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INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN ™

LUXURY The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

WEST COAST STYLE

BEYOND DECADENCE

Authentic fashion, brave décor, & your next design indulgences

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Photo Michael Burns

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cont 32

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60

february–march.16

18. hello

True value.

SCENE 29. art

The classical-meets-urban portraiture of Brooklyn artist Kehinde Wiley comes to the Seattle Art Museum.

32. happenings

News, events, and openings.

38. word

Five industry experts reveal the life-changing moments they got hooked on design.

40. retail

Secret’s out! The owner of Vancouver’s exclusive concept shop Secret Location discusses real luxury.

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STYLE 45. fashion

Luxe layers and mixed materials are having a moment in menswear.

50. jewelry

Fascinated by the liminal space where land meets sea, metalsmith Cat McCadden draws on coastal inspiration for her latest collection.

52. fashion

Bespoke tailoring and menswear arrive in Portland, courtesy of a former New York lawyer.

56. made here

Filson’s creative director discusses the heritage brand’s evolution—and shows off the company’s stunning new flagship store in Seattle.

60. sourced

Taking our cue from inimitable fashion icon Diana Vreeland, GRAY offers some extravagant design suggestions—and a bounty of products to match.

70. interiors

High above Pioneer Square, a brick-walled Seattle loft celebrates the eclectic with a lifetime’s worth of globally gathered décor.

76. interiors

Vancouver interior designer Mitchell Freedland elevates a Manhattan penthouse with custom furniture and fine-tuned details.


tents 82

FEATURES 82. natural selection

An exclusive look inside art world titans Shari and John Behnke’s gallery-rivaling home.

88. watershed

A contemporary Montana ranch house embraces the rugged beauty—and rushing waters— of its surrounding landscape.

98. found in translation

Architect Nicolaas Wilkens shapes a modern Seattle house around gezelligheid: the distinctly Dutch concept of coziness.

BACK OF THE BOOK 106. context

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114. architecture

Inspired by Central Oregon’s rocky, almost prehistoric landscape, Hacker designs a new home for Bend’s Unitarian Universalist Fellowship.

122. architecture

A clean-lined house rises on the wild, windy shore of British Columbia’s Lake Nicola.

126. resources

Your guide to the designers, furnishings, and suppliers featured in this issue.

130. last word

30 creatives share personal objects that symbolize meaningful luxury in design.

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On the Cover

A ruggedly handsome house by Hughes Umbanhowar Architects is custom-designed for a Montana flood plain. SEE PAGE

88 Photograph by STEPHEN DUNN

Rallied by builder Tim Mather, the Lake Oswego community saves the area’s last Pietro Belluschi house. graymag . com

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The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

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Introducing the Costura Collection from Stua.

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| hello |

true value

JAMIE-LEE FUOCO

WILLIAM ANTHONY

MY HOUSE IS FAR FROM FANCY. But in the ways that matter

Big thanks to everyone who came out to GRAY’s anniversary parties in Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver this December! We had a blast celebrating with you. Pictured from left are some of the GRAY team: yours truly; special projects editor Stacy Kendall; account executive Erica Clemeson; editor Rachel Gallaher; account executive Kayse Gundram; founder and publisher Shawn Williams; and intern Nessa Pullman.

Overheard on social media

“WHEN YOUR KICKS MATCH THE ART, SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT.” @HENRY_CONTEMPORARIES, REGRAM FROM @JVSTING

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most to me, it’s luxurious. I love its circular layout, which lets my three-year-old dance a loop through the entire ground floor. I love that the kitchen is open to the dining room, so whoever’s cooking can enjoy not only company, but also elbow room. There’s a patio where we can watch the sunset, wine glasses in hand. And there’s an operable window over the bathtub—hot baths with cool air breezing in are my own personal epitome of extravagance. In short, our house supports the way my family and I want to live. There are, of course, things in it that we treasure—expensive objects, sentimental items. But when I think about luxury, my mind turns to the stuff we do, not the stuff we own. In this luxury-themed issue, we’ve steered clear of gold-leafed ceilings, multiple-car garages, and other cliché trappings of the high life. We believe that luxury is much more complex and, no pun intended, richer. Instead we talk to people who are living out their design dreams—creating everything from bespoke suits (pg. 52) to next-level concept shops (pg. 40). And we spotlight homes that reflect the unique values and priorities of their inhabitants, whether they’re passionate art collectors who forgo a traditional foyer for a curated gallery space (pg. 82) or Dutch creatives who decorate their home (pg. 98) around the concept of gezelligheid (coziness). We challenged Mark Busse to explore the concept of luxury in design for our new back-page column, “Last Word.” In turn, he asked his colleagues at HCMA Architecture + Design to bring him an object that symbolized their personal view of the subject. Check out the resulting tableau (pg. 130). It’s hard to imagine a clearer illustration of how relative and personal luxury can be—one man’s handmade shoe might be another’s drinking water. (As they say.) What’s luxurious to you? We hope you’ll join the conversation at Graymag.com.

Jaime Gillin, Director of Editorial + Content Strategy jaime@graymag.com

INSTAGRAM: @gray_magazine // FACEBOOK: graymag // TWITTER: @gray_magazine PINTEREST: gray_magazine // LINKEDIN: company/gray-magazine

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A MERICAN - MADE CL ASSIC CO NT E M PO R A RY H OM E F U R NIS H IN GS

Wells sofa, $3999; Winslow cocktail table, $1799; Tulum rug, $1399. University Village 2675 NE University Village Street, Seattle roomandboard.com


FOUNDER + PUBLISHER

Shawn Williams shawn@graymag.com DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL + CONTENT STRATEGY Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.com SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR

Stacy Kendall stacy@graymag.com EDITOR

Rachel Gallaher rachel@graymag.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Nicole Munson nicole@graymag.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Courtney Ferris, Alexa McIntyre, Brian Libby, Lindsey M. Roberts COPY EDITOR

Laura Harger NEWSSTAND MANAGER

Bob Moenster OFFICE MANAGER

Tracey Bjerke ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

Tally Williams INTERNS

Dzenita Goletic, Nessa Pullman CONTRIBUTORS

Michele Andrews, Belathée Photography, Mark Busse, Daniel G. Cole, Stephen Dunn, Rachel Eggers, Rick Etkin, Miles Fortune, Gibeon Photography, Alex Hayden, Andrew J.S., Jordan Kushins, Josh Partee, Ema Peter, Lenna Petersen, Charlie Schuck, Jami Smith, Lara Swimmer, Luis Valdizon ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Craig Allard Miller Erica Clemeson Kayse Gundram

ADVERTISING: shawn@graymag.com SUBMISSIONS: submissions@graymag.com SUBSCRIPTIONS: subscriptions@graymag.com No. 26. Copyright ©2016. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 19410 Hwy. 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, WA 98036. Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

Subscribe online at graymag.com

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Palos Verdes Estates Architect: R.Barto, AIA Designer: DLFstudio Photography: DLFstudio

Be House Proud ...inspired by Spark Modern Fires. Designed and engineered to be extraordinary. See our photo gallery at www.sparkfires.com or 203.791.2725

modern fires graymag . com

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| contributors |

BELATHテ右 PHOTOGRAPHY belathee.com pg 70

MARK BUSSE markbusse.ca pg 130

DANIEL G. COLE danielgcole.com pg 52

RACHEL EGGERS pg 82

MILES FORTUNE milesfortune.com pg 50

RICK ETKIN ricketkin.com pg 130

GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY gibeonphotography.com pg 88

LAURA HARGER lauraharger.com pg 29

ALEX HAYDEN alexhayden.com pg 82

ANDREW J.S. andrewjs.co pg 45

JORDAN KUSHINS jordankushins.com pg 122

BRIAN LIBBY brianlibby.com pg 88, 114

JOSH PARTEE joshpartee.com pg 106

EMA PETER emapeter.com pg 76, 122

CHARLIE SCHUCK charlieschuck.com pg 98

LARA SWIMMER swimmerphoto.com pg 56, 114

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The latest: ✘ GRAY’s Q+A with Riley McFerrin, founder of Vancouver’s Hinterland Design—plus a tour of Hinterland’s new showroom ✘ A Seattle rental apartment gets a glam makeover, courtesy Kelly Lyons and Lauren Hockema of K&L Interiors ✘ Modern lodging in one of Portland’s oldest buildings: a peek inside the new Society Hotel

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES graymag.com Get access to more photos and details from stories in each issue, find the most important design events happening near and far, and discover the people, projects, and places you need to know—all from the only Pacific Northwest magazine that gives design its undivided attention. Seattle firm goCstudio created movable merchandise racks for running apparel company Oiselle’s first brickand-mortar store. The steel racks raise with a manual crank and theater fly system to free up floor space for community events. See more at Graymag.com.

#GRAYMAG

INSTAGRAM: @gray_magazine // FACEBOOK: graymag TWITTER: @gray_magazine // PINTEREST: gray_magazine LINKEDIN: company/gray-magazine


Adams Architecture adamsarchitecture.net

AKJ Architects LLC akjarchitects.com

pacific northwest architects

BattersbyHowat Architects battersbyhowat.com

Ben Trogdon | Architects bentrogdonarchitects.com

These architecture and design firms are doing outstanding work in this region. They also support GRAY and our efforts to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. Please contact them for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

DeForest Architects deforestarchitects.com

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio guggenheimstudio.com

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Integrate Architecture & Planning integratearch.com

Iredale Group Architecture iredale.ca


Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

Beebe Skidmore Architects

Castanes Architects

Chesmore Buck

DAO Architecture LLC

Emerick Architects

FIELDWORK Design & Architecture

Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects

Janof Architecture

KASA Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

baylisarchitects.com

castanes.com

emerick-architects.com

janofarchitecture.com

bcandj.com

chesmorebuck.com

fieldworkdesign.net

kasaarchitecture.com

beebeskidmore.com

daoarchitecture.com

gsarchitects.net

lanewilliams.com

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Lanefab Design / Build

LEVER Architecture

Prentiss Architects

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Scott | Edwards Architecture

SHAPE Architecture Inc.

Skylab Architecture

Stephenson Design Collective

STUDIO-E Architecture

Tyler Engle Architects

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pacific northwest architects Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

o. EIGHTEEN GRAY ISSUE Ngraymag . com

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WWW.ULTRA-TEC.COM


scene

COURTESY SEAN KELLY, NEW YORK. © KEHINDE WILEY. PHOTO: JASON WYCHE.

Shantavia Beale II, a 2012 painting by Kehinde Wiley, is now on view at the Seattle Art Museum, one of 60 pieces offering an overview of the Brooklyn-based artist’s work.

“A NEW REPUBLIC” Feb. 11–May 8

Seattle Art Museum Written by LAURA HARGER

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scene

art |

BROOKLYN-BASED ARTIST KEHINDE WILEY’s kaleidoscopic mash-ups, inspired by the idiosyncratic street style of young black men and women in South LA and Harlem, come to the Seattle Art Museum this February. Juxtaposing up-to-the-minute portraiture against the loftiest of backgrounds—from triptych altarpieces to lush botanical textiles—he depicts his modern subjects as worthy of the social sanction and exalted status of historical nobility. “I take the figure out of its original environment and place it in something completely made up,” Wiley explains. “I quote historical sources [to] position young black men within the field of power.” The 60 exhibited works trace Wiley’s career trajectory, from his seminal early-2000s paintings of young Harlem men recast in the setting of Old Master works to his ongoing “World Stage” project: portraits of locals in Nigeria, India, Haiti, and other countries marked by colonialism, all rendered against vibrant backdrops and rococo patterns. Also on view are portraits of women from Wiley’s “Economy of Grace” series, as well as his stained-glass works, which reverently morph young black men into saints and martyrs. “These works bowl you over with fabulousness and beauty,” says Catharina Manchanda, curator at SAM. “This exhibition will not just engage viewers in an important conversation, but also create a galvanizing experience that will last long after they leave the galleries.” Wiley’s blockbuster show is not to be missed, whether you’re a classicist or a connoisseur of cutting-edge work. h

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ABOVE: The sitter’s pose in Morpheus, from 2008, references a sculpture by French Neoclassical sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon. TOP LEFT AND RIGHT: Anthony of Padua (2013) and The Two Sisters (2012) place their subjects against ornate floral backdrops, in poses drawn from classical paintings. The men in Wiley’s paintings wear their own street clothes; the women in his “Economy of Grace” series, on the other hand, wear couture gowns custom-made for each subject by Riccardo Tisci of Givenchy.

TOP LEFT: COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ROBERTS & TILTON, CULVER CITY, CALIFORNIA © KEHINDE WILEY. PHOTO: MAX YAWNEY ; TOP RIGHT: COURTESY SEAN KELLY, NEW YORK. © KEHINDE WILEY. PHOTO: JASON WYCHE; BELOW: COURTESY ROBERTS & TILTON, CULVER CITY, CALIFORNIA; SEAN KELLY, NEW YORK; GALERIE DANIEL TEMPLON, PARIS; AND STEPHEN FRIEDMAN GALLERY, LONDON. © KEHINDE WILEY.

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happenings |

here+ there VISIT Sai Woo

(1) The first restaurant project by rising-star Vancouver firm Falken Reynolds Interiors, Sai Woo, in Vancouver’s Chinatown, draws upon myriad local influences to infuse the two-level, 188-seat space with a sophisticated global vibe. Look for lights by Lukas Peet, chairs by Niels Bendtsen, and hexagonal tiles and potted Persian ironwood trees inspired by the nearby Dr. Sun Yat-Sen garden. A mixed plate never looked so good. ›› saiwoo.ca

House Spirits

(3) House Spirits opened its new $6 million, 14,000-square-foot warehouse and tasting room on Portland’s Distillery Row this past November, officially becoming the Pacific Northwest’s largest operating distillery. Local firm Osmose Design conjured up its elegant, streamlined look—and stunning bottle display—out of humble materials such as black MDF, Douglas fir, and aluminum. A window along the tasting bar reveals a handcrafted stainless-copper whiskey still from Louisville, Kentucky. ›› housespirits.com

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Nordia House

(2) After 25 years of planning, Portland’s Nordic community raised the curtain on its new cultural center this past summer. Located in the Southwest neighborhood, the 9,800-square-foot Nordia House, designed by Portland’s DiLoreto Architecture, nods to the work of iconic designers such as Alvar Aalto and Eliel Saarinen with its emphases on natural materials and interior spaces that exalt the soft, diffused qualities of Scandinavian— and Northwest—sunlight. The building holds event spaces, a gallery, and an outpost of Portland’s beloved café Broder—try the Swedish pancakes with lemon curd and lingonberry jam. ›› scanheritage.org

1 EMA PETER


HOT NEW NEXT

2 JEFF AMRAM PHOTOGRAPHY

HEAR Mass Timber Conference

Design in Depth Feb. 16, March 15, and April 19 The Seattle Architecture Foundation’s 2016 Design in Depth series draws industry luminaries to discuss today’s design landscape, exploring everything from cutting-edge technologies (Feb. 16) to the new regionalism (March 15) to Seattle’s most successful adaptive reuse projects (April 19). Soon you’ll be able to visit SAF in its new home, the long-awaited, much-anticipated Center for Architecture & Design, slated to open in February 2016 in downtown Seattle. ›› seattlearchitecture.org

March 22–24 Designers and builders eager to learn more about opportunities and obstacles in cross-laminated and mass timber construction in North America should attend Portland’s Mass Timber Conference, a three-day event hosting architects, engineers, city planners, and timber manufacturers for lectures and discussions on advancing innovative wood construction in buildings of all scales. Highlights include an on-the-ground construction tour through Portland. ›› masstimberconference.com

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COURTESY HOUSE SPIRITS graymag . com

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Why is best practice not good enough? Who has the right to the city? Why does the factory dictate the product?

design week portland

APRIL 15-23 How do we win the war against seeing? Can we connect design to higher purpose? How does food shape place? designweekportland.com


i n t eri o r d e s i gn

MA I SON IN C

MAISONINC.COM

1611 nw northrup

portland

503 295 0151


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PREVIEW Gold House

To create something unforgettable, often you need to take the unconventional route. That’s what Vancouver developer Rize Alliance did when it tapped global hospitality design firm Hirsch Bedner Associates to create the interiors of Gold House—a two-tower mixed-use residential complex designed by Chris Dikeakos Architects that’s about to break ground in Burnaby, B.C.’s Metrotown. HBA’s Lisa Garriss, the project’s lead interior designer, explains that Rize seeks to raise the bar on residential design and bring a decidedly international flair to the neighborhood. Gold House—HBA’s first residential project in Canada—“is about creating excitement and pushing the limits of a luxury product,” she says. Take the fivestar-hotel-esque four-story lobby, for example, and expansive unit terraces that range in size from 100 to 1,000 square feet. The exterior, too, goes for big-time drama: it’s splashed with a jaw-dropping three-story LED wall, Canada’s largest digital display, that will feature a rotating schedule of digital artwork curated by the Burnaby Art Gallery. “Design is about drama, theater, and creating unique experiences for people,” says Garriss. “Vancouver has so much opportunity to expand in the world of luxury.” And Gold House is seizing that opportunity. ›› goldhouseliving.com RENDERINGS COURTESY RIZE ALLIANCE

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—NESSA PULLMAN


SEE Anchorage Museum Feb. 5–April 10 Merging two formerly independent art shows, the new All-Alaska Biennial at the Anchorage Museum brings together 27 Alaskan contemporary artists working in photography, embroidery, sculpture, and more. Competition was tight—out of 594 submissions, guest curator Jen Budney selected just 41 pieces to display. “Many of the works are visually stunning and simply knock my socks off,” Budney says. “Others I find compelling because of their inner mystery or profound exterior strangeness.” ›› anchoragemuseum.org

Portland Art Museum Feb. 13–May 8 Spot some of the Northwest’s finest artists at the Portland Art Museum’s 2016 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards exhibition. Work by the eight winners— culled from 235 nominees—include a large-scale neon piece by Willem Volkersz, photorealistic charcoal drawings by Lead Pencil Studio, and a 40-foot clay installation by Akio Takamori that investigates the experience of children in wartime. ›› portlandartmuseum.org

COURTESY BOCCI

Bellevue Arts Museum

TRAVEL Bocci Berlin

This past November, acclaimed Vancouver design and manufacturing company Bocci—established by designer Omer Arbel—expanded east. Way east. A former 1897 courthouse in Charlottenburg, Berlin, now dubbed Bocci 79, is the company’s first European headquarters, housing a working laboratory, production hub, and product archive. Later this year, Bocci 79 will commence on-site manufacturing and launch a series of workshops and events. The six-story building is open to walk-ins; visitors can wander its atmospheric rooms, hallways, and stairwells to discover largescale installations of products, prototypes, and experimental pieces. ›› bocci.ca

Through May 1 The Bellevue Arts Museum has been on a winning streak of design exhibitions. Its latest effort, “Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture,” is the first major retrospective devoted to Kahn, one of the leading architects of the 20th century. Kahn’s influence was on par with that of Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe; he designed monumental works that harnessed light on a massive scale. A lecture and book signing on March 5 features architects Steven Holl and Robert McCarter discussing the master’s legacy. ›› bellevuearts.org

Suyama Space Through April 15 Kicking off the final year of shows at Suyama Space, Seattle’s beloved 18-year-old space for experimental art installations—slated to close this coming December—is The False Spectator, a room-sized work by Joan Tanner, the 81-year-old Californian artist known for her assemblages of found and collected objects. Troughs, columns, and steps of wood, sheet metal, and plastic webbing are suspended from a network of ropes and cables in this vast exploration of location and dispossession. If you’ve never visited Suyama Space before, this is your chance. ›› suyamaspace.org

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style

word |

a query for the creative class DESCRIBE YOUR INTRODUCTION TO

q.

DESIGN—WHAT WAS THE MOMENT THAT GOT YOU HOOKED?

ARLENE KISIEL-JERMANN architect AKJ Architects, Seattle

I first got interested in architecture at age 12, when I visited ancient sites in Greece. But I really became enamored while taking classes in interior design, when I learned how to use pencils, markers, and watercolor to develop concepts.

CARLOS TAYLOR SWANSON

woodworker and founder Madera Furniture Company, Tacoma, WA

When I was 12 years old, I built a clubhouse in my parents’ backyard that grew big enough to attract the attention of the city’s planning department. That was my first lesson in ‘best practices’ for building and design! The real hook came in high school, when I built a balsa wood model of a house I designed for an architectural drawing class. The thrill of seeing a thoughtfully designed thing come to life in three dimensions never gets old.

LANE WILLIAMS

architect Lane Williams Architects, Seattle

I BEGAN DRAWING HOUSE PLANS WHEN I WAS ABOUT NINE. MY FATHER WAS AN ART TEACHER, PAINTER, CERAMIST, AND AMATEUR ARCHITECT-BUILDER. HE TAUGHT ME BASIC CARPENTRY SKILLS AND ALL TYPES OF DRAWING WHEN I WAS IN GRADE SCHOOL—FIGURE DRAWING, PERSPECTIVE DRAWING, ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING. THE HOOK WAS IN. I STILL DRAW WITH A PENCIL.

RENEE RUSSO I WAS A TEENAGE JOCK WHO BOUGHT MY FIRST VOGUE MAGAZINE IN SEVENTH GRADE. I IMMEDIATELY GOT HOOKED ON FASHION, WHICH LED ME TO STUDY FASHION IN LONDON. THEN AN APPRENTICESHIP WITH MARGARET HOWELL, THE THOUGHTFUL FASHION DESIGNER AND PRODUCT CURATOR, WIDENED MY KNOWLEDGE INTO CARRIE MCCARTHY INTERIOR DESIGN. stylist and creative director Marrimor, Vancouver

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owner and designer EWF Modern, Portland

The ’80s is when I started to notice everything design— MTV, foil wallpaper, magenta. My parents introduced me to functional furniture: they got a modular sofa, and I thought it was the coolest thing ever.


KITCHEN INTERIOR DESIGN

SieMatic Seattle

2030 1st Avenue   Tel: 206.443.8620 www.siematic.com


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scene

retail |

CONCEPT AND OBJECT The impossibly chic and enigmatic owner of Secret Location opens up to GRAY about the Vancouver concept store’s playful—yet serious—approach to luxury. Written by STACY KENDALL Photographed by LUIS VALDIZON

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THREE YEARS AGO, when 24-year-old Carey Melnichuk opened Secret Location, a glossy retail store and restaurant in Vancouver’s historic Gastown neighborhood, it had some locals scratching their heads. Yet the swank 7,500-square-foot boutique— seemingly whisked in from Milan, Paris, or Moscow—has been a tonic to the neighborhood’s entrenched grittiness. Offering clothing and accessories from storied fashion houses such as Carven and Vionnet, mixed with more avantgarde labels such as House of Holland and Giannico (Lady Gaga is a fan), it also houses a restaurant, helmed by executive chef Montgomery Lau, that presents fantastical tasting menus (proffering, for example, “Textures of Carrots”) and a new series of themed dinners (next up is “Dining with the Gods, Athens,” February 12–14). Vancouverites have embraced the shop, which presents its refined, singular vision absent contrivance. It’s garnered multiple retail and restaurant awards, and in May 2015 an outpost, SL, opened in nearby Richmond. Melnichuk has stayed mostly out of the limelight, preferring that the space speak—and win hearts—for itself. But GRAY caught up with the elusive proprietor earlier this winter to capture her thoughts on real luxury and the concept behind her concept store. »


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Secret Location carries vintage Chanel jewelry and bags, focusing on rare items from the quintessential luxury label. Also in the shop’s inventory are iconic cars and motorcycles; pictured here is a Triumph Bonneville T120. Previous sales include a Léon Bollée Voiturette dating from 1897.

What’s your personal vision of retail? Shopping can feel like work, but here we want it to be a treat. If you’re buying a $3,000 bag, you should not be standing in a line. Service itself is a kind of product. Our demographic is very diverse in age and cultures, which allows us to have a well-rounded selection of products. For some people, Secret Location is where they buy their magazines and have a cup of coffee; others come in to find a bespoke suit or gown or a piece of jewelry that means something to them. This was always meant to be a place where you can discover not only something new to wear, but also something new about yourself.

“At Secret Location, we are interested in brands, but only to a certain degree. Accessibility detracts from luxury.” —CAREY MELNICHUK

Let’s talk about luxury on the West Coast. Here it’s much more important to be a tastemaker or trendsetter than it is to follow others. If you compare Vancouver and other West Coast cities to places in Europe or Asia, we are very young, and we’re growing quickly. Here, we value brands that share our perspective on caring for the environment, more so, I think, than in other places. At Secret Location, we are interested in brands, but only to a certain degree. Accessibility detracts from luxury. About half of our brands are exclusive to Canada, and 90% are exclusive to Vancouver. It’s important for someone to be able to say, after shopping here, “I have this jacket, and it’s the only one in Canada.” But we also make sure that luxury isn’t taken so seriously—it can be entertaining, fun, and personable. I love the embroidered Olympia Le-Tan clutches, which are shaped like classic novels, and quirky lipshaped sunglasses from Yazbukey by Linda Farrow. We also do custom pieces that reflect a single customer’s personality—for example, we recently converted a client’s hand-drawn artwork into a luggage lining for her through the British brand Globe-Trotter. How do your own inspirations shape Secret Location? Whenever I’m abroad, I try to find time to see a new store or art gallery between business meetings. I always look for what’s new and what’s happening— I have a severe curiosity that never seems to be quenched. But ultimately, I am inspired by our customers—they are intellectual, design-driven, and quality-focused, and so we work that much harder to find products that will elicit a response or stir an emotion. This shop is not about me. That’s the point of its name—it’s supposed to be special to you. h

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NECESSITIES FOR FINE LIVING Designed in Seattle, WA. since 2002

Spring & Summer 2016 Collections in stores now. Shot at Smith Rock near Bend OR. by Mark Welsh coalheadwear.com - @coalheadwear


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IN THE MOOD Winter dressing doesn’t have to be a snooze—seize the opportunity to play with layers, mix in some vintage, and test out a tailored look. Men of the Northwest, here’s looking at you. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by ANDREW J.S. Styled by MICHELE ANDREWS Model: LOGAN BRAY, HEFFNER MANAGEMENT

A palette pulled from the moody hues of winter is a boon to any ensemble—muted colors (think rich olive green, deep gray, and classic black) allow the dresser to quietly experiment with new silhouettes and materials. Rumet Knit Coat by Hannes Roether from Baby & Company, Seattle.

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“Dressing is an art form and one of the oldest modes of expression, and we should all experience that playfulness, no matter the gender.” —MICHELE ANDREWS, STYLIST

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AS THE NORTHWEST continues its meteoric rise as a world-class region, we think it’s time to minimize the casual clothes and embrace a new level of sophistication. That doesn’t mean ditching comfort, and it doesn’t require a daily suit. All that’s needed to turn an everyday outfit into a head-turning style is attention to form and an appreciation of the unexpected. We’ll call the look the New Northwest Man—he’s mindful, a little enigmatic, and never afraid to throw on a few extra layers. »

Polo shirts are coming back. Instead of popping the collar à la early 2000s, try a cardigan and jacket on for size. Tan jacket, Maiden Noir, Seattle. Alpaca-blend cardigan and 1952 pique shirt by Fred Perry x Nigel Cabourn from Baby & Company. OPPOSITE: Layering enables slick style transitions throughout the day, and a coat thrown over the shoulders emphasizes contour. Raglan Maniche coat by Mauro Grifoni and Zip Cardy sw eater by YMC from Baby & Company. Vintage liner jacket, stylist’s own.

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“The Northwest is still all about the quality of our fleece, and we’re still rooted in pragmatism. But we’re starting to focus more on overall silhouette, which includes more exaggerated lines and shapes.” —MICHELE ANDREWS, STYLIST

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Slim suits have been in for a while, but the wide-legged pants on this refreshingly nostalgic number hearken back to the 1940s. Vintage jacket, 1960s button-up, and vintage loafers, stylist’s own. Slim Lines pant by Instead We Smile and Rumet coat by Hannes Roether from Baby & Company. OPPOSITE: Unexpected mixtures lead to unexpectedly elegant results: put a fashion-forward piece like a down kimono over vintagewear. Button-up shirt, blazer, and white quilted jacket, stylist’s own. h

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SEA CURRENT Drawing inspiration from West Coast to East, metalsmith Cat McCadden infuses a strong sense of place into her handcrafted oceanic baubles.

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by MILES FORTUNE Stylist LENNA PETERSEN Model KARINA LESAGE

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FOURTEEN YEARS AGO,

Cat McCadden moved from Philadelphia to Seattle armed with jewelry she’d collected over the years, a penchant for the coast, and an antsy feeling. As a freelance graphic designer, she used design skills every day, but the two-dimensional nature of the work left her creatively dissatisfied. “I wanted to create something tangible with my hands that meant more to people than a flat image,” McCadden recalls. “I asked myself, ‘What can I do that will impact everyday moments?’” Drawing on her lifelong love of jewelry and the notion that pieces are often attached to significant life events (engagements, birthdays, travel), McCadden began to work with metal, creating chunky necklaces and drop earrings with long chains. She called her burgeoning company Grace Gow in homage to her late grandmother, who “was always doing amazing projects: sewing glam Katherine Hepburn–style suits, whipping up French-inspired meals, or making oil paintings. She was a creative inspiration.” After three years of small but successful trunk shows, in 2010 McCadden started metalsmithing classes at Pratt Fine Arts Center. There she worked with rough, uncut stones, exploring ways to translate natural forms in modern ways. Her newly launched spring-summer 2016 collection, her fourth to date, is a testament to refined craft and the

SEE MORE OF MCCADDEN’S WORK AT GRAYMAG.COM/ GRACEGOW

allure of the seaside. Stud earrings with basket settings show off rough tourmalines in aquatic hues. Miniature crab claws, cast in bronze or silver, dangle from delicate chains. Barnacle rings nestle against fingers in a reminder of their watery inspiration. Each detailed piece is infused with nostalgic glamour and a love of the ocean. “This collection is fully inspired by places where the city meets the sea,” says McCadden, who recently decamped from Seattle to live and work on Vashon Island, a 20-minute ferry ride away. “We all attach our own meaning to jewelry, but everyone remembers spending summer days at the beach. These oceanic forms evoke a sentimental connection to the sea that’s universal.” h

“IT’S INCREDIBLE TO SEE HOW CERTAIN FORMS OF JEWELRY MAKING REALLY HAVEN’T CHANGED IN THE PAST 10,000 YEARS. IT’S POWERFUL TO THINK ABOUT THAT HISTORY WHEN YOU WORK IN THIS MEDIUM.” —CAT MCCADDEN, DESIGNER

The Sea Goddess ring features a rough-cut tourmaline gemstone. OPPOSITE: A model wears an Asymmetrical Gladiator necklace made from forged brass segments that can move organically. graymag . com

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The fitting lounge at Portland’s Wildwood & Company features the work of local craftsmen and artists, including a large Oregon black walnut table by Makers Woodworks. Bolts of fabrics from the world’s preeminent mills, such as Holland & Sherry, are displayed library style on walnut built-in shelves constructed by Mark Pendergrass, complete with a rolling ladder.

jacket required A former New York City attorney brings bespoke tailoring to Portland. Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by DANIEL G. COLE

THEY SAY YOU CAN’T GO HOME AGAIN, but Joseph Mueller left Oregon 15 years ago for college and then a New York law firm— and then returned to settle down in Portland in 2010. He brought with him a penchant for the bespoke suits he’d enjoyed in his Gotham days, but he couldn’t find a reliable source for handmade custom suiting. The places he did find “take your measurements in the store and send them to a factory to merely tweak a block pattern. The nuances of the human body are much more complex than that,” says Mueller. »

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the art of watershaping

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So Mueller filled that niche himself, taking sewing and tailoring classes at night and on weekends while working at a Portland law firm and planning the launch of his custom suit business. This past summer, he unveiled Wildwood & Company—a brick-and-mortar workshop, fitting lounge, and retail shop in downtown Portland, carved out of a former Chinese restaurant with brick walls and high ceilings. “I wanted an updated men’s club—all the good stuff and none of the bad,” he explains. “A place that’s warm and inclusive.” Clients are measured on-site, with fabrics draped directly on the body. Finalizing a suit can take up to three fittings, with every detail (armhole shape and placement, for instance) unique to the wearer. Wildwood’s team of tailors can also create bespoke shirts, vests, and sweaters in addition to suits, which start at $2,900 and range from casual to a tux fit for a wedding. The retail portion offers locally made men’s accessories and gifts, including custom handmade leather shoes by Portland shoemaker Reid Elrod. “Wildwood is for anyone who wants a suit, a shirt, or a shoe that’s made in the best way it can be, with a story they can be proud of,” says Mueller. “I’ve given up on pigeonholing my clients—everyone is a potential client.” h

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A leather briefcase by Lori Caldwell of Minnie + George, one of the 25 (and counting) local artisans carried by Wildwood. A sample by Reid Elrod illustrates the many layers of a handmade shoe. Wildwood tailors cut the fabric and sew the suits on-site. A handmade vest and a double-breasted suit jacket in a half-cashmere, half-wool fabric.

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Celebrating the modern idiom

modernfan.com

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Torsion >> Bright Nickel with Maple Blades and optional Light


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COURTESY FILSON; INTERIOR: LARA SWIMMER

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Outerwear brand Filson throws open the doors on its bold new Seattle store—and writes the next chapter in its venerable history. Written by JAIME GILLIN

WHEN THE 119-YEAR-OLD Seattle-based

brand Filson opened its new flagship shop this past November, it broke the rules of retail design. “Generally, you don’t put a store out of sight from the street, and you don’t put it upstairs,” says architect Mike Mora of Heliotrope Architects, the firm hired to design the 6,500-square-foot space. Yet the company opted to place the store on the second floor of its headquarters-and-factory building, in a cavernous space with no storefront windows— in Seattle’s industrial SoDo neighborhood, no less. And black paint? Another ‘don’t.’ “You don’t use black in retail spaces—it sucks out light and makes it hard to showcase product,” says Alex Carleton, Filson’s creative director, with an irreverent grin.

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Yet it features heavily here, gleaming from the shop’s extensive custom casework. And it works. “Black creates a sense of endlessness, of mystique, of being outdoors in the forest,” says Carleton, who oversaw the project, intently working out every detail—from the hand-forged bronze wolfhead handles on the front doors (inspired by Jack London’s Call of the Wild) to the Native American textiles and vintage camp blankets in the dressing rooms (inspired by Yellowstone’s Old Faithful Inn). Tossing out the timeworn rules of shop design is bold, but it’s entirely in keeping with Filson’s history and pioneer spirit. The company has been breaking its own path since 1897, when it launched with a line of heavyweight wool outerwear for Klondike »

Filson’s flagship shop opened in November 2015 in a historic machinists’ building in Seattle. The company shoots its catalogues out in the wild, with real outdoorsmen and -women modeling its clothes and gear— including, above, the helicopter pilot who flew the crew around Alaska for the fall 2015 edition.


Showrooms: 333 N.W. 16th Ave. Portland, OR 800-452-7634 12001 N.E. 12th St. #38 Bellevue, WA 800-574-4312 www.chown.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Design features in Filson’s new space include a modern totem pole by local sculptor Aleph Geddis; a trellis made from salvaged timber that creates an intimate scale within the soaring volume; and front doors built of reclaimed redwood that sport 55-pound bronze pulls fashioned by third-generation blacksmith Darryl Nelson.

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Gold Rush stampeders. After that rush faded, Filson started to outfit Pacific Northwest loggers. It’s continued to evolve with the times, and its wares have most recently been embraced by a new generation in beards and plaids (no coincidence that lumbersexual was on the Oxford English Dictionary “Word of the Year” shortlist in 2015). When he was hired in 2014, Carleton, formerly of L.L.Bean and Ralph Lauren, was charged with breathing fresh energy into the beloved brand—and creating products and retail experiences that both respect the company’s Northwest heritage and durable reputation and yet are “innovative and competitive in today’s congested retail market,” as he puts it. The new shop embodies this mission. Original artifacts referencing Filson’s history—cedar dogsleds, Darius Kinsey photographs of loggers, Nativecarved sculptures—are displayed on high shelves running the length of the store. Quality was another obsession. “We all

wanted the physical environment to be as close in quality to Filson’s garments as we could get it,” Mora says. “Through the space—its materials, its hardware, the execution of all its details—customers understand they’re in a space that was built to last, just like a Filson jacket or hat.” Compounding that challenge was an extremely tight time frame for construction. When the architects and the builder, Dovetail General Contractors, were brought on board, they had five months to complete the store before holiday shopping hit. Dovetail recruited many of its favorite local collaborators: O. B. Williams built the casework; Cascade Joinery fabricated the interior trellis; Duluth Timber sourced the salvaged wood; Quantum Windows crafted the warehouse-style windows; and Architectural Elements created the stairs’ hot-rolled steel guardrail. The team worked late and on weekends to get the job done. “Everyone was really inspired and passionate,” says Dovetail principal Scott Edwards. “It sounds cheesy, but it’s true. We all had an immediate attachment to Alex’s vision for the space. It got everyone fired up.” The store opened on November 24 and has been packed with shoppers—undeterred by its out-of-theway location—ever since. “Find a way or make one,” polar explorer Robert Peary liked to say. As in Arctic expeditions, so with pioneering retail projects. h

LARA SWIMMER

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“why don’t you . . . ?”

Written by STACY KENDALL

THIS ICONIC QUESTION FROM AN ICONIC WOMAN was the prompt in

Diana Vreeland’s celebrated Harper’s Bazaar “advice” column, which appeared throughout the 26-year span of her editorship, from 1936 to 1962. Vreeland’s suggestions were extravagant, inspiring, and sometimes downright outrageous. Perhaps most notoriously, she wrote, “Why don’t you rinse your blond child’s hair in dead champagne to keep it gold, as they do in France?” (Of course, there’s no evidence that the French do this.) Other loopily marvelous ideas: Why don’t you tie black tulle bows around your wrists? Keep an elk-hide trunk in the back of your car? Re-do your whole house in every shade of green? With the spirit of Mrs. Vreeland animating our pen, we’ve written our own prescriptions for embracing extravagance in unexpected ways, featuring furniture and accessories that embody their own essence of luxury. »

Gild the lily? Platner Gold Collection by Knoll, available through Inform Interiors, Seattle and Vancouver, informseattle.com and informinteriors.com.

For the 50th anniversary of the Platner Collection, designed in 1966 by architect Warren Platner, Knoll has reissued the full range of iconic bent-metal pieces in a glossy 18-karat gold-plated finish. In a way, it’s a return; when Platner first designed the pieces, he envisioned a gold coating, but it didn’t prove durable enough for production. New technologies have made his glam vision a reality. Please, indulge.

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“why don’t you . . . ?” Channel the 18th-century banqueting craze by throwing an over-the-top dinner party, with each course featuring a different fruit? Forbidden Fruit Dinner Party by Chris Antemann in collaboration with Meissen, chrisantemann.com. »

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In 2012, Oregon sculptor Chris Antemann was invited to collaborate with Meissen master artists at the storied porcelain company’s manufactory in Germany, where she created one-of-a-kind pieces for them as well as limited-edition sculptures. The resulting works exude Baroque-era whimsy, yet her figures adopt playfully contemporary gazes and postures. The Bellevue Arts Museum will exhibit 16 of her pieces in its second-floor gallery February 26 through May 29.


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Place a dormeuse in your home office and “faint” on it dramatically during dull video-conferences? Febo ’15 Dormeuse by Antonio Citterio for Maxalto, available at B&B Italia, Seattle, divafurniture.com.

“why don’t you . . . ?”

Install a grown-up fort? When people ask about it, whisper that it’s where you work to further “the Cause.” (The Cause is online shopping.) Koya desk by Marie Christine Dorner for Ligne Roset, available at Ligne Roset, Seattle, ligne-roset-usa.com, and Livingspace, Vancouver, livingspace.com.

Strip down? Go utterly minimalist in the bathroom. Arden Double Washstand by Waterworks, available through Chown Hardware, Bellevue and Portland, chown.com. »

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S H O P O U R F U LL P R O G R AM M E D LI N E, D I S C OVE R S H OWR O O M E XC LUS IVES AN D E X P LO R E C USTO M O PTI O N S B R O W S E T H E O N LY T U F E N K I A N O U T L E T I N T H E U . S . S T O C K E D W I T H C L O S E O U T S , O N E - O F - A - K I N D S A N D S E M I - A N T I Q U E S AT S A V I N G S U P T O 6 5 %

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“why don’t you . . . ?”

Interior designer Carrie Hayden recently collaborated with Seattlebased, South African–born decorative artist Lauren Sloan to launch a limited-edition series of bespoke wallcoverings, including a hand-painted agate pattern and an embossed crocodile texture made from layered plaster and glazes. Among Sloan’s many highprofile commissions, she has decorated the palace for King Abdullah and Queen Rania in Aqaba, Jordan.

Pretend you’re one degree from royalty? Signature Wallcoverings available through Hayden Collective, Seattle, carriehayden.com.

Wrap your canopy bed in fragrant, living garlands? Make a morning ritual of lightly misting them with springwater. Caged King Bed by Kara Mann for Milling Road by Baker, available through Brougham Interiors, Vancouver, broughaminteriors.com. »

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sourced | Take up collecting antique oyster spoons and display them in a chinoiserie cabinet? (Decluttering was so 2015.) Zhin Cabinet by Currey & Company, available through Bedford Brown, Portland, bedfordbrown.com.

“why don’t you . . . ?” Convert your mudroom into a candy room, stocked floor-to-ceiling with sweets, and install this light fixture? Sky Candy Pendant by Esque Studio and Cedar & Moss, available at Zinc Art + Object, Edmonds, WA, zincartobject.com.

Make a giant bookcase your headboard, and fill it with the titles of your idols’ known favorites? David Bowie published his top 100 books list online in 2013. Pollen Bookcase by Sacha Lakic for Roche Bobois, Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver, roche-bobois.com. h

FOR MORE OF OUR FAVORITE NEW PIECES, GO TO GRAYMAG.COM/ LUXURYSOURCED

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ENDOR Sofa, WING chair, KARA tables by

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TREASURE TROVE

Tucked into a former Gold Rush hotel in Seattle’s oldest neighborhood, a blank-slate loft is elegantly transformed by a lifetime’s worth of globally collected goods. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by BELATHÉE PHOTOGRAPHY

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: A brick arch connects the bedroom to the living room in Kate and Rick Poole’s Seattle loft. A Fortuny tapestry, a gold-framed oval mirror scored at a yard sale, and a Tibetan rug from Tufenkian add rich texture. The cloches protect a preserved blue jay nesting on green moss alongside a Madagascan sunset moth, and a vintage beaded handbag that Kate Poole’s father found in an abandoned house when she was a child. The glass domes are a “beautiful way to add drama to pieces,” Poole says.

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t’s easy to breeze right past the historic Terry Denny building on First Avenue in Seattle’s bustling Pioneer Square neighborhood—unless you look up. Its stunning late-Victorian red-brick façade hints at city history: it was completed in 1891, after the Great Seattle Fire had destroyed downtown, and operated through World War II as the Northern Hotel. “The first time I walked into this apartment, I fell in love,” says Kate Poole of her fifth-story loft. “The high ceilings, exposed brick, and hardwood floors—there’s so much history here.” It was an appropriate perch for Poole, who along with her adult daughters, Jessie and Sara, owns E. Smith Mercantile, the popular apothecary-style shop and bar just a half-block down First Avenue. Her wanderlust and eclectic tastes have filled both her shop and her home with hundreds of items collected during decades of travel and savvy scourings of yard sales and thrift shops. A visit to Poole’s 1,100-square-foot loft, which she shares with her husband, Rick, a project manager at Schuchart/Dow, reveals how her sharp eye and appreciation of one-of-a-kind objects enliven a space. From the carefully composed vignettes (bird nests rescued from a friend’s yard; framed butterflies) to the stacks of antique dishes, Poole eschews all style rules except one: “I find beautiful things that I love and I bring them home. It’s eclectic, but it makes me happy.” »

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Taking pride of place at the center of the loft is a painting on wood of the Archangel Michael acquired on a family trip to the Greek island of Santorini. Set in a shallow alcove and bracketed by two candleholders, it is a visual tie to Poole’s heritage: “All Greek households have altars. My father is Greek and my greatgrandfather’s name was Michael.” OPPOSITE: The loft has limited natural light, so Poole deploys mirrors to amplify illumination throughout the space. In the corner of the living room is a cabinet crafted from piano legs and an antique child’s bed, one of the first vintage pieces Poole and her husband purchased together. Both of their daughters slept in it when they were young. »

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“I FIND BEAUTIFUL THINGS THAT I LOVE AND I BRING THEM HOME. IT’S ECLECTIC, BUT IT MAKES ME HAPPY.’’ —KATE POOLE, RESIDENT 74

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Cotton muslin curtains take the place of doors and screen off the bedroom during dinner parties. OPPOSITE: A cloche in the bedroom holds a gold birdcage charm and a collection of rocks and minerals that spark Poole’s memories of a childhood spent playing outdoors for hours on end. h

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ABOVE IT ALL

Vancouver interior designer Mitchell Freedland delivers sky-high design to a posh Manhattan penthouse.

Written by NICOLE MUNSON Photographed by EMA PETER

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Vancouver interior designer Mitchell Freedland transformed a Manhattan penthouse into an ode to sophistication and style. A dark gray wall, painted in Manor House by Dulux, grounds the front entrance and intensifies the photographic diptych by California artist Joey Lehman Morris. Eleven-foot-high ceilings and walls coated in Dulux’s Kitten White are prime real estate for an impressive art collection, which includes White Paint on Trash Bag, a mixed-media piece by Luca Pizzaroni that hangs in the dining room. A eucalyptus table and channeltufted chairs—custom-designed by Freedland’s firm and crafted by Vancouver’s Bloom Studio—are bracketed by a custom Colin Campbell rug underfoot and a Lindsey Adelman chandelier for Roll & Hill overhead. »

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Mitchell Freedland Design architecture: Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman Architects

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IF YOU ASK MITCHELL FREEDLAND ABOUT GLAMOUR, he just might tell you

that you’ve been doing it all wrong. “It isn’t about glitz,” he explains, “but about quality and beautiful materials.” The Vancouver-based interior designer is an expert on the topic, having masterminded dozens of high-end residences over his 32-year career. In his latest commission, a newly constructed penthouse for sale in midtown Manhattan, just two blocks from the Empire State Building, Freedland turned the 3,590-square-foot blank space into an elegantly refined home. Freedland and senior designer Gerald Day commissioned custom furniture for each room and enlisted Fred Torres Gallery to curate showstopping art that almost rivals the residence’s killer views. To guide the design, Freedland and his client, Bizzi & Partners Development, conjured up an imaginary homebuyer— “a couple who spend time between New York and Italy and need a perch in the city when they are here.” And who will welcome Freedland’s lofty version of luxury in the upscale nest he’s created for them. »

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LEFT: Bar stools upholstered in citrus-hued leather from Vancouver’s Jus Modern anchor a breakfast nook with a bird’s-eye view up Fifth Avenue toward Central Park. The custom Poliform kitchen, Sub-Zero appliances, and Silestone countertops were spec’d by Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman Architects. RIGHT: A painting by Singaporean artist Fyerool Darma is a high-contrast counterpoint to the warm grays in the powder room, including silver travertine countertops and walls covered in silk paper from Phillip Jeffries, sourced from Crown Wallpaper & Fabrics.

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Freedland opted for “soft ivory, alabaster, and champagne� tones in the master bedroom to impart a feeling of serenity and elegance. He layered textures, creating tone-on-tone shadow and light effects with, for example, a Tufenkian rug sourced from Salari Fine Carpet Collections and curvy chenille-upholstered chairs custom-designed by Freedland. The light is a discontinued piece from Circa Lighting; the side table was designed by Freedland and manufactured by Bloom Studio. h

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A wall of Jeff Brouws photographs leads to a SieMatic kitchen with orange cork floors in the house Olson Kundig designed for philanthropists Shari and John Behnke. A Glenn Rudolph photograph hangs above the knife rack. Two Flexform chairs from Inform Interiors face a wall embedded with three screens playing the Bill Viola video work Witness.

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Natural SELECTION The home of Seattle art world activators Shari and John Behnke melds the best elements of a public gallery and a private dwelling. Written by RACHEL EGGERS : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

DESIGN TEAM

architecture and interiors: Olson Kundig construction: Schuchart/Dow lake cabin interiors: Jennie Gruss Interior Design metalwork: 12th Avenue Iron; Twisted Metalworks

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“W

e haven’t been what I would call focused collectors,” says Shari Behnke, with a wry smile, about the bounty of modern and contemporary art that she and her husband, John, have gathered over decades. “It was a natural process—we bought what we liked, and the art just became part of our daily lives.” Several years ago, running out of wall space and weary of stashing works in off-site storage, the Seattle philanthropists looked for a new home for their collection and themselves. They purchased a lot on a steep hilltop facing Lake Washington in the lush Laurelhurst neighborhood they’ve long called home. For the new construction, the couple reached

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out to Olson Kundig, the renowned Seattle firm with vast experience in designing for art collectors. “It was a very collaborative process,” says Tom Kundig, the design principal on the project. “We share a genuine love of art. The challenge was to create a variety of types and scales of space to best showcase such a varied collection—without losing a sense of ‘home’ appropriate for both entertaining and reflection.” The result is a modern construction with a steel and wood exterior that reflects the firm’s industrial yet warm aesthetic. The interior design supports the needs of works such as video and sculpture, as well as the Behnkes’ preference for continually refreshed salon-style installations. Spacious white walls throughout the home, often in relatively small spaces, re-create the intimate scale of a gallery and draw you close to the art. »


The Behnkes in the front gallery, which features a rotating display of art that the couple changes out annually. Pictured here is a show they call “She’s a Piece of Work,” with pieces by Steve Davis, Claudia Fitch, Helen Chadwick, and Wangechi Mutu. RIGHT: A sliding wall created by Olson Kundig in the dining room allows the couple to reveal as much or as little storage space as they like; it’s fronted with a textural sculpture by Ghanaian artist El Anatsui, made from liquor bottle caps. The steel-legged dining table, also by Olson Kundig, is topped with a huge resin hamburger sculpture, a find from a student art show. The chairs were custom-designed and fabricated by Roy McMakin.

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STYLE HERE THERE

The expansive collection—national and international in scope, with strong representation of Seattle artists—is just one aspect of the Behnkes’ deep roots in the art world. They’ve supported artists living and working in Seattle for years, starting with the establishment of the Neddy Artist Awards in 1996 in honor of John’s brother Ned, a Seattle artist and teacher at Cornish College of the Arts who passed away from complications from AIDS in 1989. And for all the incredible pieces—spot the Matisse lithograph!—in the Behnke home, each installed with a curator’s eye, there’s a noticeable lack of formality. As Shari notes, “It’s a way of just living here, doing what you do. You can’t be too precious about art.” These days, the Behnkes acquire fewer works but collect in greather depth—Shari is particularly excited about a series of Nicole Eisenman figurative paintings currently in the home’s front gallery. They’re also focusing on ways to invest in artists that will best sustain their long-term artistic development and careers. The work that most drives Shari these days is The New Foundation, an organization she established in 2012 alongside founding director Yoko Ott: it’s dedicated to supporting contemporary visual artists, curators, and writers through grants, curatorial support, and free public programs. “Our art is not separate from our lives and what we do and care about,” Shari muses. “Our home is a reflection of who we are. It’s a particular kind of luxury that I’m grateful for.” h

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A plunging series of zigzagging stone steps behind the Behnkes’ house leads to a snug cabin. Seattle designer Jennie Gruss transformed the interiors of the former life-jacket storage space into a light-filled retreat complete with a loft bed, tiny kitchen, and mod orange floor.

SEE MORE ONLINE AT GRAYMAG.COM/BEHNKE


STYLE HERE THERE Stunning water views grace the living room, cantilevered over a hillside with a precipitous drop. The Vitra Polder sofa from MBI Seattle and Cocca lounge chairs from Arflex are angled toward the floor-to-ceiling Fleetwood windows. The custom steel coffee table was designed by Olson Kundig and crafted by 12th Avenue Iron. The two frisky ceramic dogs on the table were purchased from The Art Production Fund in New York, and the abstract sculpture in the corner is by Arlene Schechet. OPPOSITE TOP LEFT: The master bedroom features a painting by Portland-based artist Jessica Jackson Hutchins and a cowhide rug from The Rug Company. OPPOSITE TOP RIGHT: John specifically requested an old-school black-and-white marble floor somewhere in the house; the Calacatta marble mosaic tile from Pental ended up in the master bath. The freestanding tub, designed by Philippe Starck for Duravit, is from Seattle Interiors.

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The Watershed Lodge is nestled amid a grove of cottonwoods in southern Montana, part of an abandoned ranch brought back to life by taming its often-flooded plain. Architect Scott Hughes and landscape architect Raymond Jungles’s design diverts water to retaining ponds through a custom channel built into the foundation.

STEPHEN DUNN

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watershed A riverside Montana ranch is reborn with sustainable land management practices and smart, striking architecture. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by STEPHEN DUNN and GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Hughes Umbanhowar Architects construction: Highline Partners landscape architecture: Raymond Jungles Studio

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GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

i

n a world increasingly grappling with climate change, floods are a growing threat able to rupture communities and landscapes. Yet humans—from ancient Egypt to modernday Holland—have relied upon this natural phenomenon for millennia as a means of irrigation and sustainable land management. This old-yet-new strategy helped to birth the Watershed Lodge, a residence on a onceabandoned ranch in Big Timber, Montana. The site is stunning, a 2,000-acre property with gently rolling hills and a grove of mature cottonwoods. But it’s also challenging. The Yellowstone River bisects the ranch and overflows its banks each spring, and a tributary creek runs

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alongside the house. Although constructing a luxurious 3,000-square-foot house in an active flood plain might seem counterintuitive, architect Scott Hughes, of Florida- and Los Angeles–based firm Hughes Umbanhowar Architects, saw a chance to create groundbreaking modern architecture at one with its surroundings. Hughes had worked with the husband-and-wife clients on two previous projects in Florida, where the couple and their three young children spend winter months. For their new residence in Montana, they wanted to embrace the outdoors and build a glass-sheltered view of the natural landscape. “We were looking to create an architectural vocabulary that spoke to a casual lifestyle but didn’t produce another rusty, faux-western log cabin,” the architect explains. »


“WE WERE LOOKING TO CREATE AN ARCHITECTURAL VOCABULARY THAT SPOKE TO A CASUAL LIFESTYLE BUT DIDN’T PRODUCE ANOTHER RUSTY, FAUX-WESTERN LOG CABIN.”

GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

—SCOTT HUGHES, ARCHITECT

To add natural textures to the minimalist interior, wood from a former barn on the property was repurposed for the interior walls, while the stairs leading to the fireplace and living room are of chiseled stone. LEFT: The sunken living room is positioned at the junction of the T-shaped home’s two volumes. The wraparound galvanized steel fireplace has a glass sleeve that lowers at the push of a button to enclose the flames. graymag . com

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Hughes collaborated with acclaimed Miami landscape architect Raymond Jungles on a water management plan inspired by the Dutch, who have reclaimed hundreds of square miles from the North Sea by constructing polders: low-lying tracts shielded by dikes, ponds, and channels that divert rising water. Similarly, the Hughes-Jungles team designed and dredged a series of deep ponds, running parallel to the house, to hold the river’s seasonal overflow. Counter to expectations, the house is set between the creek and the polders. As such, the home itself “becomes sort of a channel that controls flooding,” Hughes explains. The design enables rising water to flow around the home on its way to the polders, but if the water rises

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beyond a certain height, it is diverted through a small channel built into the foundation. The team also incorporated the ponds into the geothermal system that warms and cools the house year-round, and they’re part of the plumbing supply used for irrigation and flushing toilets. The house, located across a bridge from its carport and sitting atop a 3-foot plinth for added flood protection, is composed of two interlocking volumes: a two-story portion lined with floor-to-ceiling windows and a single-story oblong that runs perpendicular to it. “The two-story glass wedge is the public space, the entertaining space, that takes advantage of views,” Hughes says. “The one-story element is the private space and is more enclosed.” »


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GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

The earthy colors and natural materials of the living room’s lounge chairs and daybed ensure the home’s interiors don’t compete with the views beyond the custom Duratherm windows. When the site floods in early spring, water advances to the edge of the house.


A pristine kitchen by German manufacturer Bulthaup is centered upon a larch-topped kitchen island. A variety of woods, including ipé hardwood floors, cedar ceilings, and salvaged barn-lumber walls, warm up the minimalist space.

The T-shaped layout is one Hughes frequently employs in his designs for its access to light and views. “We don’t do square houses with rooms in all four corners. We tend to pull houses apart,” the architect explains. The Montana project’s main spine runs from the front door out toward the river, and an interior hallway—the perpendicular axis— heightens the sense of procession and drama as the vistas unfold. Broad eaves that protect residents from the elements allow easy indoor-outdoor living—a tactic Hughes learned well when designing for warm, wet Florida climates. The two axes intersect in the dramatic, light-flooded two-story space that serves as the home’s entry hall, where a wraparound galvanized steel fireplace’s glass screen frames a view into the living area on its opposite side. The second floor is reserved for the

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master bedroom suite, while the single-story oblong is dedicated to children’s and guest bedrooms. Pristine and glassy as its contemporary architecture may be, the house makes ample use of wood to add texture and warmth, including lumber salvaged from a demolished barn on the ranch and used as exterior and interior cladding, as well as elegant Brazilian ipé floors and rough-hewn cedar walls. Materials such as slate flooring and the copper custom master-bathroom tub speak to the geology of the mountainous landscape. The home’s minimalist style doesn’t strive to make a statement or deny its vividly beautiful surroundings. Instead, its design ensures there’s always a breathtaking view— one that’s constantly changing as the seasons cycle and water levels rise and fall. »


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TOP: The family room includes the house’s sole use of brick, in its fireplace, which doubles as a display wall for the clients’ art collection, including this Warhol print. ABOVE: The master bathroom features a custom two-person copper soaking tub. LEFT: The master bedroom was designed with not only floor-to-ceiling glass, but also a band of clerestory windows to offer a view of both land and sky. The hanging fireplace is by Fireorb. h PHOTOS THIS SPREAD: GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

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FOUND IN TRANSLATION A Dutch couple brings an international design sensibility—and decades of meticulously collected antiques—to their new Seattle home. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by CHARLIE SCHUCK

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For a creative Seattle couple, architect Nicolaas Wilkens designed a new home that showcases their collection of antiques as well as views of Lake Washington and, on a clear day, Mount Rainier. The clients opted for a shed roof over a pitched profile to protect their neighbors’ lake views. The orange front door proudly greets visitors with the Dutch national color.

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Wilkens Design Studio interiors: Wilkens Design Studio and Suidman Design construction: MN Custom Homes engineering: Carissa Farkas Structural Engineering; Aspect Consulting (geotechnical); Springline Design (civil)

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At center stage in Ben and Kitty Suidman’s bright and white living room are their art, views, and furnishings—including a Hamilton series sofa by Minotti, a purple Fat felted wool chair by B&B Italia, and a neutral rug by Roche Bobois. The Tibetan hammered metal stools in front of the Town & Country fireplace from Sutter Home & Hearth are covered with Designers Guild velveteen fabric. The poured-concrete custom coffee table is the Suidmans’ own design, and the gouache piece over the fireplace, by a Dutch artist, was a gift to Ben from his parents on his 25th birthday.

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g

ezelligheid is a Dutch word that doesn’t translate directly into English, but its meaning surpasses mere language barriers. It encompasses the idea of being cozy, welcoming, warm, and inviting—all important shared pleasures at the heart of Dutch culture. It’s the feeling you get with friends and family, or when you’re curled up on the sofa with a good book and a glass of wine. Bonus points if there is a cat or two involved. For homeowners Ben and Kitty Suidman (who met 20 years ago in Hong Kong but are originally from the Netherlands), gezelligheid was a central value as they designed a new 4,000-square-foot house overlooking the ever-changing waters of Lake Washington. Between husband and wife, they’ve lived in 10 countries, acquiring a hoard of treasures and antiques along the way. From Kitty’s traditional Chinese wedding dress to paintings Ben inherited from his family, each piece has a story that is deeply meaningful to the couple. They met their ideal match in Seattle-based architect Nicolaas Wilkens of Wilkens Design Studio—he’s Dutch, too, so he gets gezelligheid. He didn’t bat an eye at the prospect of designing a modern home around the Suidmans’ fleet of eclectic objects. “Dutch people are proud of their homes,” Wilkens says. “The things they have collected, inherited, or simply accumulated define who they are and announce to visitors that their homes are welcoming places—that’s gezellig.” Adds Ben, pointing overhead at a cloudlike pendant by Dutch designer Marcel Wanders: “We bought only one new thing when we moved in—that light.” Their design evolved as the project progressed. Initially the team planned to renovate the site’s original house, a 1940s Tudorinspired brick building. “But we ran into unforeseen costs before we could even address Ben and Kitty’s requests,” says Wilkens. “Eventually we just asked, ‘If we’re going to spend that much money and still have only 7-foot ceilings in the basement, what’s the point?’” »

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RIGHT: Seattle’s Semigood Design fabricated the custom-designed dining table from steel and solid zebrawood. Asian antiques, such as a tall cabinet and wood altar table from China and a series of Japanese wood-block prints, are striking counterpoints to the gleaming minimalist lines of the white lacquer kitchen system by Pedini. As for the lights over the island, Ben notes, “We bought the antique glass lamps at an auction in Belgium, and we have used them in every space we’ve had for the past 15 years.” He modified them with red steel-cable power cords.

Armed with a new plan for a completely fresh structure, they faced yet another challenge: the steeply sloped lot could pose a slide risk in rainy weather if the existing terrain was disturbed. So Wilkens reinforced and repurposed the original foundation, adding 600 square feet by incorporating an area that was formerly a patio between the old house and garage. The two-level house has a distinctive butterfly roof topped with an eagle’s-nest studio that’s currently Kitty’s office. The home’s lower level holds the Suidmans’ master suite and features 9-foot ceilings, heated concrete floors, and a gallery-like entry hall just off the garage that displays bronze Japanese tea ceremony pieces and the custom hand-embroidered Chinese dress that Kitty wore at their wedding dinner. On the main floor, the kitchen, living, and dining areas flow seamlessly into one another, with FSC-certified French oak flooring serving as the common denominator. A guest suite is easily closed off with a pocket door, an element used throughout the house to emphasize its openness. “Before moving to Seattle, we lived in a loft in Chicago, and we loved the connected feeling of that space,” Kitty recalls. Two blackened-steel staircases with concrete risers (one connecting the two floors of the house and one running from the main level to Kitty’s rooftop office) contrast with the home’s prevailing light-hued aesthetic while echoing the darker tones of the many dispersed antiques. Vibrant, rich textiles and furnishings issue blasts of color against the gallery-white walls. Boldest of all, though, is the front door, painted an eye-popping tangerine. “The Dutch national color is orange,” Ben explains. “When we painted it, I sent an email around to all the neighbors saying, ‘No, this is not a primer color!’” He pauses with a wide smile and laughs, “After all, we had to add a touch of Dutch!” »

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ABOVE: Ancient and contemporary play as well together in the master bedroom as they do throughout the house. A painting of Buddhist monks is displayed over the BoConcept bed; the back wall displays a 200-year-old Japanese scroll showing the Kiyumizu-dera temple in Kyoto, where Ben proposed to Kitty. RIGHT: The almost futuristic master bathroom is lined with textured Ona tiles from Porcelanosa. A large Halo blu•stone tub by Blu Bathworks is situated in front of a window to take advantage of the views. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Two ornate mirrors hang over a Chinese antique cabinet; The wide-screen fireplace divides the living room from the rest of the main level. A reading nook features a fuchsia Fat sofa by B&B Italia, bronze statues, and Asian antiques. h

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| context |

DESIGN TEAM

construction: MCM Construction deconstruction: The ReBuilding Center

In 2015, the Griffith House—now called the Belluschi Pavilion—was taken apart piece by piece and relocated to Marylhurst University, where it serves as a classroom, meeting area, and event space.

next life

A Lake Oswego builder, a university, and a crew of supporters rescue an endangered midcentury gem. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by JOSH PARTEE

SOMETIMES PASSIONS BECOME PROJECTS—

and sometimes projects take on lives of their own. Such was the case in 2006 when Lake Oswego builder Tim Mather heard about the planned demolition of the Griffith House—a 916-square-foot midcentury jewel designed by Pietro Belluschi, the late and acclaimed Portland-based Italian American pioneer of Northwest modernism. Mather, founder and president of MCM Construction, decided that the 1951 house had to be saved. “There were only two Belluschi buildings in the Lake Oswego area, and one was

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a church that had been demolished a couple years prior,” Mather says. “It would be a shame to lose this fantastic architectural resource.” Just two days after hearing the news, Mather drove out to see the house. Set at the northeast end of the lake, the structure was uninhabited but in fairly good shape. Mather met its owner, who explained that the cost of restoring such a small house—its numerous technical problems included an outdated radiant heat system—meant it had no prospective buyers. Demolition crews were due on-site in six weeks.


COURTESY MCM CONSTRUCTION AND SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

In 1949, newlyweds Arthur and Lucy Griffith, searching for a small home in which to start their life together, saw architect Pietro Belluschi’s plans for new minimalist houses in Life magazine. The couple sent the architect a letter, asking if he would design them a “well-built, easy to maintain onebedroom house” for $10,000. He accepted the challenge, although he usually worked at grander scales—he’d designed the Portland Art Museum and the Commonwealth Building, as well as many places of worship, arts centers, and educational facilities across the country. »

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COURTESY MCM CONSTRUCTION AND SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

| context |

ABOVE: In his 1949 reply to Arthur and Lucy Griffith, Belluschi commended the concision of their letter and noted that although he was then taking few commissions, their challenge intrigued him. RIGHT: In 1947, Life magazine featured a small Belluschi-designed home in an article about prototype housing for U.S. soldiers returning home after World War II. Âť

COURTESY MCM CONSTRUCTION

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Photography: Michael Stearns / Hybrid3 a design studio

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| context |

“THE HOUSE IS ELEGANT, SOPHISTICATED, AND UNDERSTATED. BELLUSCHI’S DESIGNS DIDN’T HAVE MASSIVE ARCHWAYS OR LARGE BRASS LETTERS THAT SAY, ‘LOOK AT ME! HERE I AM!’ HIS WORK WAS SUBTLE AND REFINED.’’ —TIM MATHER, MCM CONSTRUCTION

The surfaces, windows, cabinets, and lighting in the Belluschi Pavilion are all original. Although the deconstruction team could not save the home’s foundation and cork floor, they salvaged some of its bricks, which were used to reconstruct the fireplace. Belluschi designed the wooden divan to hold a radio at one end and provide comfortable lounging space for listeners. »

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| context |

The large windows in the 916-square-foot space let in plenty of natural light, and the fir ceiling beams epitomize Northwest midcentury architecture. “The fireplace is an interesting detail,” says Tim Mather, the contractor who saved the building from destruction. “Typically you don’t include such a large feature when you’re building a small home, but here it anchors the space well.”

“We were standing on the property, and I just asked him if I could have the house,” Mather recalls. His audacious request worked: with the caveat that the structure had to be moved offsite as soon as possible, the owner handed Mather the key. Mather arranged two open houses to find a buyer who would cart the house away. Ten interested parties turned up, but each one wanted to relocate the house outside Lake Oswego—a no-go as far as Mather was concerned. “Lake Oswego has few historic resources, and my goal was to keep this house in our community.” With the deadline looming, he hired Portland’s ReBuilding Center to meticulously dismantle and inventory the house piece by piece, stowing its original siding, surfaces, windows, cabinets, and lighting in a 48-foot shipping container. “Okay, now what do I do with it?” Mather recalls

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wondering. He investigated several settings before he connected with nearby Marylhurst University, which hoped to preserve the Griffith House on campus as a learning tool for staff, students, and the public. Now Mather had to raise the necessary funds. To kick off the effort, he looped in Belluschi’s two sons, Tony and Peter; Sue Griffith, who grew up in the house; and Keith Kinsman, son of the original builder and head of the Kinsman Foundation, which wrote the first check. Eight years later, after the team had gathered more than $500,000 in donations and gratis labor and materials, the renamed and reassembled Belluschi Pavilion opened its door on Marylhurst’s campus this past March—welcoming both architectural pilgrims and the public and ensuring that Belluschi’s architectural legacy will live on in Lake Oswego. h


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| architecture |

THE TRANSCENDENT LANDSCAPE Hacker designs a Unitarian Universalist church that takes inspiration from Central Oregon’s austere volcanic beauty. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by LARA SWIMMER

The angular forms of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship church in Bend, Oregon, designed by Hacker, were inspired by the volcanic outcroppings of Central Oregon’s high desert. The site’s fractured basalt lava flows inspired the placement of the building’s stone walls, made from tuff mined from a nearby quarry. »

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Hacker construction: Kirby Nagelhout Construction landscape architecture: Walker Macy interior furnishings: Deca/Steele Associates sustainability consultant: Vidas Architecture structural engineering: Walker Structural Engineering graymag . com

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| architecture |

w

hen award-winning Portland firm Hacker competed, in 2012, to design Bend’s Unitarian Universalist Fellowship project, principal Corey Martin had recently joined the company. But the designer jumped headlong into the opportunity, with big ambitions and a deep affection for the region. “At the interview, Corey said he wanted to create architecture for Central Oregon that had never been done before,” the firm’s longtime managing principal, Jonah Cohen, recalls. “And I think we did that,” Martin agrees.

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An Oregon native, Martin has spent nearly every weekend of his life traveling over the Cascades to ski, bike, and enjoy time outdoors. Long before joining Hacker—while he worked on projects such as the Maryhill Overlook land-art installation at Allied Works and designed award-winning houses at his own former firm, PATH Architecture—Martin had fantasized about designing a building at one with Central Oregon’s high-desert landscape and its rocky, volcanic underpinnings. Joining Hacker brought him that opportunity. “This is a spiritual space in a beautiful place,” Martin says of the Unitarian locale. “It had the potential to be transcendent.” »


LEFT: The sanctuary is a cocoon of natural cedar illuminated by a skylight. “We wanted it to feel like you’re inside a hollow log,” designer Corey Martin says. ABOVE AND RIGHT: Carvings on sliding doors between the sanctuary and social hall are inspired by Central Oregon’s columnar basalt cliffs. BELOW: The church occupies a pristine 12-acre site on the western edge of Bend that commands views of the mountains beyond.

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“WHAT MAKES CENTRAL OREGON SPECIAL IS THAT YOU CAN SEE ITS LANDSCAPE BEING CREATED AND ERODED. WE DECIDED WE’D CONNECT THE ARCHITECTURE TO THOSE PROCESSES, AS IF THE BUILDING ITSELF WERE A PRIMORDIAL MATERIAL.’’ —COREY MARTIN, DESIGNER

Martin demonstrates how the wooden sliding doors fuse the sanctuary and social hall into one shared space. ABOVE: Deep-set windows are placed to frame specific views, such as a grove of ponderosa pine. »

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Marcel Chair Shinsaku Miyamoto

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| architecture |

The building is designed to be grand yet intimate, as seen in the fireside room, located just off the sanctuary and wrapped in sound-absorbing wood.

The architecture takes its cues from the region’s active volcanic geology and the 20,000year-old lava flow that cuts right through the 12-acre site. The 17,600-square-foot building is a poetic fusion of cedar, stone, and glass seemingly carved out of the dynamic earth. “What makes Central Oregon special is that you can see its landscape being created and eroded,” Martin explains. “We decided we’d connect the architecture to those processes, as if the building itself were a primordial material: a box of charred wood carved with sight lines and sun angles. Layers of waves shift and bend. Our plan was meant to bring the land into the project.” The building contains classrooms, offices, a kitchen, and flexible spaces that house a preschool, yoga classes, and community events and performances. Central to the design is a 250-seat sanctuary that opens onto a glassensconced social hall, symbolic of the congregation’s love of gathering together. But whether you’re inside this building or out, you experience a vivid sense of its surrounding geography—as if nature itself is the connection to, and proof of, a higher power. h

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GARY GLADWISH ARCHITECTURE WWW.2GARC.COM

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home on the range

On the windswept shore of British Columbia’s Nicola Lake, a husband-and-wife architect and interior designer collaborate on a thoroughly contemporary ranch house. Written by JORDAN KUSHINS : Photographed by EMA PETER

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Michael McDonald interiors: Jo Ellen Kelly construction: Pache Construction millwork: Mill Creek Manufacturing

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In the dining room of a Nicola Lake home, a dramatic Slamp chandelier hangs over an Ikea table, surrounded by chairs from ISA International. Âť


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| architecture |

IN THE CANADIAN GRASSLANDS three

hours northeast of Vancouver lies Nicola Lake, a weathered and somewhat wild vestige of the area’s rich ranching past. Grazing cattle and real-life cowboys are common sights across its rugged terrain, and it’s here that Jo Ellen Kelly, a senior associate at Stantec Architecture, and her husband Michael McDonald, executive vice president at Kasian, collaborated on the project that they now call home. McDonald has deep ties to the region (his great-grandparents emigrated from Italy and homesteaded on Nicola Lake), so when the rare opportunity arose to buy waterfront property, the couple jumped at the chance to create their own home and continue the family legacy. It was only their second time working together (the first was for a client), but their collaboration was smooth. To reach creative consensus, “we would ‘sell’ our ideas to each other,” says Kelly. One thing they agreed on from the start: the house, though modern in style, would draw inspiration from the region’s pastoral legacy. “It’s what we call a contemporary ranch house,” Kelly says. “It’s in the country, but we wanted it to have an urban connection.” Sourcing local talent was a huge boon to the project. “There are some incredible craftspeople in the Nicola Valley,” McDonald says, noting the cabinetmakers at Mill Creek Manufacturing as well as builder Tim Pache, who conducted an “almost forensic excavation” so as to disturb the site as little as possible. Inside the home, clean lines and natural materials such as quartz, stone, and basalt turn the traditional rustic aesthetic on its head. “We

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designed it very much like a gallery,” Kelly says, noting the bright white walls and the scraped, stained maple floors. A wide travertine fireplace in the middle of the open-plan living space and “small hits” of fir sprinkled throughout the project tie the home’s interior to its epic surroundings. An 8-foot-high window wall spans the full length of the main floor, offering panoramic views and opening onto a wraparound deck perfectly situated for protection from the lake’s powerful winds. A row of clerestory windows captures additional light, and, when they’re open, cross-ventilation carries breezes up from the lake throughout the home. “The house is like an observatory over the water,” McDonald says. “When you’re standing against the big windows, the lake seems to slide out from under you.” h

ABOVE: Glazed walls and a pair of Eames Aluminum Group seats overlook the lake from the living room. BELOW: Dark glulam beams contrast with the white walls and frame the staircase leading to the lower level.


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Bright Ideas

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| resources |

29. ART Kehinde Wiley Studio New York kehindewiley.com

Scandinavian Heritage Foundation Portland scanheritage.org

Seattle Art Museum Seattle seattleartmuseum.org

Seattle Architecture Foundation Seattle seattlearchitecture.org

32. HAPPENINGS Anchorage Museum Anchorage anchoragemuseum.org

Suyama Space Seattle suyamaspace.org

Bellevue Art Museum Bellevue bellevuearts.org Bensen Vancouver bensen.ca Bocci Vancouver and Berlin bocci.ca Burnaby Art Gallery Burnaby, B.C. burnabyartgallery.ca Chris Dikeakos Architects Vancouver dikeakos.com DiLoreto Architecture Portland diloretoarchitecture.com Falken Reynolds Interiors Vancouver falkenreynolds.com Hirsch Bedner Associates hba.com House Spirits Distillery Portland housespirits.com Lukas Peet Design Vancouver lukaspeet.com Mass Timber Conference Portland masstimberconference.com Museum of Vancouver Vancouver museumofvancouver.ca Osmose Design Portland osmosedesign.com Portland Art Museum Portland portlandartmuseum.org Rize Alliance Properties Vancouver rize.ca Sai Woo Vancouver saiwoo.ca

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Vancouver Art Gallery Vancouver vanartgallery.bc.ca 38. WORD AKJ Architects Seattle akjarchitects.com EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com Lane Williams Architects Seattle lanewilliams.com Madera Furniture Company Tacoma, WA maderawoodworking.com Marrimor Design Studio Vancouver marrimor.com 40. RETAIL Secret Location Vancouver and Richmond, B.C. secretlocation.ca 45. FASHION Andrew J.S. Seattle andrewjs.co Baby & Company Seattle babyandco.us Maiden Noir Seattle maidennoir.com Michele Andrews Seattle mishnar.com 50. JEWELRY Grace Gow Seattle shopgracegow.com Pratt Fine Arts Center Seattle pratt.org 52. FASHION Foster Row Portland fosterrow.com

Makers Woodworks Portland makerswoodworks.com

Chown Hardware Bellevue, WA, and Portland chown.com

Minnie + George Portland minniegeorge.com

Chris Antemann Joseph, OR chrisantemann.com

Wildwood & Company Portland wildwoodcompany.com

Currey & Company curreycodealers.com

Wildwood Bespoke Portland wildwoodbespoke.com 56. MADE HERE Aleph Geddis Orcas Island, WA alephgeddis.com Architectural Elements Bellingham, WA archele.com Cascade Joinery Ferndale, WA cascadejoinery.com Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com Duluth Timber Bow-Edison, WA duluthtimber.com Filson Seattle filson.com Heliotrope Architects Seattle heliotropearchitects.com O.B. Williams Company Seattle obwilliams.com Quantum Windows Everett, WA quantumwindows.com 60. SOURCED B&B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com divafurnitureseattle.com

Esque Studio Portland esque-studio.com

Jus Modern jusmodern.com

Inform Interiors Seattle informseattle.com

Mitchell Freedland Design Vancouver mitchellfreedland.com

Inform Interiors Vancouver informinteriors.com Knoll knoll.com Ligne Roset Seattle ligne-roset-usa.com Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com Meissen meissen.com Roche Bobois Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver roche-bobois.com Waterworks waterworks.com Zinc Art + Object Edmonds, WA zincartinteriors.com 70. INTERIORS E. Smith Mercantile Seattle esmithmercantile.com

Bedford Brown Portland bedfordbrown.com

Tufenkian Portland tufenkian.com

Cedar & Moss Portland cedarandmoss.com

Gwathmey Siegel Kaufman Architects New York gwathmey-siegel.com

Kelly Forslund Seattle kellyforslund.net

Baker Furniture bakerfurniture.com

Brougham Interiors Vancouver broughaminteriors.com

Fred Torres Gallery New York fredtorres.com

Hayden Collective Seattle carriehayden.com

Essential Apothecary Alchemist Seattle essentialapothecary shop.com

Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org

Candelabra Inc. shopcandelabra.com

76. INTERIORS Bizzi & Partners Development New York bizzipartners.com Bloom Furniture Studio Vancouver bloomfurniturestudio.com Brentano Inc. brentanofabrics.com

Once A Tree Furniture Vancouver onceatreefurniture.com William Switzer Furniture Vancouver williamswitzer.com 82. NATURAL SELECTION 12th Avenue Iron Seattle 12thavenueiron.com Arlene Schechet New York arleneschechet.net Art Production Fund New York artproductionfund.org Claudia Fitch Seattle claudiafitch.com Glenn Rudolph Photography Roslyn, WA glennrudolph.com Inform Interiors Seattle informinteriors.com Jeff Brouws Photography jeffbrouws.com Jennie Gruss Interior Design Seattle jenniegruss.com Jessica Jackson Hutchins Portland marianneboeskygallery.com MBI Seattle Seattle mbiseattle.com Olson Kundig Seattle olsonkundig.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE

| COUCH | Jamieson Furniture Gallery For the past 25 years, designer Richard Jamieson has been recognized as a leader in the modern urban plank movement. Jamieson Furniture’s large Bellevue showroom artfully blends handcrafted live-edged tables with unique and custom-designed hardwood furniture for all the rooms in your home. 10217 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004 | (425) 577-8627 jamiesonfurniture.com

Tom Bakker Design Are you building a new home, condo, or office, or are you planning to remodel? As a professional interior designer, I would love to work with you. I’m a great listener and have been involved in projects all along the West Coast, from Vancouver, B.C., to La Jolla, CA. I also create one-of-a-kind contemporary art, and I’d be happy to discuss your custom-art needs as well. My latest commission was recently installed in a home at Big Horn Golf Club in Palm Desert, CA. Call me today to book your first consultation. (206) 877-3327 | tom@tombakkerdesign.com tombakkerdesign.com

At COUCH, we custom-build each piece from scratch to the specifications you select. We offer quality US construction that ranges from mid-market to high end. Our flexibility means any of our hundreds of styles can be built at any size. It means you pick legs, fabric or leather, and cushion firmness. Our experienced staff will help you create a finished product that is both comfortable and beautiful. “Custom” used to mean built from the ground up, exactly like you want it. At COUCH, it still does. 5423 Ballard Avenue N.W., Seattle, WA 98107 | (206) 633-6108 couchseattle.com

ZINC Modern Art + Object ZINC brings a mix of modern furniture, contemporary art and a collection of unique gifts to the waterside village of Edmonds, just 15 minutes from Seattle. Visit ZINCArtObject.com for hours, 24/7 shopping, and a schedule of art openings and special events. ZINC makes your world FUN to live in! 102 3rd Ave South, Suite B, Edmonds, WA | (206) 467-1027 ZINCArtObject.com

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| resources |

Pental Granite & Marble Seattle pentalonline.com Roy McMakin Seattle and San Diego, CA domesticfurniture.com Schuchart/Dow Seattle and Sun Valley, ID schuchartdow.com Seattle Interiors Seattle seattleinteriors.com SieMatic Seattle siematic.com The Rug Company therugcompany.com Twisted Metalworks Seattle manta.com Wangechi Mutu New York wangechimutu.com 88. WATERSHED Bulthaup bulthaup.com Duratherm Window Corporation durathermwindow.com Fireorb fireorb.net Highline Partners Studio Bozeman, MN highline-partners.com Hughes Umbanhowar Architects Venice, CA and Hobe Sound, FL huum.com Raymond Jungles Miami, FL raymondjungles.com 98. FOUND IN TRANSLATION B&B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com divafurnitureseattle.com Blu Bathworks Vancouver blubathworks.com BoConcept Bellevue, WA boconcept.com Designers Guild designersguild.com FLOS flos.com Marcel Wanders marcelwanders.com

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Minotti minotti.com MN Custom Homes Bellevue, WA mncustom.com Pedini Seattle and North Vancouver, B.C. pediniusa.com pedinivancouver.com Porcelanosa Seattle porcelanosa-usa.com Roche Bobois Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver roche-bobois.com Semigood Design Seattle semigoods.com Suidman Design Seattle suidman.com Sutter Home & Hearth Seattle sutterhearth.com Wilkens Design Studio Seattle wilkensdesignstudio.com 106. CONTEXT Kinsman Foundation Milwaukie, OR kinsmanfoundation.org Marylhurst University Marylhurst, OR marylhurst.edu MCM Construction Lake Oswego, OR mcmbuild.com The ReBuilding Center Portland rebuildingcenter.org 114. ARCHITECTURE Hacker Architects Portland hackerarchitects.com Kirby Nagelhout Construction Bend, OR kirbynagelhout.com Vidas Architecture Bend, OR mlvidas.com Walker Macy Seattle and Portland walkermacy.com Walker Structural Engineering Bend, OR walkerse.com

122. ARCHITECTURE Herman Miller hermanmiller.com Ikea ikea.com ISA International havaseat.com Mill Creek Manufacturing Merritt, B.C. millcreekdesign.ca Pache Construction Kamloops, B.C. pachebuilders.com Slamp slamp.com 130. LAST WORD HCMA Architecture + Design Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. hcma.ca AD INDEX 81. Agnes Underground Seattle agnesunderground.com 59. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com camerichseattle.com 53. Anderson Poolworks andersonpoolworks.com 109. Argent Fabrication Seattle argentfab.com 20. Atelier Lapchi Portland lapchi.com 113. Baylis Architects Seattle and Bellevue, WA baylisarchitects.com 119. Ben Trogdon Architects Seattle bentrogdonarchitects.com 61. Best Plumbing Seattle bestplumbing.com 69. Bloom Furniture Studio Vancouver bloomfurniturestudio.com 123. The Burrard Vancouver theburrard.com 44. Coal Seattle coalheadwear.com 57. Chown Hardware Portland and Bellevue, WA chown.com

16. DEKTON by Cosentino Vancouver, Portland, Seattle, and Spokane, WA cosentino.com 34. Design Week Portland designweekportland.com 17. Design Within Reach Seattle and Portland dwr.com 123. Domestic Architecture Seattle and San Diego, CA domesticarchitecture.com 8. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com 111. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com 131. The Fixture Gallery Multiple locations thefixturegallery.com 121. Gary Gladwish Architecture Seattle 2garc.com 4. Hammer & Hand Seattle and Portland hammerandhand.com 2. Hive Portland hivemodern.com 67. Hotel Lucia Portland hotellucia.com 15. Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com 119. Issaquah Cedar & Lumber Issaquah, WA cedarexperts.com 121. K & L Interiors Seattle kandlinteriors.com 119. Kozai Modern Vancouver kozaimoderntrade.com 13. Ligne Roset Seattle ligne-roset-usa.com and Available through: Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com 121. Madera Furniture Company Tacoma, WA maderafurnitureco.com 35. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com

63. OPUS Hotel vancouver.opushotel.com 123. Paper Hammer Seattle paper-hammer.com 109. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com 113. Resource Furniture Vancouver resourcefurniture.com 9. Roche Bobois Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com 19. Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com 111. Savvy Cabinetry by Design Seattle savvycd.com 27. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com 12. The Shade Store Seattle, Portland theshadestore.com 39. SieMatic Seattle Seattle siematic.com 21. SPARK Modern Fires sparkfires.com 43 Stoneboat Vineyards Oliver, B.C. stoneboatvineyards.com 7, 41. Subzero and Wolf Seattle subzero.com/seattle And available through: Arnold’s Appliance Bellevue, WA arnoldsappliance.com Basco Appliances Portland bascoappliances.com Judd & Black Electric Lynnwood, WA juddblack.com 65. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 28. Ultra-tec ultra-tec.com 132. Urban Hardwoods Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles urbanhardwoods.com 31. Victoria + Albert vandabaths.com 6. West Elm Workspace Seattle and Portland westelmworkspace.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE

IIDA Northern Pacific Chapter presents the 2nd annual RISE Keynote Presentation featuring writer and inspirational speaker Danny Harris. His talk focuses on the vital role that knowing and talking to strangers plays in shaping successful ventures, and most importantly, living a meaningful and connected life.

not2big®

Tickets on sale February 8th riseseattle2016.eventbrite.com

React. Reduce. Rethink. Recycle. Relax. At not2big, we build modern artisan furniture and accessories one piece at a time. Handcrafted and individually numbered, no two pieces are exactly alike. Our designs combine the warmth of wood with a creative mix of other materials to produce timeless furniture that is functional and beautiful. Whether you choose an in-house design or a custom piece, it will be a true original. Our goal is to inspire, delight, and surprise, bringing our clients a personalized experience and providing them with a unique product not available anywhere else. We’re rethinking how furniture is made.

For more information: iida-northernpacific.com

(425) 503-0710 | not2big.com

March 24, 2016 | 7:00am - 9:30am | The Westin - Seattle

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“What is luxury in design?” This was the question that Vancouver-based dynamo Mark Busse—producer of CreativeMornings/Vancouver, co-founder of Industrial Brand and director of creativity and engagement at HCMA Architecture + Design—posed to his HCMA colleagues in January 2016. One frosty morning, as a reply, 30 of the firm’s designers lugged into the office items that represented their own personal interpretation of luxury. Head online to Graymag.com/luxury to hear the stories behind the objects and learn more about the project. Produced by MARK BUSSE : Photographed by RICK ETKIN

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ELEVATE YOUR BATH

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A tribute to the art of decorative detail perfected by the skilled artisans and A tribute to the art of decorative detail perfected by the skilled artisans and craftsmen at the turn of the century. The St. George Collection is stately, sculptural, craftsmen at the turn of the century. The St. George Collection is stately, and and well-proportioned. St.balance George bathroom fixtures marry flowing curves with Style substance strike a perfect in the bathroom faucet collections from American Standard速. sculptural, and well-proportioned. St. George bathroom fixtures marry sculpted to provide that classic architectural St. George collection Our faucets ridges are engineered to look beautiful and function flawlessly.feel. Worry-free, drip-free and built to last, flowing curves with sculpted ridges to provideand thatbathrom classic architectural feel. products include toilets, freestanding bathrubs, sinks. Come in today all of our bathroom faucets are covered by our Limited Lifetime Warranty on function and finish. Designed St. George collection products includekitchen toilets,&freestanding bathtubs, and to speak with one of our knowledgeable bath consultants. to create an elegant and luxurious bathroom focal point, our freestanding tubs come in a variety of styles bathroom sinks. Come in today to speak with one of our knowledgeable and are made to fit in the space of an average-sized bathroom. kitchen & bath consultants. Tigard Showroom Bendone Showroom Salem Showroom Eugene Showroom Come in today to speak with of our knowledgeable kitchen & bath consultants 7337 S.W. Kable Lane 503-620-7050

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