__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

2019

1

PLUS Dovercourt’s Activity Guide

RT.ORG DOVERCOU

Summer

E AWAITS ER ADVENTUR YOUR SUMM

URT DOVERCO

3

7 9

Jeff Leiper

N CENTRE RT RECREATIO DOVERCOU

Inside

SWIM • FITNESS •

ON NUE, OTTAWA OURT AVE 411 DOVERC OURT.ORG 0 • DOVERC 613-798-895

®

HIGH FIVE Accredited

charity no. 11944 Registered

1

City Councillor conseiller municipal

TY GU ID E ER AC TI VI ET E SU M M T’ S CO M PL SPORTS • ARTS • MUSIC

PROGRAMS SUMMER 2019

FIND it here.

UR DOVE RC O

1 4263 rr000

613-580-2485 kitchissippiward.ca

June 2019

kitchissippi.com

@kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

kitchissippitimes

100% LOCAL

Wellington Village is 100 years old this year. Dave Allston’s latest Early Days column starts on page 12.

It’s 1855 Carling Ave.

Y R R E B

! n o s a Se

They’re small, but they pack quite the punch of flavour. Whether you eat them fresh, make them into jam, bake pies and crumbles, or freeze them for later, nothing beats the taste of fresh local berries.

Visit our Carling location for berries that are fresher than fresh!


June 2019 • 2

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

PHOTO BY TED SIMPSON

EDITOR’S LETTER

June reflections This year marks the 100th anniverary of the founding of Wellington Village and a few items in this month’s issue fit the theme, including Early Days and Who Lives Here. We’ve also profiled a few area shops and services in our latest business roundup. This is the time of year when our community calendar is bursting with local events both big and small. We receive a lot of requests and we try and squeeze as many of them into that back page as possible! Don’t forget that the web version of the calendar (kitchissippi.com/events) is almost always bigger than what we’re able to share in the printed edition. We also add events as we get them. So don’t forget to bookmark it! Speaking of events, Westfest is coming up fast! See our handy list on page 19 for some ideas if you’d like to maximize your enjoyment when you visit. This annual community festival is a staple of the Ottawa festival circuit and every June we can count on discovering some new music at this popular event. There’s a lot to love about this little festival that grew. Elaina Martin, who I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know over the past dozen years, challenges and

inspires many people in our community, myself included. She pours her heart and soul into an event that is diverse and interesting in so many ways. Her passion for the arts is one of her best qualities and I’ve always admired how she raises people up around her, whether it’s volunteers, artists, or musicians. When she discovers a new voice, she leads them to the stage. I can’t imagine how many performers she’s embraced and encouraged. She’s a real community builder and I thank her for keeping Westfest free and for making it a safe and accessible place for everyone. Many of us are busy fixing up our yards and gardens. KT readers will enjoy Judith van Berkom’s article about Berit Erickson’s “Corner Pollinator Garden”. I had the pleasure of meeting Berit at Churchill Alternative’s annual plant sale recently and I admire her dedication to the cause. For the past two years she’s been educating herself about pollinator plants and finding ways to attract bees, butterflies, and birds. What’s more, she keeps a stack of brochures at her garden to help spread the word. Find the article on page 16. And speaking of gardening, Charlie Senack brings us the story of Connaught Public School’s outdoor garden initiative. You can find that online at kitchissippi.com. Of course, this means all that summer is just around the corner! Don’t miss our annual Summer Guide for expert tips and great product recommendations. It starts on page 25. Happy spring,

We received this email from the winner of the passes for the Ottawa Children’s Festival and we wanted to share it here: “I just wanted to send you a photo taken while at the Ottawa Children’s Festival on Saturday. My son Evan and I (we’re on the right side in the photo) brought along our good friends Lisa Norman and her son Ben with us and we saw an amazing show, Les Parfaits Inconnus. We also spent several hours taking in all the on-site activities. Thank you so much for the tickets – it was a real treat for all of us! Cheers, Jenn We are so glad you all had a great time Jenn! Did you know that KT email newsletter subscribers are automatically entered to win great prizes from local businesses? It’s our way of saying thank you for reading. Sign up at kitchissippi.com.


SHOP LOCAL Fashion, fresh pasta, bike repair, sweet treats, and more Check out some new businesses in Kitchissippi, say goodbye to some favourites

Barlian Roshan, who runs Saaj and Sanaa with her husband Delasah, says she was frustrated by a lack of dress options. Her new shop is located at 1107 Wellington St. W. Photo by Andrea Tomkins undertake repairs big and small for your bike or sell you a new one. They’ve been in Ottawa since 1992 and are relocating from the Glebe. Just up the road at 7 Hamilton Ave. N. is bike store and repair shop Full Cycle. This is their second location, adding to the one at St. Laurent Blvd. Continued on page 24

monkeyjoesottawa.com

3 • June 2019

Bar and Grill

KitchissippiTimes

1265 Carling Ave. (Westgate Shopping Centre) 613-725-2992 contact@monkeyjoesbarandgrill.ca

kitchissippitimes

will now also feature a deli section with sandwiches and Italian cheeses. Tony expects a mid-June opening and adds that he’s already been pleased with the interest shown by neighbours walking by. For anyone who needs to upgrade their bike, a couple of new locations may be of interest: McCranks Cycles and Skis, at 1b McCormick St. in Hintonburg, can

@Kitchissippi

April at 1107 Wellington St. W., stocked up with products from Europe and the Middle East, and decorated the interior with Barlian’s own artwork. She says that since opening, their selection has been finding favour among Muslim and nonMuslim women. Rental options are also available for many products. And if you need to pick up dinner after dress shopping, plan on stopping by the Home of Fresh Pasta. The local Italian grocery store has been on Preston Street for thirty-five years but is relocating to Hintonburg, at 1063 Wellington St. W. Owner Tony Zagaria boasts that the shop carries Ottawa’s largest selection of pastas and sauces — and the selection is to expand at the new location. Besides their already-famous products like pizza dough and stuffed focaccia, the store

kitchissippi.com

T

here’s no reason for Kitchissippi residents to be bored this summer. Plenty of exciting new businesses have moved onto the local main drag, from fashion and food to cannabis and cycling. Saaj and Sanaa is perhaps one of the most unique new clothing boutiques in Ottawa, specializing in modest women’s formal wear. Barlian Roshan, who runs the store with her husband Delasah, says that as a Muslim woman she was frustrated by her lack of dress options for fancier events. “I always found that I had a really difficult time being able to find dresses that I’d be able to wear, because I wear a headscarf…everything I found was strapless, or it was really really short,” Barlian explains. Barlian and Delasah opened up their boutique in


LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY Hampton Park: The next 100 years Raising awareness of the issues affecting one of Kitchissippi’s best-loved greenspaces SUBMITTED BY SHARON BODDY

June 2019 • 4

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

S

ince 1927, when the National Capital Commission’s predecessor bought the land, Hampton Park has been Kitchissippi’s backyard. It’s the place where many of us have played, exercised, walked the dog, daydreamed, picnicked, or flown kites. Some of the same trees that were there 50, 100 or even 200 years ago are still there today. But Hampton Park is in trouble. In 2015 the NCC removed about 400 trees and replanted at least half of what was lost with other species like burr oak, yellow birch, and eastern white pine, to name a few. The trees removed were mostly white ash, devastated by the emerald ash borer, an invasive insect. White ash is now a critically endangered species. Since then, more mature trees have been lost or damaged by extreme storms, and more are at risk. In some areas, native grape vines have already smothered dozens of small trees, depriving them of sunlight; some newly planted trees are in their path. Japanese knotweed, a non-native, invasive species is also moving into areas where trees once stood and shading out smaller native species. Population increases are also putting the pressure on. Between 1996 and 2016, Kitchissippi’s population increased by only about 2,000 people. Between 2016 and 2018, however, the ward’s population jumped from 38,640 to almost 45,000. Planned developments, like Westgate, will further increase foot, bike and dog traffic, and risk more damage to tree roots, soil compaction, and dead and damaged vegetation. CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSE Public parks and urban forests are important in adapting to and responding to climate

change impacts, like extreme storms and temperatures, and excessive flooding. Urban forests help cool the city. Step into the Hampton Park woods on a hot summer day and it’ll be a few degrees cooler. Trees absorb millions of litres of stormwater every year, lessening the impacts from local flooding. One mature sugar maple, for example, can absorb more than 20,000 litres of water every year. Trees and vegetation remove pollutants like excess carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter from the air; promote biodiversity; and provide food and habitat for local and migratory wildlife. Public parks and forests are also good for us. Study after study shows that having access to greenspaces make us healthier. Hampton Park has environmental protection but few people are aware of it. In 2005, the City of Ottawa published its list of Urban Natural Areas. As a protected zone, certain activities are prohibited in Hampton Park (UNA 122). Other than signage about on- and off-leash dog areas, however, park users don’t know what activities are and are not permitted and why. TAKING ACTION A small group of neighbours and local groups recently met with representatives from the NCC and the City to see what can be done to conserve Hampton Park for the next 100 years. The NCC is the majority landowner; the City is responsible for maintenance (recreational facilities, garbage, mowing, etc.). We discussed issues affecting the park and woods, the possibility of installing educational signage to protect key areas, and the resources available to help us plant more trees and other native species, and keep invasive species under control. As a result of the meeting, a request for recycling bins has already been made.

KITCHISSIPPI TIMES

250 City Centre Ave., Suite 500 Ottawa ON K1R 6K7 www.kitchissippi.com Kitchissippi, meaning “the Grand River,” is the former Algonquin name for the Ottawa River. The name now identifies the urban community to the west of downtown Ottawa. EDITOR/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Andrea Tomkins editor@kitchissippi.com twitter.com/kitchissippi CONTRIBUTORS Dave Allston, Judith van Berkom, Ellen Bond, Bella Crysler, Jacob Hoytema, Hollie Grace James, Paula Roy, Jeremy Soule PROOFREADER Anne Boys-Hope ADVERTISING SALES Eric Dupuis 613-238-1818 x273 eric@kitchissippi.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tanya Connolly-Holmes creative@greatriver.ca GRAPHIC DESIGNER Celine Paquette celine@greatriver.ca FINANCE Jackie Whalen 613-238-1818 x250 jackie@greatriver.ca All other enquiries 613-238-1818 info@kitchissippi.com

(L-R): Eileen Hunt, Hampton-Iona Community Group; Christine Earnshaw, Tree Fest Ottawa; Linda Landry, Friends of Carlington Hill; Sharon Boddy, resident. (Not pictured, Laura Stone of Tree Fest). PHOTO BY ANDREA TOMKINS

We’ve made an excellent start but need help to raise awareness of the issues affecting Hampton Park – and by extension all greenspaces – so that we can ensure that the park remains an important public resource for the next 100 years. If you’re concerned about the changes you’ve seen and want to get involved, please send an email to Friends of Hampton Park, c/o Sharon Boddy at urbanweedeater@ gmail.com. Sharon Boddy is an environmental writer and researcher, and 50+ year resident of Kitchissippi.

Distribution A minimum of 15,000 copies are distributed from the Ottawa River to Carling Avenue between the O-Train tracks and Sherbourne Road. Most residents in this area will receive the Kitchissippi Times directly to their door. If you did not receive your copy, or would like additional copies, please contact us. Bulk copies are delivered to multi-unit dwellings and retail locations. Copies are available at Dovercourt Recreation Centre and Hintonburg Community Centre. distribution@kitchissippi.com 613-238-1818 The Kitchissippi Times is published by

PUBLISHER Mark Sutcliffe PRESIDENT Michael Curran The next issue of your Kitchissippi Times: July 1 Advertising deadline: Reserve by June 19


NEWS FROM NEPEAN HS

Building a healthy, active and engaged community through recreation

411 DOVERCOURT AVE., OTTAWA ON

Goodbye for now

REGISTER NOW FOR SUMMER PROGRAMS Sports, Music, Arts, and the Summer Specialty Fitness Pass SUMMER CAMPS We have tons of variety and options for every age.

BY BELLA CRYSLER

F

Bella Crysler was KT’s Nepean High School correspondent. You can read her body of work for the 2018-2019 school year at kitchissippi.com.

NEED AFTER SCHOOL CARE? Register now for our extended day recreation after school program for 2019-2020. • RBC Bluesfest DJ • Musical theatre • RBC Bluesfest & Cityfolk Rock University • Singing • Stage, Sound & Tech

• What’s in a song

PRIVATE & GROUP LESSONS

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Bella Crysler is a grade 12 student at Nepean High School.

www.bsoma.ca

5 • June 2019

450 CHURCHILL AVE. N OTTAWA 613.627.2762

KitchissippiTimes

• Cityfolk Ukulele Band

kitchissippitimes

While June marks the end of my four years at Nepean, and my very last article for the Kitchissippi Times, it is also a time for new beginnings! The day after prom I’ll be leaving for Temagami, Ontario to spend the summer working as a camp counsellor at Camp Wabikon. After that, I’m off to Kingston, Ontario in September to start my first year at Queen’s University! I’ll be starting an undergraduate degree in general arts, and while I haven’t decided on a major yet, I can’t wait to start taking classes and figuring out what it will be. I also plan on continuing to write creatively and hope to join clubs (maybe even a student newspaper?) to keep writing. Having the opportunity to write for my local newspaper has been one of the highlights of my senior year. I want to say a big thank you to everyone who read my articles or let me interview them. I had so much fun!

@Kitchissippi

opportunity to write for my local newspaper has been one of the highlights of my senior year.”

SUMMER SWIM LESSONS Convenient options: one week long or once a week

kitchissippi.com

”Having the

613.798.8950

SUMMER’S ALMOST HERE…

Our student correspondent’s final column rom sleep-outs and walkouts to book clubs and book launches, I’ve had the opportunity to cover some amazing stories at Nepean High School this year. I was lucky enough to get the chance to interview extraordinary students, teachers, and even two principals as a Kitchissippi Times volunteer. I know this is the worst cliché in the book, but it feels like just yesterday I was sitting down to write my first article… how did September turn into June so quickly? The month ahead holds the end of the school year and final exams for NHS students. June also means graduation and prom for my fellow seniors! For Nepean’s grads of 2019, the countdown is on for the official end of high school. A fact that is relieving, terrifying and exciting all at the same time.

dovercourt.org


HUMANS OF KITCHISSIPPI

sponsored by

613-820-5040 Woodroffe/Richmond

Humans of Kitchissippi is a special street photography project designed to introduce readers to some of the people who live, work, and play in Kitchissippi. Each instalment of HOK contains three elements: a photo, a name, and a quote from the subject that reveals a little bit about who they are. Go to kitchissippi.com to view our ongoing collection of humans.

June 2019 • 6

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

Meet Kristina Reis Beaton

SPECIALIZED IN GREEK CUISINE

“Apples, that was my street name. I was homeless and all the kids had street names, it was kinda like being in the book Holes, when they all got names. I said I wasn’t going to pick my name, I was going to wait until someone gave it to me, because I wanted it to be like that book. One of the kids said ‘Hey you eat a lot of apples’, I’m going to name you Apples, and that is going to be your street name. “I was born in Prince Edward Island, in O’Leary before they stopped delivering babies there. I loved PEI. I think about it everyday. The fields and the hills and the lupins, the big colourful flowers that line the ditches for a couple of weeks every summer. I used to play in the woods a lot. I’d roleplay I was in a story in the forest. That’s where I came up with my first characters, was when I was in PEI. I looked out the window and I saw all these people walking by out in the field, in front of our building, and I thought oh they all have a story, and ever since then I wanted to be a writer. That morning I came up with a character, I guess he was my imaginary friend, and I write about him to this day. That moment changed the way I think, and process everything around me. It’s like having a movie in my head all the time and see these people, these characters and they seem so real. Anytime there is conflict, I feel bad for them. I feel like I can’t make them up, they have to find me. It feels almost divine. I just finished writing a 200,000 word draft, and I’m currently reading books on how to edit it. Writing the draft is the easy part, editing is a whole different thing. I want to write a series, and then I want to make it into a movie. I took animation at school, just so I can make my books into movies. I’m such a weirdo, but it makes me happy. I think about writing all of the time. It’s all inspired by PEI, the fields and the forests where I played as a kid. The flowers and the smell of the salt in

the air. I go and visit as often as I can. I can never afford it, but last summer I saved up and went. Every time I go it’s just magical. It feels like I’m in a fairy tale when I go there. I like to go into the woods, early in the morning when the mist is coming up and just get lost in the trees. “I came to visit Ottawa, became homeless, but still had my dream to make my books into movies. So I took the opportunity to start my life from scratch, I went back to school, and now I work for Disney and now I know how to animate my own characters, and that to me is a dream come true.” Collected by Ellen Bond


FOOD & DRINK Made-in-Westboro granola hits local shelves

Nourishing families and raising funds for Ottawa charity PHOTO AND STORY BY PAULA ROY

T

repertoire to keep my very active family fuelled.” Little did she know that one day she’d be selling it under the Westboro Granola Co. label. Having previously co-owned a bookstore called The Sports Page, Pam also worked as a primary school teacher prior to staying home to raise her family. She wasn’t looking for a new career, but several months ago her middle son – while eating

a bowl of granola – told her that since she loved making granola so much, she should start a business. “It really struck me as a great idea that I couldn’t believe I hadn’t thought of before, and his suggestion came at the perfect time. That too was serendipitous,” she says. In just two months, Westboro Granola Co. was up and running, with Pam’s recipe being handcrafted in multiple batches

SPONSORED CONTENT

advantage of this valuable program if you plan on hosting a pool party this summer! The single most important way to keep everyone safe is to ensure that everyone is supervised in and around water. If you know the risks, you can establish water rules so everyone can stay safe and have fun.

7 • June 2019

411 DOVERCOURT AVE. dovercourt.org 613.798.8950

KitchissippiTimes

Thankfully, every drowning death is preventable with water safety knowledge and common sense. • Learn to swim • Always swim with a buddy • Children and non-swimmers should always be supervised around water • Wear a lifejacket whenever you are in a boat • Alcohol and water don’t mix: don’t drink and swim, don’t drink and drive a boat

While many adults may not feel the need to freshen up their swim abilities, baby boomers are the fastest growing group of drownings. Regardless of how well you swam as a child, your ability diminishes with age or reduced practice. Dovercourt’s swim lessons are for all ages and stages, from infants to adults. Adults sometimes take unnecessary risks, overestimate their abilities, or use alcohol while boating or near water. At Dovercourt, adults can update their water safety skills by signing up for registered, private or drop in swim lessons. In addition to their swim lessons, Dovercourt provides lifeguards in all of their programs that are near or in water, including in their summer camps, SUP, rafting, lifeguarding and sailing programs. They also offer a “rent a lifeguard or instructor” program, where people can hire one of their highly trained staff to teach or guard at a pool – take

kitchissippitimes

High water levels in and around Ottawa this spring mean water safety is on everyone’s minds. At Dovercourt, teaching water safety is as important as teaching the technical skills of swimming. Each year, more than 150 people drown in Ontario, and drowning is the second leading cause of accidental death for children under five years old. Statistics also show that children under 12, boaters, young men, and seniors are at greatest risk of drowning. Many people don’t even know what drowning looks like. Drowning is fast and silent; there’s no splashing and no screaming.

@Kitchissippi

Water Safety Education at Dovercourt

kitchissippi.com

hey say necessity is the mother of invention. In Pam Midgley’s case, it may have taken a generous helping of serendipity as well. As she and her husband were raising three sons – now all in their 20s – this Westboro mom found herself making a lot of granola. “Granola was an essential part of my culinary

every week, using a lengthy process that involves a lot of stirring and rotating of trays. She readily admits that hers is the kind of granola that those who appreciate quality would make for themselves, but notes that because it is a time-consuming process, not everyone does it. “My goal was to have a ratio that was just right; I wanted just 50% rolled oats plus 50% other good stuff including coconut, pecans, dried cranberries, pumpkin seeds and more, with only pure Canadian maple syrup as a sweetener,” she explains. “I make it the way I love it because I wouldn’t want to offer anything less to others. So many times, I have eaten this granola, and thought to myself, this is great granola, which is why that phrase is on the label.” Continued on page 18


HOMES & FAMILY

June 2019 • 8

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

The “house on the hill” was built between 1920-1921. For more photos, see the web version of this article at kitchissippi.com. PHOTO BY ANDREA TOMKINS

Who lives here: The house on the hill Who would build a house on a hill, and why? BY DAVE ALLSTON

W

ellington Village is an ideal neighbourhood to raise a young family, and the ever-increasing number of children in the area is a sign this little community has come full circle. The 1919 auction was chiefly aimed at young families who were encouraged to stop renting and instead build their own dream home; a strategy that worked when a neighbourhood of young families was created overnight. I have always been amazed at the way a house can tie multiple generations together. So many important moments in one’s life occur here. Some people pick up an antique or old artifact and instantly wonder about the history of that object

– who might have owned it, what was happening in their lives as they used it. It creates a connection to another era, or person. Now multiply that by a thousand when it’s a house that is creating that powerful connection, a home with its features and quirks that was lived in, even built, by a family many generations prior. It’s impossible to not feel the spirit of those former residents within the walls of the home. Alison Zinni and Eric Lussier visited Wellington Village ten years ago while hunting for their first home and fell in love with a particular house. Hearing their story of finding 144 Byron Ave., one gets the sense it was more than just a “good deal” that led Alison and Eric to purchasing the house. It was something

more transcendent. After first viewing the house they actually crossed it off their list. “I remember distinctly, we had really liked it, but it was a little over our budget, and a little out of the neighbourhood we wanted, so we decided not to go for it. Then we were at a friend’s cottage, floating in the lake, looking up, and we realized it really had an impact on us, and we decided we would go for it,” Alison says. Harry and Laura Schroeter were the first occupants of the home, and the parallels to Alison and Eric are evident. The couple had specifically selected the unique lot halfway up the hill (a hill so steep that in 1899 the Ottawa Electric Railway Company had no choice but to blast through in order to run their streetcars to Britannia), on which to

construct their first home. Harry, a 30-year old professional homebuilder constructed the home (nicknamed “House on the Hill”) between 1920-1921, for his growing family. Eric surmises that the hill appealed to Schroeter because of the unique options it created. A significant grade difference between the two sides of the house allowed for walk-out access from the basement to the laneway – a handy entrance for a busy homebuilder who likely stored materials, visited with clients, and did late-night work in his basement office. (Schroeter notably helped establish Wellington Village’s first community association, the Elmdale Municipal Association, in 1922 and was its first president.) The Schroeter family lived in the house for over 80 years, with one other family


sponsored by

SPONSORED CONTENT

Make the Best Investment: Real Estate Strategies in a Sellers’ Market at the rear of the original house, it brings you upstairs where creative space usage previously saw the toilet and bathtub each in their own separate rooms. Alison and Eric have created their own unique touches, with a skylight over the landing at the top of the stairs, and two cute and spacious bedrooms for their two growing kids. At the rear, an impressive master bedroom with ensuite has been added to provide comfortable space and even more light. The basement is one of Eric’s favourite areas of the home. Though unfinished, there are a series of nooks each with their own role in family life. A vintage workbench is prominent in one corner, and Eric created another space with a platform for early morning playtime with the little guys. Continued on page 10

Mother Nature may have been late this spring, but Ottawa’s real estate market was not— the historically busier spring real estate market arrived early. With less inventory available than in previous years, 2019 is proving to be a sellers’ market, the strongest in the past decade. A sellers’ market can be a stressful time for home buyers. Below are some tips to keep you organized and stress free. 1. Decide to work with a Realtor. Pick someone who you trust and who will educate you about the market and the strategies necessary for a successful purchase. 2. Timing is important. When a property is listed, do not wait for the open house to view it. Call your Realtor and book an appointment to see it immediately so that you can do your research. If you feel you do not want to waste your Realtor’s time, stop feeling that way; it is their job. They will be more than happy to show you properties any time.

3. Book your showings with the Realtor who will prepare an offer for you. If you are only calling a home’s listing Realtor because you think that the seller will pay less commission if the listing Realtor represents the buyer, think again. In a competitive market, when there often is more than one offer presented at the same time, it is to the sellers’ benefit to waive any advantage their Realtor may have offered should they bring their own buyer. You will have more of an advantage when represented by the Realtor you’ve been working with to view properties from the start. Ottawa is a terrific place to invest in real estate. It consistently improves. Owning the home you live in is one of the best investments you will ever make, so contact an experienced Realtor to ensure you are making the best investment possible.

info@cherrypickhomes.com 613-422-8688 – cherrypickhomes.com

kitchissippi.com

calling it home before Eric and Alison. There was much work to be done to improve the home but the couple has been careful and respectful in ensuring it was modernized, and even expanded, without sacrificing the features that give it its character and charm. And in this way, they have succeeded. What is most striking when you first enter the home are the original dark wood trim finishes and large panelled windows, which create a bright and open living space. The front portion of the interior looks practically the same as I imagine it would have in 1920, but the new large plank flooring creates a seamless transition to a new rear addition, which adds even more light and family space. A winding staircase, all original, is where a visitor really feels transported to the 1920s. Located somewhat unusually

By Deb Cherry, Broker with Engel & Völkers Ottawa

@Kitchissippi kitchissippitimes

Contact us to learn about the Engel & Völkers advantage.

KitchissippiTimes

9 • June 2019

©2019 Engel & Völkers Ottawa Central, Brokerage. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. John King & Deb Cherry, Brokers.


PRIVATE SALE CONDO “The Continental” @ Cleary avenue

Beautifully appointed condo, 1 large bedroom, 1 bathroom, Large Den/Guestroom off living room with French Doors, LRT coming soon at door step. Asking: $489.900 For more information: 613-422-5582

HOMES & FAMILY WHO LIVES HERE? Which

Kitchissippi-area homes are you most curious about? It could be an old home, a new one, a big one, or a small one. Send an email to editor@kitchissippi. com and we’ll make some inquiries.

L.A. SICOLI MASONRY & RESTORATION

June 2019 • 10

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

★Chimney Repairs ★Repointing ★Flagstone

★Window sills ★Parging ★Cultured Stone

★Custom StoneWork ★Interlocking Stone ★Stone Foundation Wall Repairs

FREE Estimates Luciano Sicoli, Company Owner • 613-859-4684

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The house on a hill Continued from page 9 “I love that the basement is rough. I can go make a mess, drill into the ceiling. You need a little space like that,” beams Eric. Alterations to the backyard have been beautifully executed, a far cry from the “jungle” the couple faced when they first moved in. A treehouse for the kids is the newest addition. The location on the hill presents a few challenges, notably a lost ball in the street can end up down at Clarendon, and the car has slid onto the neighbour’s lawn during a flash freeze. The couple jokes about being entertained while watching out the front window from their breakfast table at cars attempting to navigate the difficult Granville turn on an icy morning.

”Renovations Join Us!

Wednesday, June 19, 2019 Registration | 5 p.m. Event | 5:30 p.m. 18 Eccles St. Ottawa Chinese Alliance Church

have yielded a collection of historic finds...”

Alison highlights the front porch, sharing memories of occasionally loud parties during their first few years in the home pre-children, which transitioned to memorable hours bonding with baby and taking in the vibes of Wellington Village. A short house history left behind years ago by the Schroeter family also spoke in detail of enjoying the verandah “watching the world go by” and “teenage years spent consuming books from the living room library” and “five grandchildren being rocked to sleep in the rocking chair” – more parallels between past and present. 2019 is an anniversary year for the neighbourhood, but also for Alison and Eric. They met in 1999 during university,

Alison Zinni and Eric Lussier with their sons Oscar and Jack. PHOTO BY ANDREA TOMKINS

and after finishing school, a relocation to Ottawa and three years in Spain, they purchased 144 Byron Ave. in 2009. They married in 2011 (“two weeks and nine months before Oscar was born,” jokes Eric) and have been lovingly updating the home ever since. Renovations have yielded a collection of historic finds from inside the walls, including old newspapers, toys, packaging, a dish, even a few photos from long ago. Oscar and Jack excitedly shared the discoveries with me. It is history coming alive in a tactile way, in a home awash with stories. Alison and Eric have made some significant modifications, yet have successfully balanced vintage and modern. I think Mr. Schroeter would be proud of the “House on the Hill,” a dream from 100 years ago that lives on for a wonderful family in 2019.


GIVING

sponsored by

CATHERINE

/McK

MCKENNA

@Cat

CMcK

Member of Parliament, Ottawa Centre

Five things about CHNA volunteer Keith Hobbs STORY AND PHOTO BY ANDREA TOMKINS

B

ack in May, Keith Hobbs was presented with a “Volunteer of the Year Award” by the Civic Hospital Neighbourhood Association (CHNA). He’s known to many in his own neighbourhood but we are presenting five things that stood out during a recent conversation with KT.

4) Before he was a volunteer he worked in various communication roles in the Public Service. Keith jokingly “blames” his drive to volunteer on his mother’s “preachy teachy side of the family.” He first moved to the area in 1973, the year of a public meeting about the Ottawa Near West Neighbourhood Study. “I thought it would be interesting to see what’s happening and meet the neighbours.” (A common refrain for anyone who volunteers with a community association!) The CHNA grew

out of that, although it was originally known as the Homeowners Association. He’s been president, a board member, and a “backroom player” ever since. In the early days of the association, a lot of time was spent going door-to-door, informing neighbours of the issues of the day. Some of the hot topics he’s dealt with include traffic, development, and local parks. 5) Keith agrees the social benefits of volunteering can’t be understated. “For a shy quiet guy who doesn’t really like to speak, I really like to be with

people,” says Keith. He jokes that the cookies that are served at the meetings are the main reason for his continued service, but we know it’s really because he’s deeply invested in his community. “I think some things could and should be different, and I want to see how change can come about.” Is there a non-profit group or volunteer that you think we should feature in KT? Do you know someone who is making our community a better place? Let us know! Send your suggestions to editor@kitchissippi.com.

kitchissippitimes

3) He’s modest to a fault. Keith says there are many neighbours who are more deserving of the CHNA honor.

Keith Hobbs sat down with KT for coffee and a cookie at Blumenstudio.

@Kitchissippi

2) Longevity runs in his family. Keith’s mother is 93, and last year she drove from the farm to the Good Companions Centre to deliver a church service.

kitchissippi.com

1) His local roots are deep ones. Keith was born at the Grace Hospital, “… and with any luck, the Grace Manor will make bookends of my life,” he jokes. He has a few bricks when the hospital was closed and torn down in 1999 to make way for the Salvation Army Grace, a licensed long-term care facility. His grandmother was born in Hintonburg and his grandparents were married at the Nepean Town Hall (now known as the Churchill Seniors Recreation Centre).

KitchissippiTimes

11 • June 2019


EARLY DAYS Celebrating 100 years of Wellington Village There might be some confusion about where it begins and ends, but it definitely has its own history BY DAVE ALLSTON

June 2019 • 12

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

W

ellington Village turns 100 years old this year, and though now part of a seamless series of neighbourhoods that frequently leads to identity confusion (is it part of Hintonburg? Westboro?), it has a very unique history that sets it apart from those slightly older areas.

It was on May 30, 1919 that the infamous lot auction was held in a circus tent at Wellington and Holland to auction off each lot south of Wellington one at a time to individual buyers (a year later the lots north of Wellington would be sold in a similar auction). Within just a few years, the first few hundred homes were built and young families were living in homes built by

Do you recognize this building? View the web version of this story at Kitchissippi.com for details and more archival photographs of Wellington Village.

Ottawa’s best local tradesmen, using the finest materials (more often than not) and sourced close-by. The community was then known simply as “Elmdale,” a name later given to the local public school, theatre, tavern, tea room, and other businesses. The auctions ensured that no individuals acquired large quantities of lots (though some small-time builders did construct multiple houses in the district), and no large-scale developers were involved. The end result was that virtually every house is unique. Global economic factors later further shaped the neighbourhood, establishing two distinct building periods in Wellington Village: houses built between 1919-1929, and those built from 1941-1947 (after the depression and WWII). Notably, the ground work for the future Wellington Village was actually laid out many years prior, and had real estate swung in a different direction at that time, the neighbourhood might look very different today. The story of Wellington Village goes back to the original farm grants and the early dirt road that wound its way to Richmond (hence why it was known as “The Richmond Road,” it was renamed to Wellington Street in the Hintonburg and Wellington Village in 1908). It was along Richmond Road that the first settlers built homes, including Scotsman Roderick Stewart, who in 1832 built a stone house at what is now the southeast corner of Wellington and Julian Avenue but at the time was in the middle of pure wilderness in Nepean Township. Stewart and his family farmed an area from Holland to Western Avenue until the 1890s. (Original farmer lots along Richmond Road were typically 200 acres

and very narrow and long, stretching from Scott Street to Carling Avenue but were only four or five city blocks wide). One of the original Stewart son farmhouses still exists – physically moved up the street in 1920 – and is now 32 Granville Ave. The Wellington Village subdivision’s earliest beginnings actually comes in 1875, when Ottawa auctioneer Hector McLean purchased 38 acres of the Stewart farm, the portion north of Wellington, which presumably had been used minimally by the Stewarts as grove and gardening space. McLean laid out “McLeansville” and began offering lots for sale. The roads were laid out similarly to what they are today, but there was one less north-south street, allowing for deeper lots on each street, and lots were 60’ wide instead of 33’ today. “Grange” was an original 1875 McLeansville street name. Richmond Road was really the only selling point to prospective buyers. The streetcar was still 30 years away, and though trains had begun running along Scott where the Transitway exists today in 1870, the station at Bayview was located far closer to the new cheaply available subdivisions of Hintonburg and Mechanicsville. There was little enticement to live in the area, so the lots remained unsold. McLean built a beautiful stone house in 1876 at the corner of McLean Street (now Smirle, named after the man who bought the house two years after it was built) in an attempt to garner interest, but only a few were purchased. By 1882, the Stewarts had reclaimed all the land through repurchase and foreclosure, and McLean was out of the real estate prospecting game.


sponsored by

font: frutiger LT Std, 67 bold condensed, no stroke

e lets Prius Prim , the 2019 shape, de ic o m m na g dy ro drivin design, ae r hybrid rk o o ed w pt EV l ul al er , sc lo gy . It s . run in eith er before id te chno ef ficiency power to er than ev oven hybr defining With the r and long with it s pr mbined – and re he g co ed l rt in n fa ta iz bi to el m im co max leading you trav aterials , ce while r both. s a cl assweight m s it up, o p er forman e deliver and light enhance ug it in, ga ge, Prim reach pl ar to to ch to ly t ic us es se tr o qu oo ec harmoni u can ch inues our d a full el yo nt an l, co al nk f e o ta 1 im t ll B es ius Pr With a fu 035 km. ive, the Pr nge of 1, ting to dr driving ra d exhilara omise. pr an m ge co ar out Easy to ch lit y, with ient mobi more ef fic

NE W P O S IMAGINE THE

SIBLE.

kitchissippitimes

ME IUS PRI 20 1 9 P R

KitchissippiTimes

13 • June 2019

”Over the past 20 years, property values have skyrocketed. ”

E R U T U F E H T O T N I G U L P

@Kitchissippi

Wellington Village’s houses were built, and font: frutiger LT Std, 57 black condensed, stroke 0.15 the commercial Wellington West strip was in full swing. pantone 409 cvu pantone 072 CVU The neighbourhood continued to experience growth and change: The Victoria Theatre became a car dealership, and later, the site of an apartment building; the Bank of Toronto (now TD) opened in 1937 at the corner of Holland; the Island Park and Richmond intersection, which featured a roundabout from 1929-1957, also featured gas stations on all four corners for nearly the entirety of the 1950s and 1960s. Wellington Street mainstays such as Morris Home Hardware, Hillary’s Cleaners and Lauzon Music all opened in the late 1940s or 1950s; the Laura Secord building (now Second Cup) was built at the corner of Holland in 1955; and the Metro opened in 1967 (as IGA Foodliner). Sadly, the iconic Stewart farmhouse was demolished in 1961, a low point in our community’s history. Another phase of long-lasting businesses was born in the early 1980s with Wild Willy’s, Duss Brothers BMW, Won Ton House, the Ottawa Bagelshop, and Herb and Spice. They were all part of another shift in the neighbourhood. Over the past 20 years, property values have skyrocketed, with many new types of businesses opening and sharing the streetscape. Several condo buildings have been built, and some of the original houses are being replaced with infill housing. The character of most streets has yet to be significantly affected as in other neighbouring communities, but it may not be far off. Yet, Wellington Village and its impressive built heritage, its well-loved businesses, safe streets and friendly vibe has made it an ideal neighbourhood to live, work and play. There is a lot to celebrate in 2019, particularly 100+ years of great history!

kitchissippi.com

In 1892, Roderick Stewart’s son Alex registered an updated plan of McLeansville, adding in the additional street and making a few other small changes, but his plan may have been more of a strategic one as he was in negotiations with a group of investors affiliated with the Ottawa Electric Railway, who were buying up other neighbouring farms such as the Hinton-Holland farm and the Cowley farm. In April 1893, the Stewarts sold their farm to the ‘Ottawa Land Association’ (OLA), who knew the coming of the streetcar would eventually make the land in the vicinity much more valuable and desirable shortly. Their patience was incredible. Astonishingly, they held on to empty farmland for 28 years, until after WWI when they could sell the lots at a premium. They adopted Stewart’s plan and laid out the area south of Wellington with the narrower (33’ wide) lots. Two separate small subdivisions along the western edge of Wellington Village were the 1893 Cowley plan called “Ottawa West,” which consisted of the streets west of Western Avenue (the western boundary of the City of Ottawa until 1950, by the way!), and Mayfair and Piccadilly were actually the first plan of the “Hampton Park” community in 1910, so the 100th anniversary technically excepts this portion of the Village. The OLA held their auctions in 1919 and 1920, and construction immediately began on hundreds of houses and on the local businesses and services that were immediately required. A community was established practically overnight. Within just a few short years, there was a public school (Elmdale), a theatre (Victoria), a hardware store (Higman’s), grocery stores, gas stations, barber shops, doctors offices, restaurants and more. By 1930, over half of


COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT Robot party at Westboro Beach Did you see the bots on the beach?

PHOTOS BY JEREMY SOULE

home@dianeandjen.com

SOLD OVER ASKING!

CENTRETOWN TOWNHOME 478 McLeod Street Listed at $599,900

SOLD OVER ASKING!

SOLD OVER ASKING!

GLEBE SINGLE 44 Glendale Avenue Listed at $739,900

WESTBORO TOWNHOME 33 Briarway Private Listed at $679,900

Erin demonstrates her prototype scissor lift beach cleaning bot. Erin designed and constructed all her robots with the help of a 3D printer.

WEST CENTRETOWN SINGLE 82 Cambridge Ave. N. Listed at $689,900

THINKING OF MOVING TO THE SUBURBS?

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

dianeandjen.com

Erin Kennedy hosted a Robot Missions’ robot party at Westboro on May 18 and 19. Members of the community came out to try her latest beach-cleaning prototypes, ask questions, and learn all about robots. Robot Missions is an educational and community initiative designed to “develop low-cost robots to clean pollution, collect sensor data, and educate the community.” Erin is headed to International Space University this summer.

June 2019 • 14

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

SOLD OVER ASKING!

WEST CENTRETOWN 83 Elm Street Listed at $599,900

WESTBORO SINGLE 146 Buell Street Listed at $699,900

WELLINGTON VILLAGE SEMI ORLEANS SINGLE 88 Huron Avenue North 1082 Chateau Cres. Listed at $739,000 Listed at $429,900

Get your advice from the Top Top 1% across Canada for Royal Lepage

STITTSVILLE SINGLE 98 Beechfern Drive Listed at $539,900

613-725-1171

Beck Langstone listens to Erin describe her vision for the prototype bot.

Gus’s Kitchen and Bath 2183 Carling Ave. Ottawa ON K2B 7E8

guskitchenandbath.com


Beck Langstone and Ryan Geike volunteer their time every week to assist Erin with her robotic endeavors.

Owen Columbus, Magdalena Columbus and their sons Miles and Theo gather around the bots as Erin explains how they work. kitchissippi.com

Erin Kennedy logs data for one of her prototype bots.

@Kitchissippi kitchissippitimes KitchissippiTimes

15 • June 2019


June 2019 • 16

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS

Berit Erickson’s two-year project to attract bees, butterflies and birds is paying off. Here she is in her back garden.

Plant it, and they will come Anyone can create their own pollinator garden STORY AND PHOTO BY JUDITH VAN BERKOM

H

ow often do we ask ourselves or wonder what we could do to reverse, arrest, or slow down, the effects of climate change and the extinction of bird and insect species here in the city? We feel powerless. What possible difference could one person make? But history has shown us over and over again the power of one to affect change.

Berit Erickson has been an avid gardener for over 20 years, planting mainly for decorative purposes. Two years ago her focus changed to creating a garden that supports wildlife without using pesticides, but there was a lot more to learn. Her inspiration came from an inner voice, which said, “there must be something I can do.” Climate change and declining insect populations were everyday news and she really wanted to do something.

“I wanted to plant the front, where it was sunny, not with grass, but with plants that would help the environment. I decided to make a pollinator garden,” she says. Bringing Nature Home by Douglas Tallamy and Gardens of the High Line by Piet Oudolf, both available from the Ottawa Public Library, inspired, guided her choices, and provided the information needed to get started. “I was completely unfamiliar with native plants. Once I learned that I

could attract bees, butterflies, and birds, using plants, I had to start all over,” Berit explains. She calls it her Corner Pollinator Garden, and it really began when a cedar tree had to be removed as a result of ice and snow overhanging the street. This area became the site of a garden dedicated to native plants and the feeding of native bees, butterflies and birds. It’s on full view to anyone who wants to see it, at the corner of Fraser and Sherbourne Avenue.


“Bringing Nature Home by

Douglas Tallamy and Gardens of the High Line by Piet Oudolf, both available from the Ottawa Public Library, inspired, guided her choices, and provided the information needed to get started.”

@Kitchissippi kitchissippitimes KitchissippiTimes

17 • June 2019

They are good for monarch butterflies and the stems of some varieties become cavity nest sites for bees and are host plants to some kinds of butterflies and moths. “They are power plants really.” The spring is when woodland plants flower, taking advantage of the sunlight before the trees come out. Flowering shrubs and trees are also important. The first to bloom is the pussy willow and the wild plum, which hosts hundreds of moths for bird food. Chipmunks will eat the fruit in the fall. The summer features a variety of pollinators. Berit choses plants with hot colours – oranges, reds, adding white and yellow flowers. “I am very interested in hummingbirds and plant a lot of red flowers,” she says. “Jewel Weed, if you are able to get it, has an orange tubular flower with a lot of nectar.” There are several plant sales in the ward where one can buy native plants but it can get expensive. Berit decided to use seeds, and explains that many native plants need to go through the winter – called stratification – and can be planted in pots outside in the snow germinating the following spring. Berit often has passersby stopping to see her garden and ask questions. She’s put up a sign, and provides brochures with information. Sometimes there are free seeds in small packages too, so neighbours can start their own pollinator gardens.

kitchissippi.com

“I did a lot of research. I had been trying to attract humming birds for the last 20 years. Last year I had a couple of juveniles around the garden quite a bit. I had plants for nectar but you also need plants that attract insects. They need insects for protein – any birds really. I didn’t know humming birds ate insects.” These two years have been ones of discovery. Berit says she’s not an expert, but is eager to encourage others to create their own pollinator garden with native plants and to share the knowledge she’s gained so far. On her website (cornerpollinatorgarden.net) she shares information about creating a garden using native plants to attract and sustain wildlife. Last summer she put in a pond with a stream in her backyard. She’s been planting more shrubs and trees, providing nesting places and berries in the fall for birds to eat. She didn’t realize how much providing water would help. With the hot, dry summer last year, she had many families of birds coming for a drink. “We had warblers – who usually eat insects in the canopy of trees – come down when they heard the sound of the water,” says Berit. The goal of a pollinator garden is to provide a variety of native plants, trees and shrubs that cover the growing season from early spring to the end of the fall. Berit explains that the “easiest” season is the fall when asters and goldenrod are in bloom.


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ASK THE EXPERT

June 2019 • 18

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

BY: DR. EMMA POLLON-MACLEOD B.SC.ND. Q: No matter how much I restrict my calorie intake I can’t loose weight! What’s going on? A: There are so many factors that impact weight loss far beyond caloric intake. Hormones, digestive health, and inflammation can play a major role in preventing someone from losing weight. The health of our thyroid gland can have major implications for weight gain. If ones thyroid is underactive they can feel lethargic and really struggle to lose weight, despite being on very restrictive diets. Balancing and supporting the thyroid can be they key to many peoples weight loss woes. Our microbiome, the vast ecosystem of microorganisms that lives within our digestive tract, can alter our body’s hunger and satiety signals. This can lead to uncontrollable cravings, inflammation, and problems with storing weight. When trying to lose weight it is essential that all of these factors are considered and corrected in order to achieve weight loss success! Q: What can I do about the new ‘belly’ I have gained since menopause? A: As a woman ages her progesterone and estrogen will naturally start to decline until she hits menopause where the levels are pretty much non-existent. This drastic reduction in hormones can seriously hinder weight loss goals. It can also cause weight gain in areas, like the mid-section, where there wasn’t any before. Balancing a woman’s hormones can not only allow her to feel like herself again but can also help shed the weight that was gained through menopause. Dr. Emma Pollon-MacLeod B.Sc.ND. Naturopathic Doctor NutriChem Compounding Pharmacy & Clinic 613-721-3669 | clinic@nutrichem.com NEW LOCATION: 2599 Carling Ave. Ottawa, ON K2B 7H7

FOOD & DRINK Made-in-Westboro granola hits local shelves Continued from page 7 Pam’s granola is doing more than nourishing families; it’s also raising funds for the Bethany Hope Centre. “I needed a licensed commercial kitchen in which to prepare my product and as soon as I toured the facility I knew it was a perfect fit not only as a workspace for me but also as a charitable partner, which I’d also been seeking,” she explains. As if she needed any more serendipity, when touring the kitchen, Pam discovered that they were actually making their own granola at Bethany Hope Centre as part of the cooking lessons and meals offered there to help enrich the lives of young parent families. An avid runner, cyclist, swimmer and crosscountry skier, Pam applies the same kinds of hands-on attention to her marketing and distribution that she does to granola-making. On her daily running route through the community, she stops at her Westboro-area retailers, which include Produce Depot, Westboro Pharmasave and the Herb and Spice to check on inventory and even straighten up the display, making her way back to these stores very soon after with additional product as needed. “I’m working my way up to longer distance runs so I can check in at Seed to Sausage on Gladstone regularly as well,” says Pam, who will also be selling her product this summer at the Night Market on Fox and at the Main Street Farmers’ Market. Pam is still on the lookout for a few more retailers for her granola as she feels confident she has the capacity to increase production. “Westboro Granola Co. is still very much a one-person enterprise but my husband Dave Taylor has taken on the title of CFO (Chief Fun Officer) and he’s been very supportive since I made the decision to embark on this fulfilling venture,” she says. “I can say with genuine enthusiasm that it’s absolutely more fun than work and I think that’s because it’s the right business at the right time in my life. It is so humbling to see how many people are enjoying it and it feels so good to satisfy people’s hunger for good,

“I make it the way I love it because I wouldn’t want to offer anything less to others,” says Pam Midgley. wholesome homemade food.” Pam notes that without the generosity of neighbourhood friends, it is unlikely that she would be running her own business now, making granola. “For years, I used a recipe that originated with one of my granola-making friends, but I knew it had to be modified because it wasn’t truly my recipe.

As I made changes, everyone at home was delighted to offer taste testing services!” If you need any further proof of Pam’s joyful spirit and the determination she has for her business to succeed, check out her very active @westborogranolaco on Instagram, where you’ll find playful shots of bags of granola posed in locations all over town.

”It is so humbling to see how many

people are enjoying it and it feels so good to satisfy people’s hunger for good, wholesome homemade food.”


ARTS & CULTURE Affordable, Clean, Secure, Central √ Inside Storage √ Over 600 Lockers √ Climate Controlled √ Over 100 √ 7 Days/Week Different Sizes

Westfest weekend is here!

340 Parkdale Avenue

10 tips

(between Wellington & Scott)

Here are to maximize your enjoyment of one of the best community festivals in Ottawa.

1.

Westfest is taking place from June 7-9 in the park beside Tom Brown Arena (141 Bayview Rd.). There is limited parking in the area so visitors are highly encouraged to take public transit, walk, or bike.

Cyclists should definitely make use of the free supervised bike valet. Your bike and helmet will be perfectly safe while you enjoy the festivities.

Use the westfest.ca site to help plan your day. Check out artist bios and listen to some sample tracks. There is a wonderfully diverse line up planned for each day of the festival.

5.

7.

JimWatsonOttawa.ca

Bring the kids. There’s no designated kid zone this year but there is plenty for children to see and do, including fun workshops and art education at the Ottawa Art Gallery Youth Programming Art Tent. Also on site: balloon artists, buskers, and of course, a great musical line up!

@JimWatsonOttawa

8.

Consider getting your hair cut (yes, really!) at the “Westfest Cutting Shack.” Local hairdressers will be accepting donations for Westfest programming in exchange for hair cuts, braiding, colourful extensions, and updos. It’s kind of a cool thing to do at a festival!

9.

Westfest is generally a “rain or shine” event but in past years it has been cancelled due to extreme weather. Check their official Facebook page for updates before you head out if you’re not sure.

10.

Share your photos to Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using the hashtag #Westfest2019. And speaking of photos, look for Kitchissippi Times staffers on Saturday June 8! We’d love to take your photo and share it with our readers.

A mix of exotic flavours and cooking styles: Full range of Indian & Pakistani Cuisine, especially Punjabi Cuisine and Hakka Chinese style cuisine. Guru’s services extend to all areas of Indian & Pakistani Punjabi cuisine through full service restaurant and event catering. We offer the authentic experience for tasting ethnic food

Guru’s Inspired Food Bar 1123 Wellington St. West 613-695-8999 gurusinspired.com

Come visit us for lunch or dinner at Westfest! Only a 5 minute walk from Tom Brown Arena.

CMYK / .eps

facebook.com/gurusinspired

@gurusinspired

19 • June 2019

The food trucks and stands on site include Angry Dragonz, Walking Tacos, Big Town Burgers, Royi Street Cart, Mr. Sundae, Simply Raw, and Art-Is-In Bakery.

613-580-2496 Jim.Watson@Ottawa.ca

KitchissippiTimes

One of the best things about Westfest is that it is free to attend, but you will definitely want to bring some cash. (Although if you forget, there will be ATMs on site.) Something pretty in the Indigenous Pavilion might catch your attention! And of course, there will be food trucks. Speaking of which…

3-1-1 (24h)

kitchissippitimes

4.

If food trucks aren’t your thing, grab a meal at a nearby pub or restaurant. Or bring a picnic! Blankets and lawn chairs are welcome. Refill your water bottle at the Westfest hydration station.

Mayor Jim Watson

@Kitchissippi

3.

Here to Help

kitchissippi.com

2.

6.

613-729-2130

www.parkdaleministorage.com


2019

June 2019 • 20

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

Yamantaka//

Sonic Titan JUNE 7

CHARLIE MAJOR JUNE 8

ASPECTS JUNE 9

A7G YOUTH DRUMMERS : AMANDA FOX : SALMON ELLA : NOVUSOLIS MASTER CAMERON ERIC LEON : BONNIE DOON : TINA SOL DANIELLE GRÉGOIRE : KHALEEFA ‘APOLLO THE CHILD’ HAMDAN NATALIE HANNA : CHURCHILL SCHOOL OF ROCK : LARISSA DESROSIERS BROTHERS WILDE : DANAH-LEE : THE BACK ROADIES : JACK PINE THE NICKEL KINGS : MUSICABILITY CHOIR : DAVIS DEWAN AUDREY SAPARNO + SHALINI AHUJA : SUBHRAJ SINGH GRAVEN : MALAK SOUND : DYNAMIC @OTTWESTFEST #OTTWESTFEST TOM BROWN ARENA PARK


MAINSTAGE SCHEDULE FRIDAY, JUNE 7

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

HOST

5:35 6:45 8:00 8:30 9:20

A7G Youth Drummers with Amanda Fox Salmon ella Novusolis Master Cameron Eric Leon Bonnie Doon Tina Sol

Helvetica Bold

Cody Coyote + Kimberly Sunstrum

HEADLINER

8:15

‘Hindsight Storytellers’ Curated by Danielle Gregoire Churchill School of Rock Larissa Desrosiers Brothers Wilde Danah-Lee The Backroadies Jack Pine The Nickel Kings

YAMANTAKA // SONIC TITAN

9:30

HEADLINER

9:45

HOST

HOST

Master Cameron Eric Leon 5 PM

SUNDAY, JUNE 9

1:10 PM 2:10 3:10 4:05 5:05 6:00 7:00

CHARLIE MAJOR

3 PM 4:00 4:45 5:30 6:20 7:10 8:10 9:00

Musicability Choir Davis Dewan Audrey Saparno & Shalini Ahuja Subhraj Singh Graven Malak Sound Dynamic HEADLINER

ASPECTS

The new Albert at Bay Suites Hotel Logo - November 15, 2005

@Kitchissippi

S

kitchissippi.com

S

logo-horizontal-whitebg

kitchissippitimes

RS

21 • June 2019

SEE ALL THE ARTISTS PROFILES AND MORE AT WESTFEST.CA

KitchissippiTimes

Jeff Leiper

Kichissippi Ward Councillor


HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING Reinventing fitness in Wellington West Barres and Wheels continues legacy of former studio STORY AND PHOTO BY HOLLIE GRACE JAMES

June 2019 • 22

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

D

It’s all in the family at Barres and Wheels. Marie Boivin’s son Leo is her right hand man. Her daughter Florence is a spin instructor and her other daughter, Mégane, teaches barre.

ance, yoga, running, pilates – Marie Boivin has always been keenly interested in the world of fitness and nutrition, praising its ability to get her through “difficult phases” in her life. Though many of her adult years have been dedicated to advancing her career in the financial industry, she never completely gave up on this passion, always carrying it with her, until life itself, as it so often does, pushed her in a completely new direction. Finding herself at a crossroads and caring for an ailing mother diagnosed with brain cancer, she wasn’t quite sure where things were going. And then, in a tiny hospital room at The Queensway Carleton, an idea was born. She cast aside all uncertainty as this new concept lit up her dying mother’s eyes, and time stood still because this exact moment would become a defining one – she was going to open her very own fitness studio. Three days after the passing of her mother, the idea became a concrete reality, with Marie signing the lease of a “beautiful space in Stittsville” and officially opening Barres and Wheels just in time for her late mother’s birthday. Although in creating what she truly loved, she was ultimately faced with navigating completely new territory. Marie combined Ottawa’s strong barre community with a strong spin community, and if the old adage rings true that it’s all in the name, Barres and Wheels was born for success. Here, the curriculum is all about adhering to Marie’s motto of sweat, sculpt, and refuel, with a selection of classes built for

precisely the ability to do just this. There are a variety of ways to do each though, explains Marie. For example, you can sweat it out at spin or bootcamp, sculpt with a traditional barre class, and finally refuel courtesy of in-house café Avoca, which offers healthy smoothies, coffee, and food. “Studio 1 was simply a trial,” says Marie, “to see how things were going to go.” And things certainly went well. So well, in fact, that Marie decided to celebrate the one-year anniversary of Barres and Wheels with the big announcement about a second location. By October 2018, Sugar Mountain on Elgin St., where patrons once flocked to achieve the buzz that only comes with overindulgence on sugary snacks, officially transformed into quite the opposite – two floors of Barres and Wheels fitness furor. And Marie didn’t intend to stop at Studio 2 either. When the owners of popular Wellington West barre studio Inside Out decided it was time to move on to other things, they couldn’t simply leave their clientele hanging. Marie was eager to step up to the challenge of “continuing the barre culture that Inside Out had created.” The third, and newest, location of Barres and Wheels took over 1416 Wellington St. W. on January 28, 2019. “We are loving the location,” beams Marie. “It’s such a vibrant and exciting neighbourhood.” Across the three locations now dotted across the city, the mindset remains the same – redefining exercise with a love of pure and simple movement. The barre workout, originally conceived by German ballerina Lotte Burke, is a combination of ballet, pilates, and yoga movements designed to accentuate definition while building a long, lean look. Spin is the flip side to this coin. It’s the ultimate cardio


SPONSORED CONTENT

STOP LIVING IN PAIN

workout, designed to build endurance. A “clubhouse feel” with facilities that allow people to head back to work in full blow dry and makeup was important to Marie, but she is equally invested in her instructors. “We are selective. We tend to stick with people who have experience and certifications in the fitness industry,”

she says. “When not properly monitored, too often injuries happen so quickly and that sets you back months.” Her main goal, however, is for people to simply feel good. “When you focus on sweat, sculpt, and refuel, you don’t need to diet – if you focus on this as part of your life, you will feel good.”

”We are loving the location,

Our goal is to find the cause of your pain and solve the problem. We will educate you on prevention and provide you with solutions. What you won’t get here is: - assistants doing your treatment - just being put on machines and heat - feeling like a “number” - feel like you need to come forever Our focus is on true one-on-one care and a personalized approach to treatment, in a professional, friendly atmosphere. Call us to ask how we can help you, or come in for a tour and meet our staff.

PHYSIOTHERAPY & HEALTH CENTRES

613-792-1166 411 Roosevelt Ave suite 309 SERVING THE OTTAWA COMMUNITY FOR 25 YEARS

@Kitchissippi kitchissippitimes

An experience they will never forget!

KitchissippiTimes

Ages 4Y-16Y Y Neighbourhood Day Camps Camp Otonabee – Outdoor Day & Overnight Camps

ymcaywca.ca | 613-832-1234

YMCA-YWCA of the National Capital Region

23 • June 2019

Register online today!

kitchissippi.com

It’s such a vibrant and exciting neighbourhood.”

Have You Been Told You Have to Live With The Pain? Do You Want to Be More Active and Improve Your Mobility? At Back on Track, we love to help people get back to living the life they deserve. When pain strikes in your knee, lower back, neck or shoulders, or if you experience an injury from sport or exercise - we know it’s very tempting to leave it and hope it’ll simply “go away on its own” with time and rest. At Back on Track, we are very pleased and privileged to be part of the Westboro community. We are so grateful to the thousands of clients who have trusted us with their care over the last several years. Our incredible team of dedicated healthcare professionals are here to treat, guide, educate and support you every step of the way. Whether you’re looking for Physio, Chiropractic, Massage, Acupuncture/ Dry Needling, Exercise, or Nutritional/Weight Loss advice, our team is here for you.


SHOP LOCAL Fashion, fresh pasta, bike repair, sweet treats, and more Patti Brown*

Susan Chell**

Sarah Toll**

675 Island Park Drive $1,225,000

345 Sherwood Drive $719,900

241 Breezehill Avenue S $589,900

320 Parkdale Avenue Unit 206 499,900.

June 2019 • 24

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

TEAM

SOLD

SOLD

40 Crown Cresent Carlington

364 Hinton Ave Civic Hospital 344 O’Connor St, Ottawa, ON K2P 1W1 DIRECT:

*Sales Representative **Broker

613-563-1717

Continued from page 3 Sadly, Oh So Good Desserts has left the neighbourhood but if you’re still looking to satisfy your sweet tooth, La Diperie is now open in Westboro at 429 Richmond Rd. A popular chain in Montreal, La Diperie offers soft serve, cookie dough, ice cream cakes and sandwiches, as well as many vegan options. Twiss and Weber is moving from Wellington West to 443A Sussex Drive in the first week of July, near the Byward Market. Co-founder Laura Twiss says that while the move is important for helping their business grow, they “love Wellington West” and are happy their fashion line found its early footing here. Max’s Footwear has moved across the road to 1261 Wellington St. W., half a stone’s throw away from their old location. They are now exclusively cobbler and shoe repair services. Before transitioning away from retail, they donated many pairs or fabulous footwear to St. Vincent de Paul. Amani Health has opened up a health and wellness centre at 1272 Wellington St. W. Visitors can try the six-month “Real You” program, which develops an all-encompassing personal plan with a number of health professionals, or take services like physiotherapy or a yoga workshop. KT readers will remember last

month’s profile on Superette, one of the three recreational cannabis dispensaries that opened in Ottawa last spring. The business has taken up residence at 1306 Wellington St. W., in the former Terra20 location. Feather Company Ltd, coming to 408 Churchill Ave., will also jump into the industry, selling cannabis accessories. Located at 295 Richmond Rd. is Westboro’s newest bar and gastropub, The Newboro, serving a selection of cocktails, beers, and evening dining plates. They’ve also made themselves a venue for live music, and are hosting an open mic on Thursday nights. The inaugural edition was led by legendary local guitarist Jesse Greene. Ebb & Flow has left the neighbourhood and their shop at 373a Richmond Rd. will be soon be taken up by Fjällräven, a popular Swedish-based supplier of outdoor gear such as backpacks and jackets. Sisterhood613, located at 371a Richmond Rd. Suite 5, is a new beauty salon run by Su Chu, who has also owned Her Beauty & Lash Lounge in Centretown. Su has more than a decade of experience operating in the beauty business, and aside from doing lash and brow touch-ups, she also runs workshops for those who want to learn the techniques themselves.


Fun in the

sun SUN SAFETY

MUST-HAVE BEACH GEAR


Have a sun-safe summer Expert advice for sun lovers, young and old BY TRACY NOBLE

KITCHISSIPPI SUMMER GUIDE June 2019 • 26

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

O

ttawa loves to spend the summer outdoors enjoying the warmer temperatures, but how many people are adequately prepared to protect their skin from the hot sun? According to the Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation, over 80,000 cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in Canada each year. Thankfully, skin cancer can be prevented with sun-safe habits, including seeking shade between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., wearing sunscreen, and protective clothing. Sun hats Hats play an essential role in sun protection. A good sun hat can prevent sunburn on your head, face and neck, protect your eyes, as well as prevent sunstroke and heat exhaustion by keeping your body cooler. Instead of opting for a baseball cap, select a wide-brimmed hat that protects your face and the back of your neck. Many outdoor stores, such as MEC (366 Richmond Rd.) sell wide-brimmed hats, including unisex styles in varying colours and rim sizes designed to keep you cool and shaded from the sun. Look for hats that offer UPF protection and also feature draw cords so they can still be worn on windy days or while on a boat. For children, select a hat with a “cape” on the back, as this feature offers complete neck protection without being cumbersome during play. You should also look for a hat that floats and is made from light

JOIN THE FUN THIS SUMMER WITH 

FASHION &ACTING CAMP

MIM

MODELS INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT

nylon fabric, so it will dry quickly – making it the perfect hat for a day at the beach or splash pad. Sunscreen According to Kristin Dudley of Laserderm (1600 Carling Ave.), consumers should look for an allmineral sunscreen. “Mineral sunscreens can provide an SPF of 30-50. They can also provide high UVA Protection Factors. We see more and more the impact of UVA in the role of skin cancer, so protecting against it with a high concentration all-mineral sunscreen is the most important thing consumers can do,” says Kristin. Laserderm recommends sunscreens from The Sunscreen Company, their sister company founded by Dr. Sharyn Laughlin and her husband Dr. Denis Dudley (a.k.a. The Sunscreen Doc). Local retailers, such as Natural Food Pantry (205 Richmond Rd.), terra20 (1130 Wellington St. W.) and Oresta Organic Skin Care (1121 Wellington St. W.) also offer a wide variety of natural, organic and mineral-based

sunscreens for the face, body, with options for children as well. According to Oresta Korbutiak of Oresta Organic Skin Care, “zinc oxide is a safe, natural mineral sunscreen which reflects the heat of the sun’s rays off of the skin keeping it cool and breathable. It reflects the heat and energy of the sun’s rays away from the skin, thereby reducing its temperature.” When looking for a sunscreen, it is essential to choose the right SPF factor. And don’t forget to double-check the expiry date!

sure you will receive that level of sun protection – the higher the UPF rating, the better the protection. Swim shirts also offer UPF protection and are important to wear while swimming during peak sun hours, and unlike sunscreen, the protection won’t wear off when wet and doesn’t need to be reapplied. On a hot sunny day, the sun’s UV rays can cause a sunburn in as little as 15 minutes, so before heading outside, grab what you need to fully protect yourself and your family.

Protective clothing Sun protective clothing is an easy method of sun protection and shops like MEC and Bushtukuah (203 Richmond Rd.) offer a variety of shirts and pants designed to provide complete UPF protection. While regular clothing offers some protection, sun protective clothing provides additional protection by reflecting and absorbing UV radiation. When looking for clothing with UPF protection, check the tag and label. The UPF label means the clothing has been tested and you can be

OFFERING ONE & TWO WEEK CAMPS PHOTOSHOOT AND FASHION SHOW INCLUDED

613.236.9575

INFO@MODELSINTERNATIONAL.CA REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MODELSINTERNATIONAL.CA

CONFIDENCE & SELF-ESTEEM BUILDING STYLE, RUNWAY, ACTING, MAKE-UP & HAIR, SKINCARE, NUTRITION, PHOTOGRAPHY, & MUCH MORE


Must-have beach gear for the family A few ideas of things to add to your packing list when you head out this summer BY TRACY NOBLE

kitchissippitimes

W.). Choose from their wide selection of stainless steel containers and straws, including containers and straws from the award-winning local Ottawa business, DALCINI Stainless. Eliminating single-use plastics from your

@Kitchissippi

Packing a picnic? Eliminating single-use plastics from your picnic supplies will help preserve our beaches and parks for future generations. This set is by DALCINI Stainless is available at terra20.

water. You can find a variety of quick dry towels at MEC (366 Richmond Rd.) and Bushtukah (203 Richmond Rd.). If you plan on spending a lot of time at the beach this summer, you may want to invest in a pop-up play yard for the little ones, such as the Veer Basecamp available at Fab Baby Gear. Veer designed the Basecamp to give kids a safe and shady spot of their own, perfect for a day at the beach. MEC also carries pop-up sunshades, such as the Nemo Victory Sunshade, a freestanding structure that can be easily set up at the beach and creates a cool hangout big enough for a few people. Fab Baby Gear also carries a great outdoor mat, large enough for everyone in the family to sit. It’s water resistant, making it the perfect accessory for the beach, and it folds up tightly into a sewn-in pouch, making it easily transportable. The conveniences and products available for a family beach day have come a long way! With a little planning and preparation, these products can help make a family beach day a lot of fun and make for some of the best summer memories.

kitchissippi.com

Summer is coming, and the beach is calling! If you’re planning family beach days this summer, make sure you have everything you need for a full day’s adventure! First things first, nothing can spoil a happy mood like a hungry child, so be sure to pack snacks and a picnic lunch. Finger foods always work best on the beach, so think grapes and apples for snacks, and remember to bring lots of water so everyone stays hydrated. You should also use reusable ice packs when packing your picnic basket to keep food from spoiling. Keep meals simple yet delicious by stopping by the Ottawa Bagelshop and Deli (1321 Wellington St. W.) and ordering some made-to-order “Bagelsubs” made on their signature wood-fired, hand-rolled bagels. For something sweet, drop by Thyme & Again (1255 Wellington St. W.) and see what delectable desserts they have available or order something ahead of time and pick it up on your way to the beach. Make your picnic eco-friendly with reusable containers and bags from terra20 (1130 Wellington St.

picnic supplies is a great way to make an impactful step toward preserving our beaches for future generations of beach-goers! Once you have the picnic in order, check to make sure you have a few beach toys and activities to keep the kids busy, especially if boredom hits sooner than expected. The B. Toys Bucket from Fab Baby Gear (1244 Wellington St. W.) provides endless hours of fun with an assortment of beach toys, ideal for building the sand castle of your dreams. Or surprise the kids with a slingshot whistle rocket from Mrs. Tiggy Winkles (315 Richmond Rd.). It’s just as described but is made of soft material and is designed to whistle as it flies. And why not pick up a children’s book or two as well as a travel board game for those quieter moments, like when it’s time for the kids to dry off? Lighten your load by leaving your traditional towels at home and using quick-dry towels instead. Microfibre towels that fold into small bags, making it easier to carry to and from the beach compared to other towels. In addition to their reputation for drying quickly, a quality quick dry towel can absorb up to three times its weight in

KitchissippiTimes

27 • June 2019 KITCHISSIPPI SUMMER GUIDE


Blended cheeseburgers just in time for barbecue season (NC) These chicken and mushroom burgers are flavourful, simple to make, and offer a fun take on the classic cheeseburger.

KITCHISSIPPI SUMMER GUIDE June 2019 • 28

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

Blended Chicken Cheeseburgers

Prep time: 10 mins Cook time: 20 mins Serves: 6 (1/3 lb patties)

Ingredients: ½ lb mushrooms, finely chopped 1 lb lean ground chicken ½ small onion, finely diced ½ tsp garlic and herb seasoning ½ cup breadcrumbs 1 egg 5 hamburger buns 5 cheese slices Toppings: Lettuce, tomato, onion, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, pickles Directions: 1. Place mushrooms in a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Pulse until finely chopped. 2. In a large bowl, combine mushrooms, beef, onion, garlic, breadcrumbs and egg; mix all ingredients until incorporated. Form into six patties and cook either on the barbecue or the stovetop until internal temperature reaches 160°F. 3. During last minute of cooking, top patties with cheese. Keep warm until cheese begins to melt. 4. Place patty on warmed bun and top with desired toppings. Find more ways to add fabulous flavour to your meals at mushrooms.ca. www.newscanada.com SPONSORED CONTENT

Summer is almost here at Dovercourt

A

s we turn the corner on a chilly spring, Dovercourt is gearing up for another busy summer. In July, kids ages 4 – teen will descend upon the Centre for another great summer of camps. Summer swim lessons offer convenient one day/ week as well as week-long sessions, to fit your summer holiday and camp plans. Children can stay active and learn new skills in Learn to Bike, soccer. Our fun and casual approach is a good fit with summer vibes. BSOMA offers music and art programs and camps, as well as group & private lessons at Festival House. The Summer Specialty Fitness Pass allows fitness enthusiasts to try out a wide variety of options including pre and postnatal, TRX, yoga, pilates, aquafitness and more for just $149. Existing pass holders (Group Fitness and Gold Club) may purchase this pass at a special rate, to add to their regular class routine. Wading pools at our three

locations offer a cool retreat from the hot sun. Check the schedule for hours and days. The Summer 2019 program guide is available now, while the Summer Camp book highlights our many camps and coordinating swim lessons. Register now!

411 DOVERCOURT AVE. dovercourt.org 613.798.8950


I scream. You scream. The police come It’s awkward

slgelato.com

KitchissippiTimes

29 • June 2019 KITCHISSIPPI SUMMER GUIDE

Price items clearly using pricing stickers found at the dollar store, or in a pinch masking tape and marker will work just fine. Don’t be too sentimental and overprice items; if in doubt, seek advice on prices from an objective friend. Bundle items like DVDs, toys and books for one price to catch a buyer’s’ attention. At the end of the day, if you want to move what’s left, get shoppers to fill up a bag of items for a flat fee. When it comes to your donate pile (and small household items including toys, electronics, linens, sleeping bags, sports equipment and anything left), remember that charitable organizations such as Diabetes Canada are always looking for items. You can donate your wares at one of their 2,000 Ontariobased donation bins or schedule a free home pickup at declutter.diabetes.ca.

kitchissippitimes

(NC) Now that the weather is warming up, people are gearing up for garage sale season. If you’re itching to do some spring cleaning and offload your excess stuff, here are some ways to pull off your best garage sale yet: Decide on a date and start putting up flyers in the neighbourhood or consider advertising in your local paper. Do this at least a week in advance. Check the weather forecast before you advertise because rainy days keep buyers away. Consider joining forces with other neighbours for a street sale that will draw a bigger crowd. Sort your items into “sell” and “donate” piles. Keep in mind that clothes and shoes are better to donate as you’ll make a small fraction on these items, even if they’re in good condition. Set up a table and chair so you have a place to cash people out and stay comfortable. Don’t forget to have plenty of change on hand.

1130 Wellington St. W 613.695.6565 1103 Bank St. 613.523.1116 111 Main St. E, Merrickville 613.269.4949

@Kitchissippi

How to prepare for a successful garage sale

Screamingly good gelato sold HERE

kitchissippi.com

Take a Roman Holiday!


OCDSB TRUSTEE UPDATE PROVINCIAL UPDATE

June report SUBMITTED BY ERICA BRAUNOVAN, OTTAWA-CARLETON DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEE

June 2019 • 30

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

W

ow! June is just around the corner, and while I look forward to our two month summer break there is still a substantial amount of work to be done at the board table. Between now and the end of June we plan on passing a new four year strategic plan and the operational budget for the 2019-2020 school year.  A draft of our strategic plan is available on our district website. I am very interested in hearing back from all of our stakeholders, in particular students, parents and community partners in Zone 10. Please email me at erica.braunovan@ocdsb. ca to let me know what you think of the draft plan, and to make any suggestions. I am particularly interested if you can see yourself / your student in our plan, and if not, what we could do to change that.   This past month, Trustee Ellis and I held a discussion on the OCDSB operating budget. We host these meetings every year, and it is a great opportunity to discuss the operating budget with the CFO and a couple of local trustees in a less formal way. Due to delays in getting financial information from the Ministry of Education we have had to delay the start of our budgeting process. We will now receive the staff recommended budget on Wednesday, May 29th at 7 p.m. and we will welcome delegations on the budget starting on Monday, June 3rd. People are always welcome to attend our public meetings or watch the live stream – a link can be found at the OCDSB.ca website. Due to an increase in enrollment and

a slight surplus we find ourselves in a better situation than many of the boards around the table. We should be able to minimize the feel of the cuts to education for one year, but next year will likely be harder without an increase in the per pupil spending amount.  At our April board meeting we passed a motion to re-establish the Ad Hoc Advocacy Committee as a Special Purpose Committee to ensure that important advocacy work continues. This committee is used to develop an annual advocacy strategy for board approval and advise the chair on specific advocacy issues and key messaging. In the current climate of change of direction on initiatives from the Ministry it is important that we are able to respond to consultation requests and make statements on issues in a timely fashion, and the board table is not always the most effective place for us to have these discussions as agendas are set weeks in advance. At the board meeting on May 28th there is a recommendation out of this committee to respond to Ministry consultations on School Board Hiring Practices and Class Size.   Graduation ceremonies will start happening around the district in the coming weeks. I will be honoured to attend 5 of the 6 happening in Zone 10, but as with past years I will need one of my colleagues to attend at least one as there is a conflict. Please know that I do everything I can to attend as many graduation ceremonies as possible.

Road safety, climate emergency, National Accessibility Week SUBMITTED BY JOEL HARDEN, MPP OTTAWA CENTRE

of the motion, and of the passionate speeches delivered by my NDP caucus colleagues. While PC MPPs voted down the motion, we will not be deterred. I’m committed, and our caucus is committed, to fighting for climate justice.

Time to prioritize cyclists’ safety I was heartbroken and angered by news of a cyclist who was killed by a hit-and-run driver on May 16. Just steps away Our office is here for from city hall on Laurier National Accessibility Week Avenue, the collision is a tragic The last week of May is NationalTown Halls Monthly reminder of how we’re not doing Accessibility Week, a time toCanvasses promote nearly enough to keep cyclists safe. access and inclusion for people Community Organiz This is an issue that the province with disabilities. Former Lieutenant Help Accessing Gov also has a role in addressing. Jessica Governor David Onley’s third Bell, MPP for University-Rosedale, has legislative review of the Accessibility put forward a Vulnerable Road Users for Ontarians with Disabilities Act 109 Catherine St. / rue Catherine Bill that would apply penalties under is a stark reminder of how Ottawa, ON K2P 0P4 MPP / Député(AODA) provincial, Ottawa Centre the Highway Traffic Act to any driving much work needs to be done in order to offences that result in the death ensure that Ontarians with disabilities or injury of a vulnerable road user can live their fullest lives. (including cyclists). Continued on next page Proper cycling infrastructure and laws protecting vulnerable road users are not luxuries, they’re necessities. I’m committed to working with advocates both locally and at the legislature, for cyclists’ safety.

”We’re not

Climate emergency motion On May 13, the Ontario legislature debated a motion moved by Andrea Horwath, Leader of the Official Opposition, to declare a province-wide climate emergency. Recent events, including historic flooding in our own city, offer us a glimpse of what failing to take action looks like. I was proud to speak in support

doing nearly enough to keep cyclists safe.”


Injured in a car accident? Injured inCall a carus, we are here help! accident? Callto us, we are here to help!

Good people. Great lawyers.

”Proper cycling infrastructure and laws protecting vulnerable road users are not luxuries, they’re necessities” environment, accessibility training for design professionals, and an assurance that public money is never again used to create new barriers. Accessibility is a non-partisan issue, and I hope MPPs from all parties will recognize that these are common sense first steps towards respecting the civil rights of people with disabilities.

613.722.1500 • mannlawyers.com

2148 Carling Ave Suite 201

GET MOVING AGAIN

613-722-2148 integratedtouchphysiotherapy.ca

kitchissippi.com

Continued from previous page That’s why I introduced a motion calling on the government to adopt a plan of action on accessibility in response to the Onley Report. The plan of action should include, but not be limited to, key recommendations from the Onley Report including stronger enforcement of the AODA, new standards for the built

11 Holland 300, Ottawa Suite 710, 1600 Scott St,Avenue, Ottawa • Suite 613.722.1500 • mannlawyers.com

SPONSORED CONTENT

Luciano with his teacher, his father, Antonio Sicoli. mouth from our customers is always the best form of advertising and this is greatly appreciated.

L.A. Sicoli Masonry

Luciano Sicoli l.a.sicoli_masonry@bell.net 613-859-4684

31 • June 2019

$500,000 should not even be something to have a discussion about. It should be a given. We take pride in our work and when we drive by a job that has been completed by L. A. Sicoli Masonry and Restoration it provides a sense of gratification that can’t be described by words. Word of

KitchissippiTimes

Luciano’s teacher, Antonio Sicoli, his 82-year-old father, who still comes with him to different job sites, has provided him with a simple formula for longevity: be honest with your customers, make sure you provide them with an excellent job and make sure that your prices are fair and you will have many telephone calls, along with many satisfied customers. My father always taught me that even

though you may be comfortable with the skills you have acquired, there is always more to learn and you can never stop this process if you choose to strive to be the best you can be. Learning this craft is not only about acquiring skills, it is about investing passion into your work. This allows Luciano Sicoli to provide a little bit extra in a job. Others may not always do this part. An example of this is when bricks get installed on the front of a home, on a chimney or elsewhere, there may be mortar on the face of those bricks. We mix a special muriatic acid solution and wash the bricks upon completion of a job to clean them. You would not believe the number of customers that I visit that ask me what can be done to remove the mortar from their bricks. This issue is quite often on new home construction, where the bricks have not been cleaned after the bricklayer has intstalled them. Investing two more hours to clean the front face of bricks on a home, where customers are investing $400-

kitchissippitimes

Luciano Sicoli respects, values and appreciates his customers. He takes the time to educate the customer about different materials, different options that are available to the customer and the process that will be used to complete the work. You meet the boss, the boss is the one that comes to discuss your issues and the boss will be the one that comes to do the work. We do not sub-contract out our work to anyone. Our reputation is too important. I have heard customers say that people have come, given them a price and just left them with their business card and many times have other people come to do the work.

@Kitchissippi

L.A. Sicoli Masonry offers that much more extra


COUNCILLOR’S CORNER

Some brave residents at Unitarian House have done it again! They are baring it all for The Naked Truth Calendar 2020—Sports Revealed! Make a pledge to support this project and receive your calendar early! 1.

Go to www.kickstarter.com

2.

Search “Unitarian House”

3.

Make a pledge

For more information call (613) 722-6690

City Hall update for June SUBMITTED BY JEFF LEIPER, KITCHISSIPPI WARD COUNCILLOR

KitchissippiTimes

Our office is here for you with: Monthly Town Halls Canvasses Community Organizing Help Accessing Government Services

MPP / Député provincial, Ottawa Centre

109 Catherine St. / rue Catherine Ottawa, ON K2P 0P4

P: 613-722-6414 E: JHarden-CO@ndp.on.ca www.joelharden.ca

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

T H E

CARLETON TAVERN 223 ArmstrongStreet Street 223 Armstrong

613-728-4424 613-728-4424 UGLY CLUB MONDAY:SPECIALS BREAKFAST

& up+ tax 40¢ wings$4.50 all day (incl. toast, home fries & coffee) $2 Montreal style jumbo hota.m.) dog Mon. – Fri., (8:00 - 11:00 & Sun. with (8:00 poutine a.m. – 3:00p.m.) cookedSat. in beer $5.95 Beer quart & jumbo hot dog $10.30 LUNCH SPECIALS $7.50 & UP Everything made fresh daily $5 Caesar & Screwdriver cocktails

NIGHTLY SPECIALS

Monday July 1/2 1st price pizza

CANADA DAY PARTY Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 4pm-midnight

June 2019 • 32

kitchissippi.com

1/2 price appetizers

Third Wave

4pm - midnight

Monday-Thursday & Sunday from 7-11pm.

35 cent wings

PIG ROAST!

3pm – midnight & Sunday 1-7 pm

Basted in Beer.

MONTREAL SMOKED

MEAT SANDWICH Pork sandwich, 4oz. $6.10 bun and cob of corn $ Smoked 50Meat by the pound

6.$10.00 (take out only)

HOMEMADE HUMMUS AND TABOULEH

*

all food prices are plus tax

December 31

ESTABLISHED SINCE 1935 LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

EVERY WEEKEND ESTABLISHED SINCE 1935 Nov 30

Raw Sugar Dec 1 TUESDAY: The Gruff Sisters (food bank drive) 40¢ wings Dec 6 all day + tax Open Jam $2 Montreal style jumbo hot dog cooked in beer Dec 7 with poutine $5.95 Sweet and the Back Beat Beer quart &Dec jumbo hot dog $10.30 8 Déjà vu Free pool starting at 1pm Dec 13 $3.50 16ozJam Domestic draft Open Dec 14

Rocket Rashed WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: & of The Fatwine City 8 $5 glass house & Caesar cocktails Dec 15 $2 Montreal Zydico style Jumbo Hot Dog cooked in beer Loco Dec 20

Open Jazz FRI &Night SAT: Dec 21

no cover! EndLive ofentertainment the World -Party Livebands style (12/12/2012) $2 Montreal Jumbo Hot Dogs Dec 22 cooked in beer Live Entertainment Dec 28

SUNDAY: The Mud Boys 29 40¢ wingsDec starting at 1pm + tax $2 MontrealThe styleBeer JumboNuts Hot Dog cooked in beer $3.50 Shooters We have all NFL Games on 10 Hi-Def TVs (tax inc) • No cover charge

• Party favours NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY • Free midnight toast WITH HELIUM FREE CHICKEN LUNCH - Every Wednesday 11:30-1pm with purchase of a beverage (min $4.50)

SAM’S FAMOUS ROAST BEEF LUNCH $5 tax incl every Thursday with beverage purchase

Watch all your favourite sports on 11 Hi Def TVs • Free Wireless Internet

T

he spring has flown by and June has arrived in Kitchissippi. With lots of fun summer events coming up and the promise of warm weather ahead, there is lots to look forward to here in Ottawa! Read for more information. The City of Ottawa is undertaking a Rental Accommodations Study, which will include reviews of rental housing, short-term rentals providers (such as Airbnb), student housing and shared accommodations. Each section of study includes a position paper, which are available online as well as opportunities to provide comment. Visit kitchissippiward.ca to read the papers and learn more about this study. Major changes are coming to the Trillium Pathway as construction to replace the 417/O-Train bridge gets underway. Myself and Councillor McKenney have worked with the MTO to ensure a detour that will be as safe as possible for pedestrians and cyclists during the lengthy construction process. For the first few weeks Trillium path users will need to detour to Gladstone Avenue while the new pedestrian/cycling by-pass is constructed. The by-pass is anticipated to open June 21, and will allow cyclists to use a segregated, bi-directional lane on Preston to get around the construction. For a full picture of those plans, visit kitchissippiward.ca. This project will be completed in December of 2020. The consultations for the City’s new Official Plan are still underway! Have your say in the direction, growth, and

physical development of our city’s future. You can engage with the Official Plan review process by visiting Ottawa.ca to read all the associated discussion papers and register for the project’s mailing list. Engaging with your local community association is the best way to stay up-todate on this process. And don’t forget about the Westboro-Dominion Planning Study, reviewing the planning policies and zoning for lands near the Westboro and Dominion LRT stations. You can visit kitchissippiward.ca for more information, call 613-580-2424 ext. 13944, or email westboro-dominion@ottawa.ca. Finally, I’m thrilled to announce that myself and Councillor McKenney will be holding a free Beginner Shore Fishing Clinic at Remic Rapids on June 29, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. (weather and water levels permitting). We warmly welcome anglers of all backgrounds and levels of experience to come down, share gear, and engage with our beautiful river’s ecosystem.

”Have your say

in the direction, growth, and physical development of our city’s future.”


FEDERAL UPDATE

Dog Share

Carrying the voices of community leaders SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE MCKENNA, MP OTTAWA CENTRE

I

√ Inside Storage √ Over 600 Lockers √ Climate Controlled √ Over 100 √ 7 Days/Week Different Sizes

340 Parkdale Avenue (between Wellington & Scott)

613-729-2130

www.parkdaleministorage.com

As a

Thank you to our email newsletter subscribers we are giving away a

50

$

GIFT CARD TO

kitchissippi.com.

Deadline is June 30th and the winner will be notified by email.

33 • June 2019

Look for the link at the top of the page.

KitchissippiTimes

It’s easy! Just sign up online at

kitchissippitimes

organizations the ability to help more clients, more often, and more effectively. ”

Affordable, Clean, Secure, Central

@Kitchissippi

”The grants will give these

ensure that more women are fairly compensated for their hard work. By the end of 2018, 49 per cent of federal government appointments had gone to women, up markedly from 35 per cent in 2015. In addition, Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy prioritizes the promotion of the human rights of women’s and girls, especially for access to education and health services. This policy is saving lives.

kitchissippi.com

n the summer of 2015, while running to be the Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre, I asked to meet with representatives of community organizations working to address violence against women and to provide housing and other services to vulnerable women and their children, as well as homeless youth. At the time, I didn’t know if I’d have the opportunity to represent their voices as an M.P., let alone as a member of the government and cabinet minister. However, I did understand that part of being an effective Member of Parliament is listening and learning from experts on the frontlines of social services delivery. In the event that I won, I wanted the knowledge these experts shared to help me be an effective advocate for some of our most vulnerable citizens, and the organizations that serve them. In subsequent months and

years, I was indeed able to carry the voices of these community leaders with me to meetings and decision-making tables in the federal government. Most recently, collective hard work came to fruition on May 30th with the announcement of more than $4 million in federal funding for local Ottawa women’s groups, as well as national organizations based in Ottawa. The grants will give these organizations the ability to help more clients, more often, and more effectively. This funding also supports achieving broader policy goals such as raising children out of poverty, strengthening families, and fostering more prosperous communities. Grants like these and the elevation of the former Status of Women Canada agency to the full department of Women and Gender Equality are just two examples of our government’s commitment to advancing gender equality. In 2018, our government introduced historic proactive pay equity legislation for federally regulated workplaces to

I have an adorable springer spaniel, who I would like to share for one week per month, to someone who is retired. Interested? susan7017@eastlink.ca


2019

ITALIAN L A V I T S E F

June 2019 • 34

Event Schedule

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

#PRESTONSTREET

Friday, June 14

Saturday, June 15

Sunday, June 16

Retro Italian Car and Motorcycle Museum 6:00 pm -12:30 am

Retro Italian Car and Motorcycle Museum 9:00 am - 12:30 am

Retro Italian Car and Motorcycle Museum 9:00 am-9:00 pm

Ferrari Show n Shine 6-10 pm

SWRL Freestyle Soccer Jugglers Soccer Clinic 11:00 -1:00 pm

Criterium Bike Race 9 am-2 pm

Ottawa Circus Stilt Walkers 7-7:45, 8:15-9:00 pm

Italian Car Parade 1:30-3 pm

Family Yoga 10 am

Arthur Murray Flash Mob 9:30 pm

Ferrari Demo Zone 3-4:30 pm

Living Colouring Book 4-8 pm

Capital City Dance Flash Mob 7pm

Living Colouring Book 4-8 pm

Ottawa Circus Stilt Walkers 5-5:45 6:15-7:00 pm

@PrestonStreetBia @Preston_BIA @PrestonStreetBia

SWRL Juggling on the street 4:30-8:30 pm Ferrari Show n Shine 6-10 pm Ottawa Circus Stilt Walkers 6-6:45, 7:15 - 8:00 pm Fireman’s Marching Band 6 pm Forward Dance TBD

Preston Street | OTTAWA

More information;

prestonstreet.com


— SPONSORED CONTENT —

WESTBORO VILLAGER A NATURE WALK IN WESTBORO I’m so happy to kick this summer off with a fresh, new look we have just installed throughout Westboro Village: La nature en ville Westboro Nature Walk Westboro Village now hosts an outdoor exhibition of captivating nature photography by Michelle Valberg, a Westboro Village business member since around 20 years, Canadian Nikon Ambassador, and Canadian Geographic's Photographer-inResidence. "There's magic in the nature of our own backyard," says Michelle, who has traveled internationally to capture visually stunning images of nature, but claims that it our local and Canadian nature she loves the most. The exhibition spans the whole of Westboro Village at the main intersections - on traffic boxes. Walk just over 1KM to view each of the nine displays. We are able to put forth this exhibition through the partial funding grant provided by

Shop The Village Quire this summer for Made in Canada gifts & souvenirs. 312 Richmond Rd, Westboro 613-695-2287

villagequire.ca Follow us on

@thevillagequire

the City of Ottawa Mural and Architectural Design program in prevention of graffiti. We invite you to take the Nature Walk, take photos and share them with us on social media. To learn more about the photographer, Michelle Valberg and the locations of the installations, please visit our website at westborovillage.com Coming soon… FUSE Street Festival is BACK! As with previous years, Richmond Road will be closed for auto traffic and buses. This year, the closure will span Richmond between Roosevelt Avenue and McRae Avenue. Please note that the major intersection of Churchill/Richmond will be closed for the safety of the Festival attendees. Scott Street will still be accessible. Please follow our Facebook event to keep up to date on the news, acts, and entertainment happening at FUSE. Michelle Groulx Executive Director Westboro Village Business Improvement Area


— SPONSORED CONTENT —

WESTBORO VILLAGE • June 2019 • 36

kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

TIME OUT FOR DAD Now that the weather has finally improved, it’s the perfect time to celebrate Father’s Day on one of the many picture-perfect patios in Westboro Village. (You can find a full round-up on our website at westborovillage.com!) It’s hard to pick a favourite but we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention The Clocktower Brew Pub (418 Richmond Rd.). Brunch is served Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (which is perfect, because dad gets to sleep in). Churchills (356 Richmond Rd.) is another delicious destination for dad. We’re pretty sure he’ll love the Churchill Burger. It’s made with a locally-raised organic ground beef patty from O’Brien Farms and topped with smoked bacon, St. Albert aged cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomato, and Creole Mayo. Pair it with their famous Colossal Caesar and you’ve got all of your food groups covered. While you and dad are walking off lunch in Westboro Village, drop by the Imperial Barber Shop (352 Richmond Rd.) and treat him to a professional wet shave. You can also bring it back to basics with a cut or beard trim. (This could be a fun outing with junior too!) Gift certificates are a popular option, especially for fathers who are hard to buy for. Check their list of services and book ahead at imperialbarbershop.com. Find them on Facebook and Instagram too. Whether dad is a weekend warrior or simply needs a little TLC after a couple of rounds of gardening, we recommend checking in with the experts at Back In Balance (591 Byron Ave.). There are many different services available for a wide range of needs, not just men’s health. (Go to their website for the full list at backinbalancechiro.ca.) We love the

Did you know that Dr. Michael Friedman, a chiropractor at Back in Balance, moonlights as a comedian? He will be performing at Clocktower on June 15 at 9 p.m. (A ticket for dad and his best bud might be a cool gift idea!) Admission is $17 per person and can be purchased ahead of time via Absolute Comedy Ottawa by calling 613-233-8000. Photo by Ellen Bond idea of treating dad to a massage to help relax, and treat old injuries or sore muscles. If you’re new to massage, don’t worry. Canadian massage therapists are some of the most intensely trained therapists in the world, says Lorrie Douthright, a registered massage therapist at Back in Balance. “The most important thing for me to get across to patients is that we want them comfortable with every aspect of their care. We want them to be free to speak up and ask questions if need be, and feel confident that we are there to help them meet their health goals.”

"The most important thing for me to get across to patients is that we want them comfortable with every aspect of their care." Lorrie Douthright, RMT at Back in Balance


— SPONSORED CONTENT —

GIFTS FOR YOUR STYLIN’ DADDIO Give the gift of fashion to dad for Father’s Day!

and the price is right too! We love flat rate pricing when shopping for glasses. Frames, including prescriptions lenses, are $155. Manager Ciara Dunn says new frames and sunnies are being added to the shelves through August. Here’s some big news: they now offer eye exams. Dr. Catherine Michon is bilingual and is available Tuesday through Friday. See what’s new at instagram.com/oqstories.

kitchissippi.com @Kitchissippi

Ollie Quinn manager Ciara Dunn says new frames are hitting the shelves now through August. Photo by Ellen Bond

WE KN W WESTBORO Liam Kealey

Brendan Kealey

Broker

Sales Representative

Korey Kealey

Kim Xia

Sales Representative

Office Manager

Tel: 613.369.5882 Cell: 613.698.8876 liam@kealeygroup.com

37 • June 2019 • WESTBORO VILLAGE

#wemoveottawa

KitchissippiTimes

When thinking about your next move ... call Kealeygroup!

kitchissippitimes

Get dad into the sartorial spirit at Frank and Oak (297 Richmond Rd.). Now that summer has arrived, we think dad will appreciate their easy breezy short-sleeve button down cotton-linen blend shirts. And if you love to give dad a tie for Father’s Day they have those too! We also appreciate their commitment to eco-conscious materials and manufacturing methods. Read more about it on their website. Oh, and you get 15% off your first purchase if you sign up for their email list at frankandoak.com. E.R. Fisher (199 Richmond Rd.) has been at the forefront of menswear in

Ottawa since they first opened their doors in 1905. Fashions have changed since then, but their excellent service has not. Drop by and see what’s new in store for dad! Sonia Fisher confirms that socks are a hot item for Father’s Day. Check out their Egyptian cotton socks by Pantherella. Other top picks include Italian silk neckwear and lightweight alpaca V-neck sweaters. Personalized gift certificates are always available too! From June 8-15, shoppers can save 25% on Paul & Shark sportswear and Allen Edmonds footwear. Does dad need to spruce up his spectacles or sunglasses? Hit up Ollie Quinn (354B Richmond Rd.). It’s a small shop that is high in style factor,


kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes

WESTBORO VILLAGER

@Kitchissippi

This feature is a paid advertisement sponsored in part by the Westboro Village Business Improvement Area. For more information, please see westborovillage.com. PUBLISHED BY:

Great River Media CONTRIBUTORS:

WESTBORO VILLAGE • June 2019 • 38

kitchissippi.com

Andrea Tomkins Ellen Bond FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Eric Dupuis eric@kitchissippi.com 613-266-5598

HAVE YOU BEEN TOLD YOU HAVE TO LIVE WITH PAIN? Are you worried about your mobility? MEET OUR TEAM

specializing in the treatment of active people

ALLYSON MOORE, Physiotherapist

RILEY BURNS, Physiotherapist

SANDY RIEF, Massage therapist

WANRAPA SURASO, Massage Therapist

NATALIE BLOOM, Kinesiologist

SERAH ROUNDS-ZAVITZ, Massage Therapist

BEN MATHESON, Chiropractor

DEBORA SLOAN, Dietitian

JANE MOYSE, Occupational Therapist

411 Roosevelt Ave #309 613-792-1166

physiotherapy • chiropractic • massage therapy • acupuncture/dry needling • exercise • nutrition/weight loss • concussion


COMMUNITY CALENDAR JUNE 1 - SUMMER SPECTACULAR KITCHISSIPPI COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Councillor Jeff Leiper and many Kitchissippi community associations and volunteers are organizing a Kitchissippi-wide garage sale on June 1 (rain date: June 2). Interested in clearing your closets and selling your goods? Promoting a lemonade stand or porch performance that day? Post your info on the official FB event page (search for “Kitchissippi Community Garage Sale”).

JUNE 7 AND 8 - NATIONAL BOWLS DAY The Highland Park Lawn Bowling Club will be celebrating National Bowls Day. There will be a Friday Fun Night on June 7 at 7 p.m., and an open house on Saturday June 8 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by ParticipACTION Canada. No experience necessary! Equipment will be provided. Flat soled shoes are required. For more information contact info@highlandparklawnbowling.caor visit highlandparklawnbowling.ca.

JUNE 8 - PLANT SALE The Friends of Churchill are hosting the “All Under One Roof” plant and curio sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Churchill Senior Recreation Center parking lot. Tables will be set up for a Mad Hatters Tea Party as well, where you can purchase and enjoy some sweet treats. The Churchill Senior Recreation Center will host the event inside should it rain. JUNE 9 – PLANTING IN THE PARK Iona Park will be hosting its fourth annual, “Planting in the Park” and “Yoga in the Park” on Sunday, June 9th from 9.30 a.m for the planting and Yoga at 10.30 a.m. So bring your gloves, work, then relax on your mat! Both activities are for all ages. 

JUNE 7 - BRAIN HEALTH PRESENTATION Ottawa West Community Support (OWCS) (1137 Wellington St.W.) will be hosting a presentation by the Dementia Society of Ottawa about brain health at 9 a.m. Free! Stop by to learn more about brain health, OWCS, and the Dementia Society. For info: owcs.ca or call 613-728-6016.

JUNE 10 - LAW AFFECTING OLDER ADULTS Learn about the rights and responsibilities of older adults, and those who care for them, under Ontario law. Join a lawyer with expertise dealing with the legal issues and needs of older adults to discuss a variety of topics. Happening at the Carlingwood Library on June 10 at 6:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information go to biblioottawalibrary.ca.

JUNE 7 - NIGHT MARKET ON FOX The Salvation Army Bethany Hope Centre’s Night Market on Fox (located at the corner of Woodroffe and Fox Crescent) returns Friday evenings beginning June 7 through August 23. Unique to Ottawa, the Night Market brings together vendors offering local fresh produce and locally made food and crafts. Every Friday night we invite our community to the table by having dinner at the market, enjoying our playground and performers and connecting with neighbours. For more information go to www.nightmarketonfox.ca. We are accepting vendors and entertainment. Apply by calling 613-725-1733 ext 216 or send an email to nightmarketonfox@bethanyhopecentre.ca.

JUNE 15 - OTTAWA FLOWER MARKET The Ottawa Flower Market will bring together local flower growers and the community in a once a month floral event from May to October. Located in Somerset Square Park, Hintonburg from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. We invite you to join us to browse the colourful stalls full of your favourite late Spring flowers, purchase a bouquet and meet and chat to the people that love and grow the blooms. Be sure to ask the vendors about where and how they grow their flowers, what other services they offer and tips for caring for your purchases. More info at ottawaflowermarket.ca.

JUNE 8 – LIVE BAND: THE CLASSICS Dance to classic rock ‘n’ roll and country music from 7-11 p.m. in the Westboro Legion’s Upstairs Bar & Lounge, 391 Richmond Rd. Public admission: $5. (Legion and Ladies Auxiliary members $2). For more information call 613-725-2778.

JUNE 28 - NIGHT OF WORSHIP AND MINISTRY Join St. Mary’s Parish, 100 Young St., for an evening of praise, prophecy, teaching, healing and fellowship on June 28, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Theme: “In the Shadow of God’s Wings.” Speaker: Chris Currie. Chris is the Chairperson of St. Mary’s Parish Pastoral Council. A respected leader who is actively engaged in various ministry work, he is an advocate for lay involvement in parish renewal. The Night of Worship and Ministry is held every 4th Friday of the month. For more information, please contact: Natalia Lacar (613-728-9811 x720) or email night.worship.ministry@stmarysottawa.ca. WESTBORO LEGION’S BINGO AND LEAGUES Bingo every Wednesday night at the Westboro Legion. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. for Ric’s@480 food service. Bingo games begin at 6:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Join us with your friends, or come and meet new friends. Funds raised are donated back to community organizations.

For the full list of events please go to kitchissippi.com.

Deadline for submissions:

JUNE 21

editor@kitchissippi.com Please include “Community Calendar” in the subject line of your email.

To place a Classified or Marketplace ad, please call 613.238.1818

Dave Rennie’s Autocare Quality Service & Repairs Since 1980 801 Richmond Road Ottawa, ON K2A 0G7

728-0214

39 • June 2019

KITCHISSIPPI MARKET PLACE

JUNE 22 – LIVE MUSIC AT THE WESTBORO LEGION See Country Reflections on stage from 7-11 p.m. in the branch’s Upstairs Bar & Lounge, 391 Richmond Rd. Public admission: $5. (Legion and Ladies Auxiliary members $2). For more information: 613725-2778.

JUNE 25 - BBQ AT WESTBORO BEACH Everyone is invited to the Westboro Beach Community Association “Opening the Beach” Barbeque on Tuesday, June 25 (rain date June 26). There will be face painting and a treasure hunt for the children. Several tables will highlight how we can enhance and protect this treasured green space in our neighbourhood. The barbeque starts at 4 p.m. For more information, please contact infowestborobeach@gmail.com.

KitchissippiTimes

JUNE 7 TO 9 - WESTFEST One of Kitchissippi’s favourite festivals, and it’s free!

Join your friends and neighbours at Tom Brown Arena park for a three days of music, art, and community. Food trucks, workshops, crafters, and buskers, will round out the weekend. Check the full schedule at westfest.ca.

kitchissippitimes

JUNE 3 - DAYTRIPPING: OTTAWA AND BEYOND Travel doesn’t have to be far away to be exciting. Join author and local travel expert Laura Byrne Paquet to hear about her favourite day and weekend trips in and around Ottawa. Discover ideas for short, easily accessible trips to explore the exotic locales in your own backyard! Happening at the Carlingwood Library on Monday, June 3 at 6:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information go to biblioottawalibrary.ca.

WELLINGTONWEST.CA/SIGNUP

@Kitchissippi

JUNE 1 - AFTERNOON TEA & DANCE Starting in June, the afternoon tea & dance will be held on the first and third Wednesday of every month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Churchill Senior Recreation Center. Ballroom, Line and Latin Dance in a social setting on large wood spring floor. No partner required. Cost: $3.75    

WHAT’S HAPPENING EVERY WEDNESDAY

kitchissippi.com

JUNE 1 - THE BIG GIVE 2019 The Big Give (thebiggive.ca) is an annual opportunity for local churches across Canada to provide their community with free goods and services. On Saturday, June 1, St. Mary’s Catholic Church (at the corner of Bayswater and Young Streets) will host its second annual Big Give for all members of the community. This year’s event will feature free services like haircuts and bicycle repairs, free goods like clothing and baked goods, and much more. There’ll also be a BBQ and a bouncy castle for the kids. The Big Give 2019 at St. Mary’s Church runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 1. Everyone is invited!

FIND


June 2019 • 40 kitchissippi.com

@Kitchissippi

kitchissippitimes

KitchissippiTimes


Summer

2019

1

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

DOVERCOURT

3

9

DOVERCOURT’S COMPLETE SUMMER ACTIVITY GUIDE FITNESS • SWIM • SPORTS • ARTS • MUSIC

411 DOVERCOURT AVENUE, OTTAWA ON 613-798-8950 • DOVERCOURT.ORG

Registered charity no. 11944 4263 rr0001

HIGH FIVE® Accredited

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

7

1


YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

2 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

OUTDOOR SPORTS

OUTDOOR SOCCER

An introductory soccer program to learn the basics of the game through a variety of drills and scrimmage games. No special equipment required except runners and sportswear suitable for the weather. 2-3yrs (Parent & Child) • Sat 8:45-9:30am, Jul 6 – Aug 24, SPSU01 – $125 3-4yrs (Parent & Child) • Sat 9:30-10:15am Jul 6 – Aug 24, SPSU02 – $125

3-5yrs • Sat, 10:15-11:00am, Jul 6 – Aug 24, SPSU03 – $125   5-7yrs • Sat 11:00-11:45am, Jul 6 – Aug 24, SPSU04 – $125

PARENT & CHILD T-BALL (OUTDOOR) (3-4yrs) In this relaxed, noncompetitive

environment focused on skills, team playing, and following direction, children (accompanied by parents) will develop basic motor

SUP goes outside for summer. Check out Dovercourt’s SUP partner Urnab Ocean’s website for a variety of summer SUP classes and workshops urbanoceansup.com

skills like balance, agility, and coordination, all while having fun and playing games. • Tue 5:15-6:00pm, Jul 2 – Aug 20, SPSU05 – $125   PERFECT PITCH: INTRODUCTION TO BASEBALL (5-7yrs) An introduction to baseball skills such as throwing, catching, correct batting form, running bases, fielding and positional play. Through skills, drills, and play, children will enhance their motor skills and coordination while having a blast! • Tue 6:00-7:00pm, Jul 2 – Aug 20, SPSU06 – $125


All lessons take place @Festival House, 450 Churchill Ave. N. (Ravenhill Ave. entrance) The Bluesfest School of Music and Art brings industry expertise to the community through group programming, private lessons and special events, all of which are available to artists and musicians of all ages and abilities.

PRIVATE LESSONS

Private lessons provide the most impactful experience in music education. Our teachers are equipped to prepare students for formal musical examinations, professional/semi-professional performances and casual play with friends and family. In person, one-on-one lessons under the guidance of our teachers provide personalized instruction that corrects errors in technique, builds upon the experience and abilities of the student, and focuses on tricks of the trade as appropriate for the student. We offer instruction in: Piano, Guitar, Ukulele, Drums, Voice, Harmonica, Bass Guitar and more.

July and August – Take 5 private lessons for the price of 4, only $101! Contact us for details: 613-627-2762 info@bsoma.ca FAMILY CAMPFIRE UKULELE (6yrs+) The ukulele’s popularity continues to grow because it is relatively easy to learn, good for small hands and has a sweet, happy sound. Together the groups will learn chords, how to read chords, strum patterns, and then put it all together and play classic campfire songs. This course is suitable for families to learn together! Each child should be accompanied by an adult. Please register each family member attending. One ukulele per family is provided for use in class. • Wed 6:00-6:55pm, Jul 3 – Jul 24, BSO377 – $32 • Wed 6:00-6:55pm, Aug 7 – Aug 28, BSO378 – $32 STRINGS FOR KIDS (6-11yrs) For the students who want to test drive an instrument before

committing to private music lessons. Students will try the guitar and ukulele in a group setting. Basics will be taught along with some rudimentary theory; everything they need to know before they take it to the next level. This is a beginner level course. Instruments will be provided during class time. • Ukulele Tue 5:30-6:25pm, Jul 2 – Jul 23, BSO379 – $56 • Guitar Tue 5:30-6:25pm, Aug 6 – Aug 27, BSO380 – $56 STILL LIFE (16yrs+) Still life images capture a single, symbolic moment. Guided still life painting is an accessible way to build your painting practice and gain technical painting skills. This program will focus on compositional elements, technical painting skills, and using colour theory and mark-making to create depth and add richness to still life paintings. • Thu 6:00-8:00pm, Jul 4 – Jul 25, BSO381 – $73

FAMILY CLAY (2+yrs) Spend some quality family time together creating one-of-a-kind projects and building memories that will last a lifetime. Students will explore various hand building techniques and try the wheel before finishing

ADULT WHEEL & HAND BUILDING (16+yrs) Discover the great feeling of clay in your hands. Students will explore various techniques of hand building and try the wheel before finishing pieces with our beautiful glazes. This class is open to all levels of potters. Fee includes 1 bag of clay. • Wed 6:30-9:30pm, Jul 3 – Jul 24, AC035 – $128 • Wed 6:30-9:30pm, Aug 7 – Aug 28, AC036 – $128

3

FREE - TJ WHEELER STRING BAND (10-16yrs) Join TJ Wheeler in preparing for your set to be performed at the 2019 RBC Bluesfest! Roots musician extraordinaire, TJ Wheeler has worked with students of all ages, all over the world for decades, and returns to BSOMA this summer to work with kids from our community. He will direct a small group of participants towards mastering

ADULT POTTERY AT DOVERCOURT

their works of art with our beautiful glazes. Fee includes 1 bag of clay per family. • Fri 6:30-8:00pm Jul 5, 12, 19 AC034 – $45

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

PRINTMAKING (16yrs+) Expand your skills with handprinted techniques. Create cards, zines or fine art prints with linoblock techniques. Explore the potential of printing techniques on fabric, and found objects! • Thu 6:00-8:00pm, Aug 8 – Aug 29, BSO382 – $73

a number of songs while improving technique and confidence with their stringed instrument (guitar, ukulele, banjo, mandolin etc). Please see our website for further information. • Mon-Fri, 5:30-7:30pm, Jul 8 – Jul 12, BSO376 – FREE

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

BLUESFEST SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND ART SUMMER 2019


YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

PLEASE SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR DESCRIPTIONS OF ALL SWIM LESSONS

2. Comfort and functionality of facilities 3. Flexibility and choice 4. Access and inclusion

QUALITY OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

WHAT’S DIFFERENT ABOUT SWIMMING LESSONS AT DOVERCOURT?

The Dovercourt swimming program is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim for Life® model – a comprehensive approach that focuses on three fundamental strokes. Learning Swim to Survive® and achieving the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive® Standard are key foundations of the Swim for Life® program. While Swim for Life® forms the foundation of our swimming program, it is our highly-skilled instructors who ultimately make it the success that it is. Dovercourt swim staff undergoes

AQUATIC CERTIFICATIONS FOR YOUTH Become a Swim Instructor or Lifeguard! Aquatic Leadership = Job training, skills and friends for life! Successfully complete your NL and instructor certifications at Dovercourt and you will be guaranteed a lifeguard / swim instructor position for Fall 2019.

4 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

1. Quality of curriculum and instruction

Dovercourt Recreation Centre takes swimming very seriously. In addition to being an essential life skill, swimming is also an enormous life asset – from both a physical and mental health perspective. Bottom line, those who learn how to swim will have an enormous advantage in life. Dovercourt strongly believes everyone should have that advantage, and with this, has built a unique and reputable swimming program based on 4 key pillars:

BRONZE STAR

Participants develop problemsolving and decision-making skills as individuals and in partners. They learn CPR and develop Water Smart® confidence and the lifesaving skills to become their own personal lifeguard. Prerequisite: Recommended 12 years of age. 150 minutes. • Mon-Fri 8:30-11:00am, Jul 8 – Jul 12, 14198 – $75 • Mon-Fri 8:30-11:00am, Jul 29 – Aug 2, 14199 – $75

BRONZE MEDALLION / EMERGENCY 1ST AID

Learn Lifesaving principles based on water rescue, judgment, knowledge, skill and fitness. Rescuers learn tows, carries, and release methods in preparation for rescues

of increased risk; learn to respond to increasing complex situations involving conscious and unconscious victims with obstructed airways and develop stroke efficiency and endurance in a timed swim (or timed swims). Prerequisite: 12 years of age & Bronze Star or 13 years & good swim ability. (Level 6 or equivalent). Manual: Canadian Lifesaving Manual $51. • Mon-Fri 4:00-6:30pm, Jul 2 – Jul 12, AQL1920 – $132

BRONZE CROSS

Bronze Cross teaches the differences between lifesaving and lifeguarding, safe supervision in aquatic facilities, and the principles of emergency procedures and teamwork. Participants learn how to rescue a spinal injured victim and a pulseless victim. Prerequisites: Bronze Medallion & Emergency First Aid. • Mon-Fri 4:00-6:00pm, Jul 2 – Jul 12, AQL1916 – $99

NL/ NATIONAL LIFEGUARD Candidates will learn skills relevant to safe supervision of a pool. These include

teamwork, communication, the use of specialized equipment and safety supervision. Prerequisites: Age 16, Bronze Cross and Standard 1st Aid and CPR ‘C’. Manual: Alert $51 • Mon-Fri 8:00am-5:00pm, Jun 24 – Jun 28, AQL1923 – $165 • Mon-Fri 8:00am-5:00pm, Aug 26 – Aug 30, AQL1924 – $165

SWIM INSTRUCTOR

Swim Instructor candidates learn to teach and evaluate basic swim strokes and related skills, and acquire proven teaching methods and a variety of stroke development drills and correction techniques. Swim Instructors are certified to teach and evaluate all levels of the Lifesaving Society Swim Program: Parent & Tot, Preschool, Swimmer, and Adult Swimmer. Progressively evaluated, so 100% attendance is required. Prerequisites: 16 years of age and Bronze Cross or NL. Manuals: $44 • Tue 5:30-9:30pm, Aug 13 AND Sat & Sun 10:00am-7:00pm, Aug 17 – 18, AQL1944 – $127

regular, extensive training on safety, current standards and teaching techniques. Sessions conclude with detailed skills progression report cards filled out by the instructors. In addition to their consummate level of instruction, our staff also put a strong emphasis on fun, patience and kindness. Allaying fears and instilling confidence in budding swimmers is a top priority. Read more on our website: www. dovercourt.org/enterprise/OurPool_ Whats-different

LIFESAVING INSTRUCTOR

The Lifesaving Instructor Course prepares instructors to teach the Canadian Swim Patrol, Bronze Medal awards, and Emergency First Aid. Lifesaving Instructors may evaluate and certify candidates in the Swim Patrol, Bronze Star, Emergency First Aid, and Lifesaving Fitness Awards. Progressively evaluated, so 100% attendance is required. Prerequisites: 16 years of age & Bronze Cross or NL. Manuals $67 • Tue 5:30-9:30pm, Aug 20 AND Sat & Sun 10:00am-7:00pm, Aug 24 – 25, AQL1940 – $127

LIFESAVING STANDARD FIRST AID & CPR “C”

An in-depth understanding of first aid such as medical/legal aspects, spinal injuries, heat and cold injuries, bone and joint injuries, burns and other medical injuries. Prerequisites: Open to all. Recommended 12 years of age and older. Manual: Canadian First Aid Manual $20 • Sat & Sun 9:00am-5:00pm, Jul 27 – Jul 28, AQL1960 – $122

FOR ADULTS Learn to: Swim, Save a Life, Learn to Teach.

ADULT LEARN TO SWIM

A gentle learn-to-swim program for the true nonswimmer. Don’t be left on shore, have the kids swim circles around you, or hesitate to participate in water activities again. Prerequisite: 16 years & up • Sat 8:00-8:50am, Jul 6 – Aug 24, 14308 – $105

ADULT DROP IN LESSONS • Tue 8:30-9:20pm, Jul 2 – Aug 27, $10/lesson or 8 visit pass $62.96 • Thu 8:30-9:20pm, Jul 4 – Aug 29, $10/lesson or 8 visit pass $62.96

NLS RECERT

Prerequisite: NLS, must bring card to recert. • Fri 5:00-9:00pm, Aug 16, AQL1944 – $77

STANDARD FIRST AID & CPR “C” RECERT • Sat 9:00am-4:00pm, Jul 20, AQL1950 – $94


LEVEL PARENT &TOT 1-3

WEEK 1

WEEK 2

JULY 1-5

JULY 8-12

WEEK 3

REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER IS OPEN

WEEK 4

JULY 15-19

JULY 22-26

WEEK 5

WEEK 6

JULY 29-AUG 2

WEEK 7

AUG 5-9

WEEK 8

AUG 12-16

WEEK 9

AUG 19-23

AUG 26-30

9:00

14000

9:00

14001

9:10

14002

9:00

14003

9:10

14004

9:30 L

14005

9:00

14006

9:00

14007

9:00

14008

PRESCHOOL A

8:30 L 9:00 9:30 L 9:50 T L

14009 14010 14011 14012

8:30 L 9:00 9:30 L 9:50 T L

14013 14014 14015 14016

8:30 L 9:00 T L 9:30

14017 14018 14019

8:30 L 9:00 T L 9:30 L

14020 14021 14022

8:30 L

14023

8:30 L 9:00 T L 10:00

14024 14025 14026

8:30 L 9:00 L 10:00 L

14027 14028 14029

8:30 L 9:00 L 9:50 T L

14030 14031 14032

8:30 L 9:50 T L

14033 14034

PRESCHOOL B

8:30 L 9:00 L 9:40(B/C) 10:10(B/C) L

14035 14036 14037 14038

8:30 L 9:00 9:40(B/C) 10:00(B/C) L 10:30

14039 14040 14041 14042 14043

8:30 9:00 9:40(B/C) L 9:50(B/C)

14044 14045 14046 14047

8:30(B/C) 9:40 L 10:00

14048 14049 14050

8:30(B/C) L 9:00 9:30(B/C) L 10:00(B/C) L

14051 14052 14053 14054

8:30(B/C) 14055 9:00(B/C) L 14056 10:30(B/C) L 14057

8:30(B/C) 9:00(B/C) L 9:50(B/C) 10:30 L

14058 14059 14060 14061

8:30 9:40(B/C) L 10:00(B/C) L

14062 14063 14064

8:30(B/C) 14065 9:40(B/C) 14066 10:20(B/C) L 14067

PRESCHOOL C

8:30 9:00 L 9:40(B/C) 10:10(B/C) L

14068 14069 14037 14038

8:30 L 14070 9:40(B/C) 14041 10:00(B/C) L 14042

8:30 9:40(B/C) L 9:50(B/C) 10:00

14071 14046 14047 14072

8:30(B/C) 10:00

14048 14073

8:30(B/C) L 14051 9:30(B/C) L 14053 10:00(B/C) L 14054

8:30(B/C) 9:00(B/C) L 9:30 L 10:30(B/C) L

14055 14056 14074 14057

8:30(B/C) 9:00(B/C) L 9:30 L 9:50(B/C) 8:30 L 10:30 L

14058 14059 14075 14060 14090 14091

8:30 9:40(B/C) L 10:00(B/C) L

14076 14063 14064

8:30(B/C) 14065 9:40(B/C) 14066 10:20(B/C) L 14067

8:30 9:00 L

14077 14078

8:30 L

14079

8:30 L 9:30 10:20 L

14080 14081 14082

8:30 L 9:00 L 9:30

14083 14084 14085

8:30 L 9:00 L

8:30 10:30 L

14088 14089

8:20(beg) L 14109 9:00(adv) 14110

8:30 L 10:30

14092 14093

8:30 L 9:50

14094 14095

8:20(beg) 9:00(adv)

14099 14100

8:20(adv) 10:00(beg)

14101 14102

8:20(adv) 14103 10:00(beg) L 14104

8:20(beg) L 9:00(adv) L

14111 14112

8:20(adv) L 9:00(beg) L

14113 14114

8:20 9:00 L 10:10

14118 14119 14120

10:10

14121

10:20 L

14125

9:00 L

14126

8:20 9:00 L

14129 14130

8:20 9:00 L 10:20

14138 14139 14140

8:20 10:10 L

14141 14142

9:30

14146

9:00 L

14150

30 MINUTES

30 MINUTES

30 MINUTES

30 MINUTES

PRESCHOOL D/E

30 MINUTES

8:20(beg) L 14096 9:00(adv) 14097 10:10(beg) L 14098

SWIMMER 2

8:20 10:10 L 10:20 L

14115 14116 14117

9:30 10:00

14127 14128

8:20 10:10 L

14143 14144

10:10

14145

9:40

14151

8:20 9:30

14152 14153

8:20 L

14157

SWIMMER 4/5

9:00

14163

SWIMMER 5/6

8:20 L

14170

40 MINUTES

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 2/3

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 3

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 3/4

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 4

40 MINUTES

40/50 MINUTES

40/50 MINUTES

14171

SWIM PATROL

Rookie/Ranger/Star 60 minutes

14131 14132 14133

10:10

14122

8:20 9:40 L

14134 14135

9:30

14147

8:20(adv) L 14107 10:20(beg) L 14108

8:20 L 9:40 L

10:10

8:20 L 9:30 10:20 L

10:10

8:20 9:00 L 10:10

8:20(adv) 14105 10:10(beg) L 14106

14158 14159 14160

8:20 L

14172

10:00 L

14178

8:20 L

14161

10:10

14164

8:20 10:20

14123 14124

14136 14137

14154

8:20 L 10:10

14148 14149

9:40 L

14155

8:20 L

14162

9:40

14156

8:20 L

14165

8:20 L

14166

9:00 L

14167

8:20 L

14168

9:00 L

14169

10:00 L

14173

9:10 L

14174

8:20 L

14175

10:10

14176

10:10

14177

10:00 L

14179

AFTER CAMP GROUP SWIM LESSONS

4:00

14180

4:00

14181

4:00

14182

4:00

14183

4:00

14184

4:00

14185

4:00

14186

4:00

14187

4:00

14188

SUMMER SALE PRIVATES

4:50

14189

4:50

14190

4:50

14191

4:50

14192

4:50

14193

4:50

14194

4:50

14195

4:50

14196

4:50

14197

8:30

14198

8:30

14199

45 minutes

LESSON FEES:

40 min $175

BRONZE STAR

2.5 hrs

BRONZE MED/ CROSS

2.5/2.0 hrs

LEGEND:

4:00 Med Cross

Med #AQL1920 Cross #AQL1916

T: Transition class. Parents must join their preschooler in the water until the child is ready to participate on their own and is 3 yrs old.

5 $68 $70 $74

5L $99 $104 $109

GROUP LESSONS – ONE WEEK SESSIONS DETAILS CONT’D ON PAGE 8

5

L: LIMITED ENROLLMENT T: TRANSITION CLASS

# lessons 30/40 min 50 min 60 min

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

SWIMMER 1

14086 14087

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

GROUP LESSONS – ONE WEEK SESSIONS


4:50(B/C) L 6:30(B/C)

PRESCHOOL C

5:50(adv) L

5:20(2/3) L

SWIMMER 2

14281

14269

6:50(2/3) L 14282 6:50(2/3)

5:50(beg) L 14270 5:00(adv) L 6:50(adv) L 14271 5:40(beg) L

14262 6:00 L

6:20(2/3) L

5:40 L 6:20(2/3) L

14285

14284 14285

6:20(beg) L 14274

4:30(beg) L 14280

14293

14243 14256 14257 14258 14259 14260 14247 14248 14249 14261 14265 14256 14257 14266 14267 14275 14276 14277 14278 14279 14286 14287 14288 14289 14290 14291 14292 14296 14286 14287

8:00(B/C) L 8:30(C/D) L 8:30(C/D) 9:00 9:00 L 9:50 10:00(B/C) L 10:40(B/C) 11:00(B/C) 11:30 L 8:00 L 8:30(C/D) L 8:30(C/D) 10:00 10:30 L 8:50(beg) L 9:00(adv) 9:40(beg) 10:10(adv) L 11:00(adv) L 8:20(2/3) L 8:30(2/3) L 9:00(2/3) L 9:30 10:20(2/3) L 11:10 L 11:20 L 8:00(3/4) L 8:20(2/3) L 8:30(2/3) L

14268

5:10(3/4) L 14299

4:30 L

5:00 L

4:00(B/C) L 14251 6:00(B/C) L 14252

4:00(B/C) L 14251 6:00(B/C) L 14252

Most 5 yr olds remain in Preschool level When almost 6 yrs old, enter Swimmer level Preschool A & B & C >> Swimmer 1 Preschool D & E >> Swimmer 2

14294

14283

14272 14273

14264

14242 14255

14241 14242

14243 14244 14245 14246 14247 14248 14249 14250

14232 14233

8:00(B/C) L 9:00 9:30 9:30 L 10:00(B/C) L 10:40(B/C) 11:00(B/C) 11:30 L

4:30 L 5:50 T L

RECOMMENDED PROGRESSION

SWIMMER 3

40 MINUTES

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 1

5:00 L

6:00 L

5:20(B/C) 6:30 L

5:00 L 5:20(B/C)

14218 14219

Parent & Tot 1 (under one year), P&T 2 (under two years), P&T 3 (under three years), Preschool Program (3-5 years) and Swimmer Program (5 years & up).

14263

14239 14254

14239 14240

5:00 L 6:00 T L

14220 14221 14222 14223 14224 14225 14226 14227 14228 14229 14230 14231

14204

8:00 L 8:30 L 8:30 T 9:00 9:30 L 9:40 T L 9:40 10:10 T L 10:10 10:30 L 11:00 T 11:30 L

4:00(1-3)

LEARN TO SWIM LEVELS

30 MINUTES

14236 5:30(B/C) L 14253 6:20 L

14236 5:30(B/C) L 14237 6:10 14238

14216 14217

14206

LESSON PROGRESSION:

PRESCHOOL D/E

5:10(B/C) 6:20 L

5:10(B/C) 5:30 L 6:00

14214 5:30 T L 14215 6:30 L

14205 6:00

14204

14207 14208 14209 14210 14211 14202 14203

4:00(1-3)

SUNDAY

8:40 L 8:50 9:00 9:40(3) 10:10(2) 10:20(1-3) 11:20(1-3) L

9:10 14201 10:20(1-3) 14202 11:20(1-3) L 14203

SATURDAY

JULY 6- AUGUST 24 JULY 7-AUGUST 25

TOTS 1:8 PRESCHOOL 1:3

14234 14235

14234 14235

5:20 6:00 T

5:50 L

THURSDAY

JULY 4-AUGUST 29

RATIOS FOR LIMITED ENROLLMENT:

30 MINUTES

30 MINUTES

14212 14213

14200

WEDNESDAY

JULY 3-AUGUST 28

T: Transition class. Parents must join their preschooler in the water until the child is ready to participate on their own and are 3 yrs old.

4:50(B/C) L 6:30(B/C)

5:40 T L 6:00

6:00(1-3)

TUESDAY

JULY 2-AUGUST 27

L: LIMITED ENROLLMENT B: BILINGUAL INSTRUCTOR T: TRANSITION CLASS

PRESCHOOL B

30 MINUTES

PRESCHOOL A

30 MINUTES

PARENT & TOT 2&3

30 MINUTES

14200

6:00(1-3)

PARENT & TOT 1

MONDAY

JULY 1- AUGUST 26

LEVEL

REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER IS OPEN

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

GROUP LESSONS – ONCE A WEEK LESSONS

6 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

LEGEND: LESS

# lesso 30/40 50 min 60 min


14301

10:30(4/5) L 14304 11:10(5/6) L 14307 11:10(5/6) L 14307

14306 14306

6:40(5/6) L 14305 6:40(5/6) L

8:30 9:00 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:30 9:40 10:00 10:00 10:10 10:20 10:30 10:30

14309 14310 14311 14312 14313 14314 14315 14316 14317 14318 14319 14320 14321 14322

8:30 9:00 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:30 9:40 9:40 10:00 10:00 10:10 10:20 10:30

14323 14324 14325 14326 14327 14328 14329 14330 14331 14332 14333 14334 14335 14336

July 8-12

14411 14412 14413 14414 14415

14464 14465 14466 14467 14468

4 lessons Aug 5-26

5:30 5:50 6:20 6:30 6:30 7:00 7:00

14337 14338 14339 14340 14341 14342 14343 14344 14345 14346

July 15-19

14469 14470 14471 14472 14473 14474 14475

4 lessons Aug 6-27

14416 14417 14418 14419 14420 14421 14422

5 lessons July 2 - 30

TUESDAY

9:00 9:00 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 10:00 10:20 10:30 10:30

Week 3

14423 14424 14425 14426 14427 14428

5 lessons July 3-31

5:00 5:00 5:40 6:30 7:00 7:00

14347 14348 14349 14350 14351 14352 14353 14354

July 22-26

8:30 9:00 9:00 9:00 9:10 9:30 9:30 9:40 9:40 10:00 10:20 10:20 10:30 10:30

14429 14430 14431 14432

5 lessons July 4- Aug 1

5:30 5:30 5:50 6:30

9:00 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 10:00 10:00 10:30

Week 6

14377 14378 14379 14380 14381 14382 14383 14384 14385 14386 14387

Aug 12-16

4 5

14513 14514 14515 14516

Private Package $181 $225 Semi Private Package $265 $331

# lessons

PRIVATE LESSON FEES:

14460 14461 14462 14463

4 lessons Aug 4-25

SUNDAY

9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:40 9:40 10:00 10:00 10:10 10:20 10:30

Week 7

4 lessons July 7-28

4:00 5:10 5:30 5:40

14369 14370 14371 14372 14373 14374 14375 14376

Aug 5-9

14482 14483 14484 14485

4 lessons Aug 8-29

THURSDAY

14355 14356 14357 14358 14359 14360 14361 14362 14363 14364 14365 14366 14367 14368

Week 5 July 29- Aug 2

14476 14477 14478 14479 14480 14481

4 lessons Aug 7-28

WEDNESDAY

9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:50 10:20 10:30 10:30

Week 4

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

5:00 5:20 5:30 6:30 6:30

5 lessons July 1-29

MONDAY

ONE DAY PER WEEK LESSONS

Week 2

July 1-5

Week 1

ONE WEEK LONG SESSIONS

5:10(3/4) L 14299

WEEK LESSONS 14388 14389 14390 14391 14392 14393 14394 14395 14396 14397 14398 14399

Aug 19-23

8:30 8:30 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:40 9:40 10:00 10:10 10:20

Week 9

14400 14401 14402 14403 14404 14405 14406 14407 14408 14409 14410

Aug 26-30

8:00 8:00 8:00 8:00 8:00 8:30 8:30 8:30 9:00 9:10 9:20 9:30 9:30 9:30 10:00 10:00 10:30 10:30 10:40 10:50 10:50 10:50 11:00 11:00 11:20 11:20 11:30

14433 14434 14435 14436 14437 14438 14439 14440 14441 14442 14443 14444 14445 14446 14447 14448 14449 14450 14451 14452 14453 14454 14455 14456 14457 14458 14459

14486 14487 14488 14489 14490 14491 14492 14493 14494 14495 14496 14497 14498 14499 14500 14501 14502 14503 14504 14505 14506 14507 14508 14509 14510 14511 14512

4 lessons 4 lessons Sat only July 6-27 Aug 3-24

Refunds & credits will only be given up to one week in advance of the program start date.

If you have purchased private lessons and your schedule changes, you are welcome to substitute the participant. Unfortunately, we do not reschedule or refund.

Please see the full Rec Swim schedule (including holidays & wading pools) on our website

8:30 9:00 9:00 9:00 9:30 9:30 9:30 9:40 10:00 10:00 10:10 10:30

Week 8

ALL PRIVATE PACKAGES ARE 5 LESSONS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER IS OPEN ONE DAY PER

Adult Learn 14308 to Swim 8:00

14296 14303 14304 14298

6:40(5/6) L 14305 6:40(5/6) L

14295

8:00(3/4) L 10:40 10:30(4/5) L 11:20(3/4) L

5:00(3/4) L

14294

14302 5:00(3/4) L

5:10 L

14288 14297 14290 14298

9:00 (2/3) L 10:00 10:20(2/3) L 11:20(3/4) L

8L WE $168 $173 $182

7

PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS

50 MINUTES

SPECIALTY

50 MINUTES

6:10(4/5) L

14300 14301

14295

5:00(3/4) L

14283

6:50(2/3) L 14282 5:00(3/4) L 6:50(2/3)

8 WE $101 $105 $108

SWIMMER 6

50 MINUTES

5:00 L 6:10(4/5) L

14281

9L $168 $173 $182

SWIMMER 5

40 MINUTES

SWIMMER 4

5:20(2/3) L ons 9 min $101 n $105 n $108

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

40 MINUTES

SSON FEES:


YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

GROUP LESSONS – ONE WEEK SESSIONS -CONT’D

pool & special events on our Schedules page

LAP SWIMS

BOOK EARLY

Book early - don’t wait! Only 5 spots will be available each week. All lessons begin at 4:50pm and run for 40min. That’s 10min longer than our regular private lessons and for only $185!

ADULT

12:00-1:00p* 8:30-9:30p**

50+

(Annie’s Swim)

6:30-8:15a* 12:00-1:00p

8:30-9:30p**

12-1pm

12:00-1:00p*

3:00-3:50p

(except Jul 1 & Aug 5)

2-3:45pm 5:30-7:00pm

2-3pm 7:30-8:30pm 7:30-8:30pm

2:00-3:00p

* Sharing with Aquafit or program ** Adult drop in lessons $10/ 50 minutes or 8/ $63 All swims are subject to cancellation or may be shared based on attendance.

Adults: Drop-in lessons Tues & Thurs 8:30-9:20 pm all summer.

12-1pm* 3:00-3:50p

3-3:50pm

2-3pm

HOT TUB & SAUNA ONLY

12-1pm

“Annie's Swim”

3:00-3:50p

FAMILY7-8:30pm

HOT TUB & SAUNA ONLY

12-1pm* 12-1pm* 8:30-9:30pm** 12:00-1:00p* 12:00-1:00p*

3-4pm

FAMILY OPEN

7-8am*

3-3:50pm

DISABLED 3:00-3:50p 3-3:50pm 50+

FRIDAY Saturday

6:30-8:15am* 6:30-8:15a*

12-1pm* 12-1pm* 8:30-9:30pm** 12:00-1:00p*

3-3:50pm

OPEN

TOTS 1:8 PRESCHOOL 1:3 SWIMMER 1-4, 1:4 SWIMMER 5+, 1:6

6:30-8:15a*

12-1pm*

ADULT DISABLED

6:30-8:15am*

6:30-8:15am*

LAP SWIMS

RATIOS FOR LIMITED ENROLLMENT:

SUMMER JUL 1 - AUG 30, 2019 30, 2019 SUMMER 2019 July 1 – August RECREATIONAL SWIM SCHEDULE – See the full schedule including holidays, wading

MONDAY TuesdayTUESDAY WEDNESDAY SwimNAME name Monday Wednesday Thursday THURSDAY Friday SWIM

CAMP SWIM LESSON INFORMATION:

• No parent or survival day. Last class will end early in order to discuss your child’s progress • For successful progress we highly recommend 2 weeks of lessons. Bring in your child’s report card. • Unsure of the level? Refer to website or bring your child in at the beginning of an Open or Family swim to be screened • Campers, please choose ONLY 8:20/8:30 (3 years+) or 4:00 (6 yrs & older) • For 8:20/8:30 am lessons: Drop off camper on the deck • For 4:00 pm lessons: Pick up camper after lessons on deck OR from post-camp pick-up location

RECREATIONAL SWIM SCHEDULE

7:00-8:30p

1:45-3pm

2:00-3:00p

2:00-3:45p

7:30-8:30p

SUNDAY

7:00-8:00a*

Please note: The Sunday 1-2:30pm 12:00-1:00p Open & 2:30-4pm Family swims will run in the 12:00-1:00p indoor pool on RAIN DAYS ONLY, when the outdoor wading pool is closed.

3:00-4:00p

7:30-8:30pm 7:30-8:30p Children swim Free Friday Evening sponsored by Sean McCann, Broker | The Guy with the Dog

SATURDAY Sunday

Please note: The Sunday 1-2:30pm Open & 2:30-4pm Family swims will run in the indoor pool on RAIN DAYS ONLY, when the outdoor wading pool is closed.

1:45-3:00p

Annie's Swim: A free swim for the disabled. Named in memory of 5:30-7:00p “Dover-kid” Anne Vivian, who took comfort in the warm waters of our pool during her courageous battle with brain cancer.

7:00-8:30p

(except July 1 & Aug 5)

* SHARING WITH AQUAFIT OR PROGRAM ** ADULT DROP IN LESSONS $10/ 50 MINUTES OR 8/ $63 All swims are subject to cancellation or may be shared based on attendance.

CHILDREN SWIM FREE FRIDAY EVENING SPONSORED BY SEAN MCCANN, BROKER THE GUY WITH THE DOG

ANNIE’S SWIM: A FREE SWIM FOR THE DISABLED. NAMED IN MEMORY OF “DOVER-KID” ANNE VIVIAN, WHO TOOK COMFORT IN THE WARM WATERS OF OUR POOL DURING HER COURAGEOUS BATTLE WITH BRAIN CANCER.

THE SUMMER SPECIALTY FITNESS PASS FOR ONLY

149

8 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

AQUAFITNESS PROGRAMS AQUA This class uses the resistive properties of water to achieve a full body workout that will improve cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and flexibility. Our dedicated Aquafit Instructors will introduce a variety of equipment and training styles to improve fitness. • Mon 6:30-7:15am • Tue 7:30-8:15pm • Wed 6:30-7:15am • Fri 6:30-7:15am AQUA POWER CIRCUIT Get your blood pumping and work muscles you never knew you had with this multi-level program which incorporates cardio with muscular strength and endurance techniques. Start your day feeling fresh and invigorated! • Sat 7:00-7:45am AQUA HIIT This high intensity class is designed to improve cardio

WITH THE SUMMER SPECIALTY FITNESS PASS, YOU CAN ACCESS ALL OUR SPECIALTY FITNESS PROGRAMS, ALL SUMMER LONG!

TRY ONE, OR TRY THEM ALL. JOIN US JULY 2 - AUGUST 30 (SEE CHART ON PAGE 10) conditioning and overall strength. Experience cardio drills and strength circuits all wrapped up in this 45 minute session. Participants have the choice of working in chest deep water or deep water. All fitness levels are welcome. Time to hit the pool and HIIT it hard! • Mon 7:45-8:30pm AQUA STRENGTH Offering a low impact workout focused on muscular strength and endurance. This class incorporates a variety of equipment to provide an excellent toning and strengthening workout. • Thu 7:45-8:30pm

AQUA DEEP GENTLE Held in the deep water, our Deep Gentle Aqua is a perfect choice for those who are just getting started or require a gentle low impact form of exercise. Participants wear an aqua belt, but must be able to swim without assistance. • Thu 7:00-7:45pm

PILATES PROGRAMS PILATES (FUNDAMENTALS) Whether you are a Pilate’s neophyte or experienced veteran looking to brush up on your technique, this class focuses on developing or perfecting the fundamental skills of a Pilates practice. This program will focus on essential movements with particular attention to form, alignment and breath work. • Mon 6:30-7:25pm PILATES (MULTI-LEVEL) This multi-leveled Pilates practice focuses on progressing through the repertoire of exercises and provides options to increase or decrease intensity based on the needs of your body. Experience in fundamental Pilates technique is recommended for this class. • Tue 7:00-7:55pm • Sat 10:00-10:55am

PILATES YOGA FUSION Enjoy the benefits of both Yoga & Pilates, together in one class! Improve strength, flexibility and balance in the Yoga segment, followed by a series of Pilates exercises that target and tighten the core. • Mon 7:45-8:40pm

YOGA PROGRAMS YOGA Take it slow with this gentle but deep approach to Hatha yoga. This practice links poses to breathe to reveal body awareness, inner strength, and easeful opening. • Tue 8:00-8:55pm YOGA AERIAL Lose yourself in this blissful practice that helps to enhance flexibility, develop core stability, and decompresses the spine and joints, leaving you feeling light as a feather, and better than ever! Focusing on neuromuscular development

and enhancing the mindbody connection, Aerial Yoga allows you to fully surrender to each asana, supported by a silk hammock. All levels and abilities are welcome. • Tue 7:15-8:10pm • Thu 6:00-6:55pm

YOGA GENTLE Gentle Yoga is an ideal place for many beginners to start yoga. Through modified basic yoga positions, one can build strength, flexibility


YOGA POWER FLOW Based on Ashtanga yoga movements, this class flows through postures incorporating the power of music and the body’s own strength. This class is best recommended for those who are looking for a dynamic and physically challenging workout. • Thu 7:00-7:55pm

STRENGTH PROGRAMS TRX Training with the TRX improves your core strength, joint stability, balance and metabolism. The TRX suspension system allows you to target muscular imbalances with fun and creative exercises, while experiencing a completely new and non-traditional form of strength training. • Tue 6:00-6:55pm • Thu 7:00-7:55pm

M.O.W.: (MEN ON WEIGHTS) AND MORE! Strength training with weights, along with a variety of activities and experience, is proven to improve bone density and metabolism, as well as elevate body, mind and overall well-being! This is a class suitable for men of all ages and fitness levels. • Thu 8:00-8:55pm

POSTNATAL FITNESS Dovercourt’s postnatal experts will lead you and your baby through a variety of workouts and fitness techniques to keep you active post-baby. This class incorporates a variety of exercises and equipment. Parents and babies of any ability are welcome! • Mon 9:30-10:25am This class is held at the McKellar Fieldhouse at 539 Wavell Ave. and finishes Aug 12, 2019. POSTNATAL AQUA WITH BABY Enjoy the excellent cardiovascular and muscular strengthening benefits of an aquafitness workout with the company of your baby and other new moms. Even baby gets to enjoy, as they float alongside mom in an infant flotation device provided by Dovercourt. • Tue 12:00-12:45pm POSTNATAL CORE CONDITIONING EXPRESS An express workout for moms and babies on the go! This 40-minute class will offer a tummy-tightening, postureimproving workout for all levels of fitness, with a focus on postpartum indications, such as strengthening the pelvic floor and modifying exercises for Diastasis Recti. • Fri 9:45-10:25am This class is held at the McKellar Fieldhouse at 539 Wavell Ave. and finishes Aug 16, 2019.

PRENATAL PROGRAMS YOGA PRENATAL Stay healthy during pregnancy with yoga postures to stretch and strengthen the entire body. Breath work will relax and deepen your experience, and allow a connection between mind, body and soul during this special time. Suitable for beginners. • Wed 6:00-6:55pm

SPECIAL INTEREST AND DANCE PROGRAMS ZUMBA An exciting, hip-swiveling workout where African, Caribbean and Latin dance moves are combined with aerobics and fitness, to create a perfectly toned body…without even realizing it! Join the party. • Wed 8:00-8:55pm • Sat 10:00-10:55am POUND This music focussed full-body workout combines cardio, conditioning, and strength

REGISTERED EXERCISE PROGRAMS FOR MANAGING HEALTH CONDITIONS We can help you or your loved ones stay active with exercise programs specially designed to address health concerns.

AQUA POSTSTROKE Designed for stroke survivors, Dovercourt’s PostStroke Aqua offers a safe environment for individuals to perform exercises that will increase their functional abilities. Our warm water pool has a walk-in, walk-out beach entrance, so participants are not required to use stairs or ladders. Participants must be able to weight-bear and enter and exit the water with minimal assistance. Caregivers, support-workers and helpers of any sort are always welcome at no additional cost. • Thu 12:00-12:45pm, Jul 4 – Aug 29, HWSU1 – $122

training with yoga and pilates-inspired movements. Designed for all fitness levels, POUND® provides the perfect atmosphere for letting loose, getting energized, toning up and rockin’ out! The workout is easily modifiable and the alternative vibe and welcoming philosophy appeals to men and women of all ages and abilities. • Mon 6:45-7:40pm • Thu 6:45-7:40pm

minutes of muscle and limb stretch that will improve flexibility from head to toe. Stretching is functional, helps blood flow and also helps to relieve stress. Come and shake the day off with us, in this class suitable for all levels. • Wed 6:15-7:00pm

BARRE Our barre programs use the ballet barre and toning equipment to build strengthen muscles while increasing their length and flexibility. This eclectic program combines dance, Pilates, yoga and strength exercises to improve your posture, core strength and coordination. • Mon 6:15-7:00pm TOTAL BODY STRETCH This is not a yoga class! 45

AQUA FIBROMYALGIA This gentle aquatic exercise program was created for participants living with Fibromyalgia. Aquatic exercise has been proven to decrease pain sensitivity and fatigue, making this program the best option for participants with Fibromyalgia. Participants will work to their own abilities and comfort. Individualized modifications and accommodations are provided by the instructor. • Mon 12:00-12:45pm, Jul 8 – Aug 26, HWSU2 – $97 OSTEOFIT Perform muscular strength and endurance exercises and experience an increase in functional ability under the guidance of a skilled instructor. Osteofit was created specifically for individuals who have bone density issues such as osteoporosis or osteopenia. These courses take place in the fitness center.

• Tue 1:30-2:25pm, Jul 2 – Aug 27, HWSU3 – $151 • Thu 10:00-10:55am, Jul 4 – Aug 29, HWSU4 – $151

PIPRFIT (AQUATIC EXERCISE FOR PARKINSON’S) Our warm water pool has a ramp entry and allows you to experience the therapeutic benefits of exercising in the water such as decreased pain, enhanced joint mobility, and improved strength and balance. • Fri 12:00–12:45pm, Jul 5 – Aug 30, HWSU5 – $122 * Please note these programs are not included in the Summer Specialty Fitness pass.

9

AQUA PRENATAL Make the most out of every stage of fitness throughout

pregnancy. This class offers a safe and effective fitness program for moms-to-be. Exercises are low impact and easy on the joints and the lower back, while keeping mom strong and helping to prepare the body for childbirth. • Mon 7:00-7:45pm • Thu 7:00-7:45pm

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

W.O.W.: (WOMEN ON WEIGHTS) AND MORE! Strength training with weights, along with a variety of activities and experience, is proven to improve bone density and metabolism, as well as elevate body, mind and overall well-being! This is a class suitable for women of all ages and fitness levels… come one, come all! • Wed 7:00-7:55pm

POSTNATAL PROGRAMS

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

and a strong core as well as attaining physical & emotional balance. • Wed 7:00-7:55pm


YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

10 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

SUMMER 2019 SPECIALTY FITNESS PASS

MONDAY

TUESDAY

6:30-7:15am Aqua Jake/Catherine

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

6:30-7:15am Aqua Jake

9:00-9:55am Postnatal Fitness McKellar FH Jojo

July 2 - Aug 30, 2019 FRIDAY

SATURDAY

6:30-7:15am Aqua Jojo

7:00-7:45am Aqua Power Circuit Charles

9:00-9:45am Postnatal Core Express McKellar FH TBA

10:00-10:55am Pilates (Multi Level) Carolyn 10:00-10:55am Zumba Karla

12:00-12:45pm Postnatal Aqua Jojo

ONLY 6:15-7:00pm Barre Angela/Dylan

6:00-6:55pm TRX Jojo

6:00-6:55pm Yoga Prenatal Wendy

6:00-6:55pm Aerial Yoga Wendy

6:30-7:25pm Pilates (Fundamentals) Jane/Maureen

7:00-7:55pm Pilates (Multi Level) Carolyn

6:15-7:00pm Total Body Stretch Charles

6:45-7:40pm Pound Rosie

6:45-7:40pm Pound Xiang

7:15-8:10pm Aerial Yoga Jojo

7:00-7:55pm Women on Weights (+ more) Jojo

7:00-7:55pm Yoga Power Flow Charles

7:00-7:45pm Prenatal Aqua Jojo

7:30-8:15pm Aqua Rosie/Dylan

7:00-7:55pm Yoga Gentle Wendy

7:00-7:55pm TRX Wendy

7:45-8:40pm Pilates/Yoga Fusion Charles

8:00-8:55pm Yoga Wendy

8:00-8:55pm Zumba Karla

7:00-7:45pm Aqua Prenatal Jojo

7:45-8:30pm Aqua H.I.I.T. Dylan

GET YOUR SUMMER SPECIALTY ALL-ACCESS PASS, THEN GO TO ANY OF THE CLASSES LISTED HERE. YOU CAN RESERVE YOUR SPOT UP TO 7 DAYS IN ADVANCE. CHANGE IT UP EVERY WEEK IF YOU LIKE!

7:00-7:45pm Aqua Deep Gentle Chris R. 7:45-8:30pm Aqua Strength Chris R. 8:00-8:55pm Men On Weights (+ more) Charles

149

WITH THE SUMMER SPECIALTY FITNESS PASS, YOU CAN ACCESS ALL OUR SPECIALTY FITNESS PROGRAMS, ALL SUMMER LONG! GROUP FITNESS PASS HOLDERS: $57 ACCESS THESE CLASSES FOR GOLD CLUB PASS HOLDERS: ACCESS THESE CLASSES FOR

$77

Aquafit

All classes take place at Dovercourt except the Postnatal Fitness and Postnatal Core Express (McKellar Field House, 539 Wavell near Byron)

Strength Yoga, Pilates Dance Fitness Pre or Postnatal


25 $47 month

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

6:30 to 7:15a

Step Lorayne/ Geoff

CardioMix Geoff

HIIT Lorayne

StrengthMix Jojo

CardioMix Lorayne

8am - CardioMix Lorayne

9:30 to 10:25a

Burn & Tone Ginette

CardioMix Charles

Barbell Challenge Jill

Ginette’s Variety Ginette

20/20/20 Stacey

9am HIIT Trish

5:45 to 6:40p

HIIT Stacey

CardioKickbox Charles

20/20/20 Stacey

Summer Showcase Xiang/Sam

SUNDAY 9am - Strengthmix Lorayne

In rare occurences, programs may be cancelled without advance notice in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

SUMMER 2019 SCHEDULE

Gold Club is for active older adults 55+ looking for daytime opportunities to exercise, socialize, develop new friendships and share interests.

MONDAY Morning

10:30 to 11:25a

ALL ACCESS: Add the Summer Specialty Fitness Pass classes (page 10) for just $57

$57

10:00am -Zumba Karla

$16.50 group fitness drop in (+HST)

GOLD CLUB

for Group Fitness + Fitness Centre + Pool Prices do not include HST

Heart of Gold Jill

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Small Group Strength Training Jill - GCSUM1 9:30-10:25am Jul 9 – Aug 13

Gold Yoga Eric - GCSUM2 9:00-9:55am Jul 10 - Aug 14 McKellar FH

Heart of Gold Jake

Heart of Gold Charles

THURSDAY

FRIDAY 00 $40 month 10:00-11:00am Small Group Strength Training Wendy - GCSUM4 Jul 12 – Aug 16

Heart of Gold Darlene

For Heart of Gold Classes (Ongoing payment) ALL ACCESS: Add the Summer Specialty Fitness Pass classes (page 10) for just $77

$77

Heart of Gold Ginette

Gold Aquafit Rosie - GCSUM5 12:00-1:30pm Jul 10-Aug 14

Afternoon

Add $30.00 per specialty program for Summer 2019 session (any registered class requires a Gold Ongoing Monthly Membership). Prices do not include HST. In rare occurences, programs may be cancelled without advance notice in the event of unforeseen circumstances.

Workout in our bright, welcoming fitness room! Our fitness centre features natural light and an open, inviting space with Paramount weight machines, cardio equipment (including stair climbers, elliptical machines, treadmills, an ergometer rowing machine), a Functional Fitness Trainer from Precor, free weights, body bars, Bosu, Balls, Kettlebells and more.

July 2 to August 30, 2019

Hours Closed For Classes:

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

6:30am-8:30pm

6:30am-9:00pm

6:30am-9:00pm

6:30am-9:00pm

6:30am-7:00pm

7:00am-6:00pm

10:00-11:00am, 1:30-2:30pm 8:00-9:00pm

10:00-11:00am

9:30-10:30am 1:30-2:30pm

SUNDAY 9:00am-6:30pm

00 $31 month Ongoing payment

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

ALL GOLD CLUB CLASSES ARE AT DOVERCOURT EXCEPT WEDNESDAY GOLD YOGA (MCKELLAR FIELDHOUSE)

Small Group Strength Training Jake - GCSUM3 1:30-2:25pm Jul 9 – Aug 13

$40 /month ongoing payment. $47.25 for a one month paid-in-full Gold Club pass. Gold club pass includes pool access for Rec swims, plus hot tub & sauna-only times (see Rec swim schedule online for details)

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

Group Fitness is a perfect place to start: whether you bring a buddy or make new friends, the many benefits of working out in a group make it a great choice.

11


VE DO

OU RC

RT

AV

DAY CAMPS

R SUMME

N REGISTRATIO BEGINS ND 9 JAN 2 , 201

E.

CH ILL AV E. N

DOVERCOURT EXTENDED DAY PROGRAM

TO P IN JUM

S

CAMP #AWESOME

UR

Dovercourt offers one of the largest Day Camp programs in Ottawa, with so much variety and lots to choose from. Each year we add new activities, events and camps to stay up to date with current trends and to keep things exciting. Look for details in our Camp flyer, available on our website.

THE MOST AWESOME SELECTION OF CAMPS IN OTTAWA

CH

YOUR SUMMER ADVENTURE AWAITS DOVERCOURT.ORG

Camps

RT DOVERCOU

CA

RL

IN

G

E. AV

PARKOUR CIRCUS ROBOTICS BAND

RO

BO

ST WE

DAY & OVERNIGHTS CAMP AGES 4+

T DOVERCOUR

AMPS

#AWESOMEC

TO P IN JUM

R SUMME

REGISTRATION INFO You may register for most Dovercourt programs in person, by phone (613-798-8950) or online. Visit www.dovercourt.org and click on Find a Program or Find a Camp. Visa, Visa Debit and MasterCard are accepted online payments. Refunds & cancellations: please see our website for details: www.dovercourt.org/enterprise/HowToRegister While we strive for accuracy in this program guide, please see our website for the most up-to-date information. Prices do not include HST (where applicable).

12 DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE SUMMER 2019 PROGRAMS

Our acclaimed program offers structured, age-appropriate activities for Grades 1-6 at Dovercourt Recreation Centre. With a warm swimming pool, outdoor rinks and one of Ottawa’s best playgrounds, where better to unwind after a full day of learning? Compare our prices to other school boards! To arrange a tour or to register, please call Mathew at 613-798-8950 ext. 271 or email mclift@dovercourt.org Our Commitment to children: As a High Five® accredited organization, Dovercourt is committed to developing and delivering programs that are child-centered and reflect our values of respect, diversity and inclusion. All of our program staff are trained and certified in High Five: Healthy Child Development and our programs are evaluated regularly to ensure a high standard of quality.

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

Fall 2019 registration begins for all programs on Tue. Jun 18, 2019

LOCAL BUSINESSES HELP US BUILD! Corporate naming rights offer local businesses significant profile for their funding in a place where their employees and/or customers live, work and play. Their contributions over a ten year period brand the room and help fuel our expansion project. Dovercourt is happy to welcome local businesses who have stepped up to help us: Carling Motors Volvo & Mazda, Ottawa Physiotherapy & Sport Clinics, Morris Home Team, NeoLore Networks, and Westboro Dental Station. Contact us if you want to help us grow!

DOVERCOURT RECREATION CENTRE OFFERS AN EXTENSIVE MENU OF PARTIES PARTY PACKAGES, PARTY DECOR, GAMES & ACTIVITIES, ENERGETIC PARTY LEADERS. Leave the details & mess to us! Have your party catered by Boston Pizza Carling Ave. They deliver!

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the City of Ottawa/ Recipient remercie sincèrement la Ville d’Ottawa de son soutien financier.

THE WAY I.T. IS SUPPOSED TO BE!

Profile for Great River Media inc.

Kitchissippi Times June 2019  

Your community newspaper

Kitchissippi Times June 2019  

Your community newspaper