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ARMY OF THE WABASH

Army Of The

WABASH

ARMY OF THE WABASH Established in 2012 Vol. 2, Issue 3 | Fall 2013 Welcome to the quarterly membership newsletter of the Army of the Wabash.

ARMY OF THE WABASH1


Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

Army Of The

WABASH

Quarterly Newsletter of the Army of the Wabash. The mission of the Army of the Wabash is to function as a governing body of the Midwestern regiments dedicated to the historic preservation of the US Civil War heritage, and legacy.

CONTENTS Leadership & Affiliation

2

Letter from the Editor

3

Colonel’s Desk

4

Off the Wire

6

Letter from Stan

8

Photo Gallery

10

Joel’s Corner

14

Current Attendance

16

Guide On Travels

18

More from Ron

20

Web Links

21

Calendar

22

2

AOW COMMAND STAFF Ron Wilkins Nick Leach Will Behrman Stan Hurt Ivan Guillermo Vargas

Colonel Lt. Colonel Sergeant Major Chief of Staff Communications

AOW MEMBER UNITS &DELEGATES ARTILLERY 19th Indiana Light Artillery Phil Coleman 21st Indiana Light Artillery Ziggy CAVALRY 4th Indiana Cavalry Rob Frost 7th Indiana Cavalry Rob Brack NAVAL Naval Bob Dispenza MEDICAL Medical Fred Schafer CIVILIAN TBD INFANTRY 4th OVI Co. B Trent Boham 6th Indiana (Vernon Greys) Terry Furgason 11th Indiana Mike Beck 12th Indiana RJ Hagee 14th Indiana Co. A Eric Wilson 19th Indiana Co. A Gerald Siler 19th Indiana Co. K Ron Wilkins 19th US Doug Roush 20th Indiana Co. B Dave Crane 30th Indiana Russ Gilliom 32nd Indiana Co. B Jeff Stein 42nd Indiana Co. H Joel Foust 44th Indiana Jesse Poe 49th Indiana Co. F Rob Van


ARMY OF THE WABASH

A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR WITH IVAN GUILLERMO VARGAS So, Gettysburg has come and gone. And because of that, “he” had to go too. You know who I’m talking about. My bro-merang , my cookie duster, my crumb catcher, my lip rug, my dirt squirrel, my face fitting, my face furniture, my flavor savor, my handlebar, my lady tickler, my lip toupee, my snot catcher, my soup strainer, my upper liphostery, my ‘stache. Yes, the fabled 150th Gettysburg is gone, and my wife is now delighted that the my old face lace is gone with it.

introduced himself, and showed me to the chair. I spent the next few minutes having various potions rubbed onto my skin, until finally I’m buried under several layers of hot towels (to open the pores.) Very quickly, you begin to see the appeal of a professional wet shave as you begin to immerse yourself in a soothing, sensual, and relaxing experience. Even the shaving cream is warmed, and you begin to appreciate the barber’s attention to the shaving ritual itself and his meticulous care. I'm shaved twice, downward with the grain, then up against the grain with a fresh new blade, the barber pulling my skin tight as he goes along to avoid any snags. We finished with cold towels (to close the pores) and an aftershave. The entire experi ence took about 30mins, and cost me $25 without tip. And just like that, 2 months of facial toil was removed.

About a week after I returned back from Gettysburg, I went to the wonderful people at Vee’s Barber shop in the It was a wonGeist area of Ivan “Gorillamo” Vargas, the newsletter editor, before and after his trip to Vee’s derful way to n o r th e a s t e r n wrap up a long, Barbershop to have his face hamster removed. Indianapolis to exhausting and have my first memorable Getprofessional wet tysburg week. It was a pleasure marching with all of you shave. A wet shave virgin, if you will. After being offered a and I look forward to showing off my face in Hartford City complimentary beer while I waited, Joe the barber (minus the womb broom!!)

Find Us On The Internet https://www.facebook.com/ ArmyoftheWabash

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

F ROM THE C OLONEL ’ S D ESK . . . History buffs know the importance that the three-day battle of Gettysburg played in the Civil War, but few will know what an honor it was to participate in the 150th anniversary events. The men of the Army of the Wabash, fortunately, are among the men who paid homage to those brave federal soldiers by portraying their deeds and heroism during the four-day event on the fields north of Gettysburg. The event was too long and too hot to get into the minutia, so I'll hit some of the high points. The Army of the Wabash was fortunate to portray Hoosier regiments three of the four days. We started off the event honoring the 19th Indiana on the first day; we portrayed the brave lads of the 20th Indiana on the second day, and we finished our salute to Hoosiers by recreating the 14th Indiana for the East Cemetery Hill battles. We were fortunate to have Will Eichler as our brigade commander, who lobbied for us to honor these regiments. Thanks, Will. The Army of the Wabash stood in the Army's ranks as the 2nd battalion, 1st brigade, 3rd division. More than once during the weekend, the 1st brigade receive compliments from division. Similarly, the AOW repeatedly received high praise from brigade. I'm very proud of the discipline and fighting spirit showed by the AOW during the event. And yeah, I know that sounds corny since this hobby is pretend fighting. But anyone who was on the field during Pickets Charge likely felt the sense of urgency -- real or not -- as a massive wall of Confederates surged toward the federal lines. In Gen. Dave Shackelford's correspondence after the event, he wrote of the AOW, saying, "The Army of the Wabash conducted themselves like veterans despite this was their first effort as part of a Division."

the center of the division to find out what was going on, and I noticed brigade officers starting toward our battalion too. By Saturday evening, rumor spread through the entire army that we had a fight in our ranks, and a couple AOW folks from artillery stopped by to see what happened. By Saturday night, the AOW boys who attended the social events grew the tale, adding something about a hospital and tying the air ambulance that landed Saturday to the fight. God only knows what the rumor was by the end of the weekend. Good times and great memories. Certainly, the stories will grow taller around our campfires as everyone involved adds a little to the tale. One final note about Gettysburg -- a personal note: I was a honored to participate in 150th Gettysburg knowing we were remembering Hoosier boys who fought there. I am so very proud of how well the Army of the Wabash performed. You all knew the drill and responded well as we got into formation for the fights, and you boys brought to life the memories of our forefathers who fought and died there.

One of the highlights of the event was the fist fight Saturday during division formation. Hey, we figured the provost I count myself fortunate to have commanded the AOW hadn't done anything all weekend. We might as well make during the event, and I am humbled by the honor you behim earn his keep. stowed upon me. Thank you, boys. As the division of more than 600 men stood at attention Saturday, a fight broke out between the 2nd and 4th companies, and chaos ensued. I caught a glimpse of Keith Ron Wilkins Harrison, the division chief of staff, running at full gait from Colonel, Army of the Wabash

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

OFF THE WIRE Farewell, Steve Bouldin It's difficult to imagine being in this hobby in Indiana for any length of time and not knowing Steve Bouldin, and if you didn't know him personally because you're newer to the reenacting community, you probably recognized his face. Sadly, Steve died July 18.

SEPTEMBER

From what I learned, he was at work, running cable in an attic when he was overcome by heat. Unfortunately, no one knew of his condition or got to him soon enough to reverse the damage. He died a day or two after the incident.

150th Battle of Chickamauga September 19, 20, 21 and 22, 2013 838 Dougherty Gap Rd. Chickamauga. GA If Interested contact Ryan Williams via Facebook

Sitting here writing this, I still find it hard to imagine going to an Indiana event and not seeing Steve, sharing a beer with him and catching up on things. Hartford City is going to be different next month without him there.

Vermilion County Civil War Days September 28-29, 2013 Kennekuk County Park in Danville, Illinois If Interested contact Ron Wilkins via Facebook

Steve came up through the ranks of Co. A, 19th Indiana, serving in every role the hobby offered. He was well respected in the old Cumberland Guard, where he served as anything from a private to a battalion commander. He also was a respected officer for the Black Hat Battalion, which is an organization similar to the AOW portraying the units of the Iron Brigade.

REENFORCEMENTS NEEDED!!

Lincoln & Civil War Days September 28-29, 2013 Memorial Park, Lebanon, IN If Interested contact Rob Van via Facebook Covered Bridge Fest September 28-29, 2013 Crown Point, IN If Interested contact Dave Crane at 219-306-6779

OCTOBER Columbus Crew Soccer Match October 5, 2013 Columbus, Ohio If Interested contact Trent Boham via Facebook 151st Battle of Perryville October 5th and 6th, 2013 Perryville, KY If Interested contact Chad Greene via Facebook

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We will take some time at Hartford City to allow Co. A to memorialize their fallen friend, and we -- the AOW -- will also take a few minutes out of our day to recall what a friend Steve was to us. By Ron Wilkins


ARMY OF THE WABASH

Hartford City, 2013 Events seem to fall into the same old rut, year after year after year. And once in a rut, it's difficult to climb out of it. But everyone in the AOW leadership is committed to doing things differently than we have in the past. You don't want the same, tired event, and we don't want to lead the same tired exercises at these events. So anything new is good, and we're open to suggestions. With that said, Hartford City (Oct. 11, 12, 13) will be different this year. Not enough so that it scares away the triedand-true supporters of the event, but enough to possibly entice some to return to it. Certainly, we'll do the morning memorial service, if the event chooses to have one. And yes, we'll have to do drill. But perhaps the battles might be different, and the camps might be different. I won't give away the surprises. If you want to see, come out.

The 14th Indiana, which traditionally has been unable to attend this event, will be there with a company. Also, the 20th Indiana, a relatively new group, are expected to have a strong showing too. Specific camping locations will come out later this month. Any suggestions for Hartford City's event, please get them to me ASAP so we can incorporate them into the weekend if practical. If you haven't been to Hartford City in a while, this might be the year to come back for a visit. By Ron Wilkins

Have something for the Newsletter? Send all photos, articles, info or announcements to Ivan at: ivargas21@gmail.com

Congratulations to

Jenna & Will Married Aug 31st.

I will tell you that the artillery camp is moving off of the hill it traditionally has occupied for decades. And all of the infantry, including the 49th, will all camp below the hill, out of site of the 3M plant. So there should be more opportunity for first-person exchanges without modern intrusions. I also would welcome the opportunity to bring the cav and medical's camps closer to the infantry, so that we all are camped close enough to get to know one another. By having the camps all together, it should build the esprit de corps among the different troops, companies and batteries. Expect the camps to be a little tighter than in recent years because there will be more federal soldiers attending.

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

A STAFF OFFICER’S VIEW BY STAN HURT GETTYSBURG JULY 2013 Attending the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg battles as a staff officer for the 3rd Division gave me a unique view of the event. I arrived on Monday morning with some of the staff to lay out the 3rd Division camp for our two Brigades and five Battalions. Re-enactors started arriving on Tuesday and Wednesday to prepare for the battle on Thursday at 1pm. The 3rd Division staff of General Shackelford consisted of 10 officers and men. My job as AAG was to receive orders from Federal Headquarters and relay them to the Brigades. I also consolidated the morning, weapons, and after battle reports from the Brigades and forwarded them to Federal Headquarters. I accompanied General Shackelford and Chief of Staff, Major Keith Harrison to the daily briefings by the Army General and his staff. At those meetings the battle plans were presented and orders were issued to the four Divisions. A lot of time was spent on logistics including the water and ice located on the battlefields. The failure to perform as the Army General wished resulted in some civilian personnel changes with the result that by Saturday, the logistics problems were solved. My job on the battlefield was to position the Division Colors near the General so couriers could find him with orders. I carried the wireless communications with channels to the Army General Staff and the Medical Officer. I would inform the General of pertinent information coming from the Federal and Confederate staffs. The communications was important to keep the battles scenarios in some semblance of the original plan. My secondary responsibility was communicating to the Medical Officer any casualties that needed removal from the field. Surprisingly, with over 600 troops in 3 rd Division, I only made three calls for assistance. Most of the heat exhaustion cases were handled on the field with ice and water. This speaks well of the physical condition of the troops in 3rd Division, as some days the temperature was in the low 90s with heat indexes close to 100.

AS THE ONLY MIDWESTERN DIVISION IN AN EASTERN EVENT, WE DEFINITELY PROVED OUR ABILITIES.

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Now I want to brag a little about the 3 rd Division. As the only Midwestern Division in an Eastern event, we definitely proved our abilities. We were the biggest Division on the field, and we were always in battle formation on time. I won’t go into detail about the long delays, but some of the problems stemmed from the failure in getting water and ice on the field. The Federal Headquarters staff was very open in complimenting our battle tactics and overall performance. The Brigades were timely in submitting reports so that our reports to Federal Headquarters were on time. In summary, we had fewer prob-


ARMY OF THE WABASH

lems, complained less, and it was appreciated by the Federal Staff. If you sometimes wondered why an Australian in British uniform was carrying our colors, here’s the story. Brad Manera, executive manager of the ANZAC Memorial in Sydney, contacted me and wanted to join us. I thought if someone would travel from Sydney, Australia to Gettysburg, he certainly deserved the chance to join us. Our Division Color bearer on the second day chose to be a bugler and Brad filled in for him by carrying the Colors. Brad can be described as a walking military history encyclopedia and he kept the staff entertained with stories of British and Australian military history. Our division commander, General Shackelford, is also an expert on European military history and the two amazed us with their knowledge. Brad has many years of reenacting experience, including the famous battle of Waterloo. In comparison to other reen-

actments, our Gettysburg event far outshined anything he has seen. He was thrilled to be among people who readily accepted him, a true Midwestern trait, not always the case in his experiences in other countries. As the event concluded on Sunday, the skies opened up and the rain that had held off all week soaked us as we left the battlefield. The week was a visual experience that I will always remember. It was a pleasure to share the experience with members of the 49th Indiana Volunteers and the AOW. We proved ourselves on the battlefield at Gettysburg, and our military skills will certainly grow, but most importantly, our friendship with each other around the campfire is the true reward.

Major Stan Hurt 3rd Division AAG

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

PHOTO GALLERY BY RUSSELL HAYS

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ARMY OF THE WABASH

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

Photo m By HTTP://PHOTOMEMORIESBYRHAYS.ZENFOLIO.COM 12

R.


ARMY OF THE WABASH

emories

.HAYS Most of the photos used in this newsletters were graciously provided by Russell Hays. If you wish to purchase any, please visit his website at HTTP://PHOTOMEMORIESBYRHAYS.ZENFOLIO.COM

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

JOEL’S FIX-IT CORNER BY JOEL FOUST Editor’s Note: The following is a segment from “Oilcloth & Painted Accouterments” by Jack Cox provided here by Joel Foust.

“Painting” was a 1800’s method of waterproofing cloth for such items as knapsacks, haversacks, belts, cartridge boxes and ground cloths. Properly done, the fabric does become very waterproof, but retains its flexibility. There are many different recipes for both "period accurate" oilcloth and for a modern version that looks the same, but without some of the problems of the 1850's recipe. The paint is generally applied over cotton drill or linen canvas. The instructions below discuss the making of ground cloths, but the same procedure applies to all painted goods.

take an hour or less. The sizing will prevent the paint from soaking the cloth, and it will give it some "tooth" for paint adhesion. 2. Using a roller, paint one side of the cloth with the black latex paint. Let it dry overnight. 3. Mix 2 parts of mineral spirits with 1 part boiled linseed oil. Add Japan dryer. Use 1 oz. (2 tablespoons) per pint of paint. 4. With a brush, paint the sized side of the cloth with the linseed oil mix. Let it dry. This may take several days, depending on temperature and humidity. It's NOT wise to let it dry in the house. 5. Paint on two additional coats of the linseed oil mix. Let it dry between coats. *** There is a variation of this recipe that works very well also. Instead of using plain latex paint, mix 2 parts of latex paint with one part of boiled linseed oil. Stir it thoroughly, then follow the instructions above.

Modern Recipe: While this recipe is obviously not authentic, it produces the same look and feel as the original methods. The final product looks, feels and wears as close to the original as most of us can approximate today. However, you need to make a decision as to whether you want to "fake it" with a modern approximation when a good period recipe is available. Materials: Wallpaper sizing. Get it pre-mixed and ready to use. Flat black or semi-gloss interior latex paint *** Boiled linseed oil Mineral spirits paint thinner Japan dryer (All of these materials are available at any good paint store) Method: 1. Using a roller, paint both sides of the cloth with the wallpaper sizing and let it dry. It should

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Period Recipe: This recipe is an approximation, since the original recipe specified "litharge," or lead monoxide (PbO) which is extremely poisonous. Bright Idea: Leave out the lampblack, and you have a recipe for a nice civilian waterproof cloth. I strongly recommend this recipe because it is about as authentic as you can get without putting life and limb in danger. Materials: Boiled linseed oil Mineral spirits paint thinner (or turpentine) Lampblack (comes in tubes or dry powder) Japan dryer Corn starch Method: 1. Make a sizing by boiling about a quart of water and adding cornstarch mixed in cold water until the mixture becomes a little syrupy. 2. Paint the cloth with the cornstarch sizing and let dry.


ARMY OF THE WABASH

3. Mix one part of boiled linseed oil with one part of mineral spirits. Add lamp black until the paint is a very opaque black. Add one oz. (2 tbsp) of Japan dryer per pint. 4. With a brush, paint the cloth with the blackened linseed oil and let dry. This can take several days. 5. Mix one part of boiled linseed oil with two parts of mineral spirits. Add one oz. of Japan dryer per pint. 6. With a brush, paint the cloth with the clear linseed oil mixture and let it dry. This can also take several days. Two coats of this mixture should give the results you want. (You can omit the cornstarch sizing if you want, but the oilbased paint will pretty much soak the cloth.)

Confederate Ordnance Manual Recipe: There is a recipe from the 1863 Confederate Ordinance manual which I have not tried. Use at your own risk. Materials: 28 Parts lampblack 1 Part Japan varnish 73 Parts boiled Linseed oil 1 Part spirits of turpentine 1 Part litharge (substitute Japan Dryer for this. Litharge is lead monoxide, and is very poisonous.)

Warning: The recipe uses litharge (poison hazard) and the mixture is boiled (fire hazard). Materials: • 1 pint of spirits of turpentine • 1 to 1 1/2 pints of linseed oil

Method:

• 1 lb litharge

1. Mix the ingredients, using 1 oz. (2 tbsp) of Japan dryer per quart of paint.

Method:

2. If you don't want the paint to totally soak the cloth, size it with cornstarch as in the period recipe above. 3. Apply 2-3 coats until the desired sheen is obtained.

Combine all materials in a large metal bucket. Litharge reacts strongly to aluminum and zinc. Do not use an aluminum or zinc coated vessel. Boil and stir until thoroughly mixed and dissolved. Paint on the cloth. Let dry in the sun.

Turpentine-base Recipe: This recipe comes from "Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets - 1861." This recipe will

This recipe will give a clear to reddish or yellowish color, depending upon the base color of the litharge. The first coats could be tinted with lamp black to make a glossy painted oilcloth.

sound familiar in materials and proportion, but uses turpentine instead of mineral spirits for a thinner. Hazard

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

AOW ATTENDANCE 2013 AOW ATTENDANCE

Unit

CP May 18

CP May 19

Conner Prairie

GAC Jul 6

GAC Jul 7

1

1

1

1

1

Gettysburg

HC Oct HC Oct 12 13

Hartford City

Artillery (Counted in Pieces on Field) 19th Indiana Light Artillery 21st Ind Light Artillery

1 0

Cavalry

0 0

4th Ind Cavalry 7th Ind Cavalry

14

14

14

4th OVI

8

11

11

6th Indiana (Vernon Greys)

3

0

3

11th Indiana

7

8

8

Infantry

12th Indiana

0

0

0

14th Indiana Co A

15

12

15

19th Indiana Co A

6

4

6

19th Indiana Co K

3

6

6

19th US

0

0

0

20th Indiana Co B

0

0

0

30th Indiana

6

5

6

32nd Indiana

1

1

1

42nd Indiana

6

3

6

44th Indiana

13

11

13

49th Indiana Co F

29

25

29

112

101

119

16

8

7

14

15

6

7

7

7

1 2 12 22 73

1 0 15 21 74

0 0 8 0 15 0 7 0 7 0 1 2 15 22 78

0

0

0


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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

THE “GUIDE ON� MOVES ON BY BILL COMBS If anyone has made it to an Army of the Wabash event in the past year or so, they would have seen our mighty army guide-on flowing bravely in the most blustery of winds. It flew gallantly at the 150th Anniversary of Gettysburg this past summer campaign. For those that made it to that event, you were lucky enough to see our most excellent guide-on serve its last tour of combat. The reason for this is that having only signed the 3 year papers, the Army of Wabash Guideon bid took its leave from Col. Wilkins at Gettysburg. The colonel left on Sunday night and continued on with the rest of the army as the guide-on stayed in order to rest up and gather its strength for the long journey home. The guide-on, experiencing free will for the first time in its life, was unsure on what to do with itself. It concluded that it was best to start off by returning home to the Hoosier state. Once there, it paid homage to one of the member units of the Army of the Wabash by paying its respects to the 14th IN at the Terre Haute Civil War Memorial. Knowing that it's hard to get a good job without a college education nowadays, the guide-on decided to check-out Wabash College. A school that has a try connection to the Union effort when many of her sons answered Lincoln's call for volunteers. The most prominent of these sons being Major General Lew Wallace. The guide-on took a peak into Forest Hall which is the original 1832 school house but now houses the Wabash teacher education department. Later, it looked on the honored steps of the Wabash Chapel from the Mall. However, it was sorely di sappoi nted when it found out from the Associate Dean of Students, William Oprisko, that the guide-on's previous academic accomplishments did not meet Wabash's standards. The

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guide-on was unfortunately denied admittance to the college. All was not lost, however. The guide-on would not let Wabash ruin his visit to Crawfordsville, In. It toured the towns most prestigious sites including the home of former Indiana Governor Henry S. Lane and the Lew Wallace's personal study where he wrote his best-selling novel Ben Hur. Unfortunately for the guideon, the museums were already overstaffed on tour guides despite its excellent references and qualifications. The brave little guide-on was not discouraged. Instead, it purchased a Saturday pass to Gencon Indianapolis! With the 49,000 people that were going to the event, the guide-on was sure that somebody would have a place for him. Woeful-


ARMY OF THE WABASH

ly, it was not the banner the Imperial Stormtroopers were looking for. Nor was it willing to follow the God-Emperor of the Imperium of Man from the Warhammer 40,000 universe and it barely escaped the stringent commissar clutches. The guide-on almost made it into the forces of Cygnar but the warjack's grip was a little too tight for comfort. In fact, the guide-on barely escaped intact as the sheep hosts of Mayfair's Bob & Angus Show hungrily stalked the poor, lonely guide-on around the trade floor. The guide-on, dejected, left Gencon with a heavy heart as joyous nerds, geeks, and dorks continued to celebrate some of the only days of the year when they don't have to face the fear of wedges and swirlies on a consistent basis.

the guide-on find its home so that it may enjoy the rest of its life with companionship and not retire alone.

From the point on, the tale of the guide-on is unclear. There are rumors that guide-on is heading to Chickamauga, Lebanon, and even Hartford City in hopes of finding it's true home. If you wish to know the conclusion of the guide-on's forlorn travels across the country, then I highly suggest attending any one if not all of these events. Help

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

IMPROVING YOUR IMPRESSION BY RON WILKINS Ever since I started re-enacting, I've wanted to improve -- improve my uniforms, my impression, my knowledge of the drill, my understanding of the soldiers' lives.

If you have questions about what type of equipment to purchase to improve your impression, I encourage you to seek out their counsel. They're on facebook and they're approachable if you see them at events. Both are great guys with solid impressions.

Fortunately, I had mentors along the way suggesting books to read, advising me on what vendors to purchase from and what vendors to avoid. We need more mentors who know this stuff, so in the June AOW newsletter, I discussed having resource people who could be contacted for anyone having questions about drill, accurate impressions or other questions about how to improve our kits.

I have a few names for experts on the drill, customs of service and regulations, but I need more. So I hopefully, I can release those names in the next newsletter.

I have to admit that volunteers have been slow to step forward, and I understand that. Everyone's busy. But I have two names to throw out for authenticity for uniforms and camp life impressions. They are Greg Swank of the 49th Indiana and Joel Foust of the 42nd Indiana. Both of these guys have flawless kits and have read about the uniforms and camp life of the common soldier. They've also experienced more progressive events without being tainted by the elite attitude that has turned many away from attending those events.

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Until then, if you're looking for more information about what life was like as a Civil War soldier, I highly recommend you pour over the book "Hardtack and Coffee" by John Billings. Billings didn't know when he was writing his memories of the war, but he was creating the essential how-to book for Civil War re-enactors. If you haven't read it, you should.


ARMY OF THE WABASH

Web Links Unit

Website

ARMY OF THE WABASH Facebook Page 11th Indiana 14th Indiana Co. A 30th Indiana 42nd Indiana Co.H 44th Indiana 49th Indiana Co. F 4th OVI Co. B 6th Indiana (Vernon Greys) 7th Indiana Cavalry

www.facebook.com/ArmyoftheWabash indiana11th.tripod.com coa14thind.org www.30th-indiana.org 42indiana.wix.com/home#! www.44thindiana.org www.49thindiana.com www.freewebs.com/4thovi vernongreysmilitia.yolasite.com 7thindcav.org

** Please contact Ivan Vargas (ivargas21@gmail.com) if you have a link you would like to add here.

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

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Fall 2013


ARMY OF THE WABASH

CALENDAR 2013 Max Effort Events EVENT

LOCATION

DATE

Army of the Wabash Meeting

Conner Prairie

11:00 a.m, Feb 9, 2013

**

Conner Prairie

Fishers, IN

May 17, 18, 19 2013

**

Gettysburg

Gettysburg, PA

July 4, 5, 6, 7 2013

**

Event

Hartford City, IN

October 11, 12, 13 2013

Other 2013 Events Supported by AOW Units EVENT

LOCATION

DATE

Army of the Wabash Meeting

Conner Prairie

11:00 a.m, Feb 9, 2013

Sassafrass Tea Festival

Vernon, IN

April 26, 27, 28 2013

Crown Hill Ceremony (150th Anniversary)

Indianapolis, IN

May 27, 2013 (12:00 noon)

Steam Museum

Hesston, IN

June 21, 22, 23 2013

Event

Corydon, IN

July 12, 13, 14 2013

Event

Hastings, MI

July 19, 20, 21 2013

Event

Knightstown

August 2, 3, 4 2013

Morgan's Raid

Jackson County, OH

August 16, 17, 18 2013

Event

Richmond, KY

August 23, 24, 25 2013

Event

Chickamagua

September 19, 20, 21 2013

Johnney Appleseed

Fort Wayne, IN

September 19, 20, 21 2013

Lincoln Days

Lebanon, IN

September 27, 28, 29 2013

Angola Civil War Days

Angola, IN

September 27, 28, 29 2013

Atlanta

Hampton, GA

November 1, 2, 3 2013

EVENT

LOCATION

DATE

Atlanta

Hampton, GA

September 19, 20, 21 2014

Potential 2014 Events

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Vol. 2, Issue 3 |

Fall 2013

En route from Springfield, Illinois to his first inauguration in Washington D.C., Abraham Lincoln’s train stopped in Lebanon on February 11, 1861, where he addressed the citizens of this small Boone County town.

LINCOLN’S LEBANON & CIVIL WAR RE-ENACTMENT

WHAT IF HE HAD STAYED TO VISIT? On September 28th, that’s exactly what he will do, visiting with the citizens of Boone County who wish to meet him, enjoy a photo op, and listen to him speak. Come meet a great icon of American history.

L INCOLN ’ S L EBANON & C IVIL W AR R E -

September 28 - 29, 2013 Memorial Park

ENACTMENT TWO FUN DAYS OF ACTIVITIES

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troops will be present in the park

At noon, Saturday, the President speaks at the historical marker in front of Family Video on South Lebanon St., before traveling to Memorial Park where he will remain until 5 PM.

A full encampment of both Union & Confederate

Several food vendors will be on hand, offering a variety of tasty items.

Civil War demonstrators will be on hand


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Army of the Wabash Fall 2013 issue