OECD Greening Report 2016

Page 1

OECD GREENING REPORT 2016

@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE


The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) was created in 1961. Today, the mission of the OECD is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD Secretariat provides for its 34 Member countries, as well as many non-Members associated with its work, a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. Drawing on facts, analysis and real-life experience, the OECD recommends policies designed to make the lives of ordinary people better. It works with business and with labour, and has active contacts as well with civil society organisations. The common thread in its work is a shared commitment to market economies backed by democratic institutions and focused on the well-being of all citizens. Further details on the Report and its methodology, as well as primary data and their treatment, are available upon request.

OECD Executive Directorate greening@oecd.org 2, rue AndrĂŠ Pascal, 75775 Paris CEDEX 16, France

Cover photo: Elisa LĂłpez RoldĂĄn


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

FOREWORD BY THE SECRETARY GENERAL

In 2015, the global community came together to establish landmark international agreements on climate change and sustainable development. In December 2015, 195 countries made commitments to address climate change. The Paris Agreement was adopted by consensus at the 21st Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and was signed by 177 countries in April 2016. Earlier in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals, an intergovernmental set of 17 aspirational goals with 169 targets, were adopted during the UN Sustainable Development Summit. The OECD made significant contributions to these agreements, and will have an even more important role with regard to their monitoring and implementation. For example, the OECD will apply its tools and experience to contribute to achieving the SDGs efficiently and on time, working with economies at all stages of development to do so. In addition to direct inputs, the Organisation will continue to pursue New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC), to renew and strengthen the OECD’s analytical frameworks, policy instruments and tools in order to enable governments to identify, prioritise and combine reforms to support sustainable, inclusive growth. The Greening@OECD initiative helps the OECD as an Organisation, to ‘practice what it preaches’. Over the past five years, we have made steady improvement in the environmental performance of the OECD. The latest developments are reflected in this Annual Report. While this progress is pleasing, we cannot be complacent. We will continue the drive to be ‘greener’ and to raising our standards even further in this regard. Each of us holds the key to the future we want. Every action counts. I invite you to provide your ideas and support as we move forward and enhance our environmental performance.

Angel Gurría

3


GREENING REPORT 2016 NEW PERSPECTIVES

Foreword from the Environmental Coordinator What if we could see our planet from beyond its surface? Would the meaning of our existence as inhabitants of planet Earth change as we change our perspective? To mark this year’s World Environment Day, an exhibition at the OECD (8 to 30 June) involves astronauts from the European Space Agency sharing with us the “overview effect” of seeing the Earth from space: reinforcing the realisation of how fragile life is, protected by a disturbingly thin layer of atmosphere; and how everything is connected, by the oceans and the air. We are together, on an island, in the middle of an inhospitable universe, light-years away from any place where life as we know could exist. I hope this different perspective of world and the several success stories described in the next pages will highlight how each and every one of us is responsible and accountable for our actions, past, present, and future The 2016 Greening Report is presented in three chapters, describing the Environmental, Social and Economic Performance of the Greening initiatives at the OECD.

Meet the team The Greening @OECD Initiative is located in the Office of the Executive Director. Lead by Anthony’s Rottier strategic overview, guided by his counsellors Valérie Chéré, Rosarii Coleman and Bronwyn Andrews and supported by Léa Dubosq and Anna Kalista, the Environmental Coordinator Mel Amancio implements, monitors and evaluates OECD’s Environmental Management System.

4


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD BY THE SECRETARY GENERAL

3

NEW PERSPECTIVES

4

BOUNDARIES OF THE REPORT

6

THE OECD IN 2015

6

AREA 6 PEOPLE

7

OECD’S ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

8

VISION 8 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

9

Key Performance Indications (KPIs)

9

HQE®EXPLOITATION (HQE®E) CERTIFICATION

11

ENERGY CONSUMPTION

12

WATER CONSUMPTION

14

PAPER CONSUMPTION

15

WASTE PRODUCTION & RECYCLING

17

BIODIVERSITY 19 GHG INVENTORY

20

GREEN PROCUREMENT

22

HOW IT WORKS: THE AIR FILTRATION SYSTEM

24

SOCIAL PERFORMANCE

25

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY GROUP

25

DELTA GARDEN GROUP

25

ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE

26

CARBON PRICING INITIATIVE

26

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 30

5


GREENING REPORT 2016 BOUNDARIES OF THE REPORT THE OECD IN 2015 The OECD is an intergovernmental organisation that helps to raise living standards through sharing and creating knowledge. Its work often takes the form of policy advice but sometimes develops into global standards. Its outputs influence government action and ultimately people’s lives. 1

Number of missions 3

Number of members

11 185

34

Number of meetings (in Paris) 2

3514

Number of publications 4

+50 %

653

Kg of Honey produced 5

80

Twitter followers

421 000

AREA The following OECD buildings are included in the scope of this report Château de La Muette > 6 695 m2 Marshall Building > 29 295 m2 Conference Centre > 16 171 m2 Delta > 14 300 m2 Franqueville > 5 060 m2 Monaco > 2 328 m2 Octave Feuillet > 661 m2

6

TOTAL

74 510 M2


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

PEOPLE OECD staff numbers have increased 18% since 2010, and so therefore has the number of staff members included within the scope of this report 6 : Staff in buildings within the scope of the report

2 744

Part I staff

2 492

Part II staff

854

Number of visitors

126 469

TOTAL STAFF

3246 Evolution of the total number of staff Total OECD staff

3300

3246

3200

3088 3100

2996 3000

2880

2900 2800

2826 2751

2700 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

7


GREENING REPORT 2016 OECD’S ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Responsible business conduct means that businesses should make a positive contribution to economic, environmental and social progress with a view to achieving sustainable development and that businesses have a responsibility to avoid and address the adverse impacts of their operations. Roel Nieuwenkamp, Chair of the OECD Working Party on Responsible Business Conduct

VISION Recognising that our Organisation’s activities can impact the environment, sustainable use of natural resources and public health and safety, we are committed to limit the environmental impact of our work in a manner consistent with the wider goals of green growth and sustainable development. In that regard, we strive to: 1 Ensure that the procurement policies of the Organisation give due consideration to the selection of products, materials, technologies and services which are environmentally sound 2

Optimise the use of energy, water, wood, paper, and other natural resources

3 Limit and offset the release of greenhouse gases, reduce emissions and minimise the use of other substances damaging to health and the environment 4

Reduce waste and expand re-use, recycling and use of recycled materials

5

Assess environmental risks and opportunities associated with our operations

To reach these goals, we will embody good practices and ensure we remain compliant with relevant environmental legislation in the host country and other countries where Secretariat facilities are located. We will maintain an environmental management system appropriate to our operations. This system will include: • a collection and evaluation of relevant and timely information regarding the environmental and health and safety impacts of our outputs; • measurable objectives and, where appropriate, targets for improved environmental performance and resource utilisation, and a periodical review of the continued relevance of these objectives; • regular monitoring and verification of progress toward the objectives and targets.

Employee understanding and involvement are key to the effective implementation of this Vision. We will raise awareness about the environmental performance of the OECD Secretariat and facilities.

8


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

A colourful marble in endless blackness. So fragile and limited. You can see deforestation, air pollution, erosion. We are exhausting Earth’s resources. It needs a chance to recover now, for our own sake. André Kuipers, M.D. and ESA astronaut (when seeing the Earth from space)

Key Performance Indications (KPIs) In order to measure the efficiency of OECD’s Environmental Performance, eight indicators have been identified, each with a specific target for 2020 compared to the reference year of 20101. Their evolution compared to the target is shown below. In 2016, the targets will be re-evaluated to ensure their continued relevance.

TARGET NOT REACHED YET

TARGET REACHED

NEGATIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

NEGATIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

TARGET NOT REACHED YET

TARGET REACHED

POSITIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

POSITIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

24 000 Total energy consumption (in MWh)

Target: 15% reduction

21 300 18 500

19 000

17 600

16 900

15 606 15 100

14 000 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Target: 40% reduction

Total Water consumption (in M3)

30 000

24 100

29 000

30 500

30 300

2011

2012

2013

27 100

29 388

20 000 10 000 2010

440 Total paper consumption (in t)

360

340

2014

2015

Target: 15% reduction

312

268

240

244

245

140 2011

1

2012

2013

2014

The base year for the indicator « paper consumption » is 2011 as no comparable data are available for 2010.

2015

9


GREENING REPORT 2016

TARGET NOT REACHED YET

TARGET REACHED

NEGATIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

NEGATIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

TARGET NOT REACHED YET

TARGET REACHED

POSITIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

POSITIVE PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION

Target: 10% reduction

900 Total waste generation (in t)

700

620 500

490

2010

2011

740

684

540

500 300 2012

2013

2014

2015

Target: 20% increase Total waste recycled (share as % of total)

70%

66% 58%

59%

2010

2011

60%

62%

61%

2013

2014

2015

50% 2012

Target: 20% reduction

9 700 Total GHG emissions (in tCO2e)

8 800

9 380

9 160

9 110

9 344

2012

2013

2014

2015

8 500

6 500 2010

GHG emissions related to buildings (in kgCO2e/ m2)

Total vehicle fuel consumption (in L)

30

2011

Target: 20% reduction

28 21

21

12

12

2014

2015

10 2010

25 000

22 800

2011

2012

2013

Target: 25% reduction

19 900

20 000 15 000

15 500

10 000 2010

10

20

20

2011

2012

14 100 2013

12 800

13 100

2014

2015


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

HQE®EXPLOITATION (HQE®E) CERTIFICATION Since 2011, the OECD has progressively integrated green building standards into the management of its real estate. In 2015, the Château received its certificate and in April 2016, the Franqueville building has also been certified – thereby achieving certification of OECD’s real estate main buildings. The progress achieved on OECD’s environmental performance can largely be attributed to the HQE® standards, and greening efforts are now largely embedded in day-to-day operations.

MARSHALL BUILDING

2011

DELTA

2012

CONFERENCE CENTRE

st

2014

CHÂTEAU DE LA MUETTE

2015

FRANQUEVILLE

2016

First building of its kind in France to be certified

Background In 2010, the OECD started using the French HQE®Exploitation (HQE®E) certification scheme aimed at buildings in use (i.e. not under construction). The HQE®E certification endorses the overall performance of a building with a focus on energy, environment, health and comfort. The performance levels achieved take into account product and material lifecycles. The scheme does not impose specific solutions but rather gives OECD building managers the freedom and responsibility to adopt appropriate choices and innovations.

11


GREENING REPORT 2016

ENERGY CONSUMPTION The total energy consumption 8 has decreased 27% compared with the base year 2010. Despite that, a slight increase in energy consumption was observed in 2015, for all energy types: electricity (80%), heating (17%), natural gas (2%) and heavy fuel (1%). This is a direct consequence of the weather conditions: warmer summers and colder winters demand more energy from the buildings. Because it is likely that this trend will be maintained in the future, the OECD Secretariat continually works on solutions to increase OECD’s energy efficiency and improve its energy use.

Total CPCU (heating) consumption per m2 (kWh/m2) Château

Conference Centre

Delta common areas

Franqueville

Marshall

160.00 140.00 120.00 100.00 80.00 60.00 40.00 20.00 0.00 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2012 was an exceptionally cold year. The Franqueville building is heated mainly by CPCU 2 while the other OECD buildings are less dependent on CPCU for heating. Heating control has been improving and, in July 2014, thermostat valves were installed.

Total electricity consumption per m2 (kWh/m2) Château

Conference Centre

Delta

Franqueville

Marshall

Monaco

Octave Feuillet

500.00 400.00

300.00

200.00

100.00

0.00 2010

2

12

2011

2012

2013

CPCU : Compagnie Parisienne de Chauffage Urbain (Paris District Heating Company)

2014

2015


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

The electricity consumption in the Château has decreased by 32% in the past 5 years. This is explained by the following improvements: (1) the gradual replacement of windows in 2013, (2) the regulation of heating in offices since 2013, (3) roof insulation in 2013 and 2014 and (4) the gradual replacement of light bulbs with LED bulbs since 2014.

Success story: Energy dashboard Since April 2015, it has been possible to follow in real-time the water, heating and electricity consumption in the Château, Marshall Building, Conference Centre and Delta. This was the winning idea from the OECD’s V4M Idea Awards Competition. It was selected by the Secretary-General because it involves simple but practical measures which should engage each staff member and which, when added up, can make a real difference not only in money terms but in relation to greening objectives. The data shown helps the technical teams to improve energy management, detect water leaks and other dysfunctions and control the ventilation system in order to optimise its electricity consumption (see page 24).

OECD related work The OECD publication Environment at a Glance 2015: OECD Indicators shows the primary energy supply by source in OECD countries in 2014. Total primary energy supply is made up of production + imports - exports - international marine bunkers - international aviation bunkers +/- stock changes. The breakdown excludes electricity trade.

% 100

Solid fossil fuels Nuclear

Oil Renewables and waste

Gas

80 60 40 20 0

13


GREENING REPORT 2016

WATER CONSUMPTION Since the base year 2010, the total water consumption9 has increased 22%. Nevertheless, the total water consumed in average per employee reduced 18% during the same period.

at the Conference Centre

Water consumption (m3/per employee) 500.0 400.0 300.0 200.0 2010 Château water consumption at offices buildings

Conference Centre

2011 Delta

2012 Franqueville

2013 Marshall

2014 Monaco

2015 Octave Feuillet

80.0 70.0 60.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total water consumption increased 8% in 2015, compared with 2014. Two main factors explain these figures. In 2014, the garden was not watered due to drainage work. Also, the number of staff and visitors has continued to grow. There were over 4 000 more visitors at the OECD in 2015 compared to 2014. What is happening next?

A rainwater harvesting system will be installed on the roof of the Marshall Building. This project was financed by the carbon-tax from 2014’s travels. It is expected that 100% of the water used in the gardens at Marshall Building will be provided by this system.

OECD related work The publication OECD OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Brazil 2015, released in 2015, recommends that Brazil establishes consistent and compatible criteria for water allocation and ensures that wastewater discharge limits are set in accordance with use-based water quality standards. The Environmental Performance Review (EPR) programme has been helping OECD Member countries improve their environmental management for 20 years.

14


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

PAPER CONSUMPTION Since 2011, the paper consumption10 in the buildings under the scope of this report has decreased by 32%.

Volume of print activity in the Printshop

Media Review 4%

Other products 4%

Brochures/ Flyers/ Documents 26%

Publications 35%

This graph shows the different types of work sent to the Printshop during the year 2015. Some 1.7 million A4 pages of Media Review were printed and distributed in 2015.

Official Documents 31%

Evolution of the volume printed compared to the values of 2010 Publications

Official Documents

Brochures/Flyers/ Documents

Media Review

15% 5% -5% -15% -25% -35% 2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

As shown in this graph, in the past 5 years, the OECD has greatly reduced the volume of paper consumption regarding publications, official documents and brochures/flyers. The reduction is due inter alia to new measures. It is possible to post a document on OLIS without an accompanying paper distribution. Many Committee Secretariats have taken the initiative to reduce the paper copies available in the meeting rooms. Finally, the availability of publications online has increased significantly.

15


GREENING REPORT 2016

Office paper consumption per building per employee Marshall

Château

Franqueville

Delta

Monaco

Octave Feuillet

60.0

kg/employee

50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Concerning office paper, an overall 20% reduction has been observed since 2011. Nevertheless, every employee consumed on average 26,7kg 3 of paper in 2015, and further efforts will be undertaken in 2016 to reduce the unnecessary use of paper.

Renewed Efforts to Reduce Paper Consumption Paper is a very important working material for the OECD. There has been continuous improvement in paper consumption across the Organisation over the years. Since installing the software WatchDoc in Multifunctional printers to creating a Paper Task Force in 2014, the Secretariat has been working in order to reduce unnecessary paper use in offices as well as in meetings. More can be done. In that context, the Secretary-General endorsed renewed efforts to reduce paper consumption as from March 2016. The first measures include offering the staff the opportunity to “unsubscribe” from the paper version of the staff publication @mosphere; reduce the paper distribution of the Media Review; and further reduce paper copies of documents for Committee Meetings.

OECD related work Household and sanitary 7% Other and specialised 4% Wrapping and packaging 52% Printing and writing 28%

The OECD Green Growth Studies published a Paper factsheet in Material Resources, Productivity and the Environment in 2015, where it is shown that in 2010, 52% of the world paper use was for packaging!

Moreover, in Europe, approximately 30 cubic metres of water are consumed per tonne of mechanical pulped printing paper (OECD, 2010). Waste water effluents from pulp and paper mills contain mainly: suspended solids, nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus; oxygen-consuming organic substances; organically-bound chlorine compounds; and metals and toxins, such as resin acids that leach from the wood (OECD, 2008; 2010). Newprint and magazine 9%

3

16

Only in offices buildings


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

WASTE PRODUCTION & RECYCLING Waste monitoring11 has greatly improved at the OECD, thanks to the progressively HQE®E certification of the main buildings.

800

35

700

30

600

25

Tons of waste

500

250kg /employee

20

400 15

220kg /employee

300 10

200

5

100 0

Number of items monitored (different types of waste and collection sites)

Total Waste Generation

Non-recycled waste (i.e. for district heating, incineration) (t) Recycled waste (t) Items

0 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

In 2015, 33 different items (type of waste and locations) were monitored by the OECD Secretariat, compared to 2 items in 2010. This makes it difficult to precisely compare the amount of waste produced between 2 years, and it gives a false impression that the amount of waste is increasing.

Did you know ?

 An electric lawn mower installed at La Muette’s garden cuts the grass every night, leaving it in place to be used as natural fertilizer. This operation saves 46 tons of green waste annually.

17


GREENING REPORT 2016

What happens once the waste leaves the OECD? In order to comply with the HQE®E standard, tender specifications mentions that the waste produced at the OECD have to be monitored and effectively recovered. The list below shows how the main types of waste produced at the OECD are treated / recycled. Type of waste

Quantity in 2015 (tons)

Final destination

Undifferentiated waste (DIB)

263.76

Incineration: production of heat

Paper and cardboard

235.36

Sorting at the OECD and recycling

Organic waste (restaurants)

53.42

Methanization (production of biogas)

Plastic/Package/Metal (Yellow bins)

16.93

Sorting by the City of Paris, then recycling

11.3

Sorting by the moving company and valorisation by Valdelia (Reuse by a “Social and Solidary Economy Structure” and recycled)

WEEE (including laptops, printers and screens)

8.86

Sorting at the OECD and recycling. IT material is sold to a company specialized in recycling IT equipment

Glass

8.4

Sorting at the OECD and recycling

Cartridges

4.218

Sorting at the OECD and recycling

Plastic bottles

4.018

Sorting at the OECD and recycling

Aluminium cans

1.302

Sorting at the OECD and recycling

Furniture

OECD related work The publication OECD Factbook 2015-2016: Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics shows the municipal waste generation per capita, in kg, in OECD countries and Key Partners. In the OECD area, the quantity of municipal waste generated exceeds an estimated 650 million tonnes (522 kg per capita). Municipal waste generation kg per capita, 2013 or latest available 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

18


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

BIODIVERSITY The garden at the Château de La Muette hosts not only a number of trees, bushes and flowers but also birds and bees. CORIF (Centre Ornithologique Île-de-France; Ornithological Centre Île-de-France), a regional ornithological association that observes, identifies, studies and protects birds in Îlede-France, has been doing the avifaunal study of the OECD garden in La Muette since 2012. In 2015, 87 birds of 22 different species were inventoried. In four years of follow up, 30 species have been identified on the site. The birds observed are typical of an urban park and its number is relatively stable since 2012. In 2015, 16 species have potentially nested in the OECD garden. Photo: CORIF/LELIEVRE F.

In 2015 two beehives were installed in La Muette’s garden, sponsored by the carbon pricing initiative (see page 26). They are constantly monitored by a professional beekeeper. The bees produced 80kg of honey in 2015, which was available for sale to staff at the OECD bookshop.

Photo: Greening.

OECD related work Published in 2013, Scaling-up Finance Mechanisms for Biodiversity examines six mechanisms that can be used to scale-up financing for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use and to help meet the 2011-20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The mechanisms are environmental fiscal reform, payments for ecosystem services, biodiversity offsets, green markets, biodiversity in climate change funding, and biodiversity in international development finance.

19


GREENING REPORT 2016

GHG INVENTORY Every product and activity has a carbon footprint. Since 2012, the OECD established a GHG Inventory which follows the GHG Protocol guidelines. This methodology is the outcome of a partnership between the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is internationally recognised as best practice for GHG emissions accounting and reporting, and is compliant with ISO 14064-1.

The GHG Inventory12 is reported under 3 different scopes: Scope 1: direct emissions from combustion, production and fugitive emissions Scope 2: indirect emissions from electricity and heating purchase Scope 3: other indirect emissions. Of the 15 categories described on the protocol, this report only covers two: business travel and employee commuting

GHG Inventory 1% 15%

8%

Scope 1 14%

62%

Scope 2 Scope 3 (Air travel, employees’ missions) Scope 3 (Air travel, invited experts and statutory strips) Scope 3 (Employee commuting)

The chart above indicates that 91% of the OECD’s GHG emissions are of the Scope 3 type. Missionsrelated air travel is responsible for 62% of the total.

20


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions

tCO2e

tCO2e/employee 4.2

10000 9000

4.0

8000

Total GHG emissions/employee

7000

3.8

GHG Protocol Scope 3 (Air travel due to employees missions and invited experts travel, employee commuting)

6000 5000

3.6

GHG Protocol Scope 2 (Purchased electricity, purchased steam)

4000 3.4

3000 2000

GHG Protocol Scope 1 (Stationary combustion, mobile combustion, fugitive emissions)

3.2

1000 0

3.0 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

The global trend is relatively stable, showing an overall 4% reduction compared to the base year 2010. During the same period, emissions from the facilities and vehicles owned by the OECD have decreased by 65% due to corporate “greening” initiatives while Scope 3 emissions increased by 19% as the number of staff and missions also increased.

Change in GHG emissions by scope since 2010

20% 0% -20%

Scope 1

-40%

Scope 2

-60%

Scope 3

-80% 2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

21


GREENING REPORT 2016

GREEN PROCUREMENT Over the years, the Central Purchasing Group (EXD/PBF/CPG) has been working with the different services in order to improve the selection criteria and include OECD’s commitment to Green Growth in relevant call for tenders. Some success stories from the present years are summarised below:

Catering Following the call for tender carried out in 2015 for catering services, the provider EXKI was chosen. This provider complies with the OECD’s Green Growth engagements: (1) to provide labelled biological options and, when possible, issued from local production and (2) to implement an efficient and quantifiable waste management system. 50% of the salty products are vegetarian and 25% are gluten-free. Also, 30% of the products are organic.

Did you know ?

At Le Buffet du Parc, in La Muette, fresh juices are available every day. Also, the concept of ‘Végé’Time’ was implemented: a complete vegetarian menu (starters, soup, main dish and fruits) is offered to staff and visitors

Eco-cup initiative

% Hot drinks ordered with own Mug

This graph 13 shows how successful the “Bring your mug” initiative was in 2015, in the different OECD cafeterias. The success is inevitably higher in places used by OECD staff whereas the percentage of personal mugs in the Conference Centre remains low.

22

25% 20% 15%

2014 ( since February)

10%

2015

5% 0%

Kfé Marshall Building

Conference center

Expresso EXKI (until 07/14) (Since 09/15)

Expresso Delta

Total


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

IT equipment The 2015 call for tender for IT equipment included a chapter dedicated to environmental requirements. Not only the price and the technical characteristics of the offer were considered but also (1) the distance from the manufacturing site, (2) the certifications owned by the manufacturer, (3) eco-conception, (4) packaging, and (5) product certifications. Finally, the equipment chosen was EPEAT Gold certified, meaning they meet all of the 23 required criteria and at least 75% of the 28 optional criteria that address the full product lifecycle, from design and production to energy use and recycling.

Car park

Since 2010, the fuel consumption14 by the OECD car fleet has decreased 43%. Moreover, the number of cars belonging to the OECD fleet was reduced by 32%. This initiative was taken for environmental and financial aspects. Also, the cars are being gradually replaced by petrol and electrical cars as they emit fewer particles than diesel cars.

Total fuel consumption of vehicle fleet and shuttles 22801

12.0

Liters of fuel (petrol + diesel)

19942 20000

10.0 15502

15000

14118

12848

13100

8.0 6.0

10000

4.0

5000

2.0

0

Petrol 13%

Fuel efficiency (km/l)

25000

Type of vehicles in 2015 Diesel 74%

Electricity 13%

0.0 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Meet the team “In our service we are committed to recruit providers who are themselves involved in an environmental approach in line with the requirements of the OECD. Regarding procurement, the goal is to buy the latest generation of cars, rather gasoline or electric, and we tried to reduce the number of cars. We make the effort to share as much as possible. Our drivers follow an “ecodriving” training in order to reduce as much as possible the fuel consumption. In the future, we would be happy to set up a carpooling website and a shared transfer system to airports and train stations.” Contracts and Client Services Unit Team (EXD/CSI/BLS)

Did you know ? The daily shuttles organised by the OECD Secretariat between its various locations enable the transport of 560 people per day.

 23


GREENING REPORT 2016

HOW IT WORKS: THE AIR FILTRATION SYSTEM The Air Filtration that was put in place for the Conference Centre has had positive health and environmental impacts.

Hydrothermal control

Heat exchanger

Filters

Conference room

As shown in the diagram, fresh air is captured (1) and then filtered (2) in order to eliminate airborne particles. Sensors inside each conference room indicate the air’s CO2 concentration, temperature and moisture values. The regulation and outflow (3) of the new air into the conference rooms depend on these values. The “old” air is captured in the ceiling. It goes through a heat exchanger (4) that recovers its calories before being expelled outside. These calories are then used to regulate (5) the air temperature before it is blown inside the conferences rooms.

Site Maintenance Team (EXD/CSI/BLS)

24

Filters before/after. The picture shows the filters before and after around one year use.


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

SOCIAL PERFORMANCE

What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not an end Friedrich Nietzsche, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY GROUP The Environmental Management Advisory Group (EMAG) was created in 2015 in order to advise on the environmental management strategy’s continuing suitability, adequacy and effectiveness. The group’s mandate is notably to discuss the annual environmental management programme, including decision proposals and to make recommendations for the Executive Director’s consideration.

EMAG in 2016 (Photo: Greening)

The participants of this group 4 are committed to contributing to save energy, to reducing paper consumption, to federating the greening efforts across the Organisation and to better communicating them.

DELTA GARDEN GROUP The Greening initiative sponsored the implementation of a Garden Project in Delta in 2014. In 2015 the team of volunteers harvested fruits and vegetables including: tomatoes, carrots, raspberries, gooseberries, strawberries. Rachel, one of the volunteers, says: “I like the idea of growing vegetables and fruits and do some gardening. Hopefully we will be able to continue this project in Boulogne”.

Photo: Greening

Composition of the group in 2015, some of the people listed have now left the organisation: Corinne Ley Charles (EXD/HRM), Cristina Tebar Less (DAF/INV), Daniel Escamilla (EXD/CSI), Daniel Vanderlinden (EXD/DKI), Federica Darida (EXD/PBF), Francis Barascud (EXD/CSI), Kumi Kitamori (ENV/GGGR), Liisa-Maija Harju (EXD/DO), Michelle Lübkert (EXD/DKI), Sandra Gregory (EXD/ CSI), Peter Lübkert (EXD/CSI) and Willemien Bax (PAC/AFF) 4

25


GREENING REPORT 2016 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE

The economy is a wholly owned subsidiary of the environment, not the reverse. Herman E. Daly, Economist

CARBON PRICING INITIATIVE In June 2013, the Secretary-General has decided to introduce a carbon pricing initiative at the OECD. This Initiative reflects the Organisation’s own policy analysis and advice and it is also in line with similar practices being introduced by many Member countries. While an important aim of the Initiative is to reflect the cost of carbon emissions in OECD staff travel, it is also intended to encourage management and staff to give greater consideration to environmental aspects in making their travel decisions and arrangements. Below, the GHG emissions 15 from air travel for at the OCDE.

11500

9000 8000

11000

7000

10500

6000 5000

10000

4000

9500

3000 2000

9000

1000

8500

0 2012

2013

2014

Number of missions (Part I and Part II)

tCO2e from Part I and Part II air travel

Emissions from air travel related to missions at the OECD

Emission Part I (tCO2) Emission Part II (tCO2) Total nb Missions

2015

Several Part I Directorates have reduced their emissions in 2015. Nevertheless, the overall values for Part I show an increase in 6.2% of the emissions compared to 2014, largely linked to the increase activity of the Organisation as the total number of missions has increased by 10% during the same period. In particular, between 2014 and 2015 there was a 17% increase 16 on missions to Africa, the Americas and to Asia.

Emissions/staff (Part I and Part II) (tCO2e)

CO2 emissions from air travel per OECD staff and per mission

26

2.500 2.000

2.50

2.35

Emission/ mission

1.500 1.000

0.725

0.702

0.500 2012

2013

2014

2015

Total Emissions/ staff


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

As mentioned above, the number of staff members and of missions have increased. Despite a slight reduction in 2013 and 2014, emissions per staff increased in 2015. So have the emissions per mission. One possible reason is that the OECD staff travelled to further locations and/or included more stopovers with a view to reduce the mission costs.

Carbon Pricing Revenues €180,000

€167,340

€160,000 €131,298

€140,000

2012 (collected in 2013)

2014 (collected in 2015)

2013 (collected in 2014)

2015 (collected in 2016)

€120,000 €96,000 €94,506

€100,000

€76,085

€80,000 €60,000 €36,230 €33,040

€40,000

€46,649

€20,000 €0 Total Part I

Total Part II

It was decided at the outset that the price per tonne of CO2 emitted should increase progressively. The initial price thus was set at 20€/tCO2e in 2013 (for 2012 and 2013 travel) and is now at 30€/tCO2e (for 2015 and 2016 travels). Past projects The funds raised from the carbon pricing initiative have been used primarily to improve the Organisation’s remote conferencing infrastructure in the Conference Centre, in the Château and in the smaller meeting rooms in the Marshall Building and Delta. This should not only induce a reduction, over time, of travel and missions, but also facilitate contacts with OECD stakeholders. The overall evolution17 in utilisation of the remote conferencing facilities are shown below:

Remote conferencing sessions per year and type 2921

3000 2453

2500 2000

1481 1569

1500

2014

1000 470 386

500 0

2015

561

359 405 143

Audio

Video

Webcast

Web conferencing

TOTAL

The Greening team is continuously working towards improving the monitoring of the impact of these facilities and better evaluate the actual number of missions that have been saved thanks to them.

27


GREENING REPORT 2016

Future projects For the signature of the Paris Agreement, the OECD has announced it will sponsor the plantation of one tree per staff around the Paris area. By doing so, the OECD joins the global campaign of planting 8 billion trees by 2020, one for each person on Earth. At least 3250 trees will be sponsored by the Carbon Pricing Initiative in 2016. On average, each tree from this particular project shall store 150kg of CO2 over 30 years18.

Photos: Réforest’Action

Did you know ?

The carbon footprint of a roundtrip flight from Paris to New York in Economy class is 763 kg of CO2 while for same trip in Business class it is 1526 kg of CO2?19 Therefore, planting 10 trees compensates for each roundtrip flight from Paris to New York in Business class!

OECD related work The OECD publication Climate Change Mitigation, published in 2015, has a chapter about Carbon Pricing. In the graph below, the share of GHG emissions covered by the EU emissions trading system in some EU countries. In comparison, OECD’s Carbon Pricing Initiative covers 60% of the emissions reported on the GHG inventory. ETS

Non-ETS

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

T

ES

28

E

CZ

C

GR

L

PO

K

SV

R

GE

FIN

UK SVN

D

NL

P

ES

ITA

R

PO

L

BE

S

AU

N

DE

N

HU

E

SW

IRL

LIT

T A LA FR

X

LU


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

SOURCES PAC (Public Affairs and Communications Directorate)

1

EMS (Events Management System) EXD/CSI/BLS (Executive Directorate/ Conference, Security and Infrastructure Service/ Buildings, Logistics & Services) 2

3

PAC

4

EXD/CSI/BLS

5

EXD/HRM (Executive Directorate / Human Resource Management) and EXD/CSI/BLS

6

EXD/CSI/CSD (Executive Directorate/ Conference, Security and Infrastructure Service/ Conferences and Security) 8 EXD/CSI/BLS

7

EXD/CSI/BLS

9 10

EXD/DKI/CS (Executive Directorate/ Digital, Knowledge and Information Service/ Client Services) EXD/CSI/BLS

11 12

EXD/DO (Executive Directorate / Office of the Executive Director) 13 Arpège EXD/CSI/BLS

14

EXD/CSI/BLS

15 16

EXD/PBF/ACC (Executive Directorate / Programme, Budget and Financial Management/ Accounting Division) 17 EXD/CSI/CSD Réforest’Action

18

ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization)

19

All the photos in this report were taken by Elisa López Roldán except those where the copyright are indicated

29


GREENING REPORT 2016 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This report was prepared by the Environmental Coordinator in the Executive Director’s Office and was designed by the OECD’s Digital Pre-Press Services’ Graphic Designers. This report would not have been possible without the help and knowledge of colleagues in the Executive Directorate, the Environment Directorate and the Public Affairs and Communications Directorate. The data presented in this report have been collected and analysed by the members of the staff from these Directorates.

“From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam. The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

— Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

30


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

YOU ARE HERE

Casini’s Pale Blue Dot (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

31


@

LET’S ACT TOGETHER AGISSONS ENSEMBLE

greening@oecd.org

32


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.