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JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry 2

GreeneScene Magazine •

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017


JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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I Love this P l a ce

This photo, date and photographer unknown, shows Mt. Morris early in the gas & oil boom era, obvious by the density of derricks. Likely taken prior to the turn of the century. Raymond Fox collection.

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When you stop to visit Jeanie Roush in her office at the garage, you are standing in what used to be a little log cabin from the 1700s. It is covered with blue siding now and set up for tire sales, vehicle repair, inspections and notary work. In 1848 buckboards and wagons were built here, by 1870 it was a hardware store. By the turn of the last century it was a blacksmith shop. L.L. Long turned it into Mt. Morris Motor Company in 1921 and when brothers-in-law Ollie, Raymond and Willis Fox bought into the business the family offered a line of “new and used vehicles and Ford tractors and equipment” and Rt. 19 delivered customers right to their door. Jeannie has been doing business here ever since she graduated from Evangel University in Springfield Mo. with a degree in political science in 1956, came to Mt. Morris on her father’s advice and bought the garage. “My dad said ‘Sissy, men have to have cars to go to work and women have to have them on weekend to get their hair fluffed.’ I was going to go to the police academy – but here I am!” So what’s life like in Mt. Morris? “It’s a circus here every day,” she allows. Would she be willing to tell some of the things she’s seen and heard in the last 50some years? “Well,” she says, in between giving out tire sizes to one of her workers and helping a customer get her car registration papers in order, “I suppose I could. But they are kinda spicy.” In Mt. Morris, this According to Mt. Morris Community by Ross Headly, the Livery barn was located brand of genial give and almost opposite the Mt. Morris Motor Co. and was 100 feet long and 40 feet wide. The take goes back more first owner was W.L. Wade, then Ellsworth Donaley, John L. Blake and Later Lewellen than 200 years. And & Moslander. This old landmark is no longer standing. Photo and information from some of those old stoMt. Morris History Day website 2004 collection (www.mtmorrishistory.com) ries are kind of spicy –

tate Route 19 is the “lets go for a drive in the country” way to wander south from Waynesburg to the Mason Dixon Line. Quaint old farms hug the road and the ancient remains of the Appalachian mountains, once the highest in the world, are now tree covered ridges that drop down to creeks like Calvin Run that heads south with you to Mount Morris - the last town in Greene County before crossing the line into West Virginia. And there between the broad banks of Dunkard Creek and nearby Wades Run is a stretch of high ground – hey! It might have once been a mountaintop! - that puts the Mount in Mt. Morris. There is a lot of ‘it used to be’ in this pioneer town. Log cabins used to be the only houses. The new concrete bridge across Dunkard Creek used to be an old iron bridge that horses and buggies clattered across. Roush Garage, across the street from the community center that used to be the old high school, also used to be the Fox family’s Mt. Morris Motor Company before they moved to Waynesburg in 1941 (see related story on page 7).

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MT. MORRIS, PA by Colleen Nelson

and dangerous too. It is said that hardy frontiers- voluted folds in the earth under Mt. Morris and men were defying the Crown and walking in from other places in Greene County since before the setVirginia to stake out claims in 1767 when surveyors tlers came and in time men began digging shallow Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon and their team wells to capture the oil that accompanied it and sell of axe men and native guides stopped on the banks it for a number of uses, including furniture polish. of Dunkard Creek just a few miles upstream. It They say in 1869 L. R. Strosnider put half a was there that they placed a last marker separating barrel over an abandoned well on a lot he owned, Penn’s Woods from the Virginia and Maryland col- ran a pipe from it into his store next door and used onies on the top of Brown’s Hill, then returned to the trapped gas for light and cooking. Legend has Delaware. War was happening between the French, it oysters were his favorite thing to cook. He may the English and then the American settlers against have been the first to use natural gas to make life Colonial rule. This was the unchartered Western easier but he certainly wouldn’t be the last! Frontier and these were dangerous times. In 1857 there was only one school in town Things were a little tamer after America was with 75 students. Still, early settler D.L. Donley’s born in 1776 but Mt. Morris was still a patchwork son Joseph Benton Donley (1838-1917) was able to of farms with deeds that placed them in Green get an education, then went to Waynesburg College, Township, Washington County. It became Whitley fought in the Civil War, became a lawyer, served a Twp. when Greene County was formed in 1796 and term in the United States Congress and returned would not become Perry Township until the 1840s. to practice law and live out his life in Waynesburg. When founding father Levi Morris bought a By 1879 Mt. Morris was getting with the farm on Dunkard Creek and set up housekeeping times, with more schools, businesses and even a in 1809, the nearest store was in Greensboro, 12 brass band, with horns “purchased from the promiles away. After he returned from the War of 1812 ceeds of a festival in Donley’s Grove.” People would he bought another farm and laid out the town. He sit on their porches on summer evenings listening became the first justice of the peace and his chil- to “those coronet players as the music echoed from dren and grandchildren would become postmas- hill to hill.” ters, storeowners, landlords, firemen and farmers. Spacious, well-maintained Victorian homes His son James joined Company F 7th W. Va. Vol- still stand tribute to the oil boom that hit almost unteer Infantry that Greene County’s first casualty, overnight in 1886. An old photo postcard shows Jesse Taylor served and died in. Jesse’s monument Mt. Morris with a pincushion of derricks popping still stands in Jollytown. up between barns and in backyards. New stores, After the Civil War, Mt. Morris faced polarizContinued on page 5 ing political undercurrents spawned by the war that pitted brother against brother along the Mason Dixon Line. Some of her neighbors were “copperheads,” the wife of minister Mathias Myers Eaton noted tartly in her memoirs of her three “unfortunate” years from 1866-1869 living as an outsider in Melody Bennett Longstreth shared these pictures of Mt. Morris while her her father, Junior Bennett’s Service Station, a very husband was pastor of recognizable sight in Mt. Morris, as were his pet the Methodist Episcoraccoons, Amos & Andy, he kept at the garage. pal Church. “Copperheads” was slang for the Southern sympathizers who were members of this community beside the Virginia line of the Confederacy before West Virginia was made a Union state in 1862. To many, Lincoln’s Republican party was still the enemy and political debates could get heated, fast. But the divisions spawned by war were fading and a new era was about to begin. Natural gas and Lemley Bros Carriage House, photo from Mt. Morris History Day website 2004 collection oil had been seeping (www.mtmorrishistory.com) through all those conGreeneScene Magazine •

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Continued from page 4

hotels, two banks and three theatres were built. Traveling salesmen and well drillers filled every room in town. Prosperity was in the air. By the time the 20th century arrived, Mt. Morris was a comfortable place to live and do business, just a few miles off the beaten path but close enough to Waynesburg and Morgantown W.Va. to go to work or go shopping, then come home to a town where everybody knows your name. Down at the community center lunch is served three days a week and every day men gather in the morning to drink coffee and shoot the breeze. There are old photographs on the wall – one is of the fairground and racetrack dated 1904 that used to be just out of town. When Interstate 79 South was completed in the 1970s the ramps took out one large corner of it and gas stations now sit where generations of fairgoers and their livestock used to show their stuff. Mt. Morris native Melody Bennett Longstreth of Waynesburg remembers when the Interstate ramp was dedicated. “I have a photo of the grand opening and you can see my striped tube socks in the picture, so I know it’s me with all my friends.” Was Mt. Morris a fun place to grow up in during the 1970s? “Oh my yes!” Melody says with a big grin.

“We had a big Horse and Pony 4-H Club and we used to ride everywhere. In Mt. Morris it was bicycles, horses or motorcycles. Everybody fed the stray dogs and we kids were outside from morning to night and our parents didn’t worry. Everybody knew everybody else and if you were bad it got home before you did!” John Hicks of Waynesburg, remembers riding his skateboard into town from Big Shannon Run in the 1980s when staying with his grandparents Paul and Georgia Ketchum. “I was about 14 and I’d ride to the fairgrounds. I remember seeing people riding horses on the street. It was a fun place to be a kid.” Mt. Morris is still a sleepy little town that has the power to draw in people from Interstate 79 to go to the races, get help with their vehicles or grab a good bite to eat. Roush Garage has been known to help stranded motorists and not charge for a tow. Rising Creek Bakery and Café has revived the pioneer art of making salt rising bread and the Highpoint Raceway at 208 Taylortown Road draws crowds from all over the United States to test their skills on its dirt tracks. High Point is one of the premier motocross racetracks on the national circuit and hosts rounds of regional and national championships from spring through fall. Stop by sometime. You might end up loving this place too!

According to Mt. Morris Community by Ross Headly, the Fair Ground was built by local people and could boast of one of the fastest half-mile tracks in Southwestern Pennsylvania. It was located on the site of the current I-79 interchange at Mt. Morris. Photo from Mt. Morris History Day website 2004 collection (www.mtmorrishistory.org)

Today, Mt. Morris’ claim to fame is High Point Raceway, home to The Lucas Oil Outdoor AMA Pro-National Motocross Championship, which brings literally hundreds of thousands of people each year. The 2017 event is June 17, find more on Facebook, search High Point MX. You can also read about this famous raceway’s exciting 40 year history in a previous GreeneSaver story by Tara Kinsell, Sep/Oct 2016. Find it at GreeneSceneMagazine.com. Photo by mxsportsproracing.

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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BOWLBY BITS

The Bowlby Public Library will be closed on Monday, February 20th for President’s Day holiday. T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:30-11:30am. Creative Crafting for Adults – 1st Thursday (10am-2pm) and 2nd Saturday (5-7pm): This month (Feb 2 & 11) is a Valentine-themed craft. Cost of materials $20. Pre-registration requested. Bowlby Book Club – Feb. 13, 6pm. Discussion on part 2 of Stephen King’s “The Stand.” FREE American Red Cross Training. Adult, Child & Infant CPR Certification, Feb 6, 5-8pm. Pre-registration required. Coding Camp – Children ages 5-8 learn core coding concepts as they create their own interactive stories and games using PBS KIDS characters. 8 weeks remaining. Feb meetings are 2/9 & 2/23, 5-6pm. Call to register. By Colleen Nelson UN-Birthday Party - Feb 17, 4-8pm. Enjoy traditional UN-Birthday party games, UN-Birthday cake & snacks, and a special UN-Birthday n 1825, Revolutionary war vetThat’s when those beautiful windows were craft. Pre-register your whole family. eran David Boydston and wife commissioned from Pittsburgh Art Glass Co. and After-After Hours, presented by Teen Advisory Group (TAG), Feb. Esther Ann deeded a plot of new pews were shipped in for pick up in Star City, 17, 8-10pm, for teens aged 13-18. Suggested $2 donation at the door. land in Mt. Morris to a group WV. Church records show that five of those big Please pre-register. of neighborly trustees and the first windows, complete with ornate wooden casings, Dinosaur Train Story Time – Feb. 18 11am- 1pm. For children 3-8 Methodist Episcopal Church “south cost $895. yrs, themed games, crafts, stories & light lunch. Please pre-register. of the Mason Dixon Line” was built, Then, as now, parishioners continue to care for Spring Story Time – Register NOW for Story Times offered 3/6overlooking the wagon road that their fine old church and keep it in pristine condi5/12, 2017. For all ages from babies to young adults; call for schedule. would someday be State Route 19. tion. Teen Advisory Group (TAG) is for teens 13-18 interested in influWhen its Centennial was celebrated “I’m a Minor and our family goes way back. encing library services, programs and collections. Weekly meetings are on in 1925, all descriptions of the first My dad was very active in the church and helped Wednesdays at 4pm. Call for info. two churches built there had been pay for the plexiglass we have on the outside now to Free test prep for adults studying for GED, Civil Service exams, lost to time (The first, like many pi- protect them,” Sandy said. Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. oneer places of worship, was most There was also a Baptist congregation in Mt. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule aplikely a log cabin). But many of the Morris and its church once stood near Cedar Grove pointments. descendants of those first members Cemetery, just outside of town where town founder FREE computer classes – Thursdays in Feb, 5:30-6:30pm, beginning were still there to celebrate 100 Levi Morris is buried. “I did the research and finally 2/9 with “How Do I Use This Device?” for help with tablet or smartphone years of good will on earth as it is in found his grave,” Sandy said. In 1928 evangelical (bring your device). Feb 16 is “Getting Started with a PC” for beginners Heaven – Donley, Fordyce, Lemley, preacher Walter Long held a six-week tent revival with computers. Feb 23 is “Using MS Word”. Higgins, Russell, Dooley, Callahan. that brought a wandering flock into his fold and in Retired postal worker and former Mt. Morris Friends of the Bowlby Public Library inviting new members. Call Behind the church, Ameri- time the Baptist church building became the home Fire Chief Bobby Dulaney, a spry, cheerful 85 for more info. can flags still fly beside the mossy of the Assembly of God Church. When the church year old, sets on the edge of a pew inside Mt. Local Artists are invited to display their artwork at the library during graves of veterans of the Revolu- building burned in 1943, the Assembly built a new Morris UMC against a backdrop of stained 2017. Collectors may also display. Call for more info. tionary War, the War of 1812 and church across the street which is a vibrant part of glass and grins, “I help out whenever they Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., the Civil War. It’s a fine and pri- the community today as the Mt. Morris Gospel need me. I love this church.” 11am-1pm or 6-8pm. vate place to remember the civic Tabernacle of the Assembly of God. Brainfuse - Free online tutoring database, with one-on-one tutoring strength that went into building a Christian com“We have Thanksgiving services together with available daily 2-11pm. Writing lab, study guides, and skill building resources available 24/7. Access munity in a country town, one generation at a time. the Assembly and with every other church in town,” using your library card at www.evakbowlby.org. “You really need to get a photo of the windows, Sandy said. Her Methodist ministry also hosts free Freegal & Freading - Enjoy free music, videos and books and magazines online. Library patrons they’re beautiful,” church historian Sandy Osecky community dinners every second Friday from can stream or download with mobile apps, visit www.evakbowlby.org. said. Her collection of memorabilia is extensive and March through November and takes meals to those Rocket Languages - 15 online Language courses are available through your library website, with freely shared, and the windows are just what she who can’t make it to the church to eat with their your library card. Or download mobile app, visit says they are – beautiful. They brighten the interior neighbors. www.evakbowlby.org. of the third and final church that was built in 1886 “We have a very active Methodist Women’s Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library under the direction of Rev. A.E. Husted. It was a Group and we’ve worked with Habitat for Humanfor more info or to register for any of the above wooden structure and its arched windows did not ity. We volunteer at the Perry Food Bank and at events. have fancy glass. But its distinctive bell tower was Christmas we have an Angel Tree for kids,” Sandy 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesand still is topped with a tall black peak reaching added. Other good deeds include distributing hats burg, PA 15370 to the heavens, its broad brim giving it the look of a and mittens, preparing Sunshine Baskets when pilgrim hat. It “served the people well” through the sickness strikes and hosting pie sales and fundraisoil boom times of the late 19th century and even ers to support the church’s many projects. participated in the boom. An old photo shows a The church is pastored by Jake Judy. “He’s derrick on church property where the parking lot still going to seminary school in Pittsburgh but he is now. According to Sandy’s records, membership lives here with his wife Julie and their two kids in continued “on a constant climb” and in 1917 Rev. the parsonage. We feel really blessed to have him. J.V. Potter and his “noble chore of faithful follow- Come and hear him preach some Sunday and you’ll ers” allocated funds – about $1500 - to build an ad- see what I mean,” Sandy says. dition, encase the church and its tower in golden For more information about this lovely old brick and create a “now modern twentieth century church on 256 Mt. Morris Rd call 724-324-2876. plant”.

Mt. Morris United Methodist Church

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GreeneScene Magazine •

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

by Colleen Nelson

his outstanding photograph is from the Mt. Morris History Day website (www.mtmorrishistory.org) from the collection of Raymond Fox contributed in 2001. That’s John H. Fox, standing beside the gas pumps in front of his grocery store and gas station on the way into Mt. Morris sometime in the 1930s. The signs on display tell the story of what was tasty back then: “Sanitary Ice Cream”, made locally at Bryans Sanitary Dairy, and of course Coca Cola, bottled in Cameron, West Virginia and delivered by truck to every store around. “John was my great grandfather,” said Mark Fox of Fox Ford in Waynesburg. Mark is the family historian and this photo is also proudly displayed, along with other mementos of the past, on the wall of the current day Ford dealership on East High Street, Waynesburg. This little downhome business was just another example of what was to become quite a family history in various aspects of the automotive industry. John Fox’s station pictured here was located at the intersection of Rt. 19 and Perry School Road -now Dunkard Creek Road - by the bridge over that big creek just outside of Mt. Morris. The building is no longer there, but just up the road, another building (the current day home of Roush Garage) was home to Mt. Morris Motor Company, where John’s sons originally entered the business in the 1920s selling Ford automobiles too. In 1941, the “Fox Motor Company” moved to Waynesburg and the tradition continued through the generations with three Fox Brothers now operating today’s Fox Ford dealership. If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@GreeneSceneMagazine.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

Spo r t Sh o rt s WAYNESBURG WRESTLING REACHES 900 WINS!

By Jason Tennant

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he Wrestling Program at Waynesburg Central High School enjoys a long tradition of success. Point to the 78 different wrestlers who have come through the program and won individual WPIAL titles. Those 78 combine for a total of 110 WPIAL titles won by Waynesburg Raiders. Go even further and look to the 23 Waynesburg wrestlers that have won individual state titles! Those 23 have combined for a total of 31 PIAA State Titles won by Waynesburg Raiders. Waynesburg can even boast an Olympic medalist as their most decorated wrestler of all time, Coleman Scott, won a bronze medal at the 2012 London Games. Yes, the program has had a very impressive past of individual wrestlers. Earlier this month though, it was a TEAM milestone being celebrated. Fresh off of a 1st place finish at the TRICADA Wrestling Tournament, the Waynesburg Central Wrestling team looked to continue another successful season and improve their season record of 7-2 as they were set to host an old rival in Connellsville. There was a bigger story though that night, as Waynesburg was not only looking for their 8th win on the season, they were also looking for the 900th win in program history, which they achieved with a 31-30 win that went down to the wire. “It was such an exciting match too,” said Head Coach Joe Throckmorton. “It was also fitting to do it against Connellsville, which has such a great history as well.” 900 wins!

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“It’s an awesome accomplishment to be the 3rd team in the history of the state to reach 900 wins, said Athletic Director Justin Stephenson. “Waynesburg wrestling has always been a wonderful program with so many individual WPIAL and State Champions. This just adds another tremendous accolade.” That’s right, Waynesburg is only the third team in the history of wrestling in the State of Pennsylvania to reach that milestone. On the night Waynesburg collected their 900th win, only Canon-McMillan with 1,065 and Easton with 933, stood with more wins than the Raiders. A rich coaching history has ultimately led the Raiders to this milestone as Waynesburg has four different coaches who have topped the 100-win mark. Leading the way with 248 wins is Joe Ayers-

Waynesburg Wrestling Program becomes 3rd team in Pennsylvania wrestling history to reach 900 wins.

man, who knows just about everything there is to know about Waynesburg wrestling, and contributed many of the figures used in this article. “Waynesburg has had a great tradition since 1938 and I just feel very fortunate to have been a part of it,” Ayersman said. Ayersman was a BIG part of it as his 248 wins are by far the most of any Waynesburg coach. He spent a total of 33 years with the program. First, as an assistant under Ernie Closser, and then as head

coach for 20 years. Also accounting for over 100 wins each were John Yates with 140 wins, Closser with 137, and Throckmorton, with 127 and counting. “The reason Waynesburg has been so successful is the tradition that has been passed down generation through generation,” said Throckmorton. “We have so many alumni that always want to come back and help out the program any way they can. That’s how you get to 900 wins.”

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JANUARY / FEBRUARY

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JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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BET YOU DIDN’T KNOW… BUILDING BIG BARGES IN OUR BACKYARD By Rochelle McCracken

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rownsville Marine Products (BMP) is a marine manufacturing company specializing in the new construction of barges, located in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. For those of us who live near waterways and rivers like Monongahela and Ohio, the barge is a common sight. Flat bottom crafts with sides that create a large capacity for cargo with shallow draught. Barges have been in use since 1812 and have played an important role in commerce

Randy C. welds the seams.

Mike A. works with the automated welder.

Dirk W. Panel Line Crew.

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through the 20th century. In George Washington’s bill of 1784 to Governor Harrison of VA, the canals of James River, Kanawa, the Chesapeake and Ohio were formed. These canals provided routes that connected the Atlantic Seaboard with the Ohio River and Great Lakes and the Western River Systems including the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri. During the late 1700s most immigrants and freight traveled along the East Coast by land to Wheeling or Pittsburgh and down the Ohio River to go west. This was integral to the population growth and settling of the west. BMPs’ facility once housed the Hillman Barge company and has produced marine vessels since 1939. Hillman barge was significant to commercial and industrial development of southwestern Pennsylvania. The initial construction of the facility dates between 1886-1903 and served even then as a major fabricator of shipping vessels. The location was originally a distribution center for cotton, grains, coal and other goods. The site then developed into a barge and boat manufacturing facility, a natural fit to the region’s iron and steel industry venture that was vital to the coal and coke trade. Progressive production procedures led to the state-of-the art design of large steel barges capable of supplying raw materials to the mills in Pittsburgh. Today, Brownsville Marine Products is a state of the art facility and the third largest manufacturer of barges in the United States. Nestled along the Monongahela River in a town with a population of around 2,300, it’s the unassuming, sleeping giant. Neighborly greetings welcome you at the door of this large operation. Sincerity and passion for their work are what resonates from the voices of Ted Stilgenbauer, VP of operations, and Pam Florian, Human Resources Manager. To quote Pam, “This is not our first rodeo, but we want it to be our last.” While they label themselves as a midsized family oriented company they are part of a much larger organization. They are partnered with Heartland Barge Management located on the Mississippi River, along eastern St. Louis and bordering Illinois. I had the pleasure of taking a tour of the plant with Robert Thistlewaite, Safety Manger.

Brian V. welds the bottom panel.

It was awe inspiring to see the operations in action. Steel is moved using large magnets suspended by motorized pulleys. The flash of welds and the presence of fitters adjoin the floors of the different staging areas as the steel is guided through the many steps to make it a barge. On my tour I was given time to sit and talk with one of the employees. Timmy Means has been with the company for 10 years. He started as a laborer having no prior experience and learned through work opportunities at the company to become Lead man for the Stern division of the manufacture process. Within 1 year of hire he was a first class fitter. Timmy has experienced firsthand the building and growth of the company throughout his 10 years. “I have seen the new building and cranes that come with the growth of the company, it’s been amazing to witness, and I appreciate the life it has brought to the community of Brownsville, especially for local employment,” he says. On a personal level for him, Timmy says, “I like that there is always something to learn, new opportunities and I just enjoy working ‘hands-on’.” BMP is the 3rd largest manufacturer of barges in the US. While the company’s passion is in the manufacturing of quality products, they express their belief giving everyone an opportunity. It’s one of very few that such an achievement comes through a dedica- companies that you can walk into with no prior extion and commitment to outstanding employee re- perience, get on the job training and certification, lations. The company’s core value is found in their and end up with a brighter future that includes employees’ adherence to manufacturing “A Quality career advancement. Some of the many perks proBarge at A Competitive Price.” They believe the true vided by the company for their employees include value in the quality of their product is dependent an annual picnic, where each employee received at on all of the team mates who create a sense of pride least a $100 gift or more; hams and turkeys for the in workmanship. The company operates with 225 holidays, and family fun day. fulltime employees and incorporates pay day treats During family fun day anyone can be conto say “thank you” to each of them. They hold quar- sidered family and accompany an employee to the terly company luncheons to provide company up- plant for the day. The plant is open, not operating, dates and overview safety. Management’s belief is in and gives the employees’ families an opportunity to see what they do. There are activities for the kids as well as tours to see the plant. One of the kid’s activities is hand painting. These hand paintings go into making a banner for the company. The company’s management changed in October of this year with the retirement of President and CEO, Tim Scheib. Brian Mueller is the sole Owner and Chief Executive Officer and Ted Stilgenbauer has stepped in the role as Vice President of Operations. BMP is a company partnered for success that’s a real hometown gem. Dan R. and Nate S. part of the Final Weld Crew. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Co o l at Sc h o o l

by Tyler Whipkey

West Greene – Pioneer Pantry and Backpack Program

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ccording to Mr. Jim Elsenheimer, Food Service Director at West Greene School District, almost 40% of students in school districts across Greene County qualify for free/reduced meals at school. The Free/Reduced Meal Program provides a free/reduced price breakfast and lunch at school for students who qualify. There is still a problem, however. The program

provides meals for students at school, but what about at home? Children eat approximately twenty-one meals per week, but only ten of those meals are at school. About six years ago, Greene County food service directors, along with support from the Community Foundation of Greene County and its director Bettie Stammerjohn, organized the Weekend Food Program, also known as the “Backpack” Program. This innovative program not only results in healthier eating, it also engages all interested students in community service. “At West Greene, we currently are helping 48 children in grades K-6th with this program. Each week from early October through early May, a select group of high school students come down to help pack a grocery bag full of items and then these bags are distributed discreetly by the elementary teachers into the students backpack that they take home on Friday,” explains Mr. Elsenheimer, who assumed management of the Backpack Program when he became Food Service Director at WG. Even with this success, the steadfast backers of the program felt there was still a problem. The Backpack Program provides for Elementary students, but what about the Middle and High schoolers? Mr. Elsenheimer and a group of faculty and staff members began an additional effort 2nd grade students visit the Pioneer Pantry at West Greene High School. The Pantry was initiated to this year to help with the issue of hunger in supplement good nutrition and hygiene among high school students. older students – it’s called the Pioneer Pan-

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

try. The Peer Mentoring Program hosted a food drive at the beginning of the school year, which helped “kick start” the Pantry, located in the high school cafeteria. Carlisle Pioneer Grocery in Rogersville also made a generous donation to the Pantry, and a number of families, faculty, and staff continue to make donations to the Pantry. “Aside from the product donations, we have also received generous financial grants and donations from Pursley Baptist Church, the Pittsburgh Regional Food Service Directors co-op, an anonymous administrator, and the Community Foundation of Greene County. These funds will be used to purchase items as needed, with plans of using couponing to help minimize the costs for products,” said Mr. Elsenheimer. Again, the inspiration for helping each other is growing. After a mini field trip visit to the Pioneer Pantry at the high school, one of the second grade classes from the elementary school decided to bring in donations for the Pantry, in lieu of a gift exchange at Christmas.

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GreeneScene by Tonya Gump

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Greene: Earth and Sky

By Pete Zapadka

SHOULD WE TRY TO SAVE GREENE COUNTY’S OLDEST BRIDGE?

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ith the arrival of a new year, it seems we travel farther and farther from those things in our heritage that once enriched our lives. The passage of time blurs our memories, and only a lurid event returns them to the forefront our thoughts. Such was the case with the historic Pollocks Mill Bridge near Jefferson. The bridge, built by the Massillon Iron Bridge Co., is Greene County’s second oldest, dating to 1878. It was damaged severely in September, 2014, by an overweight water-hauling truck, and its future appeared grave. But outcry from residents and action by government officials led to the restoration of the bridge, which again carries traffic. Farther upstream on Ten Mile Creek, an The Whites Ridge Road Bridge that dates to 1877 crosses Ten Mile Creek in front of the Emerald Mine. older sibling just west of Waynesburg is not faring as well. The historic Whites Ridge All photos by Pete Zapadka Road Bridge, believed to be the oldest bridge in Greene County, sits silently, virtually out of sight from drivers on the nearby highway and near a busy railroad that serves local coal mines. Have you seen it? It takes a keen eye. The nearly hidden span lies slightly closer to Waynesburg and across the highway from Bucktown Beer. Damage is evident on the Whites Ridge Road Bridge as it stands astride Ten The Whites Ridge Road Mile Creek. In the background is the Emerald Mine. Bridge dates to 1877, but it has not been in service for decades “Many a bike, bare foot and family auto passed after the nearby Emerald Mine took over the property to the south side of the creek. The website his- over that bridge. Certainly as the portal to much toricbridges.org calls it “one of the most important community interaction involving the summer celand rarest bridges in Western Pennsylvania.” Like ebration of Little League baseball,” Mr. Toothman the Pollocks Mill Bridge, the Massillon Bridge Co. continued. “Emerald Field, as the ballpark was called of Ohio constructed the span, described by historic- thus the naming the mine, was just 100 yards past the bridges.org as having an “extremely rare truss con- bridge to the right. Riding my bike back up the hill figuration . . . its main members are all wrought iron.” into town after a summer evening game made for a A recent post on Facebook showing photos of good night sleep.” So now that the Emerald Mine is being closed, the Whites Ridge Road Bridge elicited numerous stirring reactions from residents. Colleen Nelson, what will happen to the property beyond the south the local artist who each year produces the Greene end of the bridge? Can the venerable Whites Ridge Country Calendar, was so moved that she included a Road Bridge be restored so that it again can be used, pen-and-ink drawing of the bridge as the calendar’s thus saving this remarkable example of 19th century November, 2016, illustration. And local businessman building technology? Should we even try? The bridge Glenn Toothman was happy to share many personal has been ravaged by time, and may be beyond restoration. memories. Any effort will take money, determination and “I used to walk across that bridge to get to my Little League baseball games, and I caught a carp big a lot of hard work. It’s clear that Greene County never shied from enough to fill a red Radio Flyer wagon at about age 8 while fishing off of that same bridge. My mother hard work. But it’s up to residents, business leaders was not as excited to see that fish as I was to show it and government officials to act if another piece of our history is to be preserved. to her,” he said. More documentation and photos of the Whites Ridge Road Bridge can be found online at http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=pennsylvania/whitesridge/ Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com.

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ERIN’S INSIDE/OUT CAFÉ By Linda Moon

On July 1, 2012 a van carrying three adults and four youth from First United Methodist Church in Waynesburg was headed to Slidell, LA, on a mission to help rebuild areas devastated by Hurricane Katrina. One of those adults, Erin Jedlowski, Mission and Youth Leader for the church, was killed when the van was involved in a tragic accident. The church family was devastated by the loss; and within days members had gathered to brainstorm a way to honor Erin’s life and her great understanding of Jesus. They acknowledged Erin’s preference and dedication to work- Erin’s Inside/Out Café Manager Janice Gottschalk (right) enjoys the company of regular guest Hazel Ewart ing more outside, in the community, rather than inside the church. From that came the idea for Erin’s need in the county for hot meals.” Inside/Out Café, with a purpose to meet the peoHazel Ewart has been a café guest for about a ple, churched or unchurched. year. She says she enjoys both the food and spiriThe cafe began in August, 2012 on the Par- tual nourishment. “I knew Erin and this is a great ish House porch where donuts, coffee and water way to honor her memory. I think this is wonderwere handed out. Walkers…people coming from ful. I enjoy being with the people and have made the library, people walking their dogs or people a lot of friends. I dearly love Janice and at times I simply walking stopped by. Water for dogs was will help her out if she needs it.” even provided. What better way to get to know Another regular, Dennis Garret says, “I am people than over coffee and donuts? very grateful for this. Most of us are on fixed As the weather turned cold, the cafe moved incomes and if it wasn’t for places like this, we inside and “light” food such as chips and sand- might not make it financially.” wiches were served. The faces of those stopping The café is funded in part by a Greene Counby grew to include people and children from all ty Memorial Hospital Foundation grant, along walks of life, forming a community of their own. with private donations, including from Erin’s It was a time of sharing, conversation and making parents, and additional support from the UMC friends. Soon Erin’s Inside/Out Café was seeing Women of First United Methodist Church and an average of 20 people, and eventually moved to Washington Street Methodist Church. The meals the fellowship hall of the church. The menu ex- are free, with donations accepted. Some people panded to include a complete nutritional meal of may put in a quarter while others may donate $5. protein, vegetable, dairy and fruit. Today the cafe Last October, the ministry expanded to inserves approximately 70 people each Monday and clude “KidZ Kafe”, managed by Livie Schleicher Wednesday evening. and Alex Evanoff (the current Mission and Youth Janice Gottschalk has managed the cafe Director). Children eat at 6:30pm and at 7pm from the beginning, overseeing a cook and they are invited to a Sunday school room for lesabout 15 volunteers who help on a rotating basis. sons, games, artwork, popcorn and prizes for at“Without volunteers, there would be no cafe” she tendance. is quick to say. Entrance to Erin’s Inside/Out Café is on the Janet Cree, who has been volunteering since Franklin Street side of the First United Methodthe beginning, says “Everyone that attends the ist Church located at the corner of Richhill and cafe is kind and generous and appreciates the Franklin, north side of Waynesburg. Hours for work done by the volunteers…this has given me the cafe are 6:30-8:00pm. If you need more info, more compassion and a real understanding of the call the church office at 724-627-5951.

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Hunting Hills Hawkeyes Sign-ups

Abby Ozohonish of Jefferson at a Hunting Hills Hawkeyes’ clay target shooting practice.

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he Greene County Department of Recreation will host sign-ups for the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team, returning participants from 1-2pm on Jan 29 at the Greene County Fairgrounds. The registration fee is $60, or $30 for students who have already renewed their National Sporting Clays Association (NSCA) membership (NSCA card must be provided the day of sign-ups). New students in grades 3rd – 9th who are interested in clay target shooting can register from 2-3pm. A safety and training session for new team members is mandatory and will begin at 3pm immediately following sign-up. A $60 registration fee applies for all new students. Additional fees may apply during the practice season. FMI call 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

PICTURE PUZZLE

WINNER

Dominos Party Pack Carson Teagarden of Waynesburg recognized the REINDEER. He needed a little assistance from dad to pick up his prize as he doesn’t have a license. He hinted at a pizza party sometime in the near future. 16

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Newly Formed Group Helps Flood Victims

Chair of Honor The Greene County Commissioners and the Greene County Court of Common Pleas along with Rolling Thunder worked together to bring the PIA/MIA Chair of Honor Program to Greene County. Located on the first floor in the Greene County Courthouse, the POW/MIA Chair is our reminder of more than 82,701 service members who are prisoners of war and missing in action since World War I. A ceremony commemorating the installation of the Chair of Honor was held on Tuesday, Jan. 10. The ceremony was hosted by Commissioners Blair Zimmerman and Dave Coder; President Judge Farley Toothman and Judge Lou Dayich; and Clarence Fisher, Marlys Johnson and Gary Nicholson, Rolling Thunder Chapter 5 PA members.

Greene County VOAD group received a generous donation from EQT to assist with the ongoing flood relief efforts. Pictured (L-R) Amy Switalski - Director of County Housing & Family Resources, Barbara Wise - Director of Greene County United Way, Casey Durdines - Local Government & Community Affairs Specialist, Minnie Boles - Community Action Southwest Care management Ombudsman Supervisor

In response to the flooding in our county last month, a local coalition of churches, agencies and organizations have come together to form the Greene County VOAD (Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster). The group includes Catholic Charities, Greene County United Way, Salvation Army, County of Greene, Community Action Southwest, Area Agency on Aging, American Red Cross, WWJD, United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach, State Representative Pam Snyder and the First United Methodist Church in Waynesburg. The group is addressing providing resources, support and other assistance to those who sustained damage to their homes, vehicles and other personal belongings. Approximately thirty families or individuals have contacted the group with needs including basement clean-up, hot water tanks, furnace repair or replacement and one family in need of a total home replacement. VOAD is currently searching to locate a used mobile home. If you can be of assistance or know of one, please contact Barb Wise at 724-852-1009. Supporting funds and/or in-kind assistance has already been contributed by EQT, Chevron and Wayne Lumber. More is needed. Donations ear-

marked for “Greene County Flood Fund” are being accepted by the First United Methodist Church, 112 N. Richhill Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. 100% of the funds gathered will be used directly for the flood response in Greene County.  If receipts exceed existing needs, a fund will be established for future disaster responses. A complete list of contributors will be shared in the future. Trained Emergency Response Teams from UMCOR in Waynesburg, Johnstown and Pittsburgh areas and other Greene County volunteers have assessed damages and continue to assist with multiple clean-up situations.  Rev. David Lake, Pastor at the First United Methodist Church, said “It has been wonderful to see local churches, businesses, agencies and local citizens come together around the common goal of supporting those severely affected by the flooding.  These folks do not have to deal with the trauma and stress alone because the Methodist Church is committed to sharing the love of God for people especially when they are hurting.”  Those who need assistance with clean-up or mold remediation or other needs can contact Christy Orndorff, United Methodist District Disaster Response Coordinator, at 724-627-6805.

“From Black to Blue” Training Receives Funding Earlier this month the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) announced nearly $26 million to expand and diversify the economy in coalimpacted communities in five Appalachian states. According to an ARC press release, there were 28 awards, projected to train more than 7,300 workers and students impacted by the changing coal economy in certificate, credentialing, and other workforce development programs. They will also create or retain more than 2,500 jobs, leverage an additional $31 million from public and private investors, and create a more vibrant economic future for Appalachia’s coal-impacted communities. Among the awards was a $653,400 ARC grant to the Washington Greene County Job Training Agency Inc. in Washington, PA for the Transitioning from Black to Blue: Training Former Coal Workers for Natural Gas Utility and Pipeline Careers in

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Appalachia project. The ARC award will provide a targeted retraining program for displaced coal workers enabling them to pursue local employment in the natural gas utility and pipeline industry. The training courses will be offered at three regional education institutions – Butler County Community College, Westmoreland County Community College, and Washington State Community College. The curriculum includes input from the Gas Technology Institute to ensure that participants’ knowledge and skill development is industry-standard and best positions them to find stable employment in an expedited manner. The project will primarily serve a 23-county area in southeast Ohio and southwest Pennsylvania, and will serve 100 trainees. To learn more about the Black to Blue project, contact Washington Greene County Job Training Agency, Inc. at 724-229-5083.

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We are pleased to share pictures of a few of our Greene County area hunters who have earned the right to

BRAG!

Linda Kimmel Aidan Delansky

Trophy Mule Deer

Linda Kimmel shares her extraordinary experience this past hunting season. “After applying for years, my husband and I drew mule deer tags in NW Colorado for the 3rd gun season in November 2016. We spent a couple days scouting before the season opened, and saw a lot of bucks, a few really good ones. After passing up a couple of smaller ones early on the first day, I was able to take this trophy at 175 yards. I think you can tell I was very happy.” Great shot – nice trophy!

First Squirrel

Here’s a picture of a very proud Aidan Delansky, age 11, of Dilliner, PA with his first squirrel, submitted by a very proud Bobby Delansky. Firsts are always fun to share. Way to go Aidan.

Hayden Fields

Kaylee Duke

Trophy Buck

Kaylee Duke is proud to show off her trophy buck taken during archery season near Waynesburg, PA. And she has every right to be…Brag big Kaylee!

Chuck Kubasik

8 Point Buck

Chuck Kubasik of Rices Landing bagged this 8 point with an impressive 17” spread on November 30th near Ruff Creek. No wonder he’s smiling… Brag on, Chuck!

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First Buck

Jackie Taylor shared this picture of 9-year-old Hayden Fields from Sycamore, who has been hunting since he was 6. “He’s gotten a lot of squirrels over the years but never a deer,” writes Jackie. On the afternoon of November 29, Hayden was all smiles when he got his first buck! He shot it with an STW at his friend Kory Taylors family farm in Washington Township.  Way to go Hayden!

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George Taylor

Kory Taylor

10 Point Bucks John & Daniel Lagaza, father & son

8 Point Buck

Daniel Lagaza, age 8, hunting with father, John A. Lagaza, took his first buck with a crossbow this past season. This was Daniel’s 4th buck in 4 years, and 3rd 8-point in 3 years. John recalls the words of his father when he was Daniel’s age: “I remember my father always saying, ‘it’s more fun watching you take a deer than taking one myself’ and those words return true...” John shared a play by play narrative of the exciting hunt as the pair waited in the early morning dawn, patiently watching several doe, until the regal buck made his appearance “ …as the deer cleared the tree, John asked ‘Do you have a clear shot?’ and Daniel answered ‘Yes, I’m on him.’ About then he shot and a loud smack rang out as the crossbow bolt made perfect contact…” They tracked less than 20 yards before finding the prize downed with a perfect shot. John wrote “…at that moment I realized I was my own father feeling more excited than my son. I knew once again the joy of being with my son as he took another deer and first with a crossbow. I told him, ‘One day you will be old and gray and you will remember this moment we shared together as if it just happened.’ He asked ‘Will you still be alive then?’ I answered, ‘Only God knows, but if I am, I will never ever forget this either.’

There might have been a little bit of father/son hunting competition going on in the Taylor house this season. George Taylor of Waynesburg shot this nice 10 point buck in archery season on a piece of property he owns in Franklin Township. Not to be out done by his dad, 9-year-old Kory Taylor, shot his 10 point the first day of rifle season on the family farm in Washington Township with his dad’s STW.  “I’m not sure whose buck is bigger, but if you ask my son he’ll tell you definitely his!  Either way, I’m one proud wife/mom,” said Jackie Taylor, who submitted these brag worthy pictures.

Brandon McElroy

Big Buck

Brandon McElroy shares his hunting experience of October 10, 2016: “I was sitting in my tree stand, which I had set up on Tollgate Run Rd. I was looking around…saw this buck and, I will admit, I was nervous, but finally took my shot. It took me and my father awhile to find him but we finally did and I could not believe how big he really was! Thank you dad.” Congratulations, Brandon – you can brag on this one.

Cameron McIe

Big 10

Cameron McIe, 18 years old, share this photo of his “Big 10” shot on opening day. “This was my biggest buck to date,” he writes with pride. We agree, Cameron – you can sure brag on this one.

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Chase McIe

First Buck

This photo shows Chase McIe of Mt. Morris with his first buck, harvested on Nov. 28, 2016 in Perry Twp. Chase’s father, Bryan McIe, pictured with him, submitted the photo and shared with us Chase’s words, “Thanks again Uncle Dave for the gun!” Good job, Chase!

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Caleb, Jacob & Daren Orndoff

Adam Skertich

Opening Day Buck

First & Second Bucks

Adam Skertich of West Union (north 9-year old twins Caleb and of Ninevah) shot this buck on openJacob Orndoff harvested ing day at 8am, on a 180-acre piece their very first bucks this of land near his home, where he year, and brother Daren has hunted since he was 12. Adam got his 2nd. The boys were shared his story: “I hadn’t shot a buck hunting on their father, in 4 years. This very symmetrical Shawn Orndoff’s farm at buck was the 6th deer I saw that Sycamore. Way to go guys! morning, and he offered me a perfect shot at about 130 yards…I know he isn’t the biggest buck around, but Austin Grandel he’s the biggest I’ve taken and I was very happy…” Big enough to Brag, Adam! 10 Point Buck Young Austin Grandel had been planning and practicing for the first day of rifle season for many weeks. He would be taking his 300 Blackout to a tree stand in West Finley with his best friend – his dad, Brock Bayles Ryan Grandel, right by his side. Proud mom Heather writes, “Austin and Ryan were joined by Pappy Bruce, Uncle Cory and Uncle Roger, all with hopes and intentions on putting a big buck down…This 8 Point Buck hunt was going to be even more special because daddy was giving 10-year-old Brock Bayles Austin his tag so Austin was up, it was his turn to pull the trigger and proudly submitted this become the hunter…Right at last light, a large 10 point buck came picture of the 8 point buck into view and even though he may only be 6 years old he had his he shot with his 243 rifle eye on the prize! Austin’s very first buck was a 105 inch 10 point...” on the first day of season We say, “Austin, you can definitely brag on this one!” while hunting in Washington County, PA. He’s got a right to be proud – and to Brag!

Samantha Clark

10 Point Buck

It’s her first buck! Samantha shot this impressive 10 point with a 25-06 in Graysville, PA on Dec. 3, 2016. Congrats Samantha, you brag all you can!

Tyler Shaffer

Big Buck

Tyler Shaffer of Carmichaels harvested this humongous prize near Gerard’s Fort, PA. No doubt that’s a Brag Mag pic. Good hunting Tyler!

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Virgili Family

Christy Orndorff

11 Point Buck

GreeneScene staff got wind of a story going around about one of the nicest and “biggest” bucks taken in our area, by Christy Orndorff. We tracked her down for a picture. She obliged and wrote: “I got this 11 point on our farm in Franklin Twp. I have hunted since I was 12, and have never had an opportunity to see, much less take home, such a nice deer!” Thank you, Christy – it just belongs in the Brag Mag!

Hailey Hickman

8 Point Buck

Hailey Hickman shot this super 8 point on the first day of rifle season with her Savage .243 in Ruff Creek, PA. All we can say is…WOW! That’s a Brag Mag classic, Hailey.

6 Point buck, 7 Point Buck and a Coyote

Rifle season was very successful this year for the Virgili family of Fallowfield Twp., who enjoyed a family hunt on opening day at the Taylor Farm in Washington Twp., Greene County. First time hunter Aspen Virgili, 13 years old, bagged this nice 6 point buck first thing in the morning and just a couple hours later her brother Levi Virgili, 17, shot an impressive 8 point. The Virgili kids were tagged out! According to Jackie Taylor, who shared the photos, “Nothing for their dad, Sean Virgili, that day, but he did come back on Saturday and got this nice little trophy – his first coyote!”

Noah King

9 Point Buck

The bragging rights on this 9 point with a large and “long” rack go to Noah King, who harvested it on the first Saturday of the season with his Savage 30-06 in Ruff Creek, PA.

David Lund and Fred Courtwright

Big Bucks

Hunting buddies David Lund and Fred Courtwright both got something to brag about hunting at Aleppo, PA. Very impressive, guys, thanks for sharing these Brag Mag monsters!

John Journic

8 Point Buck

John Journic bagged this big buck, an 8 point, on Dec. 3 with his rifle in Morris Twp. Good work, John!

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GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

Now here’s an interesting photo we happened to find while researching the history of Mt. Morris for this issue’s I Love this Place feature. The photo, which appears on a Mt. Morris History website (www.mtmorrishistory.com), is credited to the collection of Ellen Campbell, under the photographs from Mt. Morris History Day 2001. The photo is captioned “Raymond, Ott (“Blacky”), and Rex Lemley with deer.” No date is provided, but we just had to include it in this year’s Brag Mag as much for the appearance of the proud hunters (check out those boots!) as the deer.

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Looking Back ….“Case of the 4-Sided Triangle”

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’m shot! Do something. Help me!” were the pleas shouted by Mrs. Ada Headley on August 14, 1940 as she ran to a neighbor’s house from her garage, having been shot five times in the abdomen, chest, and jaw, sustaining life threatening injuries from which she would, surprisingly, eventually recover. The scene described above did not occur in the hustle and bustle of a large city, but in our own backyard – the nearby small town of Pine Bank, Greene Co. Pa. Local media outlets of the time described the attack on Mrs. Headley as the most violent and shocking crime in the history of Greene County. The incident also became infamously known as “the case of the 4-sided triangle” because of the complicated nature of the suspected motives for the attack…more about that later. This story is among many fascinating reports one can find with a visit to the historic log structure - Greene County’s first courthouse - reconstructed at 144 East Greene Street in Waynesburg, home of the Cornerstone Genealogical Society Library. The resources and incredibly helpful staff there are invaluable to anyone conducting research on family histories as well as the history of the southwestern Pennsylvania region in general. The archives of newspapers and other historical publications are impressive, and the staff provides free research assistance to help you navigate your way through. And as we’ve already noted, it’s not all dusty, old records…you can also find real life stories of intrigue,

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By Jewel Wrick

true crime and the highs and lows in the passionate history of our people. So let’s turn back now to our mysterious scandal of the “Four-sided Triangle,” to see how the brutal event unfolded, as reported by The Democrat Messenger on the days following the attack… On the evening of August 14, 1940 in the small town of Pine Bank, Greene County, the Headley family - Ada, Robert, and their 12 year-old son John - returned home from a trip to their farm in West Virginia; and upon pulling the car into the garage they were attacked by two people who they thought at the time to be robbers. The gunmen, who were eventually identified as the widowed Mrs. Otis Cumberledge and her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Petit, had prepared for their horrifying act by taking two sets of clothing from Mrs. Cumberledge’s 15 year-old son Ellis to wear as a disguise during the attack. They drove Mrs. Cumberledge’s gray Ford sedan, parking nearby on a Pine Bank-Kuhntown road. They were suspected of leaving the car and proceeding to the Headley’s garage where they disguised themselves and laid in wait for the family.   The two women in disguises approached the Headley’s car as it entered the garage in an attempt of what appeared to be a holdup.  They walked up on both sides of the car and Mrs. Cumberledge used a toy gun to demand that Mr. Headley surrender his money while Mrs. Petit immediately began firing a .22 caliber revolver at Mrs. Headley.   After being shot five times, Mrs. Headley ran to a neighbor, John G. Cole’s house screaming and asking for help.  Mr. Headley followed his wife some time later and claimed that the two gunmen had stolen his car in order to escape. As the details of the case came to light,     Mr. Headley altered his claims, saying that he was actually forced at gunpoint to drive the women to the place along the Pine Bank-Kuhntown road where Mrs. Cumberledge’s car was parked. About fifteen minutes after the shooting, according to Constable and proprietor of the Kuhntown General Store Ralph Lohr, a “clatter on the road” startled him and he investigated. As the women sped through Kuhntown one of the car tires blew out, causing the clatter which alerted Constable Lohr to the situation. The two sisters had been fleeing the scene of the attempted murder in Mrs. Cumberledge’s car.   Lohr said, “I recognized Mrs. Cumberledge’s gray Ford sedan.   I didn’t think anything about it until I heard that Mrs. Headley had been shot.” Lohr, upon hearing

about the shooting, immediately suspected Mrs. Cumberledge’s involvement and followed the escape car because “it was no secret that Mr. Headley and Mrs. Cumberledge were ‘close’ friends.”    Sheriff Henry Flowers and his officers went to the Cumberledge house on Nettle Hill the evening after the shooting and found the car with a flat tire sitting in the yard. Mrs. Cumberledge was then questioned.  After the discovery of a bundle of discarded men’s clothing was found along the road the morning after the shooting, enough evidence was available to make an arrest.  Reportedly, as soon as the two sisters were presented with the evidence against them: the men’s clothing and witnesses who saw the gray Ford fleeing the scene, they confessed.  The women were arrested and charged with assault and battery with intent to kill.   During the interviews conducted by authorities, apparently the women made remarks which implied Mr. Headley’s involvement and resulted in his arrest.  Mr. Headley was released on $5000 bond and the two women remained in jail until the trial was held.   According to Mrs. Otis Cumberledge, she was presented with the idea for the shooting by Mr. Headley who also persuaded her that eliminating Mrs. Headley would allow him to marry her, Cumberledge, instead.   After Cumberledge was convinced to carry out Headley’s gruesome plan she enlisted her younger sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Petit, who acted as the shooter.   According to Mrs. Petit, she didn’t know why she did it.  The women’s

attorney described the situation like this: “Mrs. Cumberledge is 11 years older. She has always babied her sister. Mrs. Petit simply felt that she ought to do anything her older sister requested...She fired the shots merely as a ‘favor’ to her sister.”  The District Attorney and Special Prosecutor were flummoxed by Mrs. Petit’s involvement as there “is no question...of anything between Mrs. Petit and [Mr.] Headley.” As mystifying as Mrs. Petit’s involvement may seem, even more bewildering was Mrs. Headley’s obviously misplaced faith in her husband which ultimately resulted in her refusal to testify against him.   After posting bail in August, Mr. Headley returned to the home he shared with his wife to await trial, while Cumberledge and Petit remained incarcerated at the Greene County Jail.  According to an article in The Democrat in December 1940, “[Mrs. Headley] is confident of his [Mr. Headley’s] innocence and will testify for him,” however, the trial was postponed due to a “tragic turn of events” which happened in March of 1941. On January 18, 1941, the eve of Mr. Headley’s scheduled day in court, his wife, who had miraculously recovered from the five bullet wounds inflicted by the attack allegedly devised by her husband, willingly ingested enough strychnine to end her life. Mrs. Headley died in the Greene County Hospital after having confessed that she willingly took the poison because she was “worried.” At this

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point the case had been scheduled for trial in January of 1941 but was postponed until March because of Mrs. Headley’s death. March 10, 1941 was the final date for Mr. Headley’s trial. He was charged and found guilty of intent to kill and conspiracy to murder his wife. Mr. Headley was sentenced to a minimum of 3 ½ years and a maximum of 7 years in prison. The women, who were tried separately from Headley, both pleaded guilty and “threw themselves at the mercy of the court.” The sisters were charged with assault with intent to kill and conspiracy to murder Mrs. Headley. Mrs. Otis Cumberledge was sentenced to a minimum of 2 ½ years and a maximum of five years while her sister and the triggerman of the attack, Mrs. Elizabeth Petit, was sentenced to

a minimum of 2 ½ years and a maximum of four years. Though gruesome, the story of the four-sided triangle murder is a fascinating part of our local history, and there are countless other stories in similar form. So, if you’re looking for something to do between 1 and 4pm Monday through Friday or Saturday 10am-3:30pm, consider skipping that Netflix binge or matinee and instead pay a visit to the Cornerstone Genealogical Society Library. One can delve into their extensive collection of over six thousand books and periodicals, computerized resources, and over 400 rolls of microfilm. As the mission statement for the genealogical society states, a visit to the library will undoubtedly “stimulate interest in the fields of genealogy and local history,” and you will be greeted and assisted by an outstanding staff of volunteers.

Local CAP Receives Charter Civil Air Patrol Greene County Composite Squadron 606 has been granted a charter NERPA-606 in Waynesburg, PA Greene County. The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is a congressionally chartered, federally supported non-profit corporation that serves as the official civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force (USAF).CAP is a volunteer organization with an aviation-minded membership that includes people from all backgrounds, lifestyles, and occupations. It performs three congressionally assigned key missions:

emergency services, which includes search and rescue (by air and ground) and disaster relief operations; aerospace education for youth and the general public; and cadet programs for teenage youth. Those interested in membership or learning more about our new local CAP Unit may contact Capt. Dave Shaw, CAP Squadron Commander at 724-627-8545, by email to captshaw@squadron606.us, or visit http://www.squardon606.us.

Bird Sisters Oxford House

Illustration by Lucien Gregori from a King Features Syndicate publication at the time of the crime.

Athletes vs. Epilepsy Carmichaels Area High School senior athlete Liam Shea is participating in the Epilepsy Foundation’s Fundraising Campaign “Athletes vs. Epilepsy”. Liam says, “My goal is to help the Epilepsy Foundation raise awareness about epilepsy and to support epilepsy-related services, education, advocacy and research. I am doing this in honor of my older sister, Paige, who has a rare form of epilepsy called Lennox -Gastaut Syndrome.” Paige joins over 3 million people in the US that are affected by epilepsy, more than twice the amount of people that suffer from ce-

rebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease combined. Despite the prevalence of epilepsy in our communities, it is a neurological disorder that continues to be desperately under-funded and widely misunderstood. Liam will be setting up a donation table at CAHS basketball games to raise funds and awareness for the Epilepsy Foundation of Western/Central PA. Donations may also be sent by mail. Makes check payable to: Epilepsy Foundation Western/Central PA, and mail to: Liam Shea 280 Glade Run Road, Carmichaels, PA 15320.

Crafty Creations

Bird Sisters Oxford House in Waynesburg is accepting applications. A self- run, self-supported The Greene County Department of Recreation is offering a series of craft classes at the Greene recovery home where persons with substance abuse concerns can create a future different from the County Fairgrounds. Cost of materials is included in registration fee. Participants must pre-register: past. FMI 724-802-7186 or 724-231-5545. • Feb. 12 , 2pm: “Mommy and Me” Valentine Heart String Art, ages 3 and up, $20 per couple • Mar. 12, 2pm: Spring Topiary Tree, ages 18 and up, $20 per individual, pre-register by Feb. 26

New Scholarship for Mapletown Students

• Mar. 19, 4pm: Spring Wood Painting, ages 8 and up, $35 per individual

The Victor and Anna Mae Wancheck Beghini Scholarship has been established through the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) by Mr. & Mrs. Victor Beghini to benefit Mapletown High School graduates attending a four-year college or university with a major in a Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) field. Beginning this spring, two students will be awarded a $3,000 scholarship to be used for the students’ second year of college after high school graduation, based on verification of a declared major in a STEM field, and successful completion of the first year of college. Victor and Anna Mae Beghini, former residents of Greene County and graduates of Mapletown High School, have spent many years working and traveling in many areas of the county and world. “Anna Mae and I wanted to help students of

• Mar. 26, 2pm: “Mommy and Me” Popsicle Easter Basket, ages 3 and up, $20 per couple

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

the Mapletown area where we grew up,” said Mr. Beghini. “A scholarship helps a student with their college expenses and, having worked in the science and engineering fields my whole life, I hope to encourage these students to pursue their career dreams as well.” The application for the scholarship is included as part of CFGC’s single scholarship application form. The form allows students to apply for multiple scholarships available through CFGC, providing one set of required documentation along with any essays, letters of recommendations and other information needed for the different scholarships. The 2017 scholarship application will be available by early February with most applications due by April 3, 2017. For more information about the Victor and Anna Mae Wancheck Beghini or other CFGC scholarships, please visit our website www.cfgcpa.org, or call us at 724-627-2010.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

Additional classes offered in February include: Women’s Self Defense six-week course on Sundays beginning Feb. 19; and essential oil classes on Thursdays beginning Feb. 23. Pre-registration is required. The Ladies’ Day Vendor series will also be held on Wednesdays and Sundays beginning Feb. 19. The shows are free admission. FMI: 724-852-5323.

Presenters Needed for Career Awareness Day The Greene County Consortium of School Counselors is planning a Career Awareness Day for 8th and 11th grade students in the county on March 17th, 2017 at Jefferson-Morgan High School from 7:30-11:30. The purpose of this event is to increase students’ awareness of the

wide variety, scope and magnitude of the careers/ occupations experienced by Greene County residents. If you would be interested in sharing your career experience with the students of Greene County, please contact Sandy Throckmorton at sthrockmorton@cgsd.org or 724-852-1050.

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Greene County Conservation District Awards

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Rick and Annette Thistlethwaite of Thistlethwaite Vineyards received the 2016 Special Recognition Award for Agriculture Excellence at the Greene County Conservation District’s annual award ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13.

Dominick Barbetta, Morgan Township Supervisor, accepted the 2016 Dirt Gravel and Low Volume Road Program Municipality of the Year on behalf of Morgan Township at the Greene County Conservation District’s annual award ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13.

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ach year, Greene County Conservation District honors those within the county who have shown an outstanding commitment to soil and water conservation. Five recipients were recognized during the annual awards ceremony last month at Thistlethwaite Vineyards in Jefferson. Rick and Annette Thistlethwaite, recipients of the Award for Agriculture Excellence, were recognized for their active role in Greene County Agribusiness and the success of their award-winning winery. Thistlethwaite Vineyards, located in Jefferson, has the distinction of being the county’s first vineyard. The District noted the mix of farming and retail business success, different from traditional uses of the land. Rick and Annette were credited for the true hard work, perseverance and forward thinking which played a major role in the success of the award-winning winery. Waynesburg Borough Council and staff, recipients of Award for Urban Forestry were recognized for their vigilant care and management of “The Commons” park situated on the north side of the borough. For the past 28 years, the borough has managed the planting of over 200 tree, enabling “The Commons” to become a place of recreation and scenic beauty utilized by countless Waynesburg and Greene County residents. Morgan Township, recipient of Dirt Gravel and Low Volume Road Program Municipality of the Year Award, was recognized for enhancing municipal roads with environmentally sensitive maintenance practices that protect water, as developed by the Center for Dirt and Gravel Roads. Since 2011, Morgan Township has sought to improve Beagle Club Road located near Stoney Point. The township installed 14 cross drains, two stream crossings and the placement of 2,587 tons of Driving Surface Aggregate over a one-mile section of road, and the application of Ultra Bond sealant. The township has worked diligently to complete their projects in a timely manner and worked closely with the district to improve their road system. The Conservation District commended them on their hard work, time committed to the program, and willingness to think creatively. The Conservation District takes pleasure in recognizing those dedicated to fostering and mentoring of our local students in the knowledge of agricultural sciences. Agriculture science at West Greene High School Curt Hughes, received the Award for Excellence of Agriculture Education. Curt was recognized for his commitment to the agriculture community through his years of teaching Greene

Michael Simms, Waynesburg Borough Manager, accepted the 2016 Special Recognition for Urban Forestry on behalf of the Waynesburg Borough Council and staff at the Greene County Conservation District’s annual award ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13.

County youth the importance of agriculture sciences during his 29year career. Hughes’ fostering, mentoring and dedication to local students with the West Greene FFA program, West Greene High School and other youth agricultural organizations is an inspiration to both young and old. Current and past students have become the voices for the community and environment, and are shining starts of Greene County. MaKayla Henary, a 2016 graduate of Waynesburg Central High and current freshman at West Virginia University, was the recipient of the Conservation Speaking Award. MaKayla was recognized for her outstanding speaking skills and for placing first at the county speaking contest. She continued through the regional competitions to the State FFA Conservation Speaking Contest at the Pennsylvania FFA State Convention, placing seventh overall. MaKayla is the daughter of Jim and Kim Henary of Mt. Morris, and is pursuing a degree in Energy Land Management.

Curt Hughes received the 2016 Special Recognition Award for Excellence of Agriculture Education at the Greene County Conservation District’s annual award ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13. Pictured is Hughes (right) with District Treasurer Thomas Headlee.

MaKayla Henary of Mt. Morris received the 2016 Conservation Speaking Award at the Greene County Conservation District’s annual award ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13. GreeneScene Magazine •

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017


JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2017

Jan Feb GreeneScene 2017  

Get ready for our annual Brag Mag! Check out some of the local success! Every one has the right to Brag! Also read about Mt. Morris some loc...

Jan Feb GreeneScene 2017  

Get ready for our annual Brag Mag! Check out some of the local success! Every one has the right to Brag! Also read about Mt. Morris some loc...

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