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GreeneScene by Suzy Trublood

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entlemen, it’s that time of year again. Warm weather is on the rise, the sun is shining and the birds are singing. What better way could you spend a warm summer evening than with that special someone at the Sky View Drive-in? The concession stand will be full of delicious goodies starting at 7:30, so your kids will have smiles from ear to ear from the taste of ice cream and the smell of that hot, buttery popcorn. Or, if you and your lady just need a night out, than get ready for a super affordable, double feature for only $8 dollars! You have to go back in time to get that kind of a deal and that’s exactly where Sky View Drive-in in Carmichaels takes you. Drive-ins have been a part of American culture since the 1930s, and with so many disappearing each year, why not take your kids and show them a tradition that has been part of your life for so many years. Judy Gillogly, a retired postmaster and resident of Carmichaels, has fond memories of the drive-in. Her eyes lit up when I asked her about going to Sky View when she was in her teens. She said, “My boyfriend would pick me up in his convertible and we wasted no time getting to Sky View. The only problem at the time was the strict curfew my parents slapped me with, so I never got to finish a double feature.” She paused for a moment and curiously smiled, “it’s not the movies I remember now, anyway. It was pulling up at dusk and dropping the top on the convertible. The friends that we would always talk to while waiting in line at the concession stand. The starry night sky’s that soon followed were like none other I have seen to this day. And maybe, just maybe, my boyfriend and I might share a kiss.” She took a deep breath and let out a long sigh; “those were the best days.” She continued on, “Now when I take my grandkids, I hope they will one day recall the same great memories that I have. We are truly blessed to have one of the best of the few drive-ins that are left across the country.” Not wanting to miss all the excitement, I took my girlfriend to see a double feature of the science fiction epics, Star Trek: Into Darkness and Oblivion, with Tom Cruise. She’s not the sci-fi fanatic that I am, but hey, she has to understand who’s important in our relationship, and that’s me. So we got our tickets and rolled the top down on her Volkswagen, and I must say we felt very relaxed. With the new technology of today, you no longer have to hang the speaker on your half-rolled down window; you simply tune in your radio, and the movie comes across your car speakers, which

“Sky View owner Liz Walker in the drive-in projection room, with 35mm reels of film which will no longer be available after this year. A planned conversion to digital projection is dependent on fund raising efforts”.

gives you fantastic surround sound! For those of you who sit in a movie theatre and complain the movie is too loud, this is a great feature, because you can adjust the volume to your comfort. While waiting for the movies to start, I couldn’t resist the popcorn that smelled quite tempting. In line, I ran into a lovely lady who had been coming to Sky View for nearly fifty-five years! Gloria Zuro, who travels all the way from the Mon Valley, told me of some of her past experiences at Sky View. She went on to say, “My girlfriends and I would all get together and head for the drive-in. Just before getting here, two or three of us would hide in the trunk of our huge, 1950s Cadillac.” She giggled a bit, and then looked slightly embarrassed. She continued, “I don’t recommend that kind of behavior and I haven’t done that for close fifty years.” I told her I would not be calling the police. By the end of the conversation, we were all smiles and she said that Sky View held some of the fondest memories of her life. Finishing what were two phenomenal films, I found the sound and picture quality excellent! The feeling of the drive-in was charming and the nostalgia spoke volumes to my soul. This is an occasion I will not forget and it will be a tradition I will keep on with as long as the Sky View remains with us. God bless Elizabeth and Charles Walker for keeping a vast American tradition alive! Take your kids and support the Sky View Drive-in today!

Save Sky View Farmers Market Do you make homemade jellies, soaps or crafts? Grow your own vegetables? To help raise needed funds for the conversion to digital projection, the Sky View will be offering a Farmer’s Market every Sunday now through October 27, 2013. Vendors are being registered right now. For more information on becoming a market vendor or making a donation to an “Auction Basket” which will be sold at the market, please call Marianne at 724-366-5684. A DJ who would be willing to donate his/her time is also needed.

Editor’s Note: The Walkers are currently trying to raise funds to switch from out-moded 35 mm reel projection to a digital system, a necessity to keep the drive-in open after this year, because 35 mm film will no longer be produced by the studios. The two digital projectors that will be required are approx. $75,000 each, not including necessary modifications to the projection booth. As a seasonal theater, Sky View simply cannot afford this conversion without the help of supporters. Chuck and Liz are dedicated to keeping the drive-in open for future generations, with the help of the community that loves it. Donations of any size are appreciated. You can make donations through the website at www.skyviewdriveinpa.com and also at the drive-in when you come out for the show next weekend!

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he 2013 Greene County Fair Ladies and Shepherds Leadline competition will be presented on Monday night of the fair, Aug 5th, beginning at 6:30pm in the livestock arena. This the event that highlights the beauty and versatility of wool and a different breeds of sheep, an industry that has been a vital part of Greene County’s economy for over a hundred years. It’s quite a show, fun to watch, and fun for participants, as it is a blend of a fashion show and shepherd show. Contestants are outfitted in apparel and accessories that are made of no less than 60% wool, and can be purchased or constructed by a home seamstress. These contestants then lead a sheep that has been fitted for the show ring, and is trained to lead by halter. Girls will lead a ewe lamb or yearling ewe, and boys will lead a weather lamb or ram lamb. So spectators get to see a bit of showmanship with the animals and a fashion show with the outfits worn by the contestants. There are three age categories for contestants: 3-7 years of age for the Tiny Tots division, 8-13 years for the Junior or Intermediate class, and 14-19 for the Senior level, and shepherds are encouraged to enter the competition. A panel of three judges will focus not only on the contestant, but on the sheep he or she is leading as well - how well the sheep is prepared, trained and groomed. The judges will also be interested in the presentation of the sheep and contestant together, and the suitability of the wool outfit to the age category, and the poise and modeling of the contestant. Anyone interested in participating in the leadline contest this year is invited to contact coordinator, Janet Mawhinney, for more information. “We do reHannah Cole of Waynesburg with her “color quire advance registration and we are coordinated” lamb participated in the asking each contestant to submit a one Intermediate class at the 2012 Leadline page written commentary on his or her competition at Greene County Fair. ensemble no later than August 2nd this year,” Janet said. The written commentary introduces the contestant, describes the outfit and the sheep, and how he or she will use the outfit in their lifestyle. To become a participant, all you need to do is submit the commentary, along with your contact information, by the deadline. You can US mail to Janet Mawhinney, 408 Blaker Ridge Rd., Waynesburg, PA, 15370, or you can e-mail to jbmmmd@windstream.net. If you have questions, or need more information about the contest, you can email Janet or call 724-966-2577. If you just want to watch, plan to be at the Greene County Fair on Monday night, August 5th for a great show. The Greene County Lamb & Wool Queen Competition will also be held the same night at 6:00 pm. Anyone interested in competing for that title can also get more information by contacting Janet at the number or email above.

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ach year since 1986, a Fair Queen has been crowned at the Greene County Fair. In Jacktown, it has been happening since 1975. At both fairs, it’s true that all the competitors are lovely young women in evening gowns; however, this competition is much more than a beauty pageant. “The girls are judged on poise, appearance, ability to communicate, a speech, an interview, their stage presence, and their knowledge of fairs and PA agriculture,” said Denise Yoho, the 1989 Washington County Fair Queen and 1990 PA State Fair Queen who has served as judge for the Greene County Fair competition. “The girls really should be very knowledgeable about agriculture in their responses to interview questions, and a passion and love for fairs should be evident in their speech.” The love of fairs is so central to the competition that with the initial application, an essay on “What the Fair Means to My Community” (for Greene County) or “Why you should come to the Jacktown Fair” must be submitted. “The essay is a big part of the application,” said Debbie Stephenson, Greene County Fair Secretary. “The essay should be 300 words or less, grammatically correct, and accompanied by a photo of the contestant. Once the application is submitted, we go through each one to ensure that they are complete. Applications are due about a month before the actual competition and are available online or at the County Extension Office.” Much of the preparation for the competition takes place in the background, as Melody Longstreth can attest. “A lot goes into putting the competition on,” Melody said. “I became involved in 2009 with helping to find judges after my daughter Lindsay’s reign as Greene County Fair Queen ended. The contest needs three judges, and I try to get people who have strengths in key areas. At least one judge needs to have a pageant background, one needs to have an agriculture connection, and the third needs to have some type of communications background. Then, between them, they can judge stage presence and appearance, knowledge of agriculture, and the essay and speech. It covers the whole package.” A day or so before the contest, the building is prepared for contestants and spectators. “We set up the hall, making sure that there are enough chairs for everyone who wants to come watch,” Debbie explained. “We try to keep it down to earth, because we want the girls to be

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as comfortable as possible at their home fair. The night of the competition, the exiting queen comes and talks the girls through the process and calms their nerves. Then the judges are given a criteria sheet and they rate the girls from 1-100. The exiting queen will also present her crown to the winner.” “It is essential that the young ladies are dressed professionally and appropriately,” added Denise. “Their ability to communicate is also important. The winner will represent their county at the state fair contest the following January, and that competition is more fierce.” “We have had several county queens go on to make the top five at the state level,” Debbie said. “Our 2012 queen, Christa Ziefel, was a top 5 finisher, in Christa Ziefel , 2012 Greene County Fair Queen, received fact. That is quite a prestigious the crown from Samantha Morris. Christa finished in the accomplishment.” top five at the 2013 State Fair Queen contest, a significant “I have been a judge for nuaccomplishment. Christa will be on hand at this year’s merous contests throughout competition to calm the contestants’ nerves and crown the the years,” Denise said. “I recnew 2013 Greene County Fair Queen (photo courtesy ommend that any girl who is of Karole Wagner). considering competing to just be themselves and let their personality come through. We never know who is going to win until it is all over. Sometimes a young lady surprises you. ” FMI on this year’s fair and the fair queen contest, visit www.greenecountyfair.org or www. jacktownfair.org.

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GreeneScene by Amy Doutt

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EQT Supports Carmichaels EMT Program The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC), in partnership with EQT Corporation, announced a grant was awarded to Carmichaels Area High School for the EMT Certification Class. The grant is made possible by a contribution from EQT Corporation to the Educational Improvement Fund as part of the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program at the Foundation. The ten thousand dollar grant will be used to purchase new, updated equipment that will help new classes of students develop the skills to pass new national and state regulations for EMT certification. “EQT is excited to help students develop life-saving skills that will eventually be used in the community,” said J. L. Carpenter, Community Advisor for EQT. “The skills these students learn are not only useful in future jobs, but they are able to help Pictured (l-r): Front row: J. L. Carpenter, EQT Community make their community a safer place Advisor, Dayna Rose (Holding the Check), Morgan Berardi, to live, work and play.” Rebecca Reed, EMT class Instructor; 2nd row: Bettie Rebecca Reed, instructor for the EMT Certification Class at Car- Stammerjohn, CFGC Executive Director, Christian Babyak, michaels High School, noted that Diamond Pecjak; 3rd row: Vincent Wise, Anthony Quesada; 4th row: Christopher McKeever, Michael Mitchell, Anthony some equipment currently used by Walker, Daniel Sullenberger; Back row: Kevin Denny, the class is more than 30 years old. Lucas Walkos Additionally, the state of Pennsylvania is changing its certification/ testing requirements and will require the students to complete a national registry EMT course which is far more intensive in training and cost. “This grant is a lifesaver for the program,” noted Reed. The graduating class of 2014 will be the first to be nationally registered. Since 1999, nearly 100 Carmichaels students have walked across the graduation stage certified to enter the workforce as EMT-B’s (Emergency Medical Technician Basic). Graduates of the class are currently working and volunteering in more than twelve states. Former students are using their skills in the United States Marine Corps, Army and Air Force. More than fifteen graduates are employed with a local paid ambulance service; even more are volunteers in Greensboro, Bobtown, Nemacolin, Rices Landing, Clarksville, Jefferson and Richhill.

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MIKE FINK “KING OF THE KEELBOATERS”

istory and legend has it that Mike Fink was the hardest drinking, toughest fighting, practical joker the Ohio River ever saw. Known as the King of the Boatmen, it was not uncommon for Fink to knock men flat on their backside if they didn’t laugh at his jokes. He was the man that Davy Crockett described as, “half horse and half alligator.” No man wished to tangle with him and arrogance bled from his pours because of that. Fink was born near Pittsburgh around 1770; (the exact year remains unknown). History ties him to Greene County lore, from his travels as a keelboater on the rugged Ohio River to his capturing of murderers that stole loot from the Spanish Castle. Fink’s career began in his teens after Kentucky and Pennsylvania militiamen where badly defeated in the early stages of the Indian wars. He joined the fight, and quickly became revered for his tracking skills, which led to the death of many Indians. Fink’s Indian hunting across the Greene County woodland brought on many dark and bloody days. He also became revered for his marksmen skills, which even in those days became something of legend. Sketches of his, “great shot,” where he shot the scalp lock from the head of an Indian, became popular in the early 1800s. After the close of the wars, Fink, not wanting to take up the farming life as most retired military had, began his new career as a boatman. Navigating the rough water upstream turned him into an extremely powerful man. He had a formidable six foot three inch stature, and was a chiseled one hundred eighty pounds. Men told stories that he could drink a gallon of whiskey and still shoot a tin cup off the top of a man’s head! Fink would shout at other boatmen upon the river, “ I can out-run, out-hop, out-jump, throw-down, drag-out, and lick any man in the country!” His cries were heard as he held a gallon crock of the strongest whiskey he could find! Many drunken evenings were spent along the riverside with friends, where they would allow Fink to shoot whiskey cups off the top of their heads! Fink was also notorious for beating crewmen aboard his boat if they did not pull their own weight. Fink was quoted as saying, “woe to any man who shirks his duties.” He enjoyed having his lady along on many of his boating journeys. His crew knew that they

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were never to speak to her, and if Fink caught a wandering eye, it was met with his hair-trigger temper, and hard-oak club. His lady became part of what would be known today as, “The Mike Fink Show.” At different docking locations, he would have her place whiskey cups atop her head for him to shoot off. She would also stand and press cups between her knees, where Fink would waste no time in blasting the cup out! In the 1820s, Fink found adventure with an expedition in the Rocky Mountains… as well as his death. In one of his drunken fits, while showing off to the crew, he accidentally shot low, misjudging the cup that was atop a lifelong friend’s head and killed him. One of the crew, outraged by his arrogance and drunken display, shot Fink dead in his tracks. Perhaps Fink found in death, what he longed for in life… immortality. He has become a part of American folklore and one of the many chapters in Greene County history. He was even featured in the 1956 Actor Jeff York, left, played the role of Mike Fink in a frontier film, DAVY CROCKETT adventure series episode called “Davy Crockett and the River AND THE RIVER PIRATES. Pirates” on The Wonderful World of Disney in 1956. Davy So grab the film and raise a Crockett, portrayed by Fess Parker is on the right. toast to a legend, Mike Fink.

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Giant Eagle...

The Difference is Real

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f you thought you noticed something different about the place the last time you went tables is enough to make your mouth water. The focus on you - the customer - is here, also, to Giant Eagle in Waynesburg or Rices landing, there’s a good reason for it. There is with another of those subtle differences you enjoy without even realizing it. Unlike the something different. As a matter of fact, there are several “somethings” that are different... and not just different - better. Recent changes include some obvious advantages, like the drastic storewide lowering of prices. That’s a company-wide move made by Giant Eagle Corporate in order to remain a favored store in the fiercely competitive grocery industry. And it is working. With prices reduced - some as drastically as 25% or more - on many of the most common items and foods purchased in every department of the store, from canned goods to fresh foods, the savings are significant. If you thought shopping Giant Eagle for its superior quality and selection meant paying more, think again. Other recent changes in the store may seem more subtle, but in reality are key to creating the best customer experience possible. These are the ones that have you saying, “This is good...I like this.” These are the changes in the “front end” as it’s called in the business. As a customer, you know it as the place where you get in line at the register; you’re finished shopping and you ready to head home. This stage of the shopping trip is the last place you want any hang-ups, delays or unanswered questions. You’re ready, you want to get through the shortest line, get your groceries to the car and get out of there. And if you can accomplish that with a little consideration and courtesy from the cashier, you’re smiling on your way out the door. The new extreme focus on customer service includes knowledgeable and friendly Right? cashiers, and the new manager’s podium at the front of the store for immediate service and solutions to cashiers and customers at the registers. With a rededication to extreme focus on the customer, Giant Eagle register where you’re ready to move along quickly, the produce department is where you in Rices Landing and usually like a little slower pace, right? Looking carefully at all the selections, choosing just Waynesburg have invested the right color, firmness, texture and smell... Mary Ann knows her customers. “We keep the best employees in the as much of our produce as possible loose and displayed where you can touch and feel and company in the front end, choose the pieces you want,” she explains. Some small items may be bagged by necessity, where you’ll now find like grapes, for example, but most of the season’s bounty is not all boxed and wrapped and friendly cashiers standing smashed with who knows what is on the bottom. You get to inspect and choose what you ready at the front of their want. And there is plenty to choose from. Mary Ann has increased the selection of popular registers to greet and favorites and added new varieties of fresh foods and produce. Here comes that smile again. guide you to the quickest “We’ve really expanded the organic foods selection. So many customers prefer it,” Mary check-out; cashiers who Ann says, “You can find organic tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce, mushrooms, zucchini, broccoli Manager Mary Ann Jack shows packages of fresh cut kabob are skilled and knowland many other vegetables and fruits, even strawberries, oranges and apples.” Giant Eagle vegetables and stuffed mushrooms, examples of the new edgeable, and focused on is also the best source for locally grown produce. “We purchase tomatoes from Jack Davin convenient “Grab & Go” choices now available, part of the fresh new look and expansion in the produce department at YOU and your grocerof Forever Greene, we buy from Duda’s in Fayette and Mr. Langley’s farm among others, Waynesburg Giant Eagle. ies. Right behind them, Mary Ann explains. The buy local philosophy extends into the Floral department, where instantly available, is a you’ll find bedding plants in the spring that come from Mother Earth Farm in Ruff Creek. member of the store management team at an open podium in the very front of the store. Local flavor, fresh off the farm. That’s good stuff. Should any needs or questions arise, there’s no frustrating wait to track down a manager. If you are in a hurry, even in the produce section, you’ll enjoy the convenience of more “You no longer need to go the service desk for rain checks, product requests, keys to the “grab & go” choices, like ready-made kabob vegetables (skewers included) and cheese scooter carts or even photocopies,” explains Carla stuffed mushrooms ready to bake. With a quick stop at Ealy, personnel manager at Waynesburg Giant the fresh meat case, you can have a delicious dinner in Eagle. During the busiest hours, typically from the bag. 9am to 9pm, Giant Eagle has stationed a manageGiant Eagle in Waynesburg and Rices Landing are a ment team member there, whose sole focus is to locally owned, family business, built on over 50 years of serve the cashiers and customers at that front end. experience and service to the people of Greene County Whatever your need. Which translates to shorter and surrounding communities. They have surpassed lines, faster check-out, and no hassles or delays for and survived many other grocery stores, because they YOU. Here comes that smile... continue to focus on what is most important to the Another impressive difference customers are customers. They continue to search for new and better noticing at Waynesburg Giant Eagle is an extreme ways to improve your shopping experience, to make makeover in the produce department, now under you happy. Giant Eagle Corporate’s commitment to the management of Mary Ann Jack. Many customnew, lower prices combined with your locally owned ers know Mary Ann well, because she’s been the stores reorganization to focus on extreme customer familiar face in charge of the delicious hot foods service is working. There is a difference. You are seeing and deli department at Waynesburg Giant Eagle for it. many years. Mary Ann knows good food and fresh When you come in the Waynesburg or Rices flavor are the keys to success and you can easily see Landing Giant Eagle store you’ll receive a smile, and Customers enjoy selecting from unpackaged, firm, fresh seasonal fruit; her influence now in the produce department. chances are very good that you’ll be wearing one when much like a farmers market at Waynesburg Giant Eagle. The crisp color of in-season fruit and fresh vegeyou leave.

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SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM

FEEDS KIDS FOR FREE The Greene County Summer Food Task Force will provide free meals to children during the summer, in partnership with the food service programs at Central Greene School District and Carmichaels Area School District and various community programs and organizations. This summer free meals for children ages 18 and younger are being provided at 16 locations around the county. There are no income requirements or registration. Any child under age 18 may come to eat - free. While some locations may be operated along with a program, children do not need to be registered for the program in order to eat lunch. Just show up, give your name and eat! Special thanks to Alpha Natural Resources and EQT Corporation for their financial support of the Greene County Summer Food Program. Alpha Natural Resources provided a grant to provide meals at Mountain View Gardens and Grandview Apartments (Valley Farm Drive) through Central Greene School District. EQT Corporation provided a grant to WWJD that will cover the cost of fuel to use their van as a mobile Summer Food van, delivering food to the Jefferson and Mather sites. This summer, meals will be served at the following locations, days and times. (Please note that no meals will be served on July 4.) Carmichaels: Flenniken Library, 102 E. George Street, June 17 - July 26, M-F, Lunch at 11:45-12:45PM Wana B Park, 355 Ceylon Road, June 17 - July 25, M-F, Lunch 12 Noon (site operated by Greene County Parks and Recreation) Greensboro Mon View Park, 377 Stoney Hill Road, June 17-July 25, M-F, Lunch at 12 Noon (site operated by Greene County Parks and Recreation) Jefferson Reeseman’s Mobile Home Park, 990 Jefferson Road, June 17 - August 16, M-F, Lunch at 11:15 St. Marcellus Church, 1340 Jefferson Road, June 17 - August 16, M-F, Lunch at 11:45 (site operated by Catholic Charities) Mather Mather Park Pavilion, June 17 - August 16, M-F, Lunch at 11:30-12:30 (site operated by WWJD) Mt. Morris Mt. Morris Senior Center, Main Street, June 17 - August 16, M/W/F, Lunch 10:30-12 noon (site operated by Mt. Morris Senior Center) Nemacolin Nemacolin VFD, Roosevelt Boulevard, June 17 - July 26, M-F, Lunch 11:30-12:30 Waynesburg Bowlby Library, 311 North West Street, July 9 - August 12, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, Lunch at 11:40 Central Park Playground, between Greene Street & High Street, June 17 - July 26, M-F, Lunch at 12 Noon (site operated by Waynesburg Borough) Grandview Apartments (off Valley Farm Drive), June 17 - July 26, M-F, Lunch at 12:00-12:30 Lions Club Park, 200 E. Roy Furman Highway, June 17 - July 25, M-F, Lunch at 12 Noon (site operated by Greene County Parks and Recreation) Mountain View Gardens, 300 Mountainview Drive (off Porter Street) June 17 - August 16, M-F, Lunch at11:15-11:45 Waynesburg Central Elementary School, 90 Zimmerman Drive, June 17 - August 16, M-F, Lunch at 11:30-12:30 WWJD, 313 Jennings Avenue, June 17 - July 26, M-F, Lunch at 11:30-12 Noon Wind Ridge Ryerson Station State Park, 361 Bristoria Road, June 17 - July 25, M-F, Lunch at 12 Noon (site operated by Greene County Parks and Recreation)

Each year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture partners with local organizations to provide free meals to children when school is out for the summer. For more information about the national Summer Food Service Program, visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/summer. For more information about the sites and meal times, please call 2-1-1, or Amber Book, Regional Summer Food Program Coordinator, Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank at 412-460-3663, ext. 286.

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With over 17,000 miles and 40 states logged, Flynn Donoho is coming close to achieving his goal to travel through all 48 states on his bicycle, raising funds and awareness for the American Cancer Society. On June 4, Flynn was passing through Waynesburg, PA on his journey, and stopped at the local McDonalds for coffee and the “Big Breakfast.” GreeneSaver reader Justin Fox shared a table with him and called us to come get Flynn’s story, which he was happy to share, and so are we. “I started from my home in Huntington Beach, California on January 5, 2011. I rode around the perimeter of the United States that first year,” Flynn said. His journey was interrupted in January of 2012 when he went home to help his mom recuperate from a broken foot. He got back on the trail in May 2012, and began a procession through the central states. Now he has only 8 states remaining – all in the northeast. “I’m doing it because I have lost several friends and family members to cancer – and I want to help. People hear my story, and they donate to ACS through my website. I don’t have any corporate sponsors, but I have the Lord’s support. I also like to share my testimony, because it was while being a caregiver for family members who have suffered and died from cancer that I learned to lean on God and became a Christian,” Flynn said. There has been plenty of adventure along the ride. “Oh yes, I’ve seen the marvelous sights in Yosemite and Glacier National Park among many others, I’ve swam in all five great lakes, I’ve been on the big screen in New York City…that was a crazy place to be on a bike…” Flynn recalls. He is very self-sufficient on the road, typically camping at night, and sometimes staying with folks who offer a room and meal. He picked up his companion “Diva” while passing through Arizona. She rides in his “wagon” at the back of his bicycle and keeps him company. He averages 50 miles a day, though he has done up to 110, his record for one day when passing through the Texas Panhandle. “I get pulled over a lot, people have seen me on the news or read about it somewhere and they want to take pictures and talk…that’s okay, that’s what it’s all about. I carry a cell phone, I encourage people to call, I want to tell the story, and I want them to visit my website. ” You can find Flynn on the web by going to teamacs.acsevents.org, then go to donate to participant and type in Flynn Donoho. You’ll see pictures and his journey log, and if you choose to, you can donate to the cause.

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Clipper

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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GreeneScene by Laci Ludrosky

Beautiful homes make better communities.

724-966-8286 Toll-Free 888-223-8099 www.communitybank.tv At Community Bank, we’ve been dedicated to helping area homeowners build, maintain and beautify their homes for over 110 years. Stop in and see how welcoming a bank can really be. Or apply online at www.communitybank.tv.

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Stock Symbol CBFV EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Member FDIC

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Jacktown Fair •Wind Ridge, PA

July 16th-20th, 2013

SAVE A HORSE STABLES INC.

The Jacktown Idol competition will be held 4 nights during the fair - July 16-19

2013

SEND YOUR ENTRY NOW!

$1000 • 1st Place $500 • 2nd Place $300 • 3rd Place

Limited Number of Contestants will be Selected

No Audition Necessary

For entry form & complete details go online at

www.jacktownfair.org

Entry forms and rules also available at Direct Results, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. For more information, you can call 724-627-2040. Entries will only be accepted until available slots are filled - Get your entry in NOW!

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ave A Horse Stables Inc. has been a family and friend operated rescue in Greene County since 1982. Founded by Patricia Darlene Moore, Save A Horse Stables were established to provide unwanted horses with a second chance at health and happiness as they live out their lives to the natural end. Over the years Darlene purchased horses that were headed for slaughter from various livestock auctions and many others were rescued from individuals who were no longer able or willing to provide appropriate homes. In addition to digging deep into her own pockets and the support of her husband Kevin Moore, for many years Darlene offered trail rides, pony rides and riding lessons to help supplement the tremendous expense of feeding and caring for the rescue horses. The number of horses living on the 252 acre farm near Rogersville, where Darlene and her husband also live, averages about 50 at any given time. Darlene estimates that over the years nearly 300 horses have been saved from slaughter or starvation by coming to Save A Horse Stables. “A few were placed with loving homes, most have lived out their lives here and are buried on the farm. Sometimes the numbers go up or come down, but we always seem to have about 50 here all the time,” Darlene says. Presently there are 52 horses at Save A Horse, and Darlene is determined to provide them with a sanctuary until they die. Though the financial burden has become increasingly more difficult as time goes by with the increased costs of taxes, fencing, medical supplies and feed. “The horses are older, we’re older…” Darlene says with a weary chuckle, “I’m not sure they can handle the trail rides like they used to, and time is always in short supply.” Darlene works long hours cleaning houses, and during hay season, the days get even longer. “We cut hay on three different farms, probably close to 600 round bales, which really helps, and then we purchase the rest – we probably feed between 800 and 1,000 round bales depending on weather and number of horses,” Darlene explains. Though the trail rides may no longer be offered, they are hoping to continue pony rides and the riding lessons, with the help of neighbor Bobbie Main and Darlene’s daughter, Angela. She is also hoping to raise awareness and support from others in our community who appreciate the goals and accomplishments of Save A Horse Stables Inc. over the years. She recently applied for and received 501 (c) 3 non profit status, so donations are completely 100% tax deductible now. “I’ve often thought, you know, if 100 people donated only $10 each, that would be $1,000. It all adds up,” Darlene observes. She’s right, even a few dollars donation will help feed and provide healthcare for the horses whose lives depend on compassionate people like Darlene Moore and, perhaps, you. You can also schedule pony riding events for kids, a memorable experience and day of fun on the farm, while helping support the cause as well. More information about the operation and about many of the horses is available on the website: www. saveahorsestable.com. Darlene says, “Every horse has a story” and she’s slowly getting each of those stories up on the website so you can read about each individual one, where it came from and the struggles it has faced. If you are interested in supporting Save A Horse Stables Inc., you can mail your tax deductible donation to: Save A Horse Stable, Inc. 165 Lightner Run Road Sycamore, PA 15364

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GreeneScene by Marlaina Steveson

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$28,500 Awarded in The Challenge Program

Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship Morgan Berardi, a 2013 graduate of Carmichaels Area Junior/Senior High School was recently awarded the $1,000 Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship through the Community Foundation of Greene County. Morgan is the daughter of Hugo and Melodie Berardi of Carmichaels, PA. Rocky Doman’s parents, Bob and Patti Doman, were on hand to present the award. They are pictured here with Morgan, left, who happens to be the first female recipient of the award. As a CAHS basketball player, Morgan broke the Single Season Assist Record in both her junior and senior year, became the All Time Career Assists Leader with 574 assists in December 2012 and became the school’s second All-Time Leading Point Leader with 1,260 points in January 2013. According to the Carmichaels Girls Basketball Coach, Jim Lane, Morgan always cared about the team’s success over her personal achievements. She plans to attend Penn State University - Fayette Campus majoring in Nursing. The Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship Fund was created at the Community Foundation of Greene County by his parents, Bob and Patti, and his fiancé Tiffany Grim following his death in 2008. Rocky, a 2000 graduate of Carmichaels Area High School, was an outstanding high school football player who won numerous awards and accolades. He was one of only four Greene County players to rush for 4,000 yards. The scholarship is open to a senior male or female student from Greene County who is planning to pursue a degree at a two- or four-year institution of higher education, is a standout athlete, and demonstrates the qualities of a team player with a humble spirit. The Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship is made possible through the contributions of many individuals, businesses and corporations who participated in the Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing. For more information, contact the CFGC office by phone at 724627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

Waynesburg Chamber Awards 23rd Annual Scholarship The Educational Scholarship Fund Committee of the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce recently presented the 23rd annual scholarship in the amount of $1,500 to Jessica Black of West Greene High School. Jessica plans to attend Waynesburg University to pursue a degree in nursing this fall. She is the daughter of William and Melissa Black of Holbrook and a 2013 graduate of West Greene High School where she maintained a 3.981 grade point average. This scholarship is presented each year to a Greene County senior who plans to attend a college or trade school. The 2013 scholarship was awarded based on grade point average and a 500 word essay. Jessica and her family were special guests of the Chamber at the May General Membership Meeting of Chamber members where she read her winning essay.

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Local businesses contributed $28,500 to The Challenge Program, Inc. to support the program’s efforts to motivate and reward Greene County high school students during the 20122013 school year. The mission of The Challenge Program, Inc. is to partner with businesses to motivate high school students to excel, while introducing them to careers in their back yard. This partnership creates good habits in students and provides businesses with tangible results for their investments. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who excel in the areas of Attendance, Academic Improvement, Academic Excellence, and Community Service are awarded a monetary reward, typically a check for $250. Introduced into pilot schools this year was a fifth award, The STEM Award, to encourage excellence in science, technology, engineering, and math and to further prepare students for careers in the region. For more information about The Challenge Program, Inc., contact Mary Dreliszak at dreliszakm@tcpinc. org or at 724-984-0860 and visit www.tcpinc.org.

Representatives of local businesses supporting The Challenge Program, Inc. are pictured with one of the award recipients (l-r): Karen Zalom, Alpha Natural Resources; Troy Statler, a student at both the Greene County CTC and Waynesburg Central High School; and Jessica Johnson with CONSOL Energy. Although not pictured, Chevron also serves as a program sponsor.

Reading Competition Three teams of students from Central Greene School District participated in the Greene County Reading Competition held at Waynesburg University last month. To prepare for the competition, elementary and middle school students read and discussed 20 assigned books; high school students read 24 books. At the competition, students were quizzed on all 20 (24) books. Students from Central Greene, West Greene and Jefferson Morgan School Districts competed in the elementary, middle school and high school categories. Two teams from Central Greene garnered 1st place awards.

WCHS’s 1st place Reading Raiders Team (l-r): Matthew Desrosiers, Jessica Cain, Bailey Hawk, Devin Mowry

MBM’s 1st place Brainstorm 1st Place is pictured (l-r) Kneeling: Claire Kreider, Caleb Blair; Standing: Eden Rogers, Ben Bumgarner, Nathan Price, Amber Warren, Will Behm, Brooke Meek.

Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship A Jefferson-Morgan High School senior recently received the 2013 Army Specialist Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship award. The Community Foundation of Greene County presented Kasey Thistlethwaite with the $1,000 scholarship at the Jefferson-Morgan Awards Banquet in May. Ms. Thistlethwaite, daughter of Beverly Thistlethwaite of Clarksville, plans to attend Seton Hill University majoring in Criminal Justice. As a student at Jefferson Morgan High School, Thistlethwaite maintained a 3.8 grade average. Additionally, she was active in extracurricular activities including Volleyball, Upward Bound, National Honor Society, Foreign Language Club, Leo Club, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and Youth Traffic Safety. Thistlethwaite also participated in Community Band, Tuba Christmas, the Waynesburg University Pep Band, as well as ballet and jazz. She was a recipient of the Presidential Award, Academic Excellence Award and a Lions Club Student of the Month.

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“T

he Jacktown Fair is coming! The Jacktown Fair is coming!” Wait a second, that’s not Paul Revere shouting atop that horse, riding furiously through Wind Ridge, that’s just an excited kid! The one hundred and forty-eighth annual Legendary Jacktown Fair is just around the bend and really, it should not be missed. If you live in the area you might find yourself with a rather monotone voice saying, “well, the Fair is here another year.” You would be exactly right… one hundred and forty-eight straight years! That makes the Jacktown Fair not only one of the oldest in the country, but the longest consecutively running fair in American history! I think that is something we all should be very proud of. The grand show begins Tuesday, July 16. Admission is free if you just want to walk around and catch up on the gossip, grab a bite to eat or take a gander at all the exhibits. Get ready for the parade line-up starting at 6:30pm and be sure to catch the crowning of the new, beautiful Miss Jacktown Fair! Then head to the lower grandstand later that night, at 8:00pm to be exact, for the TUFF TRUCK CONTEST! Hand over ten bucks for admission, grab a seat and get ready for some rip-roarin’ action and excitement! Who has the Tuffest Truck? You’ll find out. Or if music is your main attraction, you’ll be better off in the upper grandstand at 8:00pm for the kickoff of the ever-so popular JACKTOWN FAIR IDOL! Admission is five dollars, and that gives you five votes to cast for whoever you feel is best. So whether you enjoy watching the trucks and jeeps climb obstacles and dive through ditches, or you’d rather listen to the extraordinary singing of the tri-state region’s most popular vocal talent show, there will be something for all! The opening evening of our beloved festival will be full of many memorable occasions. The kids will have First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Greene County to thank

Friday the 19th is the day for 4-H livestock judging, and the night for buying! Both the rabbit and the goat sale will be on Friday night beginning at 7:00pm. You can’t pull a rabbit out of your hat until you buy one, silly. And who needs a lawn mower when you can own a goat! Think of the price of gasoline for that mower! And why go to a magic show, when you could put one on at your own home? Makes perfect sense to me. Then head back to the lower grandstand for the TRUCK AND TRACTOR PULL. Twelve-dollar admission to sit in the stands, or for only three more bucks, get down in the pit where all the action is! More mud slinging than any redneck should be aloud to witness! Come and support the TRIPLE DARE BAND at 8:00pm. They are local musicians that showcase a wide variety of sounds, from folk music to outlaw country. Friday will also bring the final round of JACKTOWN FAIR IDOL, when the winners of $1,800.00 in prize money will be chosen. The $10 admission on finals night will give you ten votes for whoever you feel deserves to be the winner! To close out a perfect evening, grab a seat and wrap your arms around your sweetheart for fireworks at 9:00pm. That much fun should really be illegal. To top it all off, as if four days of insanity weren’t enough, three dynamite bands are set to take the stage on Saturday night at the Jacktown Fair! HEARTBEAT plays the main stage on the midway at 7:00pm, while RUFF CREEK BAND opens the night of entertainment on the upper grand stand at 6:30pm. Following their performance is the nationally renowned country band, STICKERS at 8:00pm! Again, if the sound of roaring engines is sweeter music to your ears, then head to the lower grand stand. The DEMOLITION DERBY rolls in to knock your socks off and blow your wig into another time zone! Starting at 8:00pm will be a show to bring down the house! Cars furiously pounding into one another until only one is left in motion. Be sure to have on your fire retardant gear, ‘cause this is going to be one hot show! I can’t think of anywhere you can get so much bang for your buck, right in your own back yard. Don’t miss this one hundred and forty-eighth annual epic event. Because you really can’t die happy until you’ve been to the Jacktown Fair!

for free rides Wednesday night, July 17, from 6:00 - 11:30pm. If a kid doesn’t get his or her belly full of excitement from the wild carnival rides in that time frame, then they didn’t go to the Jacktown Fair! Of course, one might want to choose only the smooth rides if he or she has competed in the various FOOD EATING CONTESTS that begin at 7:00pm Wednesday night. As part of 4-H fun night, the challenge will be to see who can eat the most in shortest time – hotdogs and more. All new this year is the UTV SIDE BY SIDE CONTEST. That’s on Wednesday night as well. Admission is ten dollars and the show begins at 8:00pm. This is another down and dirty contest to see who can make it through the course the fastest, and all in one piece - so much fun! These tricked out utility vehicles are ready to run circles around you and can go anywhere and do anything! From hair point turns to thrilling jumps, it’s sure to be one heck of a show! Also on Wednesday night, round two of the JACKTOWN FAIR IDOL begins at 8:00pm at the upper grand stand. Thursday the 18th will showcase POWER PULLING PRODUCTIONS! One of the best names in the business today with muscle tractors loud enough that even your old pappy will have no problem hearing them. Witness these award-winning professionals demonstrate an exciting, yet safe show. So have no fear in bringing out the kiddies. Get ready for a dynamite show! If you’d rather sing your favorite old Hank Williams tune, than head over for KARAOKE and don’t miss round three of JACKTOWN FAIR IDOL, both starting at 8:00pm on Thursday night.

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GreeneScene by Bethany Kulchock

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O

ur GreeneScene of the past this month comes from the wonderful collection of Bud Bradmon, and it is a familiar sight for many people in the Carmichaels area and beyond. Allison’s Esso station, later to become Allison’s Exxon was a fixture in Carmichaels for many years, and its proprietor was certainly a well-known figure in the community. Born in Carmichaels in 1928, Carl “Jum” Allison was raised and lived his entire life there. He was a star football player for Cumberland Township High School, and worked at this service station as a youth. After school, he served in the US Military, and spent 17 months in Korea. When he came back from the service, Jum worked for a time at Union Supply Company in Carmichaels before he became a partner in the Esso station. In late 1959, he bought the business and operated as Allison’s Esso, then Allison’s Exxon, until his retirement in 2004, just a few years before his death in 2010. “My whole family dealt there, my dad, my brother and I all dealt with Jum over the years,” recalls Bud. “You can pretty well tell by the price of gas and the cars in this picture that it must have been taken in the late 50s or early 60s. The Chevy is a 1956 model, and that white Rambler by the garage door is a 1959 I believe. The international pick-up, I can’t be sure,” he says. Bud is well-known for his affinity for cars and collectibles – especially all thing Carmichaels. In addition to his own garage on Jacob’s Ferry Road, filled with memorabilia, Bud has begun a new venture. “My grand daughters, Rebecca, Rachel & Grace, and I are doing a little store up in Jefferson. We’re calling it the “Bank of Treasures” since it’s in the old bank building right on Main Street across from the Post Office. There’s a little bit of everything in there. We’re only open on Fridays and Saturdays right now…we’ll see how it goes.” In his typical do good fashion, Bud has dedicated receipts from the sales on the last Saturday of every month to the Ronald McDonald House in Pittsburgh. “Our grandson was up there so much, you know, and it’s a really good thing, that Ronald McDonald House,” he explains. We thank Bud for sharing this great GreeneScene of the Past and wish him the best with the Bank of Treasures.

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t’s back…the most popular vocal talent show in the tri-state region, and for good reason. Once again the Jacktown Fair is offering nearly $2,000 in prize money to the winners of the Jacktown Idol Competition! They come from across the region and several states to vie for the prize money: $1,000 for 1st place, $500 for 2nd and $300 for 3rd. When that kind of money is up for grabs, you can be sure the entertainment will be first class. “We have three preliminary rounds,” explains event coordinator Shelly Brown of Direct Results. “We usually have 10-12 contestants in each preliminary round, which will be held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights this year (July 16, 17 & 18), and they are generally all very good. The judges have a tough job. Last year we had contestants from Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and our winner was from North Carolina. We also had quite a few from Greene and Fayette and Washington Counties. We have a lot of talent here.” In the preliminary “auditions” the contestants are judged on their vocal talent, stage presence and charisma, originality and marketability. And the judges are not shy about sharing their opinions with the contestants in classic “American Idol” style. “That’s The audience is also entertained usually fun for the audience, and actually the judges by the antics and feedback from always give positive feedback and constructive critiour three popular and opinionated judges Music Director Brad Henry, cism. Most contestants say they really appreciate what Little Drummer Girl Veronica they hear. We often have return contestants who have D’Angelo, and WANB grown over the years and sometimes credit the judges Program Director and Morning and their experience at Jacktown for helping them Man, Crazy Dougie Wilson. along the way,” Shelly adds.

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The judges will send two, sometimes three, contestants onto the final round. Then, in addition to the judge’s scores, fair go’ers votes help an additional contestant through the preliminary rounds to the final competition on Friday night, July 19. “Fair go’ers votes are $1 votes that help raise funds for the Richhill Agricultural Society, the non-profit organization that has presented the Jacktown Fair since 1866,” Shelly explains. “The contestant who receives the most votes, and was not already selected by the judge’s scores, will also go through to the final round and have another chance at the prize money and title. If you come to watch, there is a $5 admission to the preliminary rounds and $10 to the final round, and that actually gives you five(or ten) votes to use – so everyone who comes can vote. Once you’re in there and you hear something you really like, you can purchase more votes if you want.” So while it may not be a ticket to Hollywood, a ticket to Jacktown could be worth $1,000 cash to anyone out there who gets his or her entry form submitted in time. “The $25 entry fee is refunded 100% when you show up at your preliminary performance, so really it doesn’t cost anything to enter – there’s no risk. We will accept entries until all slots in the preliminary rounds are filled,” Shelly said. “We have had finalists and prize money winners who sang rock and pop, gospel, country and even Broadway…this competition is wide open and a great opportunity for anyone to try. “ The show is full of variety and talent; and in addition to the hopefuls contending for the prize money, Master of Ceremonies Slim Lehart keeps the audience entertained with his classic country and humor in between every act. Complete rules, details and entry forms for the Jacktown Fair Idol competition are available online at www.jacktownfair. org. You may also call 724-627-2040 for more information.

Back by popular demand, the “Wheeling Cat” Slim Lehart will once again host the Jacktown Idol competition. Best known for his long history with Jamboree USA of the Capitol Music Hall in Wheeling, Slim is at home more on the stage than off. Slim will keep the audience comfortable with his quick wit and down-home manner…and he’ll sing a few old time favorites as well.

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Adah Wins $1,000 Mary Lewis, center, of Michaels Auto Sales posts this picture of the awarding of a $1,000 check to the Adah Fire Department, which received the most likes and votes during a recent Facebook Page Promotion held by the dealership. Congrats Adah VFD!

Community Foundation Grants

Although acceptance for the first round of discretionary grant applications closed earlier this month, the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFCG) has a second round that doesn’t close until October 1, 2013. The Foundation expects to award three to five grants between $1,000 and $2,000 per grant in the each round. Eligible applicants include nonprofit, charitable, tax-exempt organizations, as well as educational institutions, schools, and government organizations whose purposes and programs benefit Greene County residents. CFGC seeks to fund organizations and ideas that will have a significant and lasting impact on Greene County, its residents, infrastructure and future. Proposed projects may include any one or more of the following broad priorities: Arts, Culture & Humanities; Children, Youth & Families; Community and Economic Development; Education; Environment; Health & Fitness; and Human Services. Applicants do not need to identify the specific grant priority. FMI: contact the Foundation office at 724-627-2010, or e-mail cfgcpa@gmail.com.

State Envirothon Results

Cruisin’ For a Cure

The 30th Pennsylvania State Envirothon was held at Juniata College last month with high school students from 61 Pennsylvania counties participating. The team representing Greene County from Carmichaels Area High School placed fifth overall and sixth in the Oral Component. The team members include (l-r): Douglas Kowalewski, Mackenzie Metcalf, Floretta Chambers, Philip Mikalik, Ashley Dotson, and Kevin Willis team coach. This is the eighth year in a row that the Carmichaels Envirothon team has placed in the top 10 at the State Envirothon.

Patriot’s Dream Riding Association sponsored its annual car and motorcycle show “Cruisin’ for a Cure” at the Alpha Aquatic Park on May 18th, 2013. With over 90 cars & motorcycles registered, a total of $7,363.06 was raised for the American Cancer Society. PDRA thanks the many contributors to the cruise. “The contributions of cash, prizes, food, equipment and time can never be repaid but know it went to a good cause,” said Tom Ayres, president. See pictures from the event on Facebook by LIKING “Cruisin’ for a Cure – Waynesburg, PA.

Dig Into Reading

The Bowlby Public Library is offering a Summer Reading Program for kids ages 6-12 and our theme this year is “Dig Into Reading!” Children enrolled in our Summer Reading Clubs will experience a different theme every Wednesday from 10am – 3pm. In conjunction with the reading clubs, the Family Literacy Department is enrolling children in their “Dig Into Learning” program where the concentration will be on social studies, science & math skills. Elementary aged kids will be exploring topics such as: Wild about Worms, Dynamic Dinosaurs, Marvelous Mummies, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Rock & Roll, and Underground. Children will also be able to participate in a special challenge program called “Gnome, Sweet Gnome.” All the summer fun begins Monday, July 8th. A Free Lunch & Movie will also be provided for children every Wednesday during the Summer Reading Program. Summer Reading Clubs are as follows: Young Adults (ages 13-18): Wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. School Age Children: Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. (6-8 years) Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. (9-12 years) Preschool: Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. (3-4 years) Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. (4-5 years)

Toddler Share: Tuesday at 5 p.m. (18-35 mos) Thursday at 10:30 a.m. (18-35 mos) Stories Under the Moon: Wednesday at 5 p.m. (3-6 years) Baby Lapsit: Thursday at 1 p.m. (birth-12 mos)

School aged children have the option of staying all day and alternating between Dig Into Reading program and the Dig Into Learning programming in the Family Literacy Department. Teens can participate in our “Beneath The Surface” program, and adults can participate in the “Groundbreaking Reads” program. To register for any summer reading program, please call 724-627-9776.

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Cities program was created to advances the nation’s economic, environmental and energy security by supporting local actions to reduce petroleum use in transportation. The United States relies heavily on foreign oil to power its transportation sector. Our country imported about 45% of the petroleum it consumed in 2011, and about two-thirds of these imports came from outside North America, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Because transportation accounts for about 71% of U.S. petroleum consumption, reducing our dependence on petroleum-based fuels in this sector supports our economy and our energy security. However increased economic and energy security aren’t the only benefits of reducing petroleum use in transportation. Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles are major sources of greenhouse gases, smog-forming compounds, particulate matter, and other air pollutants. Widespread use of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles could greatly reduce the emissions that impact our air quality and public health. Nationally, nearly 13,000 stakeholders contribute to Clean Cities’ goals and accomplishments through participation in nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions across the country, including one in Pittsburgh that covers our region. Private companies, fuel suppliers, local governments, vehicle manufacturers, national laboratories, government agencies, and other organizations join together under Clean Cities to implement alternative-transportation solutions in their communities. Pittsburgh Region Clean Cities works to accomplish these goals by 1. Building and supporting the infrastructure needed for a strong alternative fuel and alternative

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vehicle market in Western Pennsylvania, 2. Serving the needs of its member organizations through education, business consulting, development and grant writing and management of Federal and State-funded projects, and 3. Serving as the designated regional organization for all U.S. Department of Energy Clean Cities initiatives, including project funding. Clean Cities actually dates back to the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. These laws, which encouraged the production and use of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and the reduction of vehicle emissions, led to the creation of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) in 1991. The AFDC’s mission was to collect, analyze, and distribute data used to evaluate alternative fuels and vehicles. In 1992, the enactment of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) required certain vehicle fleets to acquire AFVs. Subsequently, DOE created Clean Cities in 1993 to provide informational, technical, and financial resources to EPAct-regulated fleets and voluntary adopters of alternative fuels and vehicles. The AFDC became and continues to be the clearinghouse for these resources. Its sister website, FuelEconomy.gov, provides consumers with information on emissions, fuel economy, and energy impact of all vehicles, based on vehicle data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The site also provides tips for drivers on maximizing fuel efficiency. FuelEconomy.gov was created in response to DOE’s requirement under the 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act to publish and distribute an annual fuel economy guide for consumers. To learn more about our Pittsburg Region Clean Cities, go to www. pgh-cleancities.org.

WE’VE MOVED! We finally made our move! You can now find the offices of Direct Results, Home of the GreeneSaver and Custom Graphics, at 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg. Our new home is in the building that previously housed John Howard Oldsmobile, and was originally Nickles Bakery, on the east side of Waynesburg (Morrisville). After purchasing the building last fall, we began renovations that were completed this spring and the move is complete. Very easy to find, we’re right next to Auto Zone, sort of behind Scotty’s Pizza…easy in and out with plenty of parking. We’ve also gone from about 2,500 square feet to more than 10,000 square feet of space that is now filled with new machinery and equipment to meet your needs better than ever! Signs & Vinyl Our full service Custom Graphics sign & vinyl shop will produce your banners, signage, decals, and more. We now have an interior shop where our experts can install graphics and wraps on all vehicles and trucks in any weather, rain or shine – bring it on! Screen Printing & Embroidery With new automated equipment and skilled personnel, we’ve increased production rates by over 600%! Tees, polos, hats, shirts, jackets, uniforms and more…our huge shop is now humming with the production of custom apparel for area businesses and organizations. Promotional Products With annual sales exceeding 1.5 million, Direct Results is easily the “go to” source for custom printed promotional products. Fresh ideas, creative design, innovative products and marketing strategies specifically for your business – we do it better. GreeneSaver Now with convenient parking and easy in & out, you can stop to pick up a GreeneSaver, drop off your entry forms and share your stories and pictures more easily than ever. Come visit our bright new office space and you’ll see! Direct Results BSP, Inc. is very proud to have begun ten short years ago in Waynesburg, three women with an idea and a lot of determination. Today we are a successful companying employing nearly 20 talented people and meeting the advertising and marketing needs of businesses throughout the region. Our new space is indicative of that growth, and our move necessary to meet the demands of our clients. We still have a little fine tuning and some final touches to do, but we welcome you now to our new location. Stop by and say hi!

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s two weeks enough to recoup from the amusement & madness of the Jacktown Fair? Of course it is! And what better way to celebrate the victory of your recovery, than with another crazed week of carnival rides, 4-H fun, and muscle tractors determined to sling mud and smoke the skies? One hundred and thirty years of fair business… no play on words intended, I’m sure, and the organizers of the Greene County Fair have lined up one heck of an event. It’s too bad we can’t go back in time to partake of some of the amazing Greene County Fair attractions of the past… like witnessing The Birdman, Joe Stevenson, crash his flying crow shortly after its takeoff back in the early 1900s, which would have been quite fun. However, I’m sure the folks of that time thanked God the ol’ Birdman was only badly bruised and not killed. We will not get to witness any death-defying acrobats, or talk to a sideshow charlatan that would like to give us a gander at his freak show for the low, low price of a nickel. But come on now, you can’t have everything you want in life! And I would tell you to give the Shooting Gallery Man a try, but that was also put to an end way back in the day when someone eventually shot out an eye… but hey folks, that’s show business! So, without further delay, here is the incredible lineup for the 2013 Greene County Fair! Sunday! Sunday! Sunday, August 4th is when all the exhibits are due - all the critters that create the livestock shows and all the eye appealing foods, flowers, crafts and such that compete for ribbons in the Home & Garden section. If you love to see beautiful, powerful horses, you won’t want to miss the DRAFT HORSE SHOW and you’ll really be impressed with the grace and coordination of the teams you’ll see in the DRAFT HORSE HITCH SHOW – we have some of the best right here in Greene County. The day comes to a close with the VESPER SERVICE with Reverend Donald Wilson presiding, and the inspirational music of the DAUGHTER’S OF GRACE to enjoy. Monday, August 5th is the kick off to all the competitions. Isn’t that what the county fair is all about? Who’s got the best pies and cakes and jams and garden produce and canned goods… there are literally hundreds of categories where Greene County’s best compete. But that’s not all…the 4-H and open livestock shows begin on Monday with the Goat Show, there’s a lawn & garden tractor pull (mini vrooooms!) and that’s the day the judges will choose the Lamb & Wool Queen and the winner of the charming Leadline Contest, when the shepherds and the sheep dress alike! Top your evening with a few carnival rides and the hot sound of the RUSTIC HIGHWAY BAND at 8:00 pm. All of this comes with your $8 admission – you don’t pay any extra for the rides or shows at the Greene County Fair. Tuesday, August 6th is THE major day for livestock – who will harvest the hardware (AKA trophies) as the Rabbits, Open Dairy Cattle and Market Steer Shows are judged? On Tuesday evening, let the engines roar! TRUCK PULLS rip into the stadium featuring a superb line up of muscle and tussle! Opening the show will be the CLASSIC

JUNE / JULY 2013

• GreeneSaver

SUPER STOCK TRACTORS, followed by the OPEN STREET 4X4, and to finish off what little hearing you have left will be the OPEN STREET DIESEL. All organized by the super professional POWER PULLING PRODUCTIONS! Brave the crowds and come early for a great show! Wednesday morning brings more corral competition with the 4-H & OPEN BEEF CATTLE SHOW. The showcase continues that evening at 6:30 with the 4-H MARKET LAMB SHOW. And the track heats up again with the FARM STOCK TRACTOR PULLS. Whether you’re touting your own talents with a tractor or just watching – it’s an addictive scene. If you’d prefer music to machines, then you won’t want to miss the RUFF CREEK BAND playing Wednesday night at 8pm. Thursday the 8th is SENIOR CITIZEN NIGHT at the Greene County Fair, so bring your ID if you are 65 or older and you get free admission! The excitement begins early with Harness Racing, sponsored by the GreeneSaver! Watch those beauties fly around the track and see who pulls in the purse. And speaking of pulling, there’s plenty of that going on Thursday night with the ever popular HORSE & PONY PULLS. If you want to fill your freezer with top quality meat, Greene County raised beef and lamb will be on sale at the 4-H & FFA Market livestock sale. Bring your wallet and support the hardest working kids in the county, then make plans to get grilling, kabobbing, stewing, roasting and relishing premium beef and lamb the rest of the year. Top off Thursday night with the CHRIS HIGBEE BAND in concert. On Friday the 9th the Harness racing continues, faster than ever they run! And for a truly amazing show – watch the skills of local farmers and youth displayed in the tractor driving competition. Friday evening, grab your goodies from the concession stand and get a grandstand seat early for CROUSHOURE’S CHAMPIONSHIP DEMOLITION DERBY which produces pulse-pounding excitement for young and old! Throughout the week, you’ve been enjoying the exhibits, getting friendly with the cute critters at the petting zoo, maybe you even took a monster truck ride – you can do all those things any day of the week. When Saturday rolls in, the final day of the Greene County Fair, you’ll have your chance to bid on the Dennis Beach wood carving that’s been calling your name all week. And for the grand finale on the track, Power Pulling Productions will thrill and excite you with the TRUCK & TRACTOR PULL: Super Stock 4X4’s, limited Pro & Super Farm Tractors and 20,000 lb. Open Street Semis. Whoopee! Cap off your week with this show and you’ll have done the Greene County Fair the way it’s supposed to be done. Two awesome fairs, two weeks apart in the same county. Now where else are you going to find all that? Check out the detailed schedules for both Jacktown and Greene County Fair in this issue of the GreeneSaver and prepare to experience both legendary fairs fully, which translates to having a blast!

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GreeneSaver •

JUNE / JULY 2013

June–july greenesaver 13  

This is the 2013 Fair Guide Issue of the GreeneSaver. Included inside is a full schedule for the Greene County Fair and Jacktown Fair with a...

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