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Major Project 1


ISTD: Putting on a fresh face


THE BRIEF

The International Society of Typographic Designers set a challenge to students aspiring to be members by asking them to refresh the visual identity of the society. This could’ve incorporated the adoption of a new logo, but such a fundamental change of identity would demand a strong support strategy, articulating the benefits as well as the visual material to illustrate that. Alternatively, there is wide scope for revision using the existing logo - the choice was purely ours. While ISTD aren’t actively seeking to change their identity this could’ve been a go od opportunity to influence them. I decided to attempt to improve and develop the already existing logo.


The ISTD Society was founded in July 1928 as the British Typographer’ s guide. Seven like-minded typographers met to create a society aiming “to place a bona fide typographer in every printing office and advertising agency that is worthy of the name,” to “raise the standard british typography both by percept and by practice.” In the early 1950s the name was changed to the Society of Typographic Designers, STD. Nearly 50 years later , to recognise growing influence in the other countries, STD became ISTD; the International Society of Typographic Designers. From the time, when the -de facto- medium of communication -& the typographer- was print, they continued to transform their practice to address existing and emerging media.


I decided to attempt to improve and develop the already existing logo keeping in mind ISTD’ s previous work and logo variations. The main aspect I would like to explore is linked to colour. I would like to consider this particular version of the ISTD logo. The overlayed colours make me think of printing strategies, which is and aspect directly linked to typography. I would therefore like to explore the concept of colour and print, by adding a more fresh, modern and playful lo ok.


More work of the International Society of Typographic Designers where squares still remain the recouring shape.


I began researching logos and identities. Here is a small selection of work that interested me and linked to ISTD in one way or another. Some due to the shape of the logo, some because of the 3D version, and others because of the texture and medium used to create type.


A mixture of collected research including examples of printed visual identities, cutout paper creating patterns, print experimentation projects, technological patterns such as Blackberry codes and coloured pencil cross hatching.


This, instead, is a selection of logos that caught my attention because of the clever play between the meaning of the word and the way they portrayed it through type and image.


Whilst continuing my researtch I isolated the work I found could interest me for this particular project from the one I liked in general. Images created by a multitude of squares put together and boxes of overlaying colour where the ones that stroke me the most.


Kapitza is a multi-disciplinary design studio that focuses on print, pattern, nature, minimalism and colour. They work across a range of media, including non-alphanumeric fonts, i-pad apps and three-dimensional work. Kapitza treats its visual patterns and shapes as if they were fonts, coding it so that every shape stands for a letter. I personally view it as the bridge between visuals and type, which is why it has largerly influenced my research.


After my first experiments on coloured pieces of paper I liked the idea of making somethingphysically stand out, as well as metaphorically. Therefore I thought of exploring the effect through the concept of making paper ‘three-dimensional’ by scanning and photographing it.


Lo oking at boxes and colour and developing it with the addition of a 3D factor , as well as considering an innovative composition.


Logos are generally placed within a squared or circular shape. My idea is to develop it horizontally, throughout the page, repeating the square image already present in their logo. The concept is linked to colour and print - to make it less serious, more playful and stand out.


I am exploring this by playing with the combination of pantone squares and a hand-rendered feel. A hand-rendered appearance would stand out from all the vectorial typographic work already present in the industry and would communicate a simple, personal approach to the client.


An alphabet experiment I did during a typographic workshop focusing on negative and positive spaces.


Colours are very important and have a multitude of completely contrasting connotations, especially in the typographic and advertising field. The long rectangular stripes of squares I drew in my experimentations made me think of printing processes, mistakes and alignment pages.


Some inspiration of similar square shaped arrangments and three-dimensionally treated adverts.


A mo odboard of successfully branded products through colour. My idea is to create a logo that is adaptable and that you can apply in different circumstances and on different surfaces.

Example of a successful bran DESIGN PANTONE BRAND


nd:


I started playing around and experimenting with coloured bits of cardboard paper. I did this by connecting the square element I wanted to keep in the logo, but at the same time make it different, fresher, innovative and bold. By photographing the casually assembled pieces of paper the image stands out on a flat, 2D piece of paper. The idea of having a long, striped logo that goes across the page increases the possibilities of variation and adaption, where it would be possible to take sections of the logo to apply it in different contexts.


ISTD ISTD

Developing the idea of colour squares of cardboaard into handrendered, overlayed coloured suqares and experimenting with colour palettes.


ISTD

ISTD

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ISTD

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ISTD

ISTD


I furtherly developed the square idea to a more ‘fringe’ effect logo banner that could be placed at the top of the document or page. It’s an innovative outcome, definitely different from the other , more conventional logos already existing on the market. The concept behind it is of an -organised caos-, casually arranged and cut out, to distance and lo osen the appearance of rigid hierarchy and grid regimes linked to typography and layout.


ISTD ISTD

ISTD

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Full logo COLOURS: I wanted the colours to be c‘ asually’ selected, to reflect the casual layout of the cut outs on the printed paper. I selected them from a range of warm, vibrant and vivid pantone colours. I chose the logo banner with the orange square as ISTD uses this colour quite frequently, and also include a range of blues, as it creates some contrast, and is also a tone frequently used such as the ISTD Awards.

Business card

Membership card variations ISTD

Chiara Ambrosoli

19-29 Woburn Place London WC1H 0LU United Kingdom +44 (0)7868996046 c.ambrosoli@hotmail.com

ISTD

ISTD

International Society of Typographic Designers

International Society of Typographic Designers

Chiara Ambrosoli Member 2011/2012

Chiara Ambrosoli Member 2011/2012

ISTD

ISTD

International Society of Typographic Designers

International Society of Typographic Designers

Chiara Ambrosoli Member 2011/2012

Chiara Ambrosoli Member 2011/2012


ISTD Shorter and less invasive version

ISTD


2013

Typographic Des igners

International Society of

International Society of Typo graphic Desig ners

ISTD

ISTD 2013

ISTD STUDENT ASSESSMENT BRIEDS 2013 Dear Tutors and Students, We are delighted to have Jack Zipes as our project partner in our 37th year of Student Assessments. Jack has written and translated many books of Fairy Stories and Fables. His constant delight in the investigation and exploration of tales and his work with children and adults in schools and colleges across the globe reflects our own international remit and our desire to maintain education as a constant in ISTD. As ISTD founder Vincent Steer said, our purpose is ‘to bring together in friendship and mutual help, all those with a love of the printed word’. What could be better than to work with Jack Zipes’ tales of transformation to look and the nature of the book and the transforming power of typography. In this introduction I usually address aspects of our process that we have either amended or that we consider worth bringing to your attention. However, the most significant change is that we, very reluctantly, have had to increase the registration fee to £35. Our annual cost increases now make it impossible to avoid the rise, but maintaining the quality and thoroughness of our assessment and its benefits to student requires much effort and cost. One way of participating universities/institutions mitigating the rise in fees would be through Institutional Membership which offers a 20% reduction on the registration fee, along with other benefits to the institution.Another point that is overlooked by many is that our assessment is not specific to undergraduates but is also open to postgraduate students. As the nature of postgraduate study broadens, we are keen to offer those students the opportunity to participate. Finally, as ever, I thank my colleagues on the ISTD Education Team, Board, members and the others from around the world whose entirely volunteer efforts make our annual Assessments possible.

John McMillan Education Director john.mcmillan@istd.org.uk This document may have been accessed through our website or, as is the case for many institutions, has been mailed directly to those tutors on our Education database. By mailing education @istd.org.uk with your contact details you can receive subsequent project briefs and associated information by email. ©ISTD2011 IN PARTNERSHIP WITH Jack Zipes


Envelopes & letters


The logo could be adapted to the website as well. It could turn into an interactive bar.


Message Board ent Assessm Shop ISTD Awards My Accou nt Contact

Log In

Message Board

ent Assessm Shop

My Accou nt Contact

Log In

ISTD Awards

rs Membe Events

rs Membe Events

Join

Education

Education

Join

About ISTD

About ISTD

ISTD

ISTD

ISTD


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This is a project on Colour Strips from Asa Elmehed, a student of London College of Communication, working in collaboration with Benedict Richards. It reminds me of printing alignment pages.


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ISTD i thought of possibly developing the idea of lots of squares creating a shape, pattern or letter into circular shapes instead - to modernise and soften the identity.


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Istd

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A different approach: more simple, classical, but with a modern lo ok. Nowadays hand-rendered, free typefaces give a fresh lo ok to the identity of such a prestigious society such as ISTD, keeping it classical and old-fashioned.


ISTD

ISTD

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ISTD International Society of Typographic Designers

istd

istd

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istd


Furtherly developing the idea of circles, experiemtning logos linking it to the concept of Pantone shapes and ink colours. As represented in Asa Elmehed’s circle it is worth exploring the relationship between succesfully printed colours and unsuccessful prints. In terms of typographic choices: I tried both a simple, clean, non-invasive, neutral approach with Aliquam typeface, as well as a more, oid lo ok by using a type writer font, bring ISTD back to the origins of printing.


I decided to finalise ISTD’ s new visual identity with this logo. The three colours represent the primary colours, as well as the ink cartridges - which is linked to printing and an important part of typography. The three paler rounded squares underneath the brighter ones show the difference between succesfully printed ink on paper as opposed to a faulty and less effective lo ok. ISTD is purposely placed in the top line. The squares imagery has been kept, and develop from the existing logo. The typace is simple, sans-serif, slim, neutral and non-invasive.


I wasn’t entirely convinced with my final choice as I thought it lo oked entirely at the image and not at all on the typography and it was to o linked to printing as opposed to type. This is why I furtherly developed the logo - always keeping the square element, but softening the edges, and creating type from the square itself. Consequently, to reduce the actual visual I overlayed the letters. The logo doesn’t scream “ISTD” but it is something subtle, hidden, but that has a technique and grid structure behind it. The colours are bold, vivid and warm and reflect the tones used in ISTD’s web page.


International Society of Typographic Designers.


on icati ovation n i l u broso of Comm uct Inn m A d a Chiar on College hic & Pro Lond ) Grap s on (H B.A. 11 - 2012 20 t 1 c e j Pro Major

ONE  

Research & Process of my first final major project of my B.A. in Graphic & Product Innovation at London College of Communication

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