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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

GRAHAM HOGG - DIGITAL PORTFOLIO - 201263925

Space Asia Hub - First completed building worked on as part of ‘Team Bencoolen’ for WOHA Architects - 2011


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CONTENTS

Profile Curriculum Vitae Testimonial

Year 4 WOHA - Singapore - Summer 2012 Year 5

Previous Work Examples

Index - Criteria Module Descriptors

pg. 2


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

PROFILE

I have worked at WOHA Architects in Singapore on two separate occassions, where I completed his post Part I year out working on the Space Asian Hub retail development and Ardmore Park a high rise residential building. For my honours dissertation in Year 4 I explored ‘The Architecture of the Wire’; an in depth piece of research on the impact of the TV series ‘The Wire’ upon the post industrial city of Baltimore. In Year 5 I am looking at Scotland’s identity within the Nordic region on a project called ‘Possible Orkney’. This is a joint thesis project with Alexander Hobday whom I also studied with in Year 3 at Roma Tre University, Rome.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CURRICULUM VITAE - POSTER ARCHITECTURE

With the current architectural job prospects at a premium, I have quickly realised that being, and doing, something different is what is required to succeed in being employed at the moment. After year 3 I applied for well over 100 jobs with a standard ‘Curriculum Vitae’ - all to no avail. It was at this juncture that I created a simple one page document called “Poster Architecture”. Poster Architecture was my attempt at being something different which allowed me to get myself noticed within the architecture business as the 1 page could be sent via email/post/by hand, and the employer immediately knew everything about me. It was a bold approach and resulted in my placement at WOHA Architects, Singapore between October 2010 - August 2011. The following two pages show the two different versions of my ‘Poster Architecture’. After Year 5 I intend to send out the later “Poster Architecture” which is my own version of my ‘Curriculum Vitae’. The first one is the one which i sent out in 2010 and resulted in my employment at WOHA Architects. This unique style has worked for me previously and I believe it will again yield similar results. Further to this, the testimonial I have recieved from WOHA Architects is also attached after this which showcases why I was a valuable part of their architectural framework, and why I was welcomed back for a second stint over the summer 2012. The work undertaken at WOHA Architects over the summer of 2012 is detailed later.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CURRICULUM VITAE - POSTER ARCHITECTURE - 2010

DO YOU NEED A PART ONE ARCHITECT? IF

YES,

THEN

CHOOSE

ME!

Experience of working in an architects office? Good at hand drawings? Good at model making? Photoshop, AutoCAD, Sketch-up, PowerCAD, Microsoft Office? An ability to learn new skills and ve quickly? techniques very Erasmus Exchange Student? Hard-working and a Team-player? Enthusiastic and energetic? Someone who stands out from the crowd?

CONTACT ME:

Tel No:

(+44)1387 257910 or (+44)7805202928

E-mail:

grahamroberthogg@hotmail.com or graham.hogg@strath.ac.uk

Address: 19 Mossview, Georgetown, Dumfries, DG1 4LB, Scotland

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CURRICULUM VITAE - POSTER ARCHITECTURE - 2013

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CURRICULUM VITAE - TESTIMONIAL - WOHA ARCHITECTS

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4

The study programme for Year 4 is where the student consolidates their architectural design skills, introduces the student to the idea of ar- chitecture as responsive to ‘issue’, and provides the setting where the student begins to define an area of interest in their choice of specialist optional class, and within the Cultural Studies 4 (Dissertation). Disserta- tion in particular affords the student the opportunity to pursue in depth through academic inquiry this idea of personal interest. On completion of the study programme, the student will be able to: 1. demonstrate sophisticated and comprehensive capability in design through all its stages and constituents 2. define an area of personal interest 3. document the research and critical evaluation of a chosen area of interest It is also the first year of the two year advanced study of architecture, leading to exemption from the ARB/ RIBA Part 2 Examination. The Year 4 and Year 5 are therefore closely linked and form a coherent body of study. The Year 4 year is where architectural issues and interests are initiated and discovered, to further inform work under-taken in Year 5.

[Extract from Fourth Year Handbook]

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE

The project concerns the design of a Young Adults (16-25 years old) Hospice, to be sited on the edge of either one of Glasgow’s principle parks – Glasgow Green, located in the east, or Kelvingrove Park to the west of the city. Hospice (Latin hospes, referring both to guests and hosts) is both a type and a philosophy of care that focuses on the palliation of a terminally ill patient’s symptoms. Hospices (originally conceived by the Crusaders circa 1065) were established in the early 14th century by the order of the Knights Hospitaller of St. John of Jerusalem, to provide refuge for travellers and care for the ill and dying. Many of the foundational principles by which modern hospices operate were pioneered in the 1950s by Dame Cicely Saunders. She prosthelytised that terminally ill patients needed compassionate care to help address their fears and concerns as well as palliative comfort for physical symptoms – which can be physical, emotional, spiritual or social in nature. Saunders emphasised focusing on the patient rather than the disease and introduced the notion of ‘total pain’, which included psychological and spiritual as well as the physical aspects. You should acknowledge this research in your proposals. Hospices rely on their architecture to do a significant amount of the passive palliative work, setting the scene for people going through a traumatic experience. They are places where people draw on strengths they may not have realised they had, in order to maximise their own capacity to cope. The buildings should provide the chance for people to read themselves differently, as individuals in unusually difficult circumstances, not as patients, let alone terminally ill ones. The building must feel safe and welcoming. They need to be small, and domestic in scale, yet retain a strong sense of dignity. The architecture should exude hope, giving the users a place to turn to which is surprising, thought provoking and even inspiring. As well as stitching itself between the city and the park, the hospice should be designed to increase the sense of connectedness between people: they are not alone in this situation and people can find ways of moving forward from the crisis of a diagnosis. The architecture should be thinking about the human relationships and assisting those connections, presenting spaces that make people feel better rather than worse (like most hospitals). As an architect, you must be aware of the balance of promoting infection control whilst simultaneously retaining a sense of dignity for the user at all times. You are asked to subject your own thesis ideology as to contemporary hospice design – especially singleoccupancy rooms versus ward strategy. Inherent social factors such as culture, religion, sex, relationships and bespoke places of worship should be considered in conjunction with fundamental considerations, such as maximising daylight and the opportunity to be able to look out (and even step out) from inside to outside, should be addressed. This must not however, be to the expense of simultaneously retaining a strong degree of privacy for the more intimate spaces. The hospice should serve as an interface, both physically and metaphysically. The importance of the dichotomies of inside/outside, inclusion/exclusion, life/death - all situated in a location between city and park - is intrinsic in its design.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LOCATION PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - SITE PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LEVEL 1 PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LEVEL 2 PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LEVEL 3 PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LEVEL 4-6 PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LEVEL 7 PLAN

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 18


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LONG ELEVATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 19


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LONG SECTION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - LONG SECTION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - SHORT ELEVATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - SHORT SECTION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - SHORT SECTION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - PERSPECTIVE

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - BEDROOM STUDY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - DETAILED SECTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - 3D DETAILED SECTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - INTERNAL PERSPECTIVE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - INTERNAL PERSPECTIVE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4A - HOSPICE - INTERNAL PERSPECTIVE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 31


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 33


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 37


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - VISUALISATION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - PARK IN PARIS - VISUALISATION

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 39


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - PROJECT DESCRIPTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

The project concerns the design of a Bath House, to be sited within whichever of Glasgow’s principle parks you previously selected – Glasgow Green or Kelvingrove Park. This project will complement your previous design from semester 1, and must be conscious of its relationship with its partner - in addition to its own unique responsibilities to context and programme. Having demonstrated a more humane approach to public buildings from your previous design, you should consider how to modify and manipulate the brief you have been set, to establish an exemplar centre for bathing within the formal park structure of your site. The class focuses on the design of a large (approx 3000M sq.) programmatically simple, multi-functional urban building. The building is required to be set within a specific urban character, and developed to a detailed level sufficient to demonstrate the relationship between their overall architectural concept, spatial quality and related technical and environmental considerations. The class will complement the architectural investigation of class Studio 4A – the result of the overall year’s work is a design portfolio illustrating architectural breadth and depth’ displaying the student’s understanding of architecture as an idea and architecture as an event experienced through the senses.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SITE PLAN AND SITE SECTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

A SUBTLE TOUCH ON THE L A N D S C A P E With the building forming a focal point of the park, consideration on how to ensure it did not become an overbearing feature of the park had to be made. Siza’s Leca Alvaro Swimming pools just outisde Porto was one such design to do so. His careful placement of his concrete within rock formations allowed it to have a subtle touch on the landscape. This forms the language for the lower level of the bath house giving the impression that the lower floor is carved from the ground in which it is found.

k

1

2 l

The way in which it is carved is then developed through consideration of where the baths are within the building envelope.

m

SEPARATING THE PROGRAM With the building split over two levels (1 [the upper level for dry treatment, and the lower wet treatment]), public and private spaces are considered (2), and also the servicing of the entire (i.e building circulation/changing facilities).

3

4

MAIN POOL DEVELOPMENT Considering the environmental implications that this building has, the extremely hot rooms flank the main pool to give thermal value to the main pool. The main pool spaces and the wings to either side of it are then split in a regimented structure to create similarly sized spaces, resulting in a large space being provided for the main pool much like you would expect in the caves looked at previously.

n

5

o

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

P S

U B L P A C

I C E S

Further relationships to the hospice upstream are evident throughout the design with public spaces being created outside both buildings on important routes as one of these examples.

a

b CREATING A N A T U R A L ENVIRONMENT The concept for the bath house was developed under the consideration that the main spaces within the building (the spaces which dictate the buildings design) should utilise the natural precedents available to this unique building typology.

c

On a mountainside in Japan, monkeys use the naturally forming spa’s as refuge from temperatures well below freezing, however, caves provide refuge from the world, and in unique cases form small lakes at the bottom of them. The light which enters the building from openings high above is something completely unique and can anyone argue that they would rather take a dip in water to escape the world in anything other than one of these unique caves?

d

S E C T I O N A L B U I L D I N G Developing this concept in turn ensures that the building is extremely sectional.

e

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

LOOKING UP THROUGH THE FOLIAGE OF THE CAVE The second language of the building is that of the upper floor which aims to provide the light which scatters through the foliage of the upper cave.

p

1

q

r 2 A UNIQUE N A T U R A L L I G H T With natural lighting a strong driving force of the design, many precedents were used as to how to achieve a unique light which would envelop the entire building. Principles similar to Kengo Kuma’s Prostho Museum were used in the development of the language for the upper floor. The principles for the floor plan and section of the building were developed after looking at this building, however the latice structure used is wholeheartedly different to suit the design of the bath house and to also provide environmental properties, which have all been developed through the consideration of how the latice structure is put together.

3

s

4 t

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - DIAGRAMS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

DEVELOPMENT OF THE C O N C E P T Developing the concept, the building begins to form the same functions as that of the cave.

f

The water in which you are swimming would be surrounded by the rocky face of the cave. When you then looked up from the water, you are initially provided light through trees and shrubs which are growing at the top of the cave, and then eventually you are provided light by that of a large opening to the sky.

g

Materiality is then determined by this principle and two separate languages are created. The lower floo is dark and hard while the upper floor is light and allows natural light in.

h

N A T U R A L L I G H T I N G The provision of natural light is a very important commodity to this building and as such develops on the ideas of the cave through careful consideration of the section. WOHA’s Bras Basah MRT in Singapore and Alma Hotel by LAN Architecture develop a similar set of ideas to allow light into the buildings. In Singapore it is important to note that natural light penetrates all the way to the platform several floors below, something vital to an MRT station.

i

j

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - LEVEL 1 PLAN (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - LEVEL 2 PLAN (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 47


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - LEVEL 3 PLAN (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 48


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - LONG ELEVATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 49


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - LONG SECTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 50


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION AA

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 51


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION BB

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 52


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION CC

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION DD

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION EE

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - STUDIO 4B - BATHHOUSE - SECTION FF

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

1

2 3 4

SECTION FF 1 2 3 4

KELVIN WAY RESTAURANT BAR RESTAURANT BAND STAND

SCALE 1:200

0M

10M

25M ff

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - DISSERTATION - INTRODUCTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

The Architectural Dissertation is a chance to identify, define, explore and articulate an area of investigation of students’ own interest; this investigation can be descriptive, analytical or critical. The student will develop an argument and demonstrate their position using evidence from research. The Dissertation should be a piece of academic writing of approximately 8,000 words incorporating relevant illustrations and references unless this would disadvantage students with special needs. In such cases, the Dissertation may be produced in other formats as agreed between the Dissertation Convenor (Jac Lister), the supervisor and the student. The content of the work will be drawn from a study of literature in a chosen area, fieldwork and/or experimental investigation, followed by informed evaluation and/or speculation.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - DISSERTATION - THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE WIRE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - DISSERTATION - THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE WIRE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - DISSERTATION - THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE WIRE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - MAPPING ARCHITECTURE - INTRODUCTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

The content of this aspect of the curriculum aims to introduce students to the discipline and skills of analysing buildings and making coherent reports under key headings. The underlying idea behind the class is ‘learning by doing’, i.e. that by producing an analysis and report of a building under key headings and by seeing how others have approached it, students will be in a good position to produce clear and concise reports on their own designs under those same headings.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - CULTURAL STUDIES - MAPPING ARCHITECTURE - EXTRACTS OF SUBMISSION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - ELECTIVE CLASS - IDEAL WORLDS - INTRODUCTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

This course will explore the theory and practice of late modern and post-modern architecture by looking at its engagement with and use of history and precedent in the years 1945-89. Students will conduct case-study research on key buildings and theoretical writings, and present it in seminar sessions. Group discussion will bring out the relationships between history, theory and practice through four decades of rapidly-shifting theoretical and stylistic development – decades that shaped the architectural world of today.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 4 - ELECTIVE CLASS - IDEAL WORLDS - EXTRACTS OF ESSAY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT DESCRIPTION

On my return to WOHA Architects in Singapore I re-joined the same team I worked with the previous year. The team were now working on a resort in Phuket called Rosewood - images follow on the next five pages. My main tasks for the second time I was there was working on client presentations and assisting with tender drawings for a villa which was being mocked up for client approval. As a returning intern I had already been trained in the office standards, so I was also given the added responsibility of teaching other interns the standards which the office adhered to. On top of this I re-visited the Space Asia Hub (a building I worked on a year earlier), and while I was in Singapore the building won the “2012 URA ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE AWARDS (CATEGORY B)”.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT IMAGE

pg. 66


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT IMAGE

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT IMAGE

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT IMAGE

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - SUMMER 2012 - PROJECT IMAGE

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

The MArch in Advanced Architectural Design (AAD) course is a twelve month course which represents the final stage of academic architectural education including Part 2 professional qualification. The course is divided into two constituent academic sections: the post-graduate Diploma (p/g Dip) – a nine month two semester sections (which delivers on the Part 2 formal requirements), and the Masters itself – a single three month final semester once the p/g Dip is completed. All students, assuming they meet the progression requirements, will therefore be invited to extend their course of study for this additional three months as opportunity to convert their p/g Diploma into the MArch. The MArch (p/g Dip) degree provides an open and creative learning environment embracing theory and practice where students have the opportunity to explore architecture in a broad based and general manner. The award of the MArch (p/g Dip) signals the academic culmination of a design-centred, professionally orientated architectural education, which calls for theoretical, experimental and practical exemplification. It is predominantly project-based and demands a high level of design ability. In Year 5 students will appraise current theoreti- cal approaches to architectural design, assessing and exemplifying their relevance in existing and pro- posed contexts. They will also develop and display formal and technical architectural ability; undertake a comprehensive architectural design project (thesis); demonstrate their awareness of management procedures relevant to design practice; and carry out a detailed examination of an issue or issues of particular architectural significance.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - PROJECT DESCRIPTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

The meta-theme for this year’s PGDip/ MArch studio will be ‘(un)Certain Futures’ Students are asked to identify their possible Year 5 thesis theme prior to the start of the year. The chosen topic can itself locate anywhere within the wider theme of ‘(un)Certain Futures’ Throughout Semester 1 students are expected to become an expert in the architectural history of their chosen issue(s) by engaging in architectural research of their subject. Students are also required to display a desire not only to thoroughly investi- gate the chosen topic or commodity but to combine this with an ambition to produce an architecture that is technologically innovative, socially progressive and which makes a positive and significant formal impact on the built environment. By developing the theme of (un)Certain Futures, students might end up with a coastal/rural thesis project or an intensely urban intervention – regardless, common to every thesis project is the expectation that it is informed through a critique of the changing nature of our built environment, focusing on the political, economic and ideological forces that structure the spaces of everyday life. The thesis project is thus a vehicle by which student can explore an issue. In the first semester the study should not focus on the end product but on the issue chosen. It should be sufficiently open-ended that students can explore ideas and return to the core research as an iterative process before producing a coherent end project. This will ensure that the thesis project is a research design project rather than just a feasibility design project and as such design informed by research.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - ABSTRACT (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

In an uncertain future Scotland’s identity, economy and society could become lost - are we a Northern outpost of a European region centred around the Mediterranean? Or should we begin to consider this nation as part of a wider Nordic region? The climate, culture and economy of Scotland all have more in common with Scandinavia than central Europe, but our society and its architecture currently do not reflect this. Exploring the themes of land and sea we will ask why Scotland is not following the path of its Nordic neighbours and our main aim is to uncover situations where Scotland can learn from Scandinavia and examine the feasibility of Scotland as a Nordic country. At a time when the question of Scottish nationality is coming under consideration we are looking to examine the culture and society of the wider Nordic region as well as Scotland itself as a place within this region. Our initial investigations have identified our current lack of connections within this region, however in the Orkney Isles we have identified a strategic location to instigate new connections. A former Earldom of Norway and later Denmark, Orkney was at the centre of the historical Western Norse Empire - nowadays remnants of this Norse past are still apparent in everyday life. Scotland’s location between the Atlantic and the North Sea is hugely significant and at present underused as an asset, both for the shipping and energy industries. With climate change as a driver for changes in both energy production and new global shipping routes, via the North-East passage, huge changes to the landscape and seascape are being made possible in this (un)certain future. Nordic Scotland aims to examine these changes and their significance at four different scales: Global, Northern Europe, Scotland and more specifically the Orkney Isles.

pg. 74


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pg. 75


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - RESEARCH (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

WHERE ARE WE?

GLOBAL

In an uncertain future Scotland’s identity, economy and society could become lost - are we a Northern outpost of a European region centred around the Mediterranean? Or should we begin to consider this nation as part of a wider Nordic region?

Changing patterns of global shipping are reshaping the way we can look at Scotland in it’s global context, the Northern Sea Route is opening up a faster route to Asia from Europe, cutting sailing time by 40%, whilst the Eurasian Land Bridge is changing the way goods reach the americas from China and Russia, transitting Via Russia and Scandinavia then a short hop across the Atlantic.

The climate, culture and economy of Scotland all have more in common with Scandinavia than central Europe, but our society and its architecture currently do not reflect this. Exploring the themes of land and sea we will ask why Scotland is not following the path of its Nordic neighbours and our main aim is to uncover situations where Scotland can learn from Scandinavia and examine the feasibility of Scotland as a Nordic country. At a time when the question of Scottish nationality is coming under consideration we are looking to examine the culture and society of the wider Nordic region as well as Scotland itself as a place within this region.

Scotland has in the past experienced the Orkney Isles in particular pla

The vikings also had a different perspectiv the map. Redrawing our own maps in this

Past trading links with the North Sea and B tr

“In that the North is composed of several and differing countries, it may appear pointless to speak of a ‘Nordic World’...’The North. That this term is something more than a collective noun is evident; we have already suggested that it encompasses a region of character and identity.” Norberg-Schulz, Christian, 1996, Nightlands, London:MIT Press

SCALE “The intrinsically interesting thing about maritime people is that they cross borders, since coastal people live on the margins of the state. As a result, the history of coastal populations has had a disproportionate impact and significance.Maritime people are simultaneously influenced by foreign impulses and conscious of their identity, which they share by interacting with strangers. The meeting of cultures should therefore be a central concept to the understanding of maritime history.” Holm, Paul; Coastal Life, Nordic Culture and Nation State

pg. 76

REGIONAL At the European scale shipping is being encouraged via the sea and waterways once agian as roads and land tranport becomes increasingly unsustainable. Motorways of the sea make short sea shipping a viable option in Europe, taking goods off the road and onto the sea.

M

In the Northern European region the here lies isolated from the region by mobility in this region is high. Even the Fa


an look at Scotland in it’s global ope, cutting sailing time by 40%, whilst China and Russia, transitting Via Russia lantic.

d waterways once agian as roads he sea make short sea shipping a viable to the sea.

ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - RESEARCH (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

MARITIME PAST

STEREOTYPING

Scotland has in the past experienced being part of vast maritime networks, in the viking age Scotland and the Orkney Isles in particular played a pivotal role in the governance of the Western Norse empire.

Present cultural ties, inspired by Yanko Tsvetkov’s maps. Norwegian stereotypes

The vikings also had a different perspective on our lands, drawing them always with the North towards the bottom of the map. Redrawing our own maps in this fashion gives us the chance to read Scotland from a different and unfamilar perspective. Past trading links with the North Sea and Baltci region through the Hanseatic Leaugue had established Scotland as a key trading nation in Northern Europe.

Scottish stereotypes

MARITIME PRESENT In the Northern European region the Nordic states are well connected by sea to one another, Scotland here lies isolated from the region by sea. A web of ferry routes across the Baltic means that cultural and social mobility in this region is high. Even the Faroes and Iceland are well served by the Nordic ferry system, Scotland is not.

pg. 77

EAST AND WEST The Scandinavian countries surround the Baltic Sea with the Baltic countries and Russia, however Norway does not view itself as having any ownership of this sea. They refer to the Baltic Sea as ‘their sea’ while claiming the North Sea as ‘Our Sea’. With Norway intent on utilising the North Sea for its resources such as oil and fishing, this highlights further connections between Scandinavia and Scotland that aren’t apparent at first.


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - RESEARCH Jan

Dec

200

N

ov N

b

200

150

150

100

Oct

Sep

Sep

50

RENEWABLE SCOTLAND

Apr

Apr

50

Mar

SHARED CONDITIONS

Mar

100

Oct

b

Fe

ov

Jan

Fe

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Dec

g

Au

Au

Jul

Jun

Jul

5

10

15

20

-5

Nordland, Norway

Jul

Jun

Jul

ov Oct

0

5

10

15

98.78%

20

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

Scottish Inhabitants

Jan

ov

200

N

ov

Sep

g

Sep

N

ov

Oct

Oct Sep

g

Au

N

N

ov

ov

ov N

N

Jun

Oct

Oct

Au

Au

Jul

Sep

Sep

g

Jul Jun

g

Au

Jun

Au

g

Jul

-5

Orkney Islands, Scotland

source: National Records of Scotland 2012 b

N

1.28%

ay

20

Scotland

M

15

Orkney Apr

20 10

source: Highlands and Islands Enterprise National Planning Framework for Scotl

Mar

50

Fe ay

Jun

Oct Sep

ay

Jul

Jun

15

M

g Au

Apr

Sep

50

M

g Au

100

20

Mar

Apr

Oct

b

100

150

Mar

Jul

10

Fe

ay

15 5

Dec

100

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

M

5 10 15 -5 20 0

b Fe

200

5

Apr

0 10

ay

-5

M

5

Jan

50

0

Mar

Apr

0

Climate Climate Climate Mean Temperature & Mean TemperatureMean & Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall Average Monthly Rainfall Average Monthly Rainfall

150

-5

b

50

Nordland, Norway Orkney Islands,Faroe Scotland Islands

Dec

Faroe Islands

Fe

50

Mar

-5

Land

b

20

Fe

100

ay

ay

15

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

200 150

150

M

M

10

Nordland, Norway

20,160

Jan

Dec

100

Apr

Apr

5

50

200

150

Mar

Mar

0

b

b

100 50

100

20

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

Orkney Isles, Scotland

200

150

150

-5

200

15

Jan

Jan Dec

Dec

Fe

Fe

200

10

The renewables revolution in Samso has seen all of the fossil fuel plants dismantled and they are now replaced by wind farms, bio-mass plants and fields of solar panels. Their efforts are something they believe can be emulated throughout the world in the near future, and in Orkney we find a Scottish community attempting just that. It hopes that by 2020 they will be able to produce 1.6GW of energy from wave and tidal power - enough to power 200,000 homes.

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

Faroe Islands Jan

Dec

Jan

Dec

5

Population

Orkney Islands, Scotland

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

Nordland, Norway

0

Our Nordic neighbours - this time Denmark - transformed the town of Samso into, not only a carbon-neutral town, but also a town which produces 10% more electricity than it needs and feeds it back into the grid at a profit.

Jun

0

Jun

-5

M ay

M ay

g

We exist in a region that exhibits a shared set of geographical and climactic conditions, yet our responses to this environment is not always the same.

-5

0

5

10

15

20

Faroe Islands

Climate Mean Temperature & Average Monthly Rainfall

Scotland - 5,295,000

CULTURAL & KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE Cultural and knowledge exchange currently occurs between Scotland and its Nordic neighbours, however at present it is confined to small areas, such as in the fishing industry and special interest groups.

pg. 78

Or

SCOTLAND’S MOBILITY

The Scottish Government has made proposals for Scotland to be a highly mobile country with trading routes beyond its own borders. Scapa Flow and Hunterston are at the heart of these proposals as new container transhipment facilities, becoming new major Eurpoean hubs for container shipping.

Orkneys position is as ideal for th With a natural deepwater harbour at Sc dredging. With shipping routes across t


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - RESEARCH (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

ND

ORKNEY

dismantled and they are now replaced omething they believe can be emulated unity attempting just that. It hopes that r - enough to power 200,000 homes.

20,160

Y

ighly mobile country with trading art of these proposals as new container or container shipping.

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

The EMEC (European Marine Energy Centre) are currently based in Stromness and have test sites situated throughout 600 1800 Orkney waters for both tidal and wave.

Male

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

source: Highlands and Islands Enterprise National Planning Framework for Scotland 2012

1.28%

Female

Population by Age

Land

Orkney

The waters around the Orkney Isles and the Pentland Firth are rich in potential for renewable energy. Both tidal and wave energy could be harvested with an anticipated energy production in the region of 1.6GW a realistic possibility by the year 2020. This energy has the potential to power 200,000 homes. With only ~10,000 homes on Orkney there is potential for Orkney to sell their renewable energy back to the grid at a profit.

Population by Gender

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

%

Scotland

98.78%

0-15

%

16-59

%

+60

600

1800

300

800

300

800

0

0

Migration

Scottish Inhabitants

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

0

CumulativeCumulative Installed Capacity Installed (MW) Capacity (MW)

Population

Annual Installed Annual Capacity Installed (MW) Capacity (MW)

so into, not only a carbon-neutral town, back into the grid at a profit.

RENEWABLES

0

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

%

In

%

£6 £6 billion

Out

£100

£100

£100

£100

million

million

million

million

billion

Life Expectancy

Spend on manufacture and installation 2011 2020 Source: SpendTheonCrown Estate 2011 manufacture and installation 2011 2020

source: National Records of Scotland 2012

Scotland - 5,295,000

Orkney - 20,160

Male: 77.3

Female: 81.4

Spend per year on maintenance Source: The Crown Estate 2011

Spend per year on maintenance Source: The Crown Estate 2011

Source: The Crown Estate 2011

Source: The Crown Estate 2011

SHIPPING

pg. 79

Orkneys position is as ideal for the changing patterns of global shipping as it was for viking raids. With a natural deepwater harbour at Scapa Flow capable of handling the worlds largest vessels without the need for dredging. With shipping routes across the Arctic becoming more viable and transhipment rather than port to port shipping becoming the norm, Scapa flow would be the ideal location for a Northern European hub of container shipping,

Total spend of development and consenting 2011 2020 Source: Crownof Estate Total The spend 2011 development and consenting 2011 2020

TOURISM Orkney is currently experiencing a strong growth period within its tourist industry due to cruise liners docking in its waters on a more and more regular basis. Last year seen over 70 cruise ships stop off in Orkney the most visited cruise ship destination with the United Kingdom - and this has had a large impact on Orkney’s economy. Orkney’s location between northern Europe and the Faroe Islands/Iceland means that it is anticipating even more


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 80


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

NOR D I C S CO T L A N D D E P A R T U R E S

COPENHAGEN

KM GAT E 9 7 7 A 0 6 DELAYED

TORSHAVN

BOARD I NG

HELS I NK I

C0 4

NARV I K

ARR I V I NG

S AMSO

B0 2

8 2 4

REYKJAV I K

A1 2

1 3 4 0

S TOCKHOLM

B4 5

1 3 5 9

BERGEN

DEPARTED

MA L MO

A3 0

S TAVANGER

ARR I V I NG

L E RW I C K

C2 1

5 0 6

T AMP E R E

B2 0

1 6 9 6

NUUK

B1 3

2 6 9 5

NORRBOT T EN

A0 8

1 7 6 4

K I R KWA L L

C0 1

3 0 5

DES T I NAT I ON OSLO

pg. 81

1 7 5 0

1 0 7 3


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pg. 82


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pg. 83


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pg. 84


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Nordic Scotland

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Possible Orkney

SCAPAMAX Designing a new container ship which will traverse Arctic waters, carry a larger amount 9f containers

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Suezmax Emma Mærsk Container ship Capacity 14,000 TEU

Max Draft: Max Beam: Max Length: Max Air Space:

21m 50m ∞m 68m

Panamax Maersk Lima Container ship Capacity 8,000 TEU

Max Draft: Max Beam: Max Length: Max Air Space:

12m 32m 294m 58m

p.110

Scapamax?

Malaccamax Maersk Triple E class Container ship Capacity 18,000 TEU

Max Draft: Max Beam: Max Length: Max Air Space:

21m 60m 400m 67m

New Panamax Mitsubishi MALS-14000CS Container ship Capacity 14,000 TEU

Max Draft: Max Beam: Max Length: Max Air Space:

15m 40m 366m 58m

p.111

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

pg. 85

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Flow

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

water harbour of Scapa

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

and dock in the natural deep


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pg. 86


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 87


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pg. 88


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5A - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 89


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - PROJECT DESCRIPTION (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Following on from Studio 5A, Possible Orkney will develop into architectural proposals which will look to develop the industries of Shipping, Renewables and Tourism on the archipelago of Orkney under the terms ‘Migrating Orkney’, ‘Connecting Orkney’ and ‘Inhabiting Orkney’.

pg. 90


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - MASTERPLAN (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 91


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - MIGRATING ORKNEY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 92


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - CONNECTING ORKNEY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 93


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - INHABITING ORKNEY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 94


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 95


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 96


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 97


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 98


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 99


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YEAR 5 - STUDIO 5B - POSSIBLE ORKNEY - VISUALISATIONS (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 100


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - SEMESTER ONE (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Narratives of the Unseen City This part of the class is derived from an award wining media project that I originally ran with Belgrade School of Architecture back in 2001 called “Narratives of the Unknown City.” Students are required to work in groups and by agreement with me plot a route across the city which they then record and edit together as an interactive presentation in Flash. The theme set for the year will be the concept of the “Kinetic City”. Submissions are required in the format of a designed and customised CD. 1. Introductory lecture and workshop on Multi Media Techniques and presentation of previous work 2. Weekly studio tutorials and student presentations- developing a storyboard, finding exemplary multi media work 3. Screening 4. Final show

pg. 101


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - COWS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Experimental Media - 18.10.2012 Graham Hogg Joe Grehan Lewis Hutchison Chin Wai

pg. 102


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - COWS

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 103


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - SEMESTER TWO (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Filming Architecture Students are asked to make a short film (max 90secs) that advertises and introduces their thesis design projects. Through tutorials the individual student selects one aspect of their thesis project, which they then develop through an editing process. Any medium can be chosen e.g. hand-drawn animation, mixed still and moving image, figurative narratives, abstract representations and so on. All sound and image files are required to be original, that is no downloads. Submissions are required in the format of a DVD that might be bought from a shop and which exemplifies the graphic quality of the film. 1. Introductory lecture and workshop on the relationship between film and architecture 2. Weekly studio tutorials and student presentations - developing a storyboard 3. Screening 4. Final show

pg. 104


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YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - FILMING ORKNEY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 105


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YEAR 5 - EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA - FILMING ORKNEY (refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

pg. 106


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - CULTURAL STUDIES

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name) Possible Orkney ‘War as a Precedent’ Graham Hogg

Lietenant Commander Gunther Prien & Adolf Hitler

Italian Chapel - Lamb Holm

Kirkwall Stromness

Italian Chapel Lyness

Orkney - Key War Sites

Churchill Barriers - South Isles

pg. 107


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - CULTURAL STUDIES

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Nissen Huts used for housing on Hoy

New roads were built providing employment for local people

Hutted encampments sprung up at Lyness to accommodate servicemen and their families

Farming was a big benefitiary on Orkney during the war, including the dairy farming

Orkney was the biggest exporter of eggs in the United Kingdom and servicemen sent back eggs to their families

The egg industry was still a big part of Orkney’s economy until a hurricane in 1952 resulted in the loss of 86,000 hens

Recreational facilities were provided throughout the war ffor locals and service personnel alike

Local children helped catch fish for supper and prospered because of a better education network

Reminders of the war remain on Hoy today

pg. 108


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

YEAR 5 - PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

HODOR h o d o r

pg. 109


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YEAR 5 - PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

(refer to ‘Module Descriptors’ for class code, description, title and name)

Professional Studies 5 Assignment No.1 Architects Appointment Assignment Issued: 8th March 2013 Assignment Submission: 17th May 2013

HODOR h o d o r pg. 110

Group Number: Group: Sean Edwards, Graham Hogg, Lewis Hutchison, Stephen Lockhart


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YEAR 5 - FIELD TRIP - ORKNEY

pg. 111


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pg. 112


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pg. 113


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pg. 114


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pg. 115


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YEAR 5 - FIELD TRIP - ORKNEY

pg. 116


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YEAR 5 - FIELD TRIP - ORKNEY

pg. 117


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YEAR 5 - FIELD TRIP - ORKNEY

pg. 118


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YEAR 5 - FIELD TRIP - UNCERTAINTY ROAD TOUR

To be completed in Semester 2, 2012-2013.

pg. 119


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - SPACE ASIA HUB

pg. 120


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - SPACE ASIA HUB

pg. 121


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - SPACE ASIA HUB

pg. 122


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - SPACE ASIA HUB

pg. 123


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - OGILVY & MATHER OFFICE FIT-OUT

pg. 124


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - OGILVY & MATHER OFFICE FIT-OUT

pg. 125


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WOHA ARCHITECTS - PREVIOUS WORK EXAMPLES - OGILVY & MATHER OFFICE FIT-OUT

pg. 126


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CRITERIA

The following pages detail the Part 2 criteria for validation. Note that any symbol ([number]) after a criteria article refers to a page within this portfolio which fullfills the criteria:

ie: “At Part 2 students will produce and demonstrate coherent and well resolved architectural designs that integrate knowledge of: 1. The social, political, economic and professional context that guides building construction. [1]�

All criteria are individually identified and evidenced explicitly from the content of the Part 2 academic portfolio.

pg. 127


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

DESIGN

At Part 2 students will produce and demonstrate coherent and well resolved architectural designs that integrate knowledge of: 1. The social, political, economic and professional context that guides building construction.

[1] [1] [1] [1] [1]

An understanding of: 2. Briefs and how to critically appraise them to ensure that the design response is appropriate to the site and context, and for reasons such as sustainability and budget. [2] [2] 3. The regulatory requirements, including the needs of the disabled, health and safety legislation and building regulations and development control, that guide building construction. [3] [3] 4. An appropriate philosphical approach which reveals an understanding of theory in a cultural context.

[4] [4]

And ability to: 5. Generate and systematically test, analyse and appraise design options, and draw conclusions which display methodological and theoretical rigour.

pg. 128

[5] [5]


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT

At Part 2 students will produce and demonstrate, within coherent architectural designs and academic portfolio, the ability to integrate knowledge of: 1. The principles and theories associated with visual, thermal and acoustic environments.

[6]

2. Climatic design and the relationship between climate, built form construction, life style, energy consumption and human well-being

[7] [7]

Understanding of: 3. Building technologies, environmental design and construction methods in relation to; a. human well-being [8] b. the welfare of future generations [9] c. the natural world [10] d. the consideration of a sustainable environment [11] e. the impact on design of legislation, codes of practice and health and safety both during the construction and occupation of a project.

[12]

And ability to: 4. Devise structural and constructional strategies for a complex building or group of buildings, employing integrative knowledge of; [13] a. structural theories b. construction techniques and processes [14] c. the physical properties and characteristics of building materials and componenets and the environmental impact of specification choices d. the provision of building service. [16]

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[15]


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

CULTURAL CONTEXT

At Part 2 students will demonstrate within coherent architectural designs and academic portfolio understanding of: 1. The influences on the contemporary built environment of individual buildings, the design of cities, past and present societies and wider global issues. [17] 2. The histories and theories of architecture and urban design, the history or ideas, and the related disciplines of art, cultural studies and landscape studies and its application in critical debate [18] [18] 3. The inter-relationship between people, buildings and the environment and an understanding of the need to relate buildings and the spaces between them to human needs and scale [19] And ability to: 4. Critically appraise and form considered judgements about the spatial, aesthetic, ethnical and social qualities of a design within the scope and scale of a wider environment [20] 5. Independently define, and critically appraise, their ideas in relation to a design and to the work of others

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[21]


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

COMMUNICATION

At Part 2 students will demonstrate within coherent architectural designs and academic portfolio understanding of: 1. The contribution of other professionals in the design process showing an appropriate media (including sketching, modelling, digital and electronic techniques) to represent the testing, analysis and critical appraisal of complex design proposals and their resolution to a range of professional and lay audiences. [22] [22] 2. Use architectural representations having critically appraised the most appropriate techniques available

[23] [23]

3. Produce documentation and reports which are clear, analytical and logical covering a range of architectural issues of culture, theory and design. [24] [24]

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE & LAW

At Part 2 students will demonstrate within coherent architectural designs and academic portfolio understanding of: 1. How cost control mechanisms operate within the development of an architectural project.

[25]

Understanding of: 2. The basic principles of business management and factors related to running a design practice and how architects organise, administer and manage an architectural project, recognising current and emerging trends in the construction industry such as partnering, integrated project process, value engineering and risk management. [26] 3. The inter-relationships of individuals and organisations involved in the procurement and delivery of architectural projects, and how these are defined and effected through a variety of contractual and delivery of architectural projects, and how these are defined and effected through a variety of contractual and organisational structures. [27] 4. The fundamental legal, professional and statutory requirements as they are relevant to building design and practice with particular reference to matters relating to health and safety and universal design for access. [28] [28] 5. The professional duties and responsibilities of architects, as defined and described in the Codes and Standards .

[29]

And ability to: 6. Identify and manage individual learning needs so as to prepare for and maintain professional standards commensurate with qualification.

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[30] [30]


ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIES 4A - AB418

General Aims The class focuses on the design of a small (approx 800M sq.) programmatically complex, multi-functional urban building. The design exploration includes site and programme appraisal, the generation and systematic testing, analysing and appraising of design options with the aim of drawing conclusions in the design process. It also involves an in-depth study of general spatial and environmental resolution, and in technical detail, a material investigation of a significant part of the building. This involves both a synthesis of many factors at a nascent design stage as well as research into user need and precedent appraisal. Learning Outcomes Design (ARB Part 2) D.1.2, 1.2.1, 1.3, EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU5, EU7, EU8, EU9 • An understanding of briefs, how to critically appraise them, and ability to resolve the relationship of complex programmatic requirements. • An ability to analyse existing urban context and make considered and sophisti- cated architectural response. • An ability to research specific user needs and evidence understanding within an architectural proposal. • An ability to work effectively as part of a team. Technology & Environment (ARB Part 2) T&E 2.1, 2.3 • The ability to devise environmental strategies supportive of an overall architec- tural concept and relevant to the already-established user needs and aspirations. • The ability to make considered judgements re materiality, and evidence under- standing at detail level of technical considerations • To evidence understanding of the implications of building regulation in a design proposition Cultural Context (ARB Part 2) CC 3.1, 3.2 • The ability to critically appraise the nature of a given context within the scope and scale of a wider environment • The ability to make considered judgements about the inter-relationship of a design proposition to a broader environment. • The ability to make considered and appropriate assessment of relevant prec- edent, and evidence specific relationship within architectural design proposition.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIES 4A - AB418

Communication ARB Part 2) C 4,1, C 4.2, C 4.2.1 • An ability to debate architectural issues with associated disciplines, user groups and peers. • An ability to independently and critically appraise appropriate methods of architectural representation (in both 2d and 3d technique). • To be able to make effective visual and verbal presentation of a complex archi- tectural design proposition to a variety of audiences. Management, Practice And Law (ARB Part 2) M,P+L 5.3 • A cognitive ability to manage and critically assess ones own working methods and design skills (how to systematically test, analyse and appraise design op- tions, and draw conclusions which show methodological and theoretical rigour.) Embedded Outcomes (Key Skills) • An ability in oral presentation skills • An ability in research and analytical skills, with associated response • An ability to develop a project brief • An ability to manage time • An ability to reflect on, and record, own work, skills and knowledge. • An ability to develop design development skills.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIES 4B - AB419

General Aims The class focuses on the design of a large (approx 3000M sq.) programmatically simple, multi-functional urban building. The building is required to be set within a specific urban character, and developed to a detailed level sufficient to demon- strate the relationship between their overall architectural concept, spatial quality and related technical and environmental considerations. The class will complement the architectural investigation of class Studio 4A – the result of the overall year’s work is a design portfolio illustrating architectural breadth and depth’ displaying the student’s understanding of architecture as an idea and architecture as an event experienced through the senses. Learning Outcomes Design Design (ARB Part 2) D.1.2, 1.2.1, 1.3, EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU5, EU7, EU8, EU9 • An ability to research and translate an understanding of user needs into a simple and suitably developed architectural idea. • An ability to resolve the relationship of simple programmatic requirements within the context of a large scale building design. • An ability to analyse existing urban context and make considered and sophisti- cated architectural response. • An ability to design an architectural proposition holistically to a level of sophisti- cation appropriate to the level of study • An ability to work effectively as part of a team. Technology & Environment (ARB Part 2) T&E 2.1, 2.3 • The ability to resolve complex technical issues (environmental and structural/ constructional) in support of an overall architectural concept and relevant to the alreadyestablished user needs and aspirations. • The ability to make considered judgements re material response in a specific urban context • To evidence understanding of the implications of building regulation in a com- plex design proposition

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIES 4B - AB419

Cultural Context (ARB Part 2) CC 3.1, 3.2 • The ability to critically appraise the nature of a given context within the scope and scale of a wider environment (physical, historical, cultural) • The ability to make considered judgements about the inter-relationship of a design proposition to a broader environment, to other user groups, and in ap- preciation of a larger physical context. • The ability to make considered and appropriate assessment of relevant prec- edent, and evidence specific relationship within architectural design proposition. Communication (ARB Part 2) C 4,1, C 4.2, C 4.2.1 • An ability to debate architectural issues with associated disciplines, user groups and peers, and to defend an architectural proposition in verbal discus- sion. • An ability to independently and critically appraise appropriate methods of architectural representation (in both 2d and 3d technique). • To be able to make effective visual and verbal presentation of a complex archi- tectural design proposition. Management, Practice And Law (ARB Part 2) M, P & L 5.3 • A cognitive ability to manage and critically assess ones own working methods and design skills commensurate with the level of study (how to systematically test, analyse and appraise design options, and draw conclusions which show methodological and theoretical rigour.) Embedded Outcomes (Key Skills) • An ability in oral presentation skills • An ability in research and analytical skills, with associated response • An ability to develop a project brief • An ability to manage time • An ability to reflect on, and record, own work, skills and knowledge. • An ability to develop design development skills.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - CULTURAL STUDIES 4 - AB420 General Aims Cultural Studies 4 creates the opportunity for students to focus their work for a limited but concentrated period of time on some aspect of architecture of particular interest to them. There are two aspects to this class within this theme; ‘Architectural Dissertation’ (75% weighting) and ‘Mapping Architecture’ (25% weighting). The output for the class is two assignments, one related to each of these two aspects (both of which are compulsory to pass.) The Architectural Dissertation is a chance to identify, define, explore and articulate an area of investigation of students’ own interest; this investigation can be descriptive, analytical or critical. The student will develop an argument and demonstrate their position using evidence from original research. The major component is normally a piece of academic writing of approximately 8,000 words incorporating relevant illustrations and references (unless this would dis- advantage students with special needs.) Alternative formats are agreed between the Class Convenor, the supervisor and the student. The content of the work will be drawn from a study of literature in a chosen area, fieldwork and/or experimen- tal investigation, followed by informed evaluation and/or speculation. Mapping Architecture aims to introduce students to the discipline and skills of analysing buildings and making coherent reports. The underlying idea is ‘learning by doing’, i.e. that by producing an analysis and a report of a building under key headings and by seeing how others have approached it, students will be in a better position to produce clear and concise reports on their own designs under those same headings. The intention is to widen and deepen students’ own understanding of built architectural exemplars. The individual research work is therefore supported by separate small group investigations and discussions. Learning Outcomes Design Design (ARB/RIBA Part 2) D 1.2.2 • An understanding of an appropriate philosophical approach which reveals an understanding of theory in a cultural context • An ability to work as part of a team. Cultural Context (ARB/RIBA Part 2) CC 3.1, 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2. 3.2.1, EU2, 3, 4, 5 • The ability to research and investigate existing bodies of knowledge, to gener- ate new information on one or more subjects related to architecture and engage in critical debate. • The ability to select, identify, incorporate and acknowledge pertinent material drawn from others • The ability to make assumptions, develop an argument and demonstrate with evidence an independently established architectural position. • The ability to summarise critically evidence gathered and draw conclusions.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - CULTURAL STUDIES 4 - AB420

Communication (ARB/RIBA Part 2) 4.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2 • The ability to use visual, verbal and written communication methods and ap- propriate media. • The ability to communicate a particular architectural position through verbal, written, graphic and visual means • The ability to produce documentation and reports which are clear, analytical and logical covering a range of architectural issues of culture, theory and design

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - IDEAL WORLDS

Learning Outcomes Cultural Context 1. Understanding of the influences on the contemporary built environment of individual buildings, the design of cities, past and present societies and wider global issues 2. Understanding of the histories and theories of architecture and urban design, the history of ideas, and the related disciplines of art, cultural studies and landscape studies and its application in critical debate 1. Understanding of the inter-relationship between people, buildings and the environmentand an understanding of the need to relate buildings and the spaces between them to human needs and scale Embedded Outcomes (Key Skills) 1. An ability to use, critically appraise and properly reference a variety of historical and contemporary sources and evidence 2. An ability to produce documentation and reports which are clear, analytical and logical covering a range of 3. architectural issues of culture, theory and design 4. improved ability to engage in prolonged thematic discussion with peers

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIO 5A - AB964

General Aims This module aims to introduce the year-long thesis design project. The Thesis project is the student’s opportunity to carry out a detailed examination of an issue or issues of particular architectural significance. The design project commences with an in-depth research investigation into areas of explicit concern regarding social, environmental, technical and professional responsibilities. This part of the project maps out the cultural hinterland within which the student’s thesis is to be located. This process culminates in the formation of a design brief and initial guiding ideas forming the point of departure for the ensuing design development. This module provides the structure for the assisted research and development of a student’s own position with regard to the area of investigation within which they are required to take responsibility for the issues delimitating a credible proposition. This module is the first of two that together comprise the Thesis Design Project. The other module (Design Studies 5B) offers an opportunity to establish a stance on specific architectural issues and to execute design development. Learning Outcomes Design (ARB Part 2) D1.2, D1.2.2 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU6, EU7, EU10 1. An ability to undertake independently critical and rigorous research into an identified architectural issue. 2. An ability to evidence how research and analysis into complex issues appropriately informs an original, strategic provisional architectural response (in terms of ‘brief’ and ‘context’) 3. An understanding and knowledge of the relevant philosophical and theoretical background to an identified architectural issue. Technology & Environment (ARB Part 2) 2.3 1. An ability to identify specific and general technological implications and opportunities in a complex architectural proposition. Cultural Context (ARB Part 2) CC3.1, CC3.1.1, CC3.1.2, CC3.2, CC3.2.1 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4 EU6, EU7, EU10 1. An ability to make considered judgement regarding an architectural proposition within the scope and scale of a wider environment. 2. An understanding of the broader context (artistic/economic/political/technical/environmental) that influence the design of the built environment. 3. An ability to show how the work of others informs architectural design

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIO 5A - AB964

Communication (ARB Part 2) C4.1, C4.2, C4.2.2 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU6, EU7, EU10 1. An ability to independently prepare and present a complex architectural proposition in a variety of media. 2. An ability to make coherent and structured argument regarding a designproposition, duly collated from appropriately developed research and analysis. Management, Practice And Law (ARB Part 2) M,P & L 5.3 1. An ability to make independent, and suitably self critical judgement in the design process related to a complex issue pertaining to the built environment.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIO 5B - AB965 General Aims This module aims to help the student develop and execute the Thesis Design Project. This will be informed by the work in the first semester which culminated in clarification of the thesis intention as well as the design concept. This project signals the academic culmination of a design-centred, professionally-orientated architectural education. As such, it will embody theoretical, experimental and practical exemplification and will be expected to illustrate concern with social, environmental, technical, professional and architectural responsibilities. The project will be complex, challenging and will be set within an intellectual framework which establishes, tests and concluded a hypothesis with regard to the context within which it is made. The Thesis Design Project is the vehicle for a student to explore an issue(s) of architectural significance. The focus therefore should be less on the end product and more on the chosen issue. The Thesis will typically be site-specific (the argument being that site-specificity distinguishes an architectural project from a project from another creative discipline) but there should also be the opportunity for some students to develop frameworks which are not conventionally architecturally in character or explored through conventional architectural tools. Learning Outcomes Design (ARB Part 2) D1.2, D1.2.2, D1.3, D1.3.1 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU6, EU7, EU10 1. An ability to develop to a sophisticated level a complex and coherent architectural resolution, in response to critical and intensive research and analysis of an identified issue. 2. An ability to show rigour in the pursuit of an original architectural resolution, in response to an independently identified ‘brief’ and ‘context’. 3. An ability to make a convincing architectural resolution with reference to and understanding of broad philosophical and theoretical positions. Technology & Environment (ARB Part 2) 2,1, 2.3 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU5, EU6, EU7, EU8, EU9 1. An understanding of how identified building and material technologies intimately influence the design of a complex architectural proposition. 2. An ability to resolve in detail and incorporate/integrate specific building and material technologies in a complex architectural proposition. Cultural Context (ARB Part 2) CC3.1, CC3.1.1, CC3.1.2, CC3.2, CC3.2.1 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU5, EU6, EU7, EU8, EU9, EU10 1. An ability to make considered judgement regarding an architectural resolution within the scope and scale of a wider environment. • An understanding of the broader context (artistic/economic/political/technical/ environmental) that influence the design of the built environment. • An ability to show how the work of others informs architectural design resolution.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - DESIGN STUDIO 5B - AB965

Communication (ARB Part 2) C4.1, C4.2, C4.2.1, C4.2.2 + EU1, EU2, EU3, EU4, EU6, EU7, EU10 1. An ability to independently prepare and present a complex architectural resolution in a variety of media. • An ability to make coherent and structured argument regarding a design resolution, duly collated from appropriately developed research and analysis. 2. An ability to respond coherently to the views and opinions of others. Management, Practice And Law (ARB Part 2) M,P & L 5.3 • An ability to make independent, and suitably self critical judgement in the design process related to a complex issue pertaining to the built environment.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - CULTURAL STUDIES 5 - AB967

General Aims This module aims to consolidate and develop knowledge in key thematic areas. Each lecture and workshop will map out important ideas, thinkers and projects from a variety of disciplines that have a direct bearing on the production and use of buildings and cities. Students will be introduced to a field of knowledge that is drawn from the social sciences, architectural and construction history, political science, cultural studies, economic and critical theory. The course will focus on four areas in particular: contemporary architectural history and theory, urban design and culture, technology and environment and new forms of media and communication. This module aims to widen the intellectual landscape within which architecture is studied. Learning Outcomes Cultural Context (ARB/RIBA Part 2) CC 3.1, 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2, 3.2.1, EU2, EU3 1. Articulate a relationship between ideas about architecture, buildings and cities and the broad range of disciplinary fields that both inform and provide the context for the production and experience of the built environment • Make an explicit and meaningful connection between the output of this course and their developing thesis Communication (ARB/RIBA Part 2) C4.1, 4.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2 1. Select and exploit an appropriate medium as the vehicle to explore and present their work in relation to their own stated criteria. 2. Engage with the above learning outcomes in a critical and thought-provoking manner.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - PROFESSIONAL STUDIES - AB968

General Aims Building on and complementing the principles covered in Introduction to Practice, this module focuses on the further development and understanding of firm -wide practice knowledge and skills. General principles covered in the module will address applications within the context of the Architectural business entity. Topics include professional duties, responsibilities and ethics, firm types and structure, strategic planning, marketing and public relations, human resource management and leadership, contract form and negotiation, and risk management. Learning Outcomes Communication (ARB/RIBA Part 2) C4.1, 4.3 1. An ability to organize & structure the work in a coherent and interesting manner, i.e. conceptually or thematically rather than chronologically. Management, Practice And Law (ARB/RIBA Part 2) MPL 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, D: 1.2, 1.4, T& E: 2.2)(EU 4.3, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 10.1, 10.2, 11 1. Demonstrate knowledge of how cost control mechanisms operate within the development of an architectural project; 2. Understand the basic principles of business management and factors related to running a design practice and how architects organise, administer and manage an architectural project, recognising current and emerging trends in the construction industry such as partnering, integrated project process, value engineering and risk management; 3. Understand of the inter-relationships of individuals and organisations involved in the procurement and delivery of architectural projects, and how these are defined and effected through a variety of contractual organisational structures; 4. Understand the fundamental legal, professional and statutory requirements as they are relevant to building design and practice, with particular reference to matters relating to health and safety and universal design for access. 5. Understand the professional duties and responsibilities of architects, as defined and described in the Codes and Standards relating to their professional practice.

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ARB/RIBA PART 2 CRITERIA

MODULE DESCRIPTORS - EXPERIEMENTAL MEDIA

Educational Aim 1. To explore forms of architectural representation and production using new multi and mixed media technologies. 2. To offer students the creative opportunities to explore their ideas about architecture and the built environment through film and other image-sound-text based technologies Learning Outcomes Cultural Context (ARB/RIBA Part 2) CC 3.1, 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.2, 3.2.1, EU2, EU3. Communication (ARB/RIBA Part 2) C4.1, 4.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2. Specific learning objectives are inherited from the chosen topic but the additional value is gained through the following: 1. the ability and knowledge to articulate narratives about the character of buildings, cities, and urban life through a number of different media that utilise and experiment with sound, still, moving image and text.

pg. 146


Graham hogg portfolio