Swine Grist - Winter 2022

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Swine Grist

A PERIODIC NEWSLETTER PRODUCED BY GRAND VALLEY FORTIFIERS VOLUME 24, ISSUE 4 | WINTER 2022

Dear Friends, As Christmas quickly approaches all of the Grand Valley Fortifiers family members want to wish you and your family members a very blessed Christmas! Across the provinces and across the country, we had a very “interesting” growing season and thereby variable harvest in terms of quality and in terms of yield. Although we generally associate mycotoxins with moisture and mould, as Adam points out in his article, heat stress and drought can also cause mycotoxin growth. With tight margins throughout the industry, formulators, feed specialists, and operators all need to think “precision feeding and management” and work closely together to capture as many savings and efficiencies as possible. I trust that the information that is shared within this edition of the Swine Grist will bring opportunities for improvement top of mind and will result in more investigation and discussion with your Swine Specialist and Nutritionist. As we near the end of 2022, I and all at the GVF group of companies family members are thankful for the opportunity to work so closely together with so many of Canada’s amazing Swine producers across this wonderful country. We count this a privilege and hold these relationships – many of which have existed for decades – as a rich blessing. Blessings on you, yours and your Swine operation in 2023! Sincerely, Ian Ross, President & CEO

A LOOK AT MYCOTOXIN LEVELS IN 2022 CORN HARVEST by: ADAM TOTAFURNO Monogastric Nutrition, Grand Valley Fortifiers

A

s the 2022 corn harvest commenced, the question was, would the predominately dry growing conditions, coupled with a wet August and September lead to favorable conditions for mycotoxin growth. Ultimately, any stress to the plant whether drought, high environmental temperatures, or excessive water (to name a few) could predispose the corn to mycotoxin growth. With this in mind, to date, a total number of 77 corn samples representing 49 different farms across Ontario were sampled and analyzed for DON (Vomitoxin), Zearalenone, T2, Fumonisins, and Aflatoxins (Table 1).

DON Average (ppm)

n

Halton

0.00

1

Waterloo

0.11

2

13,402

0.13

6

Perth

0.14

13

Bruce

0.14

1

Oxford

0.28

3

Niagara

0.29

2

Durham

0.40

1

Leeds Grenvilee

0.48

1

York

0.49

2

Elgin

0.52

10

Chatham-Kent

0.63

8

Middlesex

0.69

9

Table 1. Mycotoxin analysis of corn for the 2022 crop year.

Simcoe

0.70

2

Peel Country

0.80

1

As commonly seen, DON represented the majority of the mycotoxin load (all other mycotoxins tested were considered “low” contamination) with an average of 0.83 ppm (similar to the 2021 crop) and a maximum of 13.40 ppm. The latter represents the potential variability of mycotoxin contamination from farm to farm. With that said, mycotoxin data was further broken down into the various Ontario counties (Figure 1).

Brant

0.92

2

Haldimand

1.35

4

Hastings

2.35

1

Lambton

3.02

4

Stormont

3.85

1

Huron

4.62

3

DON Average (ppm) 0.83 Min (ppb)

0

Max (ppb)

13,402

Zearalenone Average (ppb)

T2 Average (ppb)

Fumonisins Average (ppb)

Aflatoxins Average (ppb)

26

17

107

0

0

0

0

0

713

906

1,760

0

GRAND VALLEY FORTIFIERS PO Box 726 Cambridge ON N1R 5W6 1-800-567-4400 grandvalley.com

Country

Figure 1. Mycotoxin analysis of corn for the 2022 crop year.

Ian Ross, President & CEO | David Ross, VP & CMO Martin Clunies, Ph.D. | Tom Reidy | Tanka Khanal, Ph.D. | Adam Totafurno | Youngji Rho, Ph.D., Monogastric Nutritionists Curtis Ebanks, Layout Editor


Though the majority of counties had DON levels below 1 ppm some counties (in particular Huron and Lambton), appeared to be somewhat of a “hot” spot. This does not go without saying however, that the number of samples (n) should be taken into consideration and mycotoxin analysis should be performed on your individual corn when determining a mycotoxin “control” strategy. Some common symptoms that may occur with mycotoxin contamination include but are not limited to: Mycotoxin

Symptom(s)

DON (Vomitoxin)

Reduced feed intake (an estimated 4% reduction in intake for every 1 ppm above 1.5 ppm), reduced growth rate and impaired immune function.

Zearalenone

Swollen vulva, rectal and vaginal prolapse, abortion, prolonged or no presentation of standing heat and overall poor reproductive performance.

T2

Reduced feed intake, intestinal hemorrhages and impaired immune function.

Fumonisins

Pulmonary Edema (heart failure and fluid accumulation in the lungs), reduced growth rate and impaired immune function.

Aflatoxins

Liver lesions (hemorrhages, jaundice, sudden death), reduced growth rate and impaired immune function.

Presentation of symptoms will depend on a variety of factors such as overall load of mycotoxin contamination, the various number of mycotoxins present (more than one type of mycotoxin can compound effects), duration of mycotoxin exposure, stage of production and overall herd health status. If one suspects the risk of mycotoxin contamination on your farm, it is recommended that your corn sample(s) be submitted to your Grand Valley Fortifiers Swine Specialist for mycotoxin analysis; from which we can present a recommended strategy for your farm.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LIVESTOCK FOR OUR WORLD

by: IAN ROSS President & CEO, GVF Group of Companies

W

ith the negative press that the livestock industry is attracting due to its alleged net negative impacts on the environment as well as the livestock production limiting animal rights agenda, all of us who proudly participate in the production of meat, milk and eggs need to “read past the headlines” and become more knowledgeable and communicative about all the positive impacts of livestock production on food, and more importantly, digestible protein security, as well as the efficiency gains and yes, even positive impacts of livestock on the environment. Over the past several months, by attending webinars, reading scientific articles and collaborating with industry partners around the world, we are increasingly aware of the significant need for the increased production of meat, milk and eggs for a growing population that is often deficient in their daily requirement of digestible protein. We are increasingly confident that when science catches up with creation, the importance of range land, crop production and woodlots to carbon sequestration and the upcycling of raw materials that are inedible to humans as well as the upcycling of human food waste into meat, milk and eggs will become readily apparent. “The world is hyper-focused on emissions without also considering sequestration, and agriculture is essentially the only industry that has carbon capture as its central function.”1

One key source of information on this topic has been through Livestock Research and Innovation Corp (LRIC) who hosted a Horizons Series webinar in September, featuring Dr. Vaughn Holder from Alltech. The following is a significant portion of the White Paper that was published by LRIC following this 45 minute webinar. To read the entire White Paper or to view the webinar, please visit: livestockresearch.ca/white_papers and look for Livestock and Society.

Why it matters to the Ontario Livestock industry:

Society is changing at an incredibly rapid pace. Industries and supply chains have been forced to become more flexible as a global pandemic, war in Ukraine and Russia, and a diminishing work force have challenged these systems. In the next 30 years an influx in population of about 2 to 3 billion will become the new reality. The population will be much wealthier with a higher quality of life than ever before. Trends in protein consumption indicate that wealthier populations intake higher amounts of protein (Moughan, 2021). Protein production will have to adapt to its changing consumer demographic and needs. Approximately 4% of the earth’s surface is appropriate for crop cultivation (Rotz et al., 2019). Climate change is present and looming. As a result, food production is more challenging for the future as resources such as water and arable land, become scarcer. If the future is to be fully food secure, we must consider all options for producing high quality protein to feed the population as the removal of animal agriculture would create a massive protein deficit that cannot be overcome by growing crops due to the limitation on available arable land.

What can livestock farmers do?

Eighty-six percent of global livestock feed is classified as inedible to humans (Moughan, 2021). Livestock, especially ruminants, can convert human-inedible raw materials into high quality food (particularly protein) for people. That food has unparalleled nutritional density (Mottet et al., 2017). The Ontario Livestock Industry has an opportunity to change the negative viewpoints on animal agriculture and educate consumers, media, and the public on why Ontario livestock production is highly valued and should be encouraged. This message is important for consumers to understand as we transition into a world with a higher population and limited resources. Reviews done regarding protein digestibility and amino acid composition comparing animal proteins to animal-free proteins are great sources of information outlining the benefits from animal protein that cannot be achieved artificially. Relaying this information to the sources criticizing animal protein is important for the Ontario livestock Industry in order to get facts into the foreground. Adopting regenerative practices (see white paper on Regenerative Agriculture) has extensive benefits regarding the climate crisis. Regenerative techniques have many benefits, the most valued is the ability for carbon sequestration via multi-species grazing systems. Not only do regenerative techniques like rotational grazing create a carbon sink, but techniques in the regenerative model can also improve soil health, prevent drought and floods, decrease nitrogen runoff, improve water quality, create biodiversity, and manage pests (LaCanne & Lundgren, 2018). Regenerative practices have proven themselves and will become the new common practice to offset emissions in the agricultural industry. Improving degraded land is critical for maintaining and increasing livestock and food production. Food security depends on healthy and resilient systems.


Swine Grist THE ONTARIO JUNIOR SWINE SHOW 2022

Cultural Change/ Challenges

Many of these new proteins which companies like Impossible Foods Inc and Beyond Meat, are simply repackaging existing nutrients into plant-based meats, milks, and similar products. While there is nothing inherently wrong with that, we should not consider these to be a part of global protein supply, as those nutrients could have been consumed directly in the form of the crops used to make them. Even the lab grown meats will need to be “fed” with existing amino acids from our existing supply, meaning that there is zero net contribution to global protein security from such products. A robust conversation of the future protein security of the world must focus on maximizing the efficient use of the resources that we have, to produce protein, and to do so without unintended social, cultural, and environmental consequences.

Research Gaps

Much of the anti-livestock sentiment in mainstream conversation is associated with the idea that livestock are bad for the environment. Critics focus very heavily on the emissions and pollution side of the equation, and very little on the effects of livestock on nutrient cycling through the environment and even carbon sequestration. We need to commit to understanding the role of livestock in ecosystems to quantify its effects on the environment. 1

Dr. Vaughn Holder, Research Project Manager, in Beef Nutrition at Alltech.

Following the show and awards ceremony the 30 top hogs were entered into the sale which was hosted by Katie Sinclair and auctioneered by Scott Bessy. It was encouraging to see the students beaming with excitement as they walked their pig around the ring on display for the bidders and buyers of this great event. While buyer attendance was lighter than previous years, most participants enjoyed a respectable price for their hog. A special call out to Tom Murray of Zantingh Direct, who stepped forward and agreed to pay the gavel price for the winning hog after the winning bidder mysteriously disappear from ringside. We also congratulate all the competitors and their parents who put in many hours to enter their pig(s) and show them in the ring. We want to say a big thank you to the organizing committee which is made up of many industry volunteers. Without their efforts, running the OJSS and sale would not have been possible again this year. For those who couldn’t attend this November, we hope to see you in 2023!

THE ONTARIO JUNIOR SWINE SHOW RETURNS!

SWINE ECONOMICS AND HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BOTTOM LINE!

by: DAVID ROSS VP & CMO, Group of Companies

O

n November 4th it was exciting to once again, return to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at the Exhibition Place, Toronto after not being held since Nov. 1, 2019. The familiar sights and smells came rushing back as I entered the coliseum and remembered how truly special an event this was. We say a big congratulations and well done to the organizing committee as it was no small feat to get this historic fair up and running again after being closed for two seasons, while also celebrating its 100th anniversary of running. The key interest point of the Royal Winter Fair for pork producers is the Ontario Junior Swine Show and Sale that runs on the first Friday of the fair. This year, the OJSS saw 35 students register to show their barrows and gilts. We were privileged to have Craig Hebert of Hensall District Co-op judge the contestants based on their showmanship and hogs’ confirmation. A big congratulations goes to Hannah Simpson who won Grand Champion, Ben Robinson who won Grand Champion Showmanship and Kelly DeBruyn who won Stockmanship Champion.

by: KEN VANDERHEYDEN Monogastric Specialist, Grand Valley Fortifiers

W

e are in a new era of skyrocketing inflation rates and we are all vulnerable, including our farm production enterprises. How are we going to address these new highs in fuel, crop inputs, and feed commodity prices? I suggest we focus on the things we have some control over starting with feed management.

Corn

$ 360 /tonne

625 kg

$ 225

Soymeal

$ 720 /tonne

150 kg

$ 108

DDGS

$ 380 /tonne

200 kg

$ 76

Premix

$ 1500 /tonne

25 kg

$ 37.5 $ 446.5

grandvalley.com


We’ve heard from you.

A 130 kg hog gains 105 kg x 2.70 feed conversion 285 kg feed x $446.50 = $127.25

Simplified Pricing Coming In February 2023.

Let’s drop the feed conversion to 2.6 x 105 kg x $446.50 = $121.90. A difference of $5.35 /hog How do we capture some of this $5.35 /hog and in some cases, more? Feeder management is a good place to start. A four hole double sided feeder @ 3 turns /year will finish 300 market hogs. 300 x $127.25 = $38,1750 of feed per year through each grower/finisher feeder. Feeder settings with 1/3 pan floor showing and 2/3 pan floor with feed covering is ideal. Full feeders allow pigs to drag feed out and into the gutter. Too little feed equals slower growth and more maintenance feed required. Poor feeder management and maintenance is an insipid profit robber.

In an effort to reduce our customers’ costs, as well as time and effort spent on paperwork, we will begin embedding our 3% Cash Discount into our premix, supplement and nursery feeds pricing starting on Feb. 1, 2023. This means the prices of these products will be lowered by 3% and the cash discount note at the bottom of our invoices will be removed. Discounted prices. Simplified Paperwork. Easier accounting for your farming operation.

2022

Feed grind of 500 -700 microns is ideal. This would be a 1/8 to 5/32 inch screen. Make sure there are no kernels getting through holes and wear. 2 0 2 2 Particle size testing can help with this.

Dear Friends

AND NEW YEAR’S SCHEDULE

Maintain cement pads to prevent pitting, deterioration, and protruding stones, offering a comfortable step to prolong feeding time. When shipping hogs, know your ideal shipping weight. Ideal weights produce optimum fat <18 mm, muscle of >68 mm , lean >61 mm to maximize index and lean premiums. Consider subscribing to our Profit Finder program which provides weekly shipping data analysis in an easy to view dash board report. With winter weather comes fine tuning of ventilation. A N D Make sure air inlets are cleaned and operating freely. Repair drops, N E W Y resulting E A R ’inSair quality of less than 15 ppm ammonia. S C H E DU L E Thank performance. you for your business in 2022. Health is crucial for great production PRRS, swine flu, circovirus, mycoplasma, bacterial pneumonia, ileitis, all play a big part in your operation’s efficiency and success. Review your protocols with your veterinarian. Vaccinating is a stressful time, so when you pull the vaccine out of the fridge, make sure you warm to room temperature. A cold shot can knock pigs on their keaster. Before you vaccinate, review expiry dates to confirm the vaccine is within its expiry date.

Processing piglets is an important job. Ensure all equipment is clean, disinfected and kept in a clean area. Rotate needles and knives regularly. Infections produce abscesses, and abscesses produce belly ruptures, excess trim and condemnations. Water supply deserves some attention. Test water for E.coli and coliform bacteria. If bacteria is positive, treat water using one of many water treatments, from chlorine dioxide, acidification, to peroxide. Water supply should provide between 500 to 1000 ml per minute of fresh clean water. Cleaning and disinfecting are crucial in controlling bacteria and viruses. To reduce wash time and break through the biofilm or grease layer, use a degreaser such as Topfoam with cold water. After applying a layer of foam, let sit for 30 minutes then pressure wash. Add a coating of disinfectant like Megades Novo to all surfaces to finalize the wash. Now that harvest is mostly behind us, take some time to review the small things that can add up to valuable savings and improve your operation’s profitability. Have a great 2023!

In order to help us provide you with the best service possible during the holiday season, please be advised of the days we’ll be closed.

MONDAY DEC. 26

MONDAY

TUESDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

JAN. 02

JAN. 03, 2023

Order early to ensure you don’t run out. DEC. 27

TUESDAY

MONDAY

8AM27- 5PM CLOSED DEC. JAN. 02 CUSTOMER SERVICE 8AM - 5PM CLOSED DESK OPEN, DELIVERIES CLOSED CUSTOMER SERVICEDEC DESK28. OPEN, RESUME CLOSED DEC. 26

TUESDAY

RETURN TO JAN. 03, 2023 NORMAL RETURN TOHOURS NORMAL BUSINESS BUSINESS HOURS

DELIVERIES RESUME DEC 28.

Thought for the Day Prepare Him Room “Yet to all who did receive Him, to those who believed in his name, He gave the right to become children of God.(John 1:12) When Christ was born on this earth 2000 years ago, there was no room for Him at the inn. Instead, he was born in a stable among the animals, that as farmers, we’re all so familiar with. However, it was Jesus’ sacrificial love to all mankind that “made room” for you and me to have access to the Father. Through His birth, death, and resurrection He made room for all who believe in His name and receive Him to become children of God. This Christmas season, have you prepared Him room? Don’t miss out on the best gift of all!


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