Partners in community, spring 2023

Page 5

PARTNERS in community

GRAND RAPIDS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
“Seeing community-led groups have access to financial resources is exciting!”
-Meredith Fennema
4

SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM

Diana R. Sieger

President

Ashley René Lee

Vice President, Strategic Communications

Kate Luckert Schmid

Vice President, Program

Stan Vander Roest

Chief Financial Officer

Marilyn W. Zack

Vice President, Development

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Kyle D. Caldwell (Chair)

Reneé Williams (Vice Chair)

Ken Fawcett, M.D.

Thomas Kyros

Emily Loeks

Brandy Lovelady Mitchell, Ed. D.

Ana Ramirez-Saenz

Samantha Rivera

Richard Roane

Caitlin Townsend Lamb

Kathleen B. Vogelsang

Daniel Williams, Ed. D.

Tel: 616.454.1751

Fax: 616.454.6455

Email: info@GRFoundation.org

Website: GRFoundation.org

PARTNERS in community is a quarterly publication of Grand Rapids Community Foundation

Contributing writers:

Ashley René Lee, Heather Gill Fox, Audra Hartges-Stern, Diana R. Sieger, DeShawn

Pope

Graphic Design: Michele Keren Design

Photography: Alfield Reeves

Photography, Isabel Media Studios

Copyediting:Joan Huyser-Honig

Grand Rapids Community Foundation is a nonprofit organization that connects people, passion and resources. For more than a century, people who care about the future of Kent County have built the Community Foundation through their time, financial resources and thought partnership. Our partners - donors, nonprofits, leaders, doers and more - consistently trust us to help bring key issues to the forefront to build community will, investment and collaboration needed to inspire change.

4 DEVELOPING A GIVING STRATEGY THROUGH A DONOR ADVISED FUND

5

APPLYING OUR NORTH STAR TO OUR INVESTMENT STRATEGY

7

A CLIENT-CENTERED APPROACH TO TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE

8

IDENTITY BASED FUNDS: ENGAGEMENT TO GRANTMAKING AND BEYOND

@GRCommFound

3 6 10 12

PARTNERS IN A NEW CENTURY PARTNERS IN PROGRESS

DIANA R. SIEGER CONSTANT DONOR LEVEL PARTNERS

THIS & THAT

PARTNERS in community SPRING 2023 | Issue 95

PARTNERS

in a New Century

People often talk about retirement in euphemistic ways because it sounds so ominous. I’ve heard these word substitutions for retiring: graduating, transitioning, an extended pause, stepping aside—or insert your favorite word here. However, I don’t think retiring sounds ominous at all. Years ago, I remember thinking, “When I retire I will relax, travel and reconnect with friends.” Well, I hope to do all those things when I retire later this year. And I will find my peace after a few months . . . I hope!

I have been fortunate to serve as president of Grand Rapids Community Foundation for 35 years. I have to say, I haven’t wasted a day of my tenure. Working for the community is not for the faint of heart. I had big plans when I walked through the door of the Community Foundation back on September 14, 1987, following in the footsteps of Pat Edison, who preceded me as executive director. She was patient with me as I wanted to change the world right then and there. This is not so dissimilar to many younger leaders today.

In truth, I was a tad terrified. Frankly, that was okay because it helped me as I overcame obstacles to my big plans. Back then, female leaders were a bit scarce, so we banded together to fortify ourselves, trading stories about how we stepped over or stepped on attempts meant to exclude us and keep us “in check.”

In the 1990s, after watching a group of girls tap dancing at the Festival of the Arts, my dear friend, the late Judy Lloyd, and I decided that we needed to dance and let loose. Judy found the perfect dance studio, JonT Dance Studio. As time went on, we invited other women to join us, and we became known as The Tappers. Our instructor told us that adult students usually start off strong then lose enthusiasm, but not us!

We expanded the group many times and danced our hearts out every Monday night for many years. We even traveled to New York City to dance in Macy’s Tap-O-Mania. Now one might say that wasn’t a smart move for someone in a community leadership role. In fact, one of the spouses thought it was inappropriate, warning me that I wouldn’t be taken seriously.

The Tappers—business leaders, judges and other exceptional women—helped shape me and influenced my leadership. That is how I weathered the headwinds of the many attempts to minimize my leadership. I leaned on these great friends who supported me and told me to ignore the slings and arrows of those who were threatened by the rise of females taking on leadership roles. I wouldn’t trade a moment of my experiences with them.

In my more serious moments, when my convictions were being challenged, I forged ahead and pushed through. Guided by wise board members and phenomenal staff, the Community Foundation has grown in influence and is helping to shape a much more equitable future.

We have grown financial assets from $38 million to $387 million, evolved our governance model, established many new fund types and purchased a permanent home for the Community Foundation in downtown Grand Rapids. We also affirmed our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—formalized in the North Star statement—and established amazing community-led initiatives and funds, like the Youth Field of Interest, Black Legacy, Our LGBTQ, Somos Comunidad, Challenge Scholars Dream funds and more. As the Community Foundation embarks on a new century of service and impact, this is a time of great momentum for our partners and our community. Here’s to the future of promise, opportunity and hope!

DEVELOPING A GIVING STRATEGY through a Donor Advised Fund

Meredith Fennema and Joshua Hiemstra are in a “roller coaster” time of life. Married during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are establishing the patterns of their married life together. As entrepreneurs, they are in an exciting phase of growth. The success of Simpler Site—the web design business Meredith founded and they now operate together—encouraged them to find ways to give back.

They chose to establish a Donor Advised fund through Grand Rapids Community Foundation for the flexibility and possibility of building a giving identity and strategy over time. Their S. Kaibab Fund is named for a special memory on a hike in the Grand Canyon, where they were engaged.

“As business owners who are trying to be systematic and strategic, we want to give long term—but our income can fluctuate from year to year,” Meredith said. “That’s where a Donor Advised fund is, for our position, really nice. We can make contributions to the fund in ways that work well with whatever finances in the business look like in a given year. And over time, we can be committed to consistently giving to the causes that we care about.”

Donor advisors are a large part of the Community Foundation’s impact today, with many actively engaged in regular grantmaking. Grant awards from Donor Advised funds make up 25 percent of the Community Foundation’s total grantmaking each year.

Meredith is a former Community Foundation staff member, having written donor stories, managed the website and more as public relations and marketing specialist from 2013-2016. The connection made it easy for her and Josh to trust the Community Foundation as a philanthropic partner.

“It’d be great if we had the time to do all of the research. But relying on people who know it intimately is a good fit for the stage of life we’re in,” Josh said.

Their philanthropic interests include Baxter Community Center, the environment, women's rights and the West Side of Grand Rapids. They are also open to receiving suggestions of organizations to support from Community Foundation staff, who regularly see funding requests from nonprofit and grassroots organizations and are in touch with local needs.

“I’m excited to see the Community Foundation lift up more grassroots organizations, especially ones that I am not aware of. Seeing community-led groups have access to financial resources is exciting,” Meredith said. “I’m hopeful we can learn from the Community Foundation and the greater community.”

Both Josh and Meredith were born and raised in the Grand Rapids area and recognize our region’s philanthropic tradition. As they develop their giving strategy, they encourage others to think about what they are passionate about before deciding on a giving method. That method might change over time, but the prioritization of giving back is a habit and practice that can continue through all life stages.

Donor Advised funds at the Community Foundation can be established with a single gift of at least $25,000 or can be built over as many as five years. Contact our team for more information about how you can support the causes you care about through a fund you advise.

| 4
Pictured: Meredith Fennema and Joshua Hiemstra
PARTNERS
in community A.H.S. Alfield Reeves Photography

Applying our North Star

TO OUR INVESTMENT STRATEGY

For Grand Rapids Community Foundation, it is a point of pride that our partners trust us to invest their gifts

We take seriously our responsibility to manage the endowment and funds to benefit community today and tomorrow. We steward the financial gifts invested, knowing that no matter where you give or how you interact with a fund—through donations or allocations—the strength and stability of our investment performance allows more support for community.

We are committed to managing our financial resources so we can respond to community needs today and in the future. Involving community in our decision-making and focusing goals on our North Star has shaped our financial approaches and has positioned us for new and continued progress.

The monies entrusted to the Community Foundation are overseen and managed by both staff and community volunteer partners with relevant experience serving on the Investment Review Committee. They review the Community Foundation’s investment policies, monitor performance and evaluate the investment consultant and individual managers. The partnership of staff, community members and hired consultants and managers ensures diverse perspectives, expertise and continued improvement.

“The Community Foundation’s investments are, of course, always impacted by the market. But we actively focus on recruiting a diverse group of experts who are known and respected in the community and invested in the success of West Michigan. This has created a solid portfolio invested for the long term,” said Stan Vander Roest, chief financial officer at the

Community Foundation. The Community Foundation and IRC will continue to adjust the portfolio, respond to the market and find opportunities for improvement. Whether you are a fund holder or give to a fund, your investment in community is well managed and will yield returns— financially and in the economic opportunities created.

Joan Garety, the current IRC chair who first joined the group of volunteers in 2018, said

“Our goal is to choose investments that will provide the Community Foundation with long term reasonable returns while minimizing negative volatility. This will allow monies for grants now and in future years. The Community Foundation’s North Star is important to us and we align our investment choices to this.”

Recent progress in investment performance

Our investment consultant, who carries out the strategy set by the Investment Review Committee, has supported our goals and strengthened our ability to track performance.

Recent successes include:

Reducing fees charged by consolidating investment managers where possible, simplifying the portfolio.

Shifting our business to diverse and women-owned investment managers. In fiscal year 2021-2022, 47.5 percent of the portfolio was managed by Minority/Women-Owned Business Enterprise (MWBE) Certified Managers, up from 29.6 percent the previous year.

OUR NORTH STAR

For West Michigan to grow and prosper, we must make sure that everyone can apply their talents and creativity to fuel our future. It is only by connecting across perspectives and overcoming inequities that we can build and sustain an inclusive economy and thriving community.

Influencing the sector as a founding investor in a Minority/Women-Owned Index Fund, opening the door for other institutional investors to participate. Assets controlled by the firm have doubled since the Community Foundation’s investment.

PARTNERS in community | 5
A.H.S.
1 3 2

PARTNERS in Progress

Since November 2022, the following organizations were awarded grants totaling $1,110,000 from unrestricted and Field of Interest funds.

AQUME Foundation, $10,000

This grant award supports AQUME Foundation’s work to establish and provide in-depth resources to communities of color to learn about and create intergenerational wealth. They do this through philanthropy, estate planning, hands-on educational workshops, networking, BIPOC leadership cultivation and more.

Coalition for Community Owned Safety, $10,000

Through educational events, the Coalition for Community Owned safety raises awareness about the City of Grand Rapids’ collective public safety problems, the community’s story and residents’ solutions for those problems.

Grand Rapids African American Health Institute, $150,000

This grant supports I Belong Strong, a new program from GRAAHI. It provides resources supporting culturally-competent mental health services to Black veterans in Kent County who are recovering from mental illnesses and substance use disorders. This partnership was made possible by the Cecilia Hoagland Fund for Local Veterans.

Has Heart Coffee Shop, $150,000

Has Heart Coffee Shop was awarded this grant to open and operate a coffee shop and creative studio for veterans at Veterans Memorial Park. This partnership was made possible by the Cecilia Hoagland Fund for Local Veterans.

Hero’s Corner Grand Rapids, $175,000

Hero’s Corner Grand Rapids is a sober drop-in place where veterans feel at home. This grant provides HCGR with operating support to provide veterans with mental health services, resource navigation, social engagements and fellowship, addiction resources and sober self-help avenues. This partnership was made possible by the Cecilia Hoagland Fund for Local Veterans.

Justice for our Neighbors, $150,000

This grant partnership helps JFON provide pro bono immigration legal services to immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers.

Kent County Welcome Plan, $10,000

These funds will support the welcome plan coordinator position core functions and focus areas to improve new American’s education outcomes, maximize economic potential and engage communities.

Kent School Services Network, $300,000

This two-year grant award helps continue the community school model that benefits our Challenge Scholars cohorts in the Union High School pipeline. Its strategies are designed to increase student attendance and well-being.

Our Community’s Children, $40,000

This grant award supports OCC’s To College/Through College team as they pilot activities to support post-secondary decisionmaking and enrollment among graduating seniors in the 2023 Challenge Scholars cohort.

Puertas Abiertas, $65,000

Puertas Abiertas provides culturally specific mental health support for Latinx community members and their families, who are survivors of domestic violence, human trafficking and/or sexual abuse.

Young Money Finances, $50,000

This grant award supports Young Money Finances as they empower youth and families with financial literacy through culturally responsive education.

A Client-Centered APPROACH TO TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE

Puertas Abiertas is a local nonprofit creating transformative change in Kent County by offering culturally-specific mental health support for Latinx women, men and their families, who are survivors of domestic violence, human trafficking and/or sexual abuse. Puertas Abiertas, which means “open doors,” started in 2019 and now has more than 540 clients. It offers support groups for women, men, adolescents and LGBTQ+ specific groups. Three separate volunteer grantmaking committees at Grand Rapids Community Foundation have approved this organization for grant awards in the past five months. Fund for Community Good, Somos Comunidad and Our LGBTQ funds’ advisory committees were inspired by its critical, intersectional work.

We interviewed Andrea Inostroza, Puertas Abiertas’ executive director, to explore its client-centered approach.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BEGIN THIS WORK IN THE SOCIAL SERVICES SECTOR?

AI: I found a need and I created a solution for it. There is a huge need of the Latino community to be able to be incorporated into the society and to be able to use the resources the community has in general. At the beginning, I thought it was like a lack of resources, but that wasn’t what it was. It was a need for an organization to be able to connect all the other organizations. So that’s what we advocacy.

PARTNERS in community | 6

WHY IS THERE SUCH A GREAT NEED FOR THESE SERVICES AMONG LATINX COMMUNITIES?

AI: The biggest issue that Latinx communities encounter in West Michigan is a lack of cultural competence, which leads to discrimination in other social service settings. Making matters worse within the Latinx community is the lack of trust for many organizations because of issues of culture, immigration and language. Our organization is the solution to this problem, as it was founded by members of the Latinx community itself and continues to have the majority of its staff, board and volunteers from the Latinx community.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE WHAT THAT ADVOCACY LOOKS LIKE IN ACTION?

AI: By providing means to healing, selfsufficiency, education and awareness, we are interrupting the cycle that perpetuates domestic violence. Our programs help victims to become less dependent on their abusers and more aware of what abuse is. We provide the space and means for healing so that the problems associated with the abuse cycle are not passed on to the next generation.

From shelters, out of the violence situations, trafficking situations or discrimination, our bilingual advocates walk them through the whole process of lawyers, courts and police. We do this while making sure all the basic needs are covered. We are always there with them. And when things start getting calm a little bit, we start including English classes, computer classes and more. Self-esteem is very important as well as providing the necessary tools to become completely independent. We discuss the difference between want and need, because we usually go back to the abusive relationship because we need the help. We need help paying the bills, you know. But if we are independent, we want to be with someone, we don’t need to be with that person.

YOU’VE GREATLY EXPANDED YOUR SERVICES SINCE 2019. HOW HAS THAT GROWTH BEEN INFORMED BY THE COMMUNITIES YOU SERVE?

AI: When they ask me how this organization started, it was because I

listened. When we came out with the idea, it was not what I want to give to them. It’s what they need from me. That’s how we start. So, when we have this conversation with our clients, every meeting we have, we always ask, “What do you need from us? What is the part that you feel weak?” And then that’s what we do, we change and build trust. We listen to clients’ needs through focus groups, 1:1 interviews, surveys and direct staff observations.

PUERTAS ABIERTAS SERVES A WIDE VARIETY OF LATINX COMMUNITIES. HOW DO YOU NAVIGATE SUCH A VARIANCE IN THE POPULATIONS YOU SERVE?

AI: I would like for the clients to be able to know more about social services, and, at the same time, I would like for the rest of the community to learn more about the Latino community. We are not all from Mexico. No, I’m from Chile! I have clients from Nicaragua, Colombia, Dominican Republic and El Salvador. We have so many places and everybody is so different. The same Spanish word can mean something completely different in another Spanish-speaking culture. We show respect and we teach clients how to respect each other. Respect and communication are the base for everything. They talk about their culture, and they share with the other clients.

WHAT IS SOMETHING YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE

EVERYONE KNOWS ABOUT PUERTAS ABIERTAS?

AI: We are here, and we are here to help and to work with the community and organizations. We don’t close the door to anybody. Not only Latinos, if we get other clients, we refer them, we transport them, we help them find where the services can be provided to them. We are here to help the community, to teach. We have to provide better services for the Latino community and give an opportunity because many good people have suffered, and they only needed someone to believe in them, to trust them.

PARTNERS in community | 7
H.G.F. Photos of their programming provided by Puertas Abiertas

2022 COMMUNITY LISTENING + ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

Co-Creating For The Future

In July 2022, The Black Legacy, Our LGBTQ, and Somos Comunidad funds hosted focus groups with members of their respective communities, noting their intersections, and with the following objectives in mind:

1. To listen more deeply to the aspirations and concerns of community members

2. To live into our desire to be in deeper relationships with communities we care about, and

3. To co-create investment opportunities in service of communities we care about.

The focus groups intended to provide a space for deep listening, including noting what was implied or more implicit in the conversation. The purpose of the sessions was not only to obtain feedback around the technical inputs related to grantmaking but, more importantly, to highlight the relational elements within communities that foster sustainable relationships and movement building. The sessions also allowed members of the respective funds to participate as observers, allowing them to listen to the voices of their communities around their respective concerns and hopes for the future

Two focus groups were held for the Black Legacy Fund in July 2022. In total, 15 community members were in attendance.

ADDRESS + DISMANTLE INEQUITIES IN PHILANTHROPIC + GRANTMAKING SYSTEMS THAT LACK INCLUSION + ACCESSIBILITY.

APPLICATIONS

130 of applications came from POC-led organizations

applications totaling $10,761,123 in requests 91%

1. grassroots organizations (non 501c3s)

22% 58%

had never been funded through the Community Foundation’s competitive grantmaking

JULY 2022 BLACK LEGACYFU N
IDENTITY BASED FUNDS
FACILITATION, CONSULTING AND REPORT ANALYSIS PROVIDED BY:
Pictured: Committee volunteers at the Community Open House
-
“I LOVE THE SENSE OF CONNECTEDNESS THAT I FEEL IN MY COMMUNITY” FOCUS GROUP PARTICIPANT

S O MOSCOMUNIDAD

TIMELINE

JULY 2022

Two focus groups were held for Our LGBTQ Community Fund. In total, 22 members of the LGBTQ+ community were in attendance.

“I LOVE MEETING OTHERS + CREATING A FAMILY WITH THOSE OF SIMILAR IDENTITIES.”

FUND

KEY THEMES

VALUES TO UPHOLD + PRIORITIZE: SELF-DETERMINATION, AUTHENTIC REPRESENTATION, ACCEPTANCE, + INCREASED OPPORTUNITIES FOR WEALTH BUILDING.

SUPPORTING RACIAL + SOCIAL JUSTICE MOVEMENTS, LOCAL ACTIVISM, + HAVING AWARENESS AROUND INTERSECTIONAL ISSUES IS CRITICAL TO THE WORK OF THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION.

PROVIDE A SPACE WHERE MARGINALIZED VOICES ARE GIVEN A PLATFORM TO PARTICIPATE IN PHILANTHROPY, FUND IMPORTANT ISSUES IN THEIR COMMUNITIES, + ESTABLISH A LEGACY OF GIVING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION.

Learning will continue to be shared with community and committees will continue to receive feedback to adapt and inform their future work!

SUPPORTING YOUTH AND CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR TALENT AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT.

COLLECTIVE GRANT APPLICATION PROCESS + GRANT AWARDS

GRANTS AWARDED

TIMELINE EXTENSION

to grassroots organizations (non 501c3s) supporting primarily youth-focused organizations

48% 100% to POC-led organizations

45% 31 grant awards totaling $827,045

new partnerships with the Community Foundation

Volunteer advisory committees use feedback from community listening and engagement to reshape grant priorities and grant application process.

Grant applications opened. Informational Sessions held to report out on community engagements and answer questions about the application process.

Grant application closed. Volunteer advisory committees reviewed all requests and made decisions about grant awards.

Grant awards announced.

AUG–OCT 2022 OCT-NOV 2022 DEC 2022 FEB 2023 DEC 2022-JAN 2023

community

2. 3. 4. 5.
PARTNERS in
56% | 9
- FOCUS GROUP PARTICIPANT
“I LOVE BUILDING A COMMUNITY HERE, + SEEING THE DEDICATION THERE IS TO SUPPORT THE THINGS WE ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT.”
ONGOING OURLGBTQFUND
JULY 2022
Three focus groups were held for Somos Comunidad Fund in July and August 2022, including one conducted entirely in Spanish, with a total of 39 community members in attendance across all three groups.
Community debrief sessions held to discuss grantmaking practices and results.

.

DIANA R. SIEGER Constant Donor Level Partners

Diana R. Sieger Constant Donor Level donors demonstrate consistent and dedicated support. The donor partners listed below have made a gift to one or more of our fund types—including Donor Advised, designated, Field of Interest, scholarship, special project or unrestricted funds—for at least five consecutive fiscal years, as of June 30, 2022. We are grateful for their steady support!

Andrew and Sonja Acosta . Rick and Loy Adamy . Amazon Smile Foundation . Emily Ambs . Ms. O’Linda L. Anderson

. Anonymous (21) . Frederick J. Antczak and Deborah J. Hughes . Mary M. Appelt M.D. . Deborah Autman . Bob and Patty Ayars . Joanne Ayotte . John and Janet Baab

. David and Janice Bailey . Joel Bair . Claudia Bajema

. Lori J. Baker . Brian and Deanna Bakker . Bank of America Charitable Foundation . Mr. and Mrs. Maurice

A. Barnes . William J. Barrett . Ms. Billie Barszcz . Rob and Shelly Batterbee . Laurie Finney Beard . Mr. Jared Belka . Shelly Belstra . Rosemary Bennett . Vickie and Tom Bergers . Darlene Berghorst . Louis and Linda Berra

. Ken Betz and Pat Brewer . Dr. William H. Beute . Rick and Kim Billings . Ruth E. Bishop . Lynne Black . Ben Boerkoel . Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Boerman . Glenn* and Betsy Borre . Eric Bouwens and Yenching Hsu . Janet and John Boyles . Barbara Bradley and Ronald Feenstra . John Braley . Thomas and Tracy Breihof Charitable Fund . James and Sharon Breuker . The Brooks Family . Andrew and Janay Brower . Robert D. and Katherine M. Brower

. Jim and Susan Brown . John and Suzette Buchan . Juli

Bunker . Katie Burns . Anna Moore Butzner . William H. Bylenga . Kyle and Juliann Caldwell . Katharine Cangelosi

. Chris and Staci Carlson . Dr. Neil Carlson . Betts and Jim Casey . Ms. Kalista A. Castine . CDV5 Foundation

Darlene Ceremello and Jessea Greenman . Rick and Willow Chapla . Iain and Michaele Charnley . Tom and Natalie Chase . The Chelovich Family . Norm and Anita

Christopher . Jim and Pat Clay . Mr. Bruce Clearing Sky

Christensen . Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. Clemens Jr. .

Dotti Clune and Jill Henemyer . Rob and Diane Collier .

Ms. Mary Cook . Huey G. and Mary Copeland . Dr. Ed and Linda Cox . Laurie and Crawford Craft . Bob and Julie Currier . Tom and Jan Czerney . Tom and Gale

Czerwinski . Bill and Margie Darooge . Gwendolyn D. Dawkins . Allen and Vivian De Jonge . David and Bridget

De Vos . Tina Freese Decker and Jason Decker . Donna and David Deeb . The Charles J DeLanoy Family Charitable Foundation . Harvey DeMaagd . Barbara DeMoor and Clive Morris . Ron and Jeanne DeWaard . Martha and Nick Dewey . Gail O. DeYoung . Mary DeYoung . Daniel and Catherine Diedrich . Beth and Ross Dornan . Jason and Stephanie Doublestein . Nancy L. Douglas . Paul T. and Celeste Doyle . Douglas and Kristine Dozeman . Mr. and Mrs. Carl W. Dufendach . Lucy Dyer Joswick and Scott Joswick . John and Penny Edison Family Foundation

. Cheryl Elenbaas . Mark and Jennifer Ellis . Michelle Ellison . Ben Emdin . Jean Enright . Pat and Dan Esch

. Bill and Kay Farr . Lynne Ferrell-Robinson and David Robinson Jr. . Eric and Kelly Fischer . Greg and Sarah

Flick . Mary and Bill Ford .

Barb Forseman . Heather and Sam Fox . Henry A. (Happy)

Fox Jr. . John and Kristine Fox . Paula and Michael Freed

. Peter and Lori French . Frey Foundation . Mr. and Mrs. David G. Frey . Brad and Jeanie Friedland . Margaret Gage . Lawrence Gammons . Don and Laurie Gardner .

Gerber Companies Foundation . Cheryl Gillett . Linsey

Gleason . Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Gleason . Mike and Rachel Goorhouse . Srikanth Gopal . Ken Grashuis and Lori Lockyear . Phillip and Vanessa Greene . Justin and Jodie Gritter . Daniel Grzywacz and Holly Westhouse

. Rená* and Gary Guttrich . Scott and Gail Haebich .

Dick Hansen . Mr. William and Claudia Hardy . Jackie Haveman and Nathan Dwiri* . Heart of West Michigan

United Way . Mr. Kenneth W. Heffner and Dr. Gail Gunst

Heffner . Jason Herlands and Gen Kobayashi . Ms. Ann

C. Hess . John and Gwen Hibbard . David Hibschman .

Dan and Diane Hickey . David Hill and Elizabeth Kidd .

Jeff Hill . Laura Hill . Harland Holman and Kira Sieplinga

. Pat Holmes . Mark and Wendy Holtvluwer . Jane Hondelink . Mr. Timothy L. Horner . Richard and Anne Horvitz . John and Janyce Huff . Robert and Laura Hughes . Katherine Humphrey . John Hunting . Steven and Joan Huyser-Honig . Integrity Business Solutions

LLC . Win and Kyle Irwin . Robert and Paulette Israels

. Carlton and Wendy Jackson . Cherry and Phil Jacobus

. Ellen M. James . Mrs. Lois Jandernoa . Matthew and Keri Jaynes . Laura Jeltema . Mark and Beth Johnson .

Margy Jones . Patricia Jones . Judith Joseph . Joseph and Elizabeth Junewick . Bryan and Kelly Kading .

Mamie Kalliel . Carol Karr and Kevin Briggs . Mary and Dan Karrip . Corrine E. Kass . Nancy Kehoe Nielsen

. The Keller Foundation . Andy and Christina Keller .

Mr. Frederick P. Keller . The W. K. Kellogg Foundation

. John and Nancy Kennedy . Kent Charitable Trust .

Mike Kerkorian and Chris Penzien . John Kershek and John Potter . Kristopher and Kathryn Kimball . Kurt and Randy Kimball . Vicki and Tom Kimball . Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Kimmel . Roberta F. King and Mike J. Miesch . Doug and Pat Klein . Stephen Klotz Family . Jim Knack

. S A “Skip” and Debbie Knapp . Ron and Jeanne Koehler

. Douglas and Louann Kohlbeck . Mr. and Mrs. Jonathon

P. Kok . Jan Koopman . Ron and Bonnie Kopp . John

E. Kotwick . Anna and Jason Kraai . Jerry and Wendy

Kregel . Blake and Mary Krueger . Janet M. Krueger and Bruce Goodman . Dr. David and Mary Kutsche . Ruth Kutsche . Cris and Tom Kutzli . Tom and Sally Kyros .

Susan and Brad Laffrey Fund . Christopher Barnes and Jessica Lalley . Rob and Linda Lalley . Marilyn Lankfer and Jeff Schad . B. Kenneth Larm . Paul and Nora LeBlanc

. Gary and Janeen Lemke . Mark and Marcie Lewis . Ping and Tim Liang .

PARTNERS in community | 10

Ray Loeschner . Arend and Nancy Lubbers . Peter

Lundeen . Suzie Mackeigan . Jon and Mary Ann March

. Barbara P. Marcus . Brenda Marean and Ron Palmitier

. Dr. Ralph E. Mathis . Ardath McCall . Mrs. Teresa McCarty . Dennis and Julie McCrary . Kate and John

McGarry . Michelle McHale-Adams and George Adams

. Brenda L. McKean . Joe and Tina Meckley . Connie R. Medema . David Meier . Meijer Inc. . Aaron and Kimberly Meles . Dr. Dan P. Millar and Mrs. Karen Lee

Carpenter Millar . Bryant and Audrey Mitchell . Ronald and Karen Modreski . Gordie and Jan Moeller . Aaron and Cheryl Molhoek . Mr. David W. Morgenstern . Mr. and Mrs. Gene Morrison . Morton Family . James and Sherry Moyer . Terri A. Mulligan . The Honorable William B. and Paula Murphy . Matt and Stephanie Muscat . Bob and Margaret Nault . Khan and Liza Nedd . Nate and Lisa Nelson . Dr. Tony and Linda Nemec Foster . Mark Nettleton . Thomas and Marcia Nobel . Gary and Peg Novosad . Robin Nunn . Ken Nysson and Carol Hennessy, Commissioner . Judge W. Baldwin* and Judy Ogden . Ward Oliver and Catharine Grad . Mr. Gerald Olson .

Timothy J. and Debra D. O’Rourke . Dr. Theresa Osmer and Dr. Eric Graf . Matt and Beth Osterhaven . Mrs. Enid Packard . Bill Padnos and Margy Kaye . Hannah

Padnos . Mitchell and Karen Padnos . Shelley Padnos and Carol Sarosik . Terry McGovern and Carol PaineMcGovern . Joan Panopoulos . Jennifer A. Pascua . Jeffrey Patterson . Ms. Linda B. Patterson . Ken and Jill Peirce . Mr. and Mrs. William P. Peterson . Jim and Julie Petrie . Larry and Jean Pinckney . Ms. Charlene Pletcher . Charles F. Pletcher . Charles Forrest Pletcher II, Sarah Granger, and Julia Pletcher . Martha J. Porter .

Marlowe Pranger and Melvina Vanderlinde . John and Ann Puckett . Dave and Laura Radle . Amy Ransler .

Daniel and Judy Rau . Carole C. Redwine . Hildi Reed . Mary Zoe Remien . Dale and Sherri Remmelts . Randy and Kris Renker . Rhoades McKee PC . Carlyn Richards

. Ridge Economic Agricultural Partners . Michael Rios .

Richard A. Roane and Leandro Robles . Sally and Larry Robson . Deb and Ron Roden . Leslee Rohs . Milt and Barbara Rohwer . Dr. Jack and Lija Romence . Lisa Marlene Rose . Brian and June Rudy . Rebecca and Dale Rynbrandt . Mary Ann Sabo and Jeff Ott . Carlos

Sanchez and Lynne Pope . David Sarnacki and Bridget

Flynn . Robert E and Marcia L Schaub Family Foundation

. Harold C. Schmidt . Mrs. Jerri Schroeder . Rana and Joseph Schwartz . Sebastian Foundation . Fred Sebulske

. Melissa A. Seguin . Ms. Barbara R. Shapiro . Robert

Shapton + Mary Reagan Shapton . Shaun and Ruth Shira

. Diana R. Sieger . Theodore and Jacqueline Simpkins . Eva Sitek . Brent and Diane Slay . Eric and Amy Smith .

Mr. and Mrs. J. Patrick Smith . Peggy J. Smith . Warren and Nancy Smith . Steven A. Starnes . Terrence M. Start

. Steelcase Foundation . Craig and Cheri Stein . Deb and Fred Steketee . Rick and Sue Steketee . Justin W. Stemple . Stan and Norma Sterk . Wendy Stock . Amy and Nicholas Stockero . Susan A. Stoddard . George

Stoutin and Dave Heilman . Philip and Dawnielle Streng .

Bill Stroh . Judy Subar . Frank Suskey . Lon and Sandy

Swartzentruber . Jim and Pat Talen . Michael and Susan

Taylor . Nick Thole and Amy Turner-Thole . Amanda and Scott Thomas . Jill and Art Tiefenbach . Martin and Louise

Timkovich . Betsey Tinkham . Claude and Sharyl Titche .

Robert and Colleen Tobin . Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Tomsik

Jr. . Jenine and Jose Torres . Philip and Diane Tower .

Caitlin and Paul Townsend Lamb . Carol L. Townsend .

Patti Trepkowski . Verlee and Mary Trice . Elizabeth

Triezenberg . Laura and Steve Triezenberg . George and Kerstin Trowbridge . Selma Tucker . Donald and Mary

Tuttle . Rudy and Nancy Van Donk . Don and Ruth Van

Stee . Mr. and Mrs. Rodney J. Van Tol . Selene Van Vleck . Douglas and Kathy Vance . Simon and Mary Vander Kooy

Foundation . Mr. and Mrs. Stan Vander Roest . Lorrie and Dave Vander Ark . Dan and Judy Vandersteen . John and Diane VanderVeen . Frank and Sharon Van Haven

. Andy and Tracy Van Solkema . Mr. and Mrs. Matthew

VanZetten . Mr. and Mrs. Larry A. Ver Merris . Ben and Emily VerWys . Phil and Kathy Vogelsang . Gary and Bobbie Vruggink . Ms. Susan M. Waddell . Gary Walker . Anita Wallgren . Warner Norcross + Judd . Mary Warner

. Lynn Warshaw and Vicki Esch . Richard Waskin and W. Larry Hanlin . Wege Foundation . Elizabeth Welch and Brian Schwartz . Ms. Aleta Wells . Barbara Wepman

. Larry and Susan Whipple . Mary White . Drs. Chad and Kathy Williams . Jeff and Janet Williams . Reneé Williams . Robert C. Williams . Janice Williford . Joan Wilson . Loyd Winer* . Susan Wittenbach . Aleicia Woodrick . Gabriel Works and John O’Connor* . Kurt and Sally Yost . Allen and Jonse Young . Bruce C. Young . Cameron Young . Marilyn and Garrett Zack . Joan and Jim Zawacki . Karen Zivi and Michael Moody . George and Gretchen Zuiderveen . Betty Zylstra and David Baak . Robert J. Zylstra

*Remembered

We go to great lengths to list each donor according to their personal preference. If you wish to have your recognition name listed differently or spotted a typo in your name, please accept our apologies and let us know by calling 616.454.1751 with any changes.

Commitment and dedication sum up Diana Sieger, who has provided more than 35 years of service and leadership as president of Grand Rapids Community Foundation. In February, Diana announced her plan to retire in 2023. Read more about this transition or make a gift in her honor at GRFoundation.org/DianaSieger.

PARTNERS in community |
11

Grand Rapids Community Foundation

185 Oakes Street SW

Grand Rapids, MI 49503

If you would like to receive PARTNERS in community and other Community Foundation news in your email inbox, sign up at GiveGR.org/Partners

THIS & THAT

ANNOUNCING DIANA SIEGER’S RETIREMENT AFTER 35 YEARS OF LEADERSHIP

After more than 35 years of dedicated service, Grand Rapids Community Foundation President Diana R. Sieger will retire later this year, in fall 2023. Diana has served as president at the Community Foundation since 1987, fearlessly moving forward to address key issues and lead transformative initiatives to support all in West Michigan. Learn more at GRFoundation.org/News

WELCOMING A NEW BOARD TRUSTEE

The Community Foundation is pleased to announce the newest member of our Board of Trustees, Caitlin Townsend Lamb, director of people advancement, lean continuous improvement systems and communications at Cascade Engineering. “I have always been passionate about connecting process excellence to individual and community well-being. As a trustee, I am excited to lend my professional experience in operationalizing strategic vision and continuous improvement in pursuit of the North Star,” Caitlin said. Caitlin has served as a member and chair of the Community Foundation’s Advisory Council, was a member of the committee that created the North Star and is one of the Community Foundation’s 100 New Philanthropists.

COMMUNITY FOUNDATION SURVEY

For the second year, we are asking partners to reply to a short demographic survey. Donor and volunteer partners received an email or letter from Ebony Reddock at Michigan Public Health Institute in March with an invitation to complete a short survey. We hope you will take the time to respond! If you have any questions, please reach out to Jonse Young, director of philanthropic services.

For many years, Grand Rapids Community Foundation has been on a journey of reflection about diversity, equity and inclusion. We’ve done this by exploring our internal practices and policies, listening to community partners and co-creating across all facets of our work. A Catalyzing Community Giving grant from W.K. Kellogg Foundation recognized and accelerated this work. The data collected in this survey will ensure we understand who is represented from all communities who call Kent County home.

SUMMER CAMP

Summertime fun is quickly approaching. West Michigan has many daytime and overnight options for youth. The camps include fun activities such as sports, arts, technology and academics. The Mary I. and David D. Hunting Family Fund and the Community Foundation proudly support dozens of well-known camps in West Michigan. Visit WestMISummerCamps.org for more information.

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage P A I D Grand Rapids, MI Permit No. 360
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.