

Repair Cafe Hub

Workshare Space Co-Op Administration

Recycled Material Sculpture Garden

Storm Water Management Pond

Path to Espous Creek

3. Administration and Support

4. Kiln and Water Treatment

Incubator

New Technology to Manufacture

Warehouse and Distribution

Prefab Insulated

Clip Connection

2. Tech Incubator Door Panel

Window Panel

Wall Panel Connector

SUNY New Paltz 3D Printing Facility

Existing Bridge

New Ways to Use Materials Material Research Facility

Existing Building Retrofit to Rec Center

1. Material Research Center

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Punched CFS

Roof Panel

Floor Panel

An Inclusive Industrial Community

Material Research Facility


Construction Training

0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0

Food Hall

Market Plaza BOCES Construction Edu.

Kiln

Asbestos Mound Skate Park

BOCES Demolition Edu.

Demolition Training

Path to Esopus Creek

5. Education Training Utilizing Fright Rail

Utilizing Solar Energy

View Near BOCES Training Center

Consoledated Transportation

Utilizing Grey Water

Training the Next Generation of Builders

Kiln and Water Treatment

On Site Material Sourcing

High Quality Building Materials

Encouraging Closed Loop Maufacturing

Collaboration with Various Industries

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Contaminated Sites in the Hudson Valley

Urban Development Area Forest Area

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Green it, Clean it!

Anai Perez, Danwei Pan, Pratibha Singh, Zixuan Zhang

About 130,000 acres of Hudson Valley land has been directly or indirectly contaminated by industry. GREEN IT, CLEAN IT transforms these brownfields into community assets that can tackle pollution and improve soil health, sequester carbon and restore land productivity. The abandoned and hazardous Tech City (former IBM) in Kingston is a test site of remediation using nature-based systems. The process of change enables us to open the site to adjacent communities and ecologies, and provides recreational and economic benefits locally and regionally. Site programing generates a range of jobs in research, manufacturing and maintenance, ensuring communities of all types have access to work and a strengthened local economy. Sites such as Tech City can become places for research and education about new infrastructures of remediation.

See the project’s video here: https://vimeo.com/380158487

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Analysis

Property Area: 258 Acres Demolished Area: 19 Acres Industrial Parcel: 20 Acres Data center/ Industrial Parcel: 16 Acres Mixed Use Parcel: 10 Acres Parking Parcel: 39 Acres Office Parcel: 3 Acres

IBM Access Point Highway Road

Timeline, Funding & Policy

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Concept Concept Diagram Diagram

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37


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40


2

System Axonometric

Green House Biodome

Glass Panels

Floor Harvest

1

Vertical

Hydroponics

5

Research Center

Concrete Shell Structure

Plaza

Library/Reading Room

Administration

12

Laboratory Research Room

Library Herbarium

Exhibition Area Demonstration Lab Classroom

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Abandoned Industries 20th Century Industrial Era 21st Century Post-Industrial Era

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QuarryScape Zhou Wu, Palvasha Sophia Khan, Nikita K, Ashwin Nambiar

For more than a century, industries along the Hudson River thrived, producing goods and employing many residents but, at the same time, polluting the environment. Extensive swaths of forests, meadows, wetlands and watersheds were contaminated and destroyed. Since the 1970s, the Valley’s many industries were abandoned, scarring the landscape and often blocking waterfront access in cities and towns all along the River. QUARRYSCAPE uses an abandoned quarry in Kingston to test new forms of energy production and to turn scarred landscapes into recreational sites for community well-being. Can industries and nature co-exist?

See the project’s video here:

https://vimeo.com/380157237

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BARRIER OF BLIGHT

R E N AT U R A L I Z I N G H I S TO R I C W E T L A N D S / WAT E R S H E D

P R O D U C T I V E R E C R E AT I O N A L LANDSCAPE

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P R O D U

P H A S I N G A N D T I M E L I N E O F T H E Q U A R RY R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N 2019

Existing Condition and capacity of the Quarry

1.Existing Condition and Capacity

2.Cleaning the Quarry

3.Restoration/Adding Ecology and Habitats

Cleaning the Quarry for Revilizivation

Callanon Industries Quarry

2026

2025

2023

of damaged

4.Quarry Revitalized and ready t able energy

Capacity Of Quarry

Limestone

Chemically Cleanig the Quarry (Hydrochloric acid and special surfactants blended)

50’

Limestone

Southern naiad Coontail

Boulders on steep edges

100’

Permian Sand

125’

Sandstone Coal Measures

Emerged

75’

Marl Slate

Floating

Naturally Ocurring Wetlands

Leafy pondweed Star duckweed

150’ 178’

Water Collection from Lake and Rainwater

200’

Submerged

Southern naiad Zosterella dubia (Water stargrass)

Filling with Natural Soil

Rubble/Waste Rock

Soil Layer Planting the Native Plants

2016 Data

4%/ year

S I T E WAT E R A N D E C O L O G Y S YS T E M

Quarry trail

Lake Katrine Existing Water Source

Riparian Buffer Zone

WETLAND AROUND QUARRY

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Collection Water in the revitalized Quarr y

Existing mined connection

VIEW FROM INSIDE HYDROELECTRIC PLANT

(WINTER AND SUMMER)

Qu


U C T I V E

H Y D R O P O W E R P L A N T D E TA I L S

to use for water storage for renew4.Quarry Revitalized and used a water Storage for Renewable Ener-

East Kingston

100% Renewable

Power Generator

Kingston City 14% Renewable Ener-

East Kingston waterfront park Ferry Dock Art trail Animal observation

HydroPower Plant

uarry for Reservoir for Hydro power Plant 70’ Drop

Devils Lake

R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N

Existing Water body for water drainage and collection

OF THE QUARRY

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R E C R E Yaie Road Lake Katrine diversion

Historic industrial t

Flatbush Road

Route 9W

Quarry trail

Hyd

Lake Katrine

Parking

Main Street

Quarry 1

P R O P O S E D R E C R E AT I O N A L T R A I L S / A C T I V I T I E S East Kingston

Educational trail

Sculptural bird habitats

AT cha

Quarry 2

W.M. Kingston

Cement Factory

Submerged aquatic vegetation(SAV) for marine animals

B I R D S / A N I M A L S H A B I TAT T R A I L

Forests Waterbody Riparian Biodiversity Wetland Proposed Trail

Hutton Brickyards

Streams Electric Line Substation

46 44

46

Houses supplied with electricity

EAST KINGSTON TRAIL

AT V B I K I N G + R


A T I O N A L

Restaurants+ cafes

Current watershed

trail

Sculpture+birds

Waterfront park

droelectric/research

Interactive art trail

Activity/event hub

East Kingston ferry

Animal observation

Flea markets

TV parking + arging station

ATV biking dirt paths

Quarried bluestone steps

Industrial history trail

Open galleries + event spaces

Ferry terminal/ charging dock

Restored wetlands along quarry edge

RACING ZONE

QUARRY EDGE TRAIL

East kingston-rhinecliff solar ferry

EAST KINGSTON-RHINECLIFF FERRY

47 F E R RY + WAT E R F R O N T PA R K

ACTIVITY HUB

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URBAN FABRIC

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Land Use Patterns and Carbon Emissions in the Hudson Valley

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Social Carbon You-Chiao Wu, Mary Elizabeth Allen, Minjung Lee, Candelaria Mas Pohmajevic

As it stands, the Green New Deal lacks specific methods and tools to implement its grand objectives. How do remedies and prescriptions hit the ground and, equally important, how does implementation prevent the inequalities seen in the Depression-era New Deal? SOCIAL CARBON is a coordinated set of strategies and projects that prioritize community and environmental needs in Kingston, framing carbon reduction as an integral part of the social life of the Valley. The project utilizes an expanded transect method to visualize and examine conditions, jurisdictions and opportunities. For the Kingston region, we demonstrate how projects of varied scales, with different stakeholders, and with multiple technical needs can be brought together via urban design thinking. We rethink the Green New Deal as a middle ground, neither top-down nor bottom-up, that motivates partnerships across communities and disciplines See the project’s video here:

https://vimeo.com/380163043

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SOCIAL CARBON at Kingston

Farmers Market Restaurants Shopping Mall + Green Line

M

NET

SVISo

Daycare Center Museums Schools

Agin

36%

TREE NURSERY

S XS

NET ZERO AFFORDABLE HOUSING

S

Social Carbon Initiative 1

Vulne

Commercial & Cultural Center

N R

Municipality ZERO

FOREST

M

Net Zero Districts

2

Vacant Lots

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

Extend Green Line Main Street & Vulnerable A

S

AGRICULTURE BELT

Collaboration across Political Boundaries

RECHARGE HUB Municipality

COMMUNITY CENTER

3 Community Led Initiatives

VULNERABILITY

VULNERABLE COMMUNITY

ADMINISTRATIVE CE Connection Dashboard Toolkits

Funding

Application

INFORMATION PLATFORM

Carbon Coordinate Plan Carbon Goals

Project Proposal

Project Proposal

Project Proposal

Social Goals

SOCIAL NEEDS SOLUTIONS

Initiative

STAKEHOLDERS

TRANSPORTATION

HOUSING

I want to use my VACANT LOTS!

Implementation

Bike Accessibility

Make bus possible in Kingston

Lack of Affordable Housing!

ENERGY

Newly Here Can’t Find Contractors! Ita

Vacant Land Owner

Rose

Bike Advocate

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Elizabeth

Kingston Resident

Susan

Kingston Resident

Nanya

NYC Commuter


M

S

XS

SYSTEMATIC CONNECTION

AREA COMMUNITY HUB

BLOCK SCALE INTERVENTION

erable Area

ocial Vulnerability Index

ng Housing

% >yrs

NEIGHBORHOOD REGENERATION

Abandoned Cement Quarry Scenic Hudson

Pilot Projects

Private Owner

Wild Species Habitats Lakes Woodlands Wetland waterfront

Area

M

WETLAND GENERATOR Community Base Organization

B VULNERABILITY

VULNERABILITY

M

LINEAR PARK & TRAIL

ENTER

CURRENT GREEN LINE

GREEN LINE TRAIL

WETLAND PARKS

CARBON EMISSION EDUCATION

Y

Share My Knowledge About The Land But How?

3 10

Housing Retrofit Guideline

Jopheth

Kingston Resident

Educators / Concerned Parents

Peter

Land Owner + Farmer

Good

Food

Housing

Transportation

6

5

7

11

12

metric tons CO2 equivalent

After School Program & Volunteers!

“The younger generation needs help to connect with the nature in their backyard.”

Service

5

31

12 5

11 5

39.5

10,268 Houses

12

36%

Transportation Method 75%

Drive Alone

> 80 years

31% Fuel Oil Kerosene

Housing Age 22

<5 years 5 years

House 46% Heating Fuel Utility Gas

Bottled,tank,LP gas

20 years

Electricity

40 years

22

Utility gas

10 years

60 years 80 years

14

5

53

Fuel oil,kerosene Coal Allotherfuels Nofuelused


Connection

C02

Green Line

Eco Building

C02 C02

C02

Electric Station

e-Bus Stop

Program

Green Jobs

e-Bike Lane

Community Garden

Program Community Center

Day-care Center

Energy Commercial

Energy Solar Panel Roof Garden South

E-Bus Station Solar Canopy E-Bike Station

NET ZERO AFFORD$%/(+286,1*

S

“...providing all people of the United States with affordable, safe, and adequate housing”

S XS

“... to create millions of good, high-wage jobs” “... upgrading all existing buildings”

Current

Job Needs

1(,*+%25+22' REGENERA7,21

Aging Houses

Vacant Lot

Community Workshops

C02 C02 C02

C02

Green Jobs Community Workshop Community Training

Using Vacant Lots

Net Zero Neighborhood Retrofitted Homes

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5HWURÀWWLQJ+RPHV


Current Vacant Lot

Job Needs Green Line

C02 Transportation Need

C02

Connection to Nature

C02 C02

Electric Transportation Access Community Greenspace

Community Initiative

Community Marketplace

HV Current Market Solar Energy Eco-Route

e-Bike Lane

Eco-Hub

S

5(&+$RGE +8%

“... Overhauling transportation systems in the United States to remove pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector”

M

WETLAND GENERATOR

“... meet 100 percent of the power demand through clean, renewable and zero emission energy sources” “... removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere by restoring natural ecosystems...”

Forest-Cave-Lake Endangered Species Preservation

Energy

C02

C02

C02

Using Abandoned Quarry

Restoring Wetland

Hill-Quarry Re-Use Abandoned Infrastructure

Solar Panel Energy Center

Wind Turbine

Hill-Wetland Restoration with Floating Wetland

Floating Wetland

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The Dead Retail Infrastructure L

M

Shopping malls

58

s

‘Big Boxes’

317

Dead Malls Big Boxes Department Stores

56

Street stores

1000+


Post Retail Scape â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Collaborative Main Street Chris Zheng, Hatem Alkhathlan, Einat Lubliner, Sushmita Sheker

With the global transition from traditional shopping to e-commerce, many Main Streets, Big Boxes and Malls have become redundant. This next phase of commerce has impacted social interaction, local economies, existing infrastructures, and many types of jobs and services. POST RETAIL SCAPE offers a new retail module in the form of a shared collaborative platform through which small businesses share space, energy, resources, waste management and storage. This sharing of assets reduces costs and carbon emissions and also funnels local dollars, promotes interaction, improves jobs and enables great social participation and equity in the remaking of Main Streets.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here: https://vimeo.com/380155358

Consumer Behavior and CO2e (kg per journey)

3.1

+ -35% Co2e

1.5

+

3.3

51%

24H

The Traditional

Traditional Shopping

The Online Shopper

The Modern + Impatient

One day delivery shoppers

E - Commerce

57


Post Retail Scape Evolution of Retail E-commerce

Traditional Retail

Infrastructure

Product

Spatial

Spacial

?

Product

Spacial

Spatial

New Model Individual Retail

Footprint

Online

Shopping malls

Product

Spatial

Spacial

Main street

Old Model Collaborative

Lower cost

Collaboration

Interaction

Experience

Railway, C

ollective

Logistical

Corridor

Refurbished Malls & Big Boxes, Regional Service Infrastructures

M

id

-s c

al

e

M

an Co uf rn ac ell tu S rin t, g

Refurbished Malls, Renewable Energy Infrastructure

Store Vacancy Rate 100%

Br

oa

0% Water Railway Existing Tram Extended Tram Extended Tram Existing Local Makers

56

58

Stations

dw

ay,

the

Co

-op

Ma

in

Str

ee

t Lig

ht

rai

l, P

ub

lic

Tra n

sit

Ex

ten

sio

n


Experiential Sidewalk

Bike Lane

Road

Light Rail

Bike Lane

Sidewalk

Proposed Section

10

30ft

Strategies

5

20

16

5

66

10

10

Retail Street | Broadway

Public Service

Shared space

Media Center

Renewable energy

Art Gallery

Mosque

Street extension

Art Center

Church

Experiential space

Bakery

M Scale | Renewable Energy Production

L Scale | Recycling and Distribution Center

Solar Farms & Data Center

Recycle to Energy Plant & Distribution Center Recycling Center

Data center

Waste to Energy Plant

3,200,000W/ 267,000 Sqft CO2 420 lbs

Solar farm

3,450,000W/ 270,000 Sqft CO2 450 lbs

Recycling Energy storage

59

57


Policy 4-5 BUSINESSES Retail collaborative

$ $ $$ $ $ $

$

Investment 1

2

3

4

Revive

Street

Location

Experiences

Land Trust

Collaborative Infrastructure

State

Incentives

Parks & Street Extensions

Renewable Energy & Waste platform Shared Space Platform

$ $ $$ $ $ $

Zoom in Collaborative Retail 25,600 W/ 2500 Sqft CO2 60 lbs

Renewable Energy System

Shared Working

Street Extension

Art Park Repair Park

Education Space Playground

Shared Production

Park

Market Square

Shared Makers

Amphitheater Meeting booth

Light Rail Shared Space Waste Bicycle Lane

Street Extension | Collaborative Consumption

58

01

02

06

07

60

03

08

04

05

09

10


Street View

Street View

Repair & Recycling

61

59


Carbon Emission of Transportation & Settlement PatternS EMISSION OF NEW YORK

205.61 (MMtCO2e)

EMISSION OF TRANSPORTATION

36%

PRIVATE CARS

70%

HUDSON

KINGSTON

POUGHKEEPSIE

NEWBURGH & BEACON MIDDLETOWN PEEKSKILL Carbon Emission (Metric ton/sq mile ·year) 50,000

Population Density Legend (Population/sq meter) Populationdesity_NY&P desity 0.000000-0.000020 0.000000 - 0.000020 0.000021-0.000055 0.000021 - 0.000055

30,000

0.000056-0.000115 0.000056 - 0.000115 0.000116-0.000226 0.000116 - 0.000226

0.000227-0.000406 0.000227 - 0.000406 0.000407-0.000707 0.000407 - 0.000707

10,000

DESIGN SITE

POTENTIAL SITES

62

0.000708-0.001065 0.000708 - 0.001065 0.001066-0.004141 0.001066 - 0.004141 0.004142-0.029946 0.004142 - 0.029946


Drive-Less Life Shuo Han, Isabella Zhang, Yao Yao

Transportation contributes to 36% of greenhouse gas emissions in New York State, of which approximately 70% comes from private vehicles. In the Hudson Valley, like much of the State (except New York City), most residents own a car. This culture of car dependency is integral to extensive highway networks, poor mass transit infrastructures and the land use patterns of the suburbs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all of which contribute to high carbon emissions. DRIVE-LESS LIFE proposes a hybrid system that reduces the emissions, in a pilot study in Poughkeepsie. There are three key methods: 1. A shared shuttle system with flexible stops and schedules replaces existing buses and enables better service. This is supplemented with an experimental system of shared autonomous electric vehicles. 2. New and expanded bus stops integrate social programming to bolster transit use. 3. The elevated section of Route 9 near the Train station is removed and the area redesigned as a new street with a mix-use development that better fits the city.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here: https://vimeo.com/380166505

63


Master plan 5

Church Chur

5. 4

Mixed-use Developments Mix-use Developments

4. 3.

2

Slope ParkSlope

3

2.

6

6.

7. 1

7

1.

8

8.

11. 8 8. 10

10.

13

13.

9.

9

11

11.

88.

8

1. Poughkeepsie Station

8.

2. Poughkeepsie Plaza

10.

3. U.S Route 9 4. Slope Park 5. Footpath to Fall Kill

8

6. Bike Station 7. Bike Lane 8. Mix-use development 9. Church Park

12

10. Street Front 11. Street Tree 12. Highway Park 13. New Commercial Street N 1

64

1.2 miles

12.

8

Park

Bike


h Park rch Park StreetDevelTrees Mix-use

U.S. Route 9 Mixed-use Developments

New Commercial Street New Commercial Street

Lane e Bike Lane

Street TreesTrees Street

Poughkeepsie Plaza Poughkeepsie Plaza

Poughkeepsie Station Poughkeepsie

Station

65


Better Bus Stops Pilot Site 1

Pilot Site 2

Pilot Site 3 Improved Bus Stops Pick-up Spots Pedestrian Friendly Street 5-min-walk radius

Pilot Site 1

Pilot Site 2

66

There is only a sign next to the road in the existing stop, even no pedestrian ways. We proposed new walkway and zebra crossings, and combined cafe, waiting room and green space to the stop.

This bus stop is in the Poughkeepsie transit hub, where the traffic is relatively busy, making it unsafe for pedestrians to walk. We reorganized the site, enabling people to walk through the whole site. A fast food restaurant is also planted in the waiting hall.


Pilot Site 3 For this site, the existing bus stop is next to the maplewood apartments, which is a low-income community. A large portion of the residents could not afford to have a private car, thus the mass transportation is rather important to their daily lives. However, the existing stop is an old small glass pavailion, both the condition and the accessbility is poor. A giant parking lot is right next to the stop, making it more friendly to drivers rather than pedestrians. We improved the walkablity as well as the accessbility of the site, integrated a deli and a waiting room to the bus stop, and repurposed part of the existing parking lot to grocery store, community library and community garden.

f

d

e g

c

b

h

a j i

l

k

a. Improved Bus Stop(With Deli) b. Grocery c. Community Library d. Community Garden e. Dining Hall f. Playground g. Walkway Connecting the Neighborhood h. Bicycle Parking Area i. Front Square j. New Pedestrian Way k. New Bicycle Lane l. New Zebra Crossing

67


PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND INSTITUTION

68


NAL SYSTEMS

69


70


A SENTENCE REWRITTEN Aasiya, Zhen Hua, Yuan Qin, Alvi Khan

The Green New Deal focuses on three primary goals: the eradication of carbon emissions, the expansion of justice, and the provision of jobs. In the Hudson Valley, the criminal justice system ranks poorly in all three measures. Prisons in the Valley, like many across the country, have become inhumane compounds that affect prisoners and their families, and are the second most carbon-intensive public buildings after hospitals. Sing Sing Correctional facility in Ossining is a maximum-security prison just outside New York City. The facility has transitioned from coal to oil to supply its energy needs still emitting over 30,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Sited on the banks of the Hudson River, Sing Sing is vulnerable to flooding as sea levels rise. And Sing Sing remains a walled fortress, cutting off the community from the River. A SENTENCE REWRITTEN addresses the goals of carbon, justice, and jobs, and demonstrates that Sing Sing can become a community asset, an educational facility, and a low-carbon facility.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here: https://vimeo.com/380152586

71


SITE SITE PLAN PLAN

PROTECTIVE PARK THICKENED WALL

CONNECTING SPACES

70 72

72


BOUNDARIES HOUSING RETAIL

PUBLIC

OFFICE

ACCESS

EMPLOYEE HOUSING ELEVATOR

RETAIL

PUBLIC SPACE

PUBLIC SPACE

ACCESS POINT

73 71


CONNECTOR

PUBLIC CIRCULATION PRISONER CIRCULATION

MORNING

AFTERNOON

FAMILY RE-

ART CENTRE

EXHIBI-

AXO

72

74


WATERFRONT FLOOD-

0m 0m 0m

2m 2m 2m

1m 1m 1m

WETLANDS + OYSTER PARK

law n

co co mm comm mm erc erc erc ial ial ial

co co mm comm mm erc erc erc ial ial ial

law n law n

sk ate

pla pla pla gro y- gro y- gro yun un un d sw d swd sw po immipo immi po im law ol ol minng ngol ng wa wa wa wa ste wa stewa ste tre ter tre tertre ter atm atm atm en en en t t t

law n

law n law n

sk sk ate ate pa pa pa rk rk rk

law n

law n

ENERGY GENERATION + SITE DEVELOPMENT

water treatment water treatment lawn water lawn treatment commercial lawn commercial skate park commercial skate park pool swimming skate park swimming pool retaining wall swimming pool retaining wall retaining wall

OBSERVATION RETAIL CAFES

WETLANDS

PARK MEMORIAL

BERM

OYSTER

75

73


HEALTH CARE IN THE HUDSON VALLEY USA

E E

EMISSIONS

10%

E E

E E EEE EE

E

E E EE E

U.S.A. HEALTH SECTOR

E

health care se rvic vide es pro

EEE E E

E

pollute environment

E EEE E

E EE E EEE E E

E E

HIGH CARBON FOOTPRINT

Health Care Facilities

E

Patients

more need for health care services

ne

ed

for he

s a lt h c a r e

E E E EE E E E EEE E E E EEEEE E E E E E E EE E E E

E

erv

ic e

E

E

E EE E

E

bia

Colum

Greene

60m

in

E E

not preventive

58.4%

E 60min

Inaccessible healthcare

1 : 1,860

1 : 950

s

k health care se see rvic n’t es do

LACK OF ACCESSIBILITY (PHYSICAL + MONETARY)

E E

E

E

1 : 2,790

E E E E E

E

15

30min

Serious Illness/Disorders

1 : 2,030

m

in

EE ce

f

or

d

E

more spending for cure

to

see

k m o r e h e a lt

re h ca

se

r vi

ce

s

E

E EE E E E E

E E

HEALTHCARE SYSTEM CARBON EMISSIONS 4%

54.2%

Patient transportation

12%

Building energy Gas, heating & cooling

3%

Other primary industries

3%

Waste treatment

5%

Pharmaceutical and chemical products

8%

Other sector & services

SYSTEM RETROFIT

E

EE E E E E

16%

38.1%

E

E E

E 9%

Agriculture

E

E E

E

E

E

E EE

E

42.5%

43.7%

E E

E 11%

13%

Other manufacturing

Anesthetic gases and metered dose inhalers

E E

EE

84%

E

Legend

E

46.1%

E

Hospital Primary Care County Boundary Urban Density

Median Household Income 112 - 3075 3076 - 8439

76

8440 - 19986

Energy for production of plastic and electrical equipment

E

E E

E

PATIENT PREVENTIVE HEALTHCARE

E

32%

E

E

E

E

EE E E

30.7%

E

E

EE

E E E E E E E E E EE E EE EE E EE E E E E E EE EEE E EE E E E EE E E E E E

19987 - 41245 41246 - 74413

Source: Healthcare’s climate footprint, noharm.org, 2019

0

84% CO2 comes from Health System supplies

Source for Vacancy - Hudson Valley pattern for progress http://www.pattern-for-progress.org/ Source for Physician to Patient ratio - Healthy Capital District Initiative (HCDI)

5

10

20 Miles

GOALS: LOWER THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ELIMINATE THE HEALTH DISPARITIES


DISPERSING WELLNESS Mansoo Han, Niharika Shekhawat, Shailee Shah, Ting Zhang

The healthcare industry accounts for 10% of the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and 9% of non-GHG pollutants. Globally, Pollution is associated with 9million premature deaths. The very same system to ensure our health and well-being is contributing significantly to the growing public health challenge presented by global warming. In the Hudson Valley, dispersed settlement patterns shape the health-seeking behavior of most people, and residents travel as much as 1.5 hours one way for basic health services. At the same time, many hospitals in the Hudson Valley have a high vacancy rate for bed space. Side by side, the healthcare landscape in the Valley is inefficient, unhealthy and carbon costly. DISPERSING WELLNESS reorganizes healthcare service delivery focusing on Greene and Columbia Counties. Small, healthcare modules in small towns and villages throughout the region – with regular schedules by medical professionals – provide wellness care for the needs of the rural populations as well new community spaces. In parallel Kingston’s HealthAlliance Hospital is reprogrammed as a hub of this system of modules and providing for more community-based health and social needs. See the project’s video here: https://vimeo.com/380161906

77


PROGRAM TRANSITION OFFICE 3F 84,750 SQFT

MAIN HOSPITAL 6F 58.4% VACANCY 134,500 SQFT

PARKING 3F 67,000 SQFT RESEARCH CENTER 2F 17,200 SQFT SERVICE BUILDING 1F 18,500 SQFT

STEPPED GREEN ROOF

HOSPITAL 3F 55,400 SQFT HOSPITAL 3F 18,450 SQFT HOSPITAL 2F 9,500 SQFT

ORIGINAL PROGRAM

DOUBLE CARE CENTER DAY CARE & FAMILY CARE 17,200 SQFT

COMMUNITY PAVILION TRAINING, PUBLIC KITCHEN, TELEHEALTH OFFICE 18,500 SQFT

PROPOSED PROGRAM

POCKET WINDOW

CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PLAYGROUND

COMMUNITY PAVILION TELEHEALTH CENTER COMMUNITY GYM TRAINING CENTER PUBLIC KITCHEN

78

COMMUNITY PAVILION


HOSPITAL AS PARK

E SKIN FACADE

COLUMBIA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL HUDSON, COLUMBIA COUNTY

79


CL

GE

AV E

RM

RA

AN

VA L

TO

CK

WN

AT IE

PH

WI

ND

ILM

ON

HA

T

M

RURAL AREA MODULAR SHED

4’

2.5’

2.5’

3’

3’

8 X 8 X10ft Column - 12 2 X 6 X 8ft Panel - 300 2in X 36in Plain Steel C-channel bar with 1/8 in - 30 I beam - 3

2’

1.6’ 1’ 0.5’

80

PUBLIC PROMENADE

STOREFRONT HEALTHCARE


WE

ST

GE

TA G

AN

TO

AN

IC

GR

CH

RM

HK

WN

AT H

AM

EE

RO

NV

UN

ILL

E

D

TO

P

PRATTSVILLE, GREENE COUNTY

al pit

to

e Sh

d

os

lH oria

Co

bia

m Me

lum

SHED AS A LIVING ROOM

81

HEALTHCARE CENTER


FOOD SYSTEM IS RESPONSIBLE FOR 25% OF CARBON EMISSIONS

MEAT AND DAIRY

ACCOUNT FOR 14.5% OF THE CARBON EMISSIONS

NEWBURGH ENLARGED CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Public School Locations

Food Desert Zone

0%-27% Students Having Free / Reduced-Price Lunch 28%-46% Students Having Free / Reduced-Price Lunch 47%-95% Students Having Free / Reduced-Price Lunch

82

FOOD DESERTS & LOW-INCOME SCHOOL DISTRICTS


What’s on your plate? Food as Knowledge Annie Wu, Moneerah Alajaji, Vasanth Mayilvahanan, Wei Zhang

Access to fresh produce is clear goal for communities seeking improved public health, and a lower carbon footprints. Yet these same communities face food insecurity, that is, a diet of processed fatty foods and high-fat meat products that are lower in cost, travel a great distance and are available in stores and fast food outlets. The Hudson Valley’s Orange County is among the highest consumers of meat despite its being home to many produce farms. In Newburgh, onethird of the population consists of diverse and largely poor school-age children, most of whom are food insecure. WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE aims to change diets of the next generation as a way of influencing a larger shift to low-emission diets. It redesigns the food system to provide fresh produce and higher quality food, produced locally, in schools as the basis of health and food pedagogy. Many schools in the United States lack adequate cooking and food prep capacities to provide such meals. Using two schools in Newburgh as a test site, the project creates space for local food producers, school food authorities, students and local residents encouraging a new understanding of food, health and carbon footprints. See the project’s video here:

https://vimeo.com/380164272 A CENTURY OF DIET CHANGE

1,000th McDonald’s restaurant opens

Meat crisis due to decrease in major cow feed-anchovies

Publication of dietary guidelines-associated health impacts

PER CAPITA AVAILABILITY OF BONELESS, TRIMMED MEAT/ lbs per year First U.S. case of mad cow disease

1st McDonald’s restaurant opens

SBA subsidized fast food chains in food desert areas

Policies viewing fast food as cheaper alternatives to develop low-income areas

83


NEWBURGH CITY

HIGH SCHOOL 3217 (TWO SCHOOLS COMBINED) NEWBURGH FREE ACADEMY NORTH

HIGH SCHOOL 3217 (TWO SCHOOLS COMBINED) NEWBURGH FREE ACADEMY

K-5 791 GAMS TECH MAGNET SCHOOL

K-5 SOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

512 HORIZON ON THE HUDSON

729 CENTRAL KITCHEN SATELLITE SCHOOL HIGH POPULATION DENSITY INTERVENTION AREA TRUCK ROUTE

ONLY 1 IN 10 CHILDREN IN THE US

consumes the recommended daily dose of fruits and vegetables

1 IN 5 PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

offers meals from fast food places like Taco Bell and Pizza Hut

1 IN 10 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS also does the same

Students who regularly eat school lunch are

30% MORE LIKELY TO BE OBESE than other kids

84

NEWBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT


SYSTEM RECONSTRUCTION

SATELLITE SCHOOLS STAKEHOLDERS: NATIONAL FUNDING

USDA NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM

STATE FUNDING

CENTRAL SCHOOL KITCHEN

USDA FARM TO SCHOOL GRANT PROGRAM ((AT LEAST 51% PRODUCE WITHIN STATE)

STAKEHOLDERS: NATIONAL FUNDING

USDA NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM

STATE FUNDING

USDA FARM TO SCHOOL GRANT PROGRAM ((AT LEAST 51% PRODUCE WITHIN STATE)

EARTH INSTITUTE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

LOCAL FARMS

HUDSON VALLEY FOOD HUB INITIATIVE

STAKEHOLDERS: LOCAL NGO FOR FARMERS

HUDSON VALLEY YOUNG FARMERS COALITION

USDA INITIATIVE TO PROVIDE FUNDINGS KNOW YOUR FARMER

MARKET KITCHEN CORNELL CO-OP EXTENSION ORANGE COUNTY TO DEVEL OP THE KITCHEN LOCAL PRACTITIONERSTO HELP EMPLOYMENTFOR THE COMMUNITY ORANGE COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

EDUCATIONAL GARDEN COMMUNAL DINING SNAP BENEFITS FOR THE COMMUNITY TO BUY FOOD

CHILDREN STUDENTS DURING SCHOOL TIME

DOWNING PARK PLANNING COMMITTEE CALVARY PRESBY TERIAN CHURCH USDA FARMERS MARKETLOCAL FOOD PROMOTION

COMMUNITY DURING HOLIDAYS - CACFP USDA SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAMS (STATE LEVEL)

DAILY & SEASONAL PROGRAMS

GARDENING

training training

85


CENTRAL KITCHEN: NEWBURGH FREE ACADEMY & GAMS TECH MAGNET SCHOOL

DINING SPACE CENTRAL KITCHEN LEARNING GARDEN WET STORAGE DRY STORAGE PACKAGING SPACE

COMMUNITY CIRCULATION STUDENT CIRCULATION TRUCK CIRCULATION

86


SATELLITE SCHOOL: HORIZON ON THE HUDSON MAGNET SCHOOL

COMMUNITY CIRCULATION STUDENT CIRCULATION TRUCK CIRCULATION

DINING SPACE CENTRAL KITCHEN LEARNING GARDEN WET STORAGE DRY STORAGE PACKAGING SPACE

87


SUBURBAN LIVES

88


89


Sprawl, CO2 Emissions & Potential Natural Connections in The Hudson Valley sprawl 1920’s

city STREETCARS

“slum growth” 1st great migration

1930’s new deal

1950’s

FHA loans

federal highway act

red lining+blockbusting

“urban renewal” 2nd great migration

gentrification

NOW immigrants rental backed securities

housing bubble + 2nd gen suburbanites

GDP INDEX TARGET

+

CO2 Emissions p/Household Sprawl Selected site Water Bodies Built Environment

90

N


These Routes Are Made For Walking Yile Xu, Jaime Palacios, Kunal Mokasdar, Lino Caceres.

The suburbanization of the New York region has benefited many but, at the same time, has consisted of narrow policies, financial incentives, and ecosystem blindness that can no longer be ignored. Sprawl has been a major contributor to carbon emissions, enabled by automobiles (and trucks) and single family houses. Suburbs have not proved to be the haven they were supposed to be. The Green New Deal offers a framework to redirect resources and policies and create an entirely different social and physical context for daily life. THESE ROUTESâ&#x20AC;Ś remakes the carbon emitting landscape of sprawl near the famous Woodbury Commons in Orange County. The project updates existing infrastructures to reduce carbon emissions, connect communities and enable diverse commuting and movement patterns. New and existing land use guidelines protect land, create opportunities for green corridors joining formerly disconnected communities and enable new forested and open public spaces. The project evolves over time, as more paths are built, as people chose alternative mobilities, and as new green and open spaces become cherished community amenities.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here:

https://vimeo.com/380163656

91


01 EXISTING DISCONNECTION Woodbury

TO MIDDLETOWN

LAST TRAIL EXIT END OF TRAIL

ACTIVITY NODES ARE DISCONNECTED BETWEEN THEM AND WITH MOST OF THE SITE.

port-jarvis rail existing trail

closed trail existing sidewalks existing nodes

Monroe

sprawl vacant lands

1 mi

wetlands water bodies

N

02 WHY DO WE PREFER CARS? OBSTRUCTED SIDEWALK

ABSENT SIDEWALK

PEDESTRIAN EXPOSURE

LAWN DOMINANCE

PRIVATIZED LEISURE

W

W

M

W

W

W

M

W

W

M

W

M

W

W

M

M Monroe W woodbury

03 SPRAWLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LAND USE

79

%

80

%

69

%

44

%

LAWN IS THE MOST POLLUTING CROP DUE TO PESTICIDES WATER USAGE AND MAINTENANCE MACHINERY.

sprawl

housing footprint water bodies lawns

92


04 PROPOSED NETWORK Woodbury

NEW CENTERS

HERITAGE TRAIL

RESIDENTIAL TRAIL SIDEWALK

NEW CENTER HARRIMAN STATION BUS ROUTE

PROPOSED PATHWAYS AND NEW CONNECTED NODES, TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE TO MITIGATE PERSONAL VEHICLE DEPENDENCE .

A CREEK TRAIL

new nodes

existing nodes port-jarvis rail existing trail creek trail

PRESERVATION

A’

Monroe

sidewalks 1 mi

wetlands N

water bodies preserved lots

05 PATHWAY DIAGRAM NEW PATHS HOST DIFFERENT USES TO INCREASE TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS

roads

water body creek trail bus route bike path new sidewalks 18’ buffer area

4 1/2’ buffer area open public space

06 STAKEHOLDER SECTION LLC

A

A’

PRIVATE PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS ARE PROMOTED TO ALLOW THE PATHS TO REACH AS MANY COMMUNITIES AS POSSIBLE.

trail creek trail

100 ft 0

sprawl

project site

4 mi

water bodies open public space

93


HERITAGE TRAIL

TRAIL

CAFE BIKE PARKING

CREEK TRAIL

PLAYGROUND

Demolishing Existing Building Reprogramming Intervention

Sidewalk New Construction Existing Construction

BUFFER ZONE

FUNCTIONS Bike Rack

Vending Machine 15â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Resting

WETLAND

94

BIKE STOP


TRAIN STATION BUS PARKING FRESHEN-UP STATION BUS STATION

PARKING LOTS

STORES

SALT STORAGE

WAITING SPACE

TRAIN STATION

Demolishing Existing Construction Reprogramming Intervention

Sidewalk New Construction Existing Construction

WORKING SURFACE TRANSIT Co-working

Reforestation

Bus Stop

Mini Park

Bike Stop

Library

LAND USE Developable Area

Reforestation

Bird

Water body Buffer

PLANTS Elm Tree

Deer Raccoon

Restaurant Cafe

ANIMALS

Fox

Ginkgo Tree

Maackia

Plum Tree

NEW CENTER

PRESERVATION AREA

95


BIG BOX RETAIL IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

Legend

Legend

Selected Site

Water

High Desity Forest

Forest

Medium Density Forest

Impervious Land

Low Density Forest

Built

Consumer Catchment

+

Selected Site

Waterbodies

Big Box Retail

96

Highways

+

Pickup Centers Consumer Catchment Water Catchment


UNBOXED Hala Abukhodair, Scott Guo, Xinuye Liu, Stuti Ganatra

The proliferation of shopping centers in the 1960s, and the highways that sustained them, are now a burden to the social and ecological landscape of the suburbs. Forests were cleared and streams and ponds were canalized, if not covered over, to enable these places. In particular, the emergence of big box store complexes has continued to shape settlement and landscape patterns which today yield ever-increasing carbon footprints. UNBOXED reimagines the spatial and social systems in and around the City of Newburgh to change the flows of commerce, distribution of goods, and the ecological flows of the region. The Big Box complex is disassembled into smaller parts, its ecosystem connections restores and, in the City, new systems of goods sales and delivery re-assert streets and stores as viable social places. Consumption in and outside of the city might be complementary.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here:

https://vimeo.com/380156155

97


Site Map

Key Map

City of Newburgh Stewart Airport

Legend Selected Site Water

st

t

Washington Lake

Forest Impervious Land

+

Built Pickup Centers Consumer Catchment Water Catchment

Existing edge conditions of water bodies and big box stores

98


Design Goals

Pickup Center System

Hybrid bus+truck Big Box store

Bus stops in urban centers Display for environmental updates Waiting area for bus Pick up booth Trashbin Shaded area for unloading

Cargo bike Suburban neighbourhood

Gas stations near suburban areas

Site Strategies TOPOGRAPHY & HYDROLOGY

WATER MANAGEMENT

CIRCULATION

PROGRAM AND USE

Warehouse Warehouse Transit Hub

C C

C

A

Community Forum

C

Reseach Center

B B B

A A

A

Botanical Garden

A

B

A A

A

A

A A A

A

B A B

Contour

A Delay

Wetland Island B Resist Watershed Bioswale

C Store New Wetland

Contour

Waterflowdirection

Highway

Main Pedestrain Trails

Water Runoff

Stormwater points

Main Road

Secondary Padestrain Trails

Watershed

Built Fabric

Bus Driveway

Plaza | Plantform

Clayey Soil

New Wetland

Parking Lot

Built Fabric

ViewPoint

Wetland Trails

Rest Area

Native plant viewpoint

Plantform Reprogram

Preserved Building

New Fabric

99


Master Plan

Ecological Strategies

1. Elevated Walkway

6 2

2. Terrace Edge

5 2

3 2

3. Detention Wetland

4 2 4. Retention Wetland

Bioswale

5. Rain Garden

Main Pedestrain Trails

Secondary Padestrain Trails Plantform | Bridge Plaza 2 6. Dry Creek

Dry Creek Perennial Garden Meadow

1

Wet Meadow Rain Garden Marsh Shrubland Hardwood Forest New Wetland

100


New Retail Strategy

Community Forum

Transit Hub

Botanical Garden

Pickup Center in Downtown Newburgh

101


FARMS AND FORESTS

102


103


GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURE

TROY ALBANY

NTY BIA COU COLUM96 MTCO2 69,8

5,881 MTCO2

5,384 MTCO2

25%

HUDSON CATSKILL

DEVELOPED LAND

5,273 MTCO2

5,255 MTCO2

SAUGERTIES

KINGSTON

17%

AGRICULTURAL LANDS

MTCO2

NEWBURGH

4000-4999

5000-6000

POUGHKEEPSIE

2000-2999

3000-3999

BEACON

98%

1000-1999

NEW CITY

Diversity of Farms

YONKERS 0

Other

0.189M Tons

Agr icu ltu

ral s

29 .6M

BT on 5.2 7

oil 67.8

%

Em

iss

Agriculture GHG Emissions

%

15

.2%

16

To n

s

s ion iss Em

k toc t es re en Liv anu gem M na a M 1%

Tons

s

All other GHG Emissions

40 Miles

HV 0.64% EMISSIONS BY TYPE

sion

s

s To n 0B 37 .1

io ns iss Em

ns

Emis

20

M To

206

8.905B Tons

104

NYS 4%

8.24M

s BT on

USA 9%

1.7 8

GLOBAL 24%

10

1-999

FAMILY OWNED FARMS

ion

s


Migroculture German Bahamon, Claudia Kleffmann, Nina Lish, Nina Ndichu,Angus Palmer.

Industrialized agriculture in the US is dramatically out of sync with the long term sustainability of land and the well-being of the people it is designed to feed. Instead of a system that entails chemicals and genetic manipulation, Regenerative Agriculture works with nature. Its practices rebuild soil, which leads to increased carbon storage, less need for nitrogen and herbicides, less erosion or flooding, healthier water systems, and, most important, healthier food. Part of a healthier farming system actually depends on livestock, appropriate pasture rotation and diverse crop management, all crucial to keeping land healthy. MIGROCULTURE is a spatial system of negotiated and shared arterial routes for livestock in Columbia County. An easement system connects paddocks and harvested cropland so farmers can share land and develop social networks. Livestock are rotated through the trail and paddocks to regenerate the land and sequester carbon. Local Main Streets, schools, and recreational opportunities are part of the new route system to create new audiences for the re-imagined landscape. See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here: https://vimeo.com/380154441 Multistrata Agroforestry Tree Intercropping Silvopasture

Managed Grazing

Regenerative Agriculture Temperate Forests NET ZERO

BENEFITS OF RESILIENT FARMING PRACTICES

105


MIGROCULTURE

Ichabod Primary, Middle and High School

VALATIE AND KINDERHOOK CASE STUDIES

A

Passive recreation opportunities

Regenerative food distribution

B

Training and networking

Research Farms Public Institutions

INSTITUTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

2 Animal Hospital

No Till Harvested Cropland Livestock Pastures

Livestock Crops

CONNECTING FARMS

Ease of animal transport Resource Sharing

Farmer 1 Farmer 2 Farmer 3 Farmer 4

RURAL COLLABORATION

Kinderhook Valatie

Towns Rail Roads

CONNECTING TOWNS Creek setback/buffer

Finding the “Path of least resistance”

Rivers & Creeks

106

History Museum

1

Kinderhook Library

Savings in livestock feed

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Little League Art School

0

0.275

1.1 Miles


A

Community Theater Pre School Valatie Town Clerk

4 Mobile Home Park

3 FARM + INSTITUTIONS

C Research Farm

B

VALATIE MAIN STREET

C

TRAINING CENTER

107


Shelterbelt - Silvopastures Pasture - lane

Crossing at creek level

Shared path Resting/activity area

Creek access

1

2

CREEK - WALK

CREEK - CROSSING

3

Opportunity to sell, exchange or share produce or resources

Low maintenance materials Closer to urban areas the path can change its character to a more formal path

PICNIC MARKET: SHOP AND EAT

BIKE STATION: REST AND PUMP

A JUST TRANSITION ECONOMIC MODEL TOP DOWN FUNDING

A new Co-operative is established to manage Regenerative Network

$

ADD POULTRY

EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

SELL FARM MACHINERY

FARMERS PARTNER

TRANSITIONING FARMER INDUSTRIAL FARMER NEW FARMER Gate System Pedestrian Path Pasture lane Alley crop lane Crops

PLANNING AND INVESTMENT EARLY AGROBUSINESS RETURNS

Livestock pasture TODAY

108

TRANSIT

PLAN AND COMMEN


Alley crops Pasture lane

Cross-country skiing opportunity

Shelterbelt - Silvopasture Pasture lane

Pedestrian path

4

REGULAR SECTION

PATH - CROSSING

WINTER RECREATION

PATH DESIGN Multipurpose shelters for farmers and shepherds Seating areas and bike stations located along the path Shared livestock path when required

FARMER SHELTER: HOLDING AREA MAINTENANCE JOBS AND NEW CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CONSTRUCTION AND TRAINING DIVERSIFY ASSETS

$

INSTITUTIONAL BIDDING AND PARTNERSHIP

CARBON CAPTURE INCENTIVES SILVOPASTURE AND ALLEY CROPS

INCREASE HERD/FLOCK

$

PROFITS UP +30%

$

$

ROI MET

$ NITROGEN TAX PENALTIES

ROAMING FARMER

TION

NCE CHANGES 1 YEAR

GROWTH AND RETURNS

PATH IMPLEMENTATION AND TOP DOWN FUNDING YEAR 2

109


Forest Linkage and Sections

N N 110


Carbon Sequestration Menghan Zhang, Tian Hao, Kuan-I Wu, Eleni Stefania Kalapoda

A tree is a carbon machine that can store huge amounts of carbon. Writ large, reforestation is a cost-efficient, nature-based means of offsetting carbon emissions while also contributing to a vast new social infrastructure. Currently, 74% of the Hudson Valley is forested yet frequently this forested land is fragmented by urban development negatively impacting biodiversity and species migration. CARBON SEQUESTRATION is a long-term plan to reforest and reconnect forests in the Kingston region as a case study for the larger region. Placing new tree nurseries and planting areas on previously industrial sites, a renewed and more connected forest landscape will create a regional carbon sink â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a huge environmental as well as recreational asset. Beyond the trees, however, the reforestation project entails considerable management and maintenance over time, including planting, harvesting, grounds work, and potential for research and innovation in the timber industry, all creating a vast array of skills and jobs for local communities.

See the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video here: https://vimeo.com/380159938

111


112


113


114


115


THANK YOU Dan Almasi, Columbia County Mental Health Robert William Balder, Cornell AAP Nancy Barton, Prattsville Art Center (Greene County) Thomas H. Benton, Lawyer Kingston Land Trust Gabe Berlin, Newburgh Transportation Advisory Committee Micah Blumenthal, Good Work Institute Jesse Brown, Hudsy TV Ellie Burhans, Hudson River Maritime Museum Kevin Burke, Hudson Valley Greenway Initiative David Church, Planning Commisioner Orange County Brendan Clemente, Bonded Concrete Jean-Paul Courtens, Roxbury Farm Pat Courtney-Strong, Activist, Kingston Mike Cotrone, Bonhomie Farm Miles Crettien, CommonShare.app Paul Daley, Hudson River Maritime Museum Dennis Doyle, Planning Ulster County Jonathan Drapkin, Hudson Valley Pattern For Progress Tony DiMarco, Global Center for Social Entrepreneurship Network Tom Eberhardt, Bastoy Prison (Norway) Bob Elliott, Hudson River Greenway Julia Farr, Kingston Land Trust Evelyn Garcia, Lenox Hill Neighborhood House Iona Gitt-Henderson, Churchtown Dairy Anthony Grice, Newburgh Council Robert Glowacki, Horizon-on-the-Hudson Magnet School Robert (Roman) Haferd, Restorative Justice Coordinator, District of Columbia Paul Halayko, Newburgh Brewing Company Laura Hartmann, Town of Ulster Citizens Kristina Hayek, NY State Parks/Bear Mountain

116


Naomi Hersson-Ringskog, Newburgh Transportation Advisory Committee Paul Hesse, Community Development Coordinator, City of Poughkeepsie Liana Hoodes, Newburgh Urban Farm and Food Leon Johnson, Lodger Newburgh Virginia Kasinki, Newburgh Urban Farm and Food Martin Kirk, NOVO Foundation Evelina Knodel, Mass Design Group Chris Kroner, Mass Design/ Poughkeepsie Gabe Landes, Cottonwood Energy Barbara Lee, A River of Opportunities Abdus Miah, Supervisor, Columbia County 2nd Ward, City of Hudson Otto Ohle, Film Maker Claire Parde, Columbia County Community Healthcare Consortium, Inc Michael Parker, Hudson Valley Young Farmers Jeffrey Potent, Columbia University, The Earth Institute Lee Ranney, Kinderhook Farm Rebeca Ramirez, Cold Spring Cheese Shop Anna Remet, Kingston Resident Ezra Ritchin, The Bail Project (USA) Bryn Roshong, Hudson Valley Young Farmers Ari Rosmarin, ACLU Smart Justice Campaign Jennifer Schwartz Berky, Planner, Ulster County Rita D. Shaheen, Scenic Hudson, Poughkeepsie Matt Shepard, Stone House Grain Michael Shiffer, Metro North/MTA Andrew Shrijver, Newburgh Property Owner Darius Sollohub, New Jersey Institute of Technology Conor Stedman, Appleseed Permaculture Kevin Sylvester, Chief of Ossining Police Michele Washington, Design Researcher June Williamson, Spitzer School of Architecture CUNY Evelyn Wright, Commonwealth Hudson Valley

117


Columbia GSAPP Urban Design Class of 2019

Š 2019 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Contributions Š the Authors All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used or reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher, except in the context of reviews. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify the owners of copyright. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions. This publication has been produced through the Urban Design Program, and the Hudson Valley Initiative at Columbia University GSAPP.

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The Climate Crisis: Envisioning A Green New Deal in the Hudson Valley  

Fall 2019 Urban Design Studio III Columbia GSAPP

The Climate Crisis: Envisioning A Green New Deal in the Hudson Valley  

Fall 2019 Urban Design Studio III Columbia GSAPP