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Camp Director Needed

Cornerstone Ministry Center in Carmichaels, PA posts an immediate opening for a Camp Director. “ If you are a graduate from a Bible College &/or you are experienced in camp leadership, we would like to talk with you. We can offer partial support as you strive to raise your own support. Cornerstone Ministry is a nondenominational ministry. For more information please visit our website at cbmswpa. org or contact Judy at 724-966-9157, cmbswpa@windstream.net.”

Cub Scout Sign-ups

Boys in the first through fifth grades, or 7 to 10 years old, are eligible to sign up for the Cub Scouts. Sign-ups will be held on September 10th at 6pm @ the Waynesburg Central Elementary School Gym, for more information contact, Crystal Cramer @ 724-451-8131 or visit www.scouting.org. Cub Scout Pack 1280 meets every Tuesdays at 6pm @ the First Baptist Church in Waynesburg, 303 W. High Street.

Fredricktown Area Public Library Fundraiser

The library posts this picture of the limited edition oil on canvas, titled “The Miner”, donated to the library by artist, Mary Elaine Lozosky, to be used as a fundraiser. The original oil of “The Miner” was awarded first place in the portrait category of the 2009 Valley Art Club Juried Show. Tickets are $5 (with 3 sets of numbers) for the 7pm PA Lottery drawing on Nov. 11, 2013. Tickets are available at the library and all proceeds benefit the library.

KING COAL S ixty years ago the mechanization of coal mining was taking away jobs for many local miners. The continuous mining machine took the place of workers who once did the work by hand. A coffee clutch, meeting at Mary’s Luncheonette in Carmichaels, talked about how they might breathe new life into the industry that Greene County was built upon. Paul Smith, Ross Allison, Stanley Allison and Ellis “Parker” Burnette focused their talks on the Wool Parade that was held each year in Waynesburg. Like the Sheep and Fiber Fest of today, the Wool Parade’s purpose was to shine a light on the sheep wool industry. Smith, the Allisons and Burnette began to question the feasibility of holding a coal festival, that would do for the lagging coal industry what the Wool Parade was doing for the sheep industry, shine a light. Stanley Allison, who had attended the Bluefield, WV Coal Festival, thought it would work for Carmichaels. The men hoped a festival would somehow trigger an A simulated mine rescue is one of the popular activities at King Coal Festival in Carmichaels

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First Assembly of God hosts Back to School Send Off

A Back to School Send Off was held at First Assembly of God at East View near Waynesburg on Sunday, August 18. The first 100 children presently in grades 1 through 5 were given free back packs filled with school supplies. Games and prizes were also conducted, and hot dogs, chips and drinks were provided. “First Assembly would like to provide a tangible blessing to the families in Greene County. This is a small investment in a most precious part of our society, the children. We want to impart a spiritual and physical blessing to our neighbors within Greene County,” said Pastor Richard Ritenour

50s Fest

Gearheads and cruisers! Classic Car and truck owners! Bikers! If you enjoy going to classic car shows and cruises around the region, Please stop at the Greene Saver office, now at 185 Wade Street (behind Scotty’s Pizza) and pick up some flyers for Waynesburg’s famous 50’s Fest & Car Cruise. Help us spread the word! The 50s Fest is Sept 14 this year, be there or be square.

Come & Get It!

September is Library Card Sign-up Month at the Bowlby Public Library! If you don’t have one, now’s the time to sign up. Damaged or lost cards will also be replaced at no charge during September. Also, if you are curious or confused about the new WAGGIN online card catalog and how to take advantage of its many benefits, plan to attend one of the WAGGIN Informational sessions presented during the month of September. These sessions will introduce you to the Polaris database and the online catalog, as well as managing your online account. Sep. 9 at 3pm; Sep. 17 at 10am, or Sep. 24 at 5:30pm. Call 724-627-9776 to reserve your seat!

upward swing to the coal industry in the area. The Carmichaels Area Chamber of Commerce came on board at the insistence of then president of the chamber, Werner Lund. Lund was the owner and operator of the Lund Theater in Carmichaels. Eventually, an agreement was reached between the chamber, and the fire companies of Carmichaels, Crucible and Nemacolin to form a King Coal Association. The association and its board of directors would host a King Coal Festival in Carmichaels. The association’s purpose would be to foster the development and advancement of the 2012 King Coal Parade entry bituminous coal industry. In May of 1954, representatives of the four groups traveled to the Coal Festival in Bluefield to get ideas for their own festival. At the June meeting of the King Coal Association, it was decided that the First Annual Pennsylvania Bituminous Coal Festival would be held October 13 through October 16, 1954. Sixty years later that festival is still held. The dates have moved to the fourth week in August, before school starts. The association is now comprised of the Carmichaels Lions Club, the Carmichaels Area Chamber of Commerce and the Carmichaels and Cumberland Volunteer Fire Department. The names and faces may have changed but the purpose of the organization remains the same, to promote the mining industry in Greene County. The success of the events held during the week of the King Coal Show festival hinge entirely on a dedicated group of volunteers from the sponsoring organizations and the community. The community and business support for the King Coal Show festival has also made it possible to continue for sixty years and counting. One wonders if those four men talking over coffee in 1954 had any idea that their efforts would still be remembered and carried on in 2013. GreeneSaver •

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Owner: Tim Frye Fax: 724-627-5265 Office: 724-852-1734 Phone: 724-825-8349 License No.: PA 021022 WV 048270

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The Corbly Reunion T

he 82nd Annual Reunion of the John Corbly Descendants Association was held the last Sunday in June at the historic John Corbly Memorial Church in Garards Fort. A worship service led by Pastor Gary Whipkey with church pianist Dixie McKahan preceded the meeting. Among the 50 people attending were not only local members but also those from Canada, Ohio, Arizona, Missouri, West Virginia and the Pittsburgh area. Prizes were given to Tony and Martha Sullivan from British Columbia for travelling the farthest distance, Eugene Everly for the shortest distance, Robert Rice, 89, for being the oldest in attendance and Chloe Holloway, 7, for being the youngest. For her many years of service as VicePresident and President of the association, Lena Galing was presented with a plate bearing the Corbly Crest. A moment of silence was observed for the recent passing Robert Rice, age 89, was recognized of Leola Wright as the oldest person attending the Murphy and Corbly Reunion this summer.

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her brother, Corbly Wright, as well as all other members lost in the past year. A presentation by Bill Miller highlighted Reverend Corbly’s Revolutionary War service with the George Rogers Clark military and settler expedition to the Falls of the Ohio (now Louisville) Kentucky. Corbly is credited with surveying the city of Louisville in 1789. The military campaign of Clark and the early settlements in Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio helped to secure the Northwest Territory at the Treaty of Paris in 1783. Corbly’s original land tract in Greene County was called “Slave Gallant” and is slightly west of the village of Garards Fort. It consisted of 431 acres and was surveyed in 1785 and patented in 1788. Before coming from northeastern Virginia to Garards Fort, Corbly was married to Abigail Kirk with whom he had four children. His second wife Elizabeth Tyler and three of their children were killed in an Indian massacre in 1782. Two of their other girls were scalped but lived to adulthood. He continued his ministry and is credited with establishing over 30 churches west of the Appalachians. In 1784, he married Nancy Lynn with whom he had eight children. When Reverend Corbly died in 1803 at the age of 70, Nancy remained on the family farm. Their brick house still stands and is located on the Carmichaels Road approximately a half mile from Garards Fort. Miller recently visited many of the churches which Corbly helped establish in the latter decades of the 1700’s. They range from the Peter’s Creek

50 members attended the 82nd Annual Reunion of the John Corbly Descendants Association, from the local area and Canada, Ohio, Arizona, Missouri, West Virginia and the Pittsburgh area.

church near Pittsburgh to the Simpson Creek church in Bridgeport, WV. The second minister at Peters Creek church, Reverend Edgar David Phillips, was the pastor at Corbly’s funeral. The Simpson Creek church is recognized as the oldest Baptist Church west of the Appalachian Mountains. Churches nearby include the Forks-of-the Cheat in Stewartstown, WV, and the following in Greene County: Bates Fork (Sycamore), Muddy Creek (Khedive) and John Corbly Memorial (Garards Fort). There is a Corbly website, highlighting the Reverend John Corbly’s life, religious, political and military accomplishments, being developed. The

site also will provide genealogy information about the Corbly family and Corbly reunions which have been held annually since 1932. Local history of Greene County, Pennsylvania, in particular Garards Fort, will also be included. Following a luncheon at the church, members were invited to tour the Garards Fort Cemetery where John Corbly, two of his wives and several children are buried. Also at this site are two large monuments commemorating the Corbly massacre and highlights of John Corbly’s life. The next Corbly reunion will be held June 29, 2014. For more information, contact William Miller at billkathymiller@yahoo.com or 724-627-7129. GreeneSaver •

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WHS Hospice Care We like to say “Hospice is a philosophy, not a place,” said Janine Zito, Clinical Manager of The Washington Health System Hospice Care, a non-profit hospice provider that serves Washington and Greene Counties. “It is a team approach that treats the mind, body & soul,” she added. Hospice emerged in Greene County in 1978. It began serving clients and was named Hospice of Greene County. It was the first hospice incorporated in Pennsylvania. The driving force behind establishing this hospice was Rev. J.E. Carlson who continued to serve the movement until his death in 1995. In 1983 a branch was opened in Washington County and it was then that the organization was incorporated as Hospice Care Inc. In 1996, it was merged with The Washington Health System. In 2002, the operation was expanded with the establishment of the Donnell House. It continues to serve the people of Greene and Washington Counties, and still employs some of the original staff. As many hospice providers describe it, hospice care is not about dying, it is about living. “Hospice recognizes dying as part of the normal process of living. Hospice affirms life and neither hastens nor postpones death. We focus on quality of time, not quantity of time,“ Janine said. When a person is terminally ill, the time they do have left and how it is lived is important. And it’s not necessarily just those last few days. Janine says if a patient wants to visit with grandkids, take a walk in the park, go on a trip… whatever they want to do, hospice can often make that possible while they are still able to do it. “The cost of hospice is covered 100% under Medicare when the criteria is met, and many insurance policies provide some level of hospice care as well, usually for individuals with life expectancy of 6 months or less,” said Janine. The level of care may differ also,

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depending on a patient’s needs. Washington Health System Hospice Care offers a comprehensive program with multiple levels of care for patients, as well as an extensive bereavement and support program for families, and a highly trained interdisciplinary team including registered nurses, certified nursing assistants, social workers and counselors, clergy, volunteers, and more. Once a patient’s attending physician and the hospice medical director determine that hospice services are appropriate, they will also decide the level of care specifically needed. Some patients and families may choose for the patient to remain in his or her own home while receiving hospice care, and other options include respite care, inpatient care, and residential hospice care at another facility. Respite care is when patients come to Donnell House in Washington to provide a break for caregivers lasting up to 5 days, with the expectation that the patient will then return home for continued care. Donnell House is a “medically specialized environment designed to feel like home,” explained Janine. Donnell House features eight private rooms, a sun room, a great room, a patio, an English garden, and a country kitchen, all of which patients and families are encouraged to use freely as if at home. “I have such a strong faith in hospice, because I have seen personally the comfort and help it can provide during some of the most difficult, and most joyful, moments of life,” said Janine. There are volunteering opportunities in hospice as well, with training programs to help individuals learn necessary skills, whether assisting patients and their families directly, performing clerical work, or even gardening and helping to care for the facilities. To find out more about The Washington Health System Hospice Care, contact call (724) 250-4500.

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What is a “Master Gardener”? By Cheryl Brendel, Penn State Master Gardener, Greene County

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ou’ve likely heard the term, maybe seen it on TV commer- ing in the Penn State Master Gardener Program. cials and certainly you’ve seen it in the GreeneSaver. The title So, what kinds of activities can you do to get those volunteer sounds impressive. hours? In the last year, Greene County Master Gardeners have Actually a Master Gardener is a volunteer who has received participated in the following: intense horticultural training, typically through universities • Writing informational articles for local publications across the US and Canada, maintains on-going education; and • Tiny Tim Project – going into schools and libraries to teach shares his or her knowledge by volunteering in the community. children, usually by letting them transplant a tomato into a pot, Master Gardeners help others learn by lecturing, conducting resometimes one that they have made from newspaper. A couple search, writing articles, making presentations and many other of the children have used their tomato to present at the county public projects. For some of the best, regionally-specific advice fair. you can get on gardening, find a Master Gardener. Or…maybe • Working at the Master Gardener Pollinator Garden. you’d like to become one! • Assisting in research by observing pollinators and reporting In Pennsylvania, the Master Gardener program is offered data through the Extension Service of Penn State University. The • Exhibiting a themed display at the county fair program is a descendant from land grants, between university • Answering questions phoned into the extension office (reeducators, federal and state governments and lay people. The search and reply) Extension’s goal is personal development. For the potential Mas• Participating in the Spring Gardening Seminar ter Gardener, it’s means education and volunteering. Penn State • Attending Farmers Markets to answer questions and present Master Gardeners are trained to have core knowledge in basic information gardening. Initially, some participants may feel a bit overwhelmed • Teaching Poison Prevention sessions in area schools when they realize how much information is covered on various • Monitoring Master Gardener classes topics. And all of it is very specific to the region where the Master Gardener lives. There are 67 counties in Pennsylvania and each has a separate Master Gardener Program. Because of the variations in weather, soil, habitat, etc., sound horticultural practices in each county or region of the state will vary. If you live in Greene County, the training and information you will receive is specific to the climate and conditions in southwestern, PA. If you are thinking about becoming a Master Gardener, there is a process. Initially you will be interviewed by other Master Gardeners in your county. The purpose of this is to meet you, explain what is involved, and answer any questions. It gives you the opportunity to decide whether you can and are willing to make a commitment to the program. The next step is to take a pre-test. This sometimes scares people away, but it shouldn’t. The pretest is given only to establish a baseline so you can see how much you improve your knowledge over the term. You can’t flunk the pre-test! The program is offered annually in Greene County with classes Oct. – Jan. on Thursday evenings (with a The Greene County Master Gardeners created a display at this year’s Greene County Fair using the fair’s theme, “Harvest Your Dreams.” The display earned a blue ribbon. break for the holidays) and final exam the first week of Pictured with the display are Jerry Tom, Dave Brendel, Cheryl Brendel, Valerie Glister February. There is a fee for supplies and materials used and Bob Glister, all Penn State Master Gardeners in Greene County. during the sessions, some of which include hands-on activities. After successfully completing the classwork and final exam, you then perform 50 hours of volunteer work in your comOther activities, ideas and opportunities are always coming munity to receive your Master Gardener certification. This needs along as well. When you attend monthly meetings, it qualifies for to be completed by the start of the next class year. Then to main- two hours. It’s not hard to get your volunteer hours in. tain your certification, you are required to complete just eight Remember, the next class for Master Gardeners in Greene hours of education and twenty hours of volunteer work annually. County will start in October. If you are interested in learning The term “Penn State Master Gardener” is only to be used by more about it, please call the Penn State Cooperative Extension individuals trained and certified to assist the Penn State Coopera- Office at 724-627-3745. Classes are held at the office, located at 26 tive Extension Service, and only when the volunteer is participat- W. High Street in Waynesburg.

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Even a Chopper Last month we talked about the Bluebird Bus Company’s Roush Propane Powered Vision School Buses, and previously we’ve talked about many companies who are converting their trucking fleets to natural gas powered vehicles. Even individual transportation can be powered by natural gas, and here is one of the most fun examples. Built to show America the promise of natural gas as a clean energy resource in conjunction with Chesapeake Energy Corporation’s 20th anniversary in 2009, the talented Orange County Choppers (OCC) crew from the hit TV show “American Chopper” partnered with the company to build the first natural gaspowered bike. The episode covered the bike’s production process as Paul Sr. and crew visited a drilling rig and learned how natural gas can power everything from a semitruck to a custom chopper. The bike sports OCC’s usual 117-cubic-inch V-twin engine, six-speed transmission and belt drive. Unlike other OCC choppers, this one features a mixer “fogger” rather than a carburetor to feed gas to the engine. In addition, the chopper’s gas gauge reads in pounds per square inch instead of gallons. Adorned with drillbit-inspired handlebars, the blue and green bike tours the U.S. to help educate the public on the benefits of natural gas as a clean, abundant, affordable, American fuel. While cng powered motorcycles are not commonplace yet, there are conversion kits on the market and it remains a lively topic of discussion among riders and manufacturers.

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Heroes Run

he Greene County Department of Recreation will host the 2013 Heroes Run/Walk beginning at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 21, along the Greene River Trail. Race-day registration ($20) and packet pick-up will begin at 7 a.m. at the Greene Cove Yacht Club in Millsboro, PA. At the conclusion of the race, the top three male and female runners and walkers overall will receive awards, as well as the top three male and female runners and walkers in various age categories. Refreshments and a random drawing for prizes will also be held following the race. This year’s event marks the seventh annual 5K run/walk and 15K run held in honor of Army Spc. Gregory Cox of Carmichaels and Marine Lance Cpl. Steven Phillips of Spraggs. Both men were killed in Humvee accidents in Iraq; Cox, 21, died in September 2004, and Phillips, 27, died in February 2006. Race proceeds benefit memorial funds established in the men’s names. The Spc. Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship Fund assists Greene County high school graduates entering the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps or the fields of public safety or public service. The Lance Cpl. Steven Phillips Memorial Fund provides support for the computer-aided drafting program at the Greene County Career and Technology Center. Both funds are being handled by the Community Foundation of Greene County. Race proceeds also help fund the cost of transportation for Greene County veterans receiving treatment at the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System clinic in Pittsburgh. Last year’s Heroes Run/Walk raised approximately $15,000, and more than 300 individuals registered. Thanks to a partnership with Central Greene School District, more than 110 employees and family members registered for the race as runners, walkers or “sleep-ins,” - individuals who paid a registration fee but did not attend the race. The school district’s efforts raised more than $2,600. The Heroes Run/Walk is sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners and is coordinated by the Department of Recreation and the Cox and Phillips families. For more information, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us to download The start of Heroes Run Race on the Greene River Trail in 2012 a race entry form.

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he Greene County Conservation District is hosting a FREE Manure Management plan writing workshop in Waynesburg the evening of October 2, 2013. If you own any livestock that pasture at your place, or if you use any manure to fertilize your garden or fields, you need to read on. Any farm in Pennsylvania that applies manure to the land - whether you fork it on there, spread it with a machine, or let your livestock drop it directly in the pasture - is required by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to have a written manure management plan, regardless of size of the property or the operation. This is really nothing new; these types of requirements have been around for over 30 years, beginning with the passing of the Clean Water Act in 1972. Grazing systems, where livestock (cattle, horses, goats, swine, fowl etc.) graze on grass, in any size field, large or small, qualify as “land applied manure”. Most of these pastures will also have “Animal Concentration Areas” (ACAs) which is where animals congregate and release lots of manure . The importance of a written manure management plan becomes even more evident when you see these areas. The good news is, it’s nothing to fear, and it doesn’t cost anything. The Greene County Conservation District is sponsoring this, the 2nd FREE workshop, to help local farmers and livestock owners write a plan and come into compliance with these regulations. Most of the time, it is relatively simple and they will walk you through the process. Remember, this is not just for Dairy Farmers or beef cattle operations. You may have a horse or

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two that runs pasture at your place – this is for you. If your kids have a 4-H project with goats or sheep that are pastured and dropping manure on the land – this is for you. If you haul in horse manure from your neighbor’s place and spread it on your cornfield or vegetable garden – this is for you. Realistically, anytime you apply any manure to your ground, you need to have a management plan. “The DEP’s goal is not to go out policing people about this, what they really want to do is educate everyone about the impact of livestock on the land, and help people manage it properly,” said Laurel Rush, agricultural technician with Greene County Conservation District. It makes sense that if your impact is low – your management plan will be easy, too. If you have a lot of manure to deal with, all the more reason to have a good management plan. We’re here to help,” Laurel added. While farmers can prepare this plan themselves they will benefit from obtaining assistance from conservation district staff. Participants in the workshop will complete the workbook section of the manual which is approved as a standard plan format. While the workshop is free, REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. For more information or to register please call Laurel at 724-852-5278. Financial and other support for this project is provided by the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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” ! g n i p p i l C “Keep On

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Jefferson Morgan School District Receives $10,000 Grant Friends of Bowlby Library Fundraiser Highlight

Jefferson Morgan School District received a $10,000 grant from the PNC Foundation to help provide professional development for pre-K teachers and supply mini Ipads for use by their students. PNC provided the funding in support of Grow Up Great, its bilingual program in early childhood education. The grant will facilitate an on-going project to incorporate technology in the classroom to foster preK student learning. The new technology combined with professional development will allow the teachers to better nurture the students’ discovery in science, math, reading and other domains through engaging high-quality lessons using developmentally appropriate practices. “The Jefferson-Morgan School District is committed to maintaining high quality early childhood education programs,” said Kevin McCarty, Early Childhood Coordinator for the school district. “This generous grant from PNC will prepare teachers to use the latest technology in the classroom and provide students and parents with excellent learning experiences. We are truly excited about this endeavor.” The 2013-2014 school year will begin Jefferson-Morgan School District’s seventh year of serving PreK students. Through its partnership with Community Action Southwest, the school district has added a second Pre-K classroom and now serves approximately 60 percent of the district’s 4-year old population. Since 2007, the Jefferson-Morgan School District has received annual grants from the United Way of Westmoreland County School Readiness to promote meaningful transition activities for its students. “Extensive research indicates that the return on investment in high-quality early education initiatives is significant and long lasting - impacting our children and the health of our economy,” said Kristen Libertini, PNC Bank branch manager in Waynesburg. ““By preparing our youngest students for educational success, we help build a solid foundation for the future of this region.” The PNC Foundation, which receives its principal funding from The PNC Financial Services Group (www.pnc.com), actively supports organizations that provide services for the benefit of communities in which it has a significant presence. The foundation focuses its philanthropic mission on early childhood education and community and economic development, which includes the arts and culture. Through Grow Up Great, its signature cause that began in 2004, PNC has created a $350 million, multi-year initiative to help prepare children from birth to age 5 for success in school and life. For more information, please visit www.pncgrowupgreat.com, www.facebook.com/pncgrowupgreat and www.youtube.com/PNC or follow @PNCGrowUpGreat on Twitter.

Highlighting a successful 2013 fundraiser, Fran Hardy, President of The Friends of Bowlby Public Library, presented an Exxon gas card to Margaret Truntich, one of the 70+ folks who contributed to this year’s Friends Fundraiser. Mrs. Hardy pointed out that the 2013 effort had a great response, and more than expected help from Jacobs Petroleum. The Friends organization annually does a letter writing campaign to request funds to help with projects carried out by Eva K. Bowlby Public Library. To encourage contributors, Steve Stuck of Jacobs Petroleum donated an Exxon gas card and ten car wash vouchers to be awarded by random drawing to people who had made contributions to this year’s fundraiser. Mrs. Truntich was the winner of the gas card and ten other winners will drive a clean car thanks to Stuck’s Laser Wash. With the tightening of state budget funds, local entities like public libraries must rely heavily on contributions for the programs those libraries provide to their communities. Friends is an organization that helps with several such programs, especially those programs geared to children’s activities. In the last year, Friends’ donations have helped fund the Summer Reading Program, a As Margaret Truntich prepares to fill her gas tank, Fran Hardy, book give-away on Rain Day, staff professional President of The Friends of Bowlby Library, presents her with development geared to children’s services, and to the Exxon gas card donated by Jacobs Petroleum. several other worthwhile library projects. Mrs. Hardy pointed out that the Friends organization was very grateful to Mr. Stuck and to all of the community members who have contributed. She was also quick to point out that although the gas and car wash promos are done, Friends and Bowlby will always welcome contributions. FMI please contact Mrs. Hardy, The winners of the 2nd Annual Greene County United Way Golf Outing held at the Greene County any Friends member, or the staff at the Bowlby Library. Country Club were Greg Rohanna, President of Greene County United Way, David Mariner, Jim McDougal and Tony Negley. Thank You to all Sponsors and Partner Agencies who made our event a huge success. Give. Advocate. Volunteer. Live United.

Greene County United Way Announces Golf Outing Winners

Greene County United Way

Greene County United Way and FamilyWize Community Service Partnership, the nation’s leading provider of free prescription drug discount cards, along with 1,000 other local United Ways announced the milestone achievement of having helped more than 5 million people get medicine they otherwise would not have been able to afford. Locally, 582 people have been directly helped by this program. “Saving people money on necessary prescriptions is vital to the health and well-being of our families and our community,” said Barbara Wise, Executive Director of Greene County United Way. “Too often, not taking medicine you need because you can’t afford it, begins a series of consequences that could start with disease progression and end with large medical bills or even bankruptcy.” Since 2005, FamilyWize, United Ways and pharmacies around the country have helped people stay healthy and productive in more than 95 percent of all U.S. counties. The partnership has provided free prescription discount cards that help people get the medicine they need, accounting for more than $500 million in direct savings on prescriptions. “United Way is focusing on creating opportunity for all by improving Education, Income and Health” said Stacey Stewart, U.S. President of United Way Worldwide. “Our partnership with FamilyWize helps us advance that cause and 1,000 United Ways across America are helping people be healthier and more productive.” “We can provide these free prescription discount cards to local social service agencies, faith-based organizations, schools, community centers, local government and healthcare providers so everyone can get the medicine they need” Wise added.

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Art Blast on the Mon T

he 8th annual Art Blast on the Mon will again be staged on Labor Day weekend, Saturday, August 31 and Sunday, September 1 at Gazebo Park on Front Street in Greensboro, Pennsylvania. This event is championed by the Nathanael Greene Historical Foundation and is a celebration of music and art for all ages. Truly one of the more unique festivals in our area, visitors enjoy many interactive programs, demonstrations and entertainment that are not so common at other local fairs and festivals. Much of Art Blast is hands-on, for both children and adults, where you get to actually experience the fun and creativity of different art forms. At Art Blast, you don’t just watch the potter spinning the clay, you get to put your hands on and feel the joy of creating and sculpting yourself. Interactive artists that will be at this year’s festival include potter Jennifer Adamson who will be doing clay sculpting; Becky Keck who will be working with mosaic art; Linda Metzer and Marlaine Arnold, demonstrating certain forms of jewelry making, Kattaztsophe Arts will show you how to make sugar skulls, a popular Mexican folk art. Several other artists will be there with interactive demos on techniques in paper art, boat making, photography and other disciplines. A special guest to Art Blast on the Mon this year is the Andy Warhol Museum from Pittsburgh with educational programs that include print making and several other creative activities. Also new this year is a presentation by Kindermusik International, providers of early childhood music and movement programs for kids. Kindermusic is developmentally specific music for kids from newborn to seven years of age, considered the best vehicle to enhance early childhood learning. The musical entertainment is always tops at Art Blast on the Mon and this year’s line-up is spectacular. With headliner Ruby Red and the Dirty Devils, you will definitely be entertained. Ruby Red & the Dirty Devils is an electric blues band based in Washington, PA. The band takes a fresh approach to the blues by covering a wide variety of styles, complimented with R & B, jazz and original material. The stage show is impressive; don’t miss it from 3-5pm on Saturday. Also performing on Saturday are Amy Randolph, author, poet and performer of Americana folk music, beginning at 12:30pm; and Scott & Rosanna with some jazz and pop music sounds beginning at 1:30pm. Sunday’s music schedule includes cover artists Malay & Silent Bob at noon and the Vibrations Band with a variety of popular tunes for everyone to enjoy beginning at 2pm. Back by popular demand to Art Blast is Fuzzy Randolph, who will be lecturing on Greensboro Pottery, the unique stoneware that was manufactured from local red clay and thus had a very distinctive coloring; and a very important influence on Greensboro’s early history and economy. Fuzzy’s presentation will begin at 2:30 pm on Saturday only, at the Greenesboro fire hall. Something for which Art Blast on the Mon has become famous is “Everyone’s Art Show & Every Kid’s Art Show” where the public is invited to enter their own artistic creations to compete for prize money and awards in various categories and divisions. The show will be at Greensboro Firehall from noon to 4pm both days, with the awards ceremony on Saturday at 5pm. The Art Blast quilt show will be displayed at the Greens-

Art Blast on the Mon 2013 Schedule of Events Sat., Aug. 31 10 am – 5 pm Music: 12:30 - 1:15 pm - Amy Randolph (Americana/Folk) 1:30 - 2:30 pm - Scott and Rosanna ( Jazz/Pop) 3:00 - 5:00 pm - Ruby Red and the Dirty Devils (Blues/ Rock) Other activities: 10 am – 4:00 pm - Antique Quilt Show, Greensboro Baptist Church on Water Street 2:30 pm - Fuzzy Randolph lecture on Greensboro Pottery at Greensboro Fire Hall Sun., Sep. 1 Noon – 4:00 pm

Electric blues band Ruby Red & the Dirty Devils will perform at the 2013 Art Blast on the Mon in Greensboro.

boro Baptist Church on Water Street, both days from 10am – 4pm. You will also find a host of artisans and craft people with their wares on sale, and a variety of food vendors available all day, both days. There is no admission to the Art Blast on the Mon, all this fabulous entertainment and fun is completely FREE. That is possible only because of the generous support of sponsors. This year’s Silver sponsors include Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts, Community Bank, Zalar’s Busing and Ransom Drilling Services. Many other local businesses also contribute with sponsorship and donations, helping to enable Art Blast on the Mon to continue celebrating arts and music and enriching our culture for the people of southwestern PA and beyond.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013

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Music: Noon - 1:45 pm - Malay and Silent Bob (Variety) 2:00 - 4:00 pm – Vibrations (Variety)

All Day, Both Days:

Everyone’s Art Show/Every Kid’s Art Show Kinder Musik for ages newborn to 7 years Interactive Artist Demos (Clay, Mosaic, Paper, Photography & more) 27


in Downtown Waynesburg

S

eptember 14, 2013 Downtown Waynesburg welcomes back for the 12th year what has become one of the most popular car cruises in southwestern, Pennsylvania. The 50’s Fest & Car Cruise, presented by Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Inc. typically draws approximately 200 classic vehicles to downtown, including a wide assortment of hot rods, street rods, rat rods, and other classic cars, trucks and motorcycles. The festival also offers retro fun with dance contests, bubblegum blowing and Hula Hoop contests and oldies music broadcast live all day by WANB Radio’s “Greene County Greaser” (aka Doug Wilson); plentiful door prizes and unique shopping and specials from many downtown merchants and restaurants. The event is sponsored by several local merchants and businesses, making it a free event for spectators and participants. There are no admission fees or registration fees for the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in down town Waynesburg. Make your plans now to be there, or be square. Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful is a nonprofit, Main Street program that operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center. Funded by the state Department of Community and Economic Development, Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful represents a community endeavor to preserve and revitalize historic downtown Waynesburg and raise awareness of the educational, cultural and historical opportunities, as well as the convenience of shopping, associated with the town.

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013


THE CARMICHAELS FAIR I

f you can’t get enough of the carnival/sideshow madness that has brought our county to life in the last several weeks, then this is the article for you! Going way back to the eighteen hundreds is the now gone but never forgotten-grand ol’ Carmichaels Fair. Those of us that are acquainted with county fairs running for almost a week, presently, would be surprised to know that the Carmichaels Fair lasted for only two days. Perhaps this was because in the midst of the harvest season, families of that day could not waste much time with the trivial, yet exciting events that took place. Speaking of exciting events, for the ladies it would have been “Best Fancy Quilt made within two years.” First place for that would have given you $2.00 dollars. But hey now, don’t scoff… two dollars in the eighteen hundreds would be about $48 dollars today! And gents, how about that well-groomed stallion you spent most of your waking hours on? If you entered him into the contest and took first place, you could expect a check for a whopping $6.00 dollars. Again, don’t laugh… that would be about $144 dollars today! So feed that stallion well! Officers of the Carmichaels Fair were emphatic that they were promoting a business enterprise and it should be run efficiently, but wanted to keep it exciting as well. They wanted to give you something that would keep your mouth watering with anticipation for the fair to return each year. One of the most exciting events was the Horse Races… not only was this fun for the whole family, especially the kids, but gave the owners a great way to show off the pride of their livestock. The County Trot, as they called it, was only for

FOUNDED IN 1852

horses that had never beaten a three and a half-minute mile. First place was a hefty $8.00 dollars, but not as hefty as day two, where the race was open to all. First place for that event was $15.00 dollars… roughly $359.00 dollars today! Who needed to harvest crops when you could just win that race? In 1905, thousands of people gathered to hear a 32-piece Indian Band from Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The 7,000 in attendance were astonished by the performance and talked about it for years to come. The promoters of that time said the fair was easy to get to, “only three miles from Pennsylvania Gates’ Station, and Steamboat Landing Port Freemont.” This easy access caused spectators to travel from far and wide. I’ve been told it was where Wana B Park is today. By 1920 the Fair had taken to the sky also, as an airplane owned by a Pittsburgh aviator gave rides to excited patrons who had come to see the beginning of a new age. This, accompanied by the new concrete road from Jefferson to Dry Tavern, must have made the people feel that they had time traveled from a bygone era. According to some research by the Kerr Family, a letter once was read publicly at the fair; a letter written by a civil war soldier during the fair to his wife back hoeme. Thomas Lucas wrote to his wife, Letty Jane Kerr Lucas, on October 19, 1862: “I suppose the ‘fair’ is over now and you are well satisfied with the performance. I hope you had a good ‘fair’ and a good time generally. I should have liked very well to have been there, but ‘Uncle Sam’ seemed to think that he couldn’t spare me just now.”

J

oyce Fortney of Carmichaels shares these news clippings of local folks enjoying the 1929 “Greene County Fair” at Carmichaels. We’re assuming it’s the same event written about below. “The clipping was given to me by an old friend of my mom’s, Amy Gideon, who is also pictured in the spread,” Joyce told us. The “spread” was all one page, but had been cut apart in order to make copies, so we’re not sure how the original was laid out, but we’ve included every picture. She was well informed on everyone whose picture appeared. We have captioned them according the the info Joyce shared with us. “My mother appears to be about 7 or 8 in the picture, so I knew it was close to 1928 or 29 when it was taken,” Joyce said. We discovered a copyright date on one of the comic strips on the back of the newspaper clipping (1929), but we never found anything identifying the name of the paper. Thank you very much to Joyce Fortney for sharing this interesting “Fair Scene” of the Past.

Bob Flenniken & Tom Patterson

The Harness Races!

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013

• GreeneSaver

Amy (Kerr) Gideon and Mrs. Harold Kline carving a pumpkin

Betty (Barclay) Ellenberger, Lucille (Barclay) Butler, Hester (Hickman) Porter

Dorothy (Fuller) Kerr feeds her Jersey calf

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013


Outstanding Fair Ambassadors Two Greene County citizens were recognized for outstanding leadership, volunteerism and dedication to our local fairs and named 2013 Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture Outstanding Fair Ambassadors At the Jacktown Fair Barron “Boots” L. Hetherington, the department’s special advisor to the Governor and PA Fair Fund administrator presented the Outstanding Fair Ambassador award to Charles “Bud” Behm of Wind Ridge, member of the Richhill Agricultural Society board of directors and life-long Jacktown Fair supporter and volunteer. Bud also received citations from PA Rep. Pam Snyder and Senator Tim Solobay, recognizing his lifetime of dedication to the fair and community. At the Greene County Fair, Mr. Hetherington presented the certificate signed by Agriculture Secretary George D. Greig, to Jeanette Trader of Prosperity, acknowledging her outstanding leadership, volunteerism and dedication to the Greene County Fair, for which she serves as general superintendent of the Home & Garden departments. “We’re extremely proud of Jeanette and appreciate her years of service to the fair,” said Commissioner Chuck Morris, chair of the Board of Commissioners.

During opening ceremonies at the Jacktown Fair, Charles “Bud” Behm receives recognition for outstanding service to the Jacktown Fair and his community. Pictured (l to R): Barron “Boots” Hetherington, Senator Tim Solobay, Behm, Rep. Pam Snyder.

Jeanette Trader receives certificate of recognition as Outstanding Fair Ambassador from Barron “Boots” Hetherington at the Greene County Fair.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013

• GreeneSaver

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2013

Aug sep greenesaver 13  

This edition features the King Coal Schedule, a chance to win Steelers Tickets and Waynesburg University and local high school football sche...

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