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The Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York

Advanced Computing Master of Archiecture, Director: Bradley Horn Instructors: Michael Szivos / Carrie McKnelly Master of Architecture, Director: Bradley Horn Critics: Julio Salcedo Fernandez / Frank Bitonti Edited by Gregory Nakata


Course Syllabus: Advanced Computing Type of Course: Lab Instructors: Michael Szivos / Carrie McKnelly Course Overview: As the lines between design and production become increasingly blurred, innovative architectural practice requires the ability both to integrate diverse software packages and to move seamlessly from digital models to physical output. This course aims to exploit the newest digital design and fabrication tools in ways that will advance all stages of architectural production, from conception and visualization to development and manufacturing. This course provides a framework for conceptualizing and producing physical output. The course is a hybrid seminar/workshop that is driven by a single course project that, in turn, is driven by a series of investigations. These investigations will approach the functions of software in such a way as to extract critical approaches to the digitization of architecture. Emphasizing integrated use of the computer for design, production, and presentation, will expose students to various modeling platforms, and techniques of making the digital physical. Technical instruction and individualized workshops will facilitate research into generative, parametric, material and temporal dimensions of digital design.

Assignments: The course will be broken into 3 assignments, each informing the next:

Learning Objectives: The course will introduce digital production techniques. In addition, the class’ two primary objectives are:

Assignment 1 – Design Learn and explore the modeling tools that will create a range of geometry based on 3 V[RGU ITCXKV[ FTKXGP ITQWPFGF CPF KPƀCVGF Investigate formal models using these physics based techniques and explore systems of making. Visualize a range of forms derived by these techniques and systems used and FQEWOGPV VJG RTQEGUU VQ VJG ſPCN HQTO Students will present a form in one of the 3 categories.

1. Help the students develop the ability to move between digital representations and physical constructions. 2. Student work should demonstrate an understanding of software packages, and modeling techniques to produce various formal types. While this course provides a vocabulary of techniques intended to develop students’ technical abilities, the course seeks to challenge students’ abilities to productively execute and conceptualize software functions. As a production driven class, students will develop a physical prototype of their research.

Assignment 2 – Prototyping Develop a prototype of a unit that will be used to create the formal geometry of assignment 1.The prototype should be an investigation QPVJGVGEJPKSWGUVJCVYKNNDGWUGFKPVJGſPCN assembly. It should be an iterative process that ITQYU KPVQ C ſPCN U[UVGO QH OCMKPI C NCTIGT piece. Assignment 3 – Assembly Students will create a version of the formal studies explored in the early portion of the course using the prototypes/units they developed in the second assignment.

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Advanced Computing Master of Architecture

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Advanced Computing Master of Architecture

01 Team: David Frank / Jennifer Chen 02 Team: Gregory Nakata / Chad Richardson 03 Team: Zev Horowitz / Francesca Bucci Vernizzi 04 Team Luke Weinstock / Nick Butterini 05 Team: Christos Athanassiou / Nicholas Cichanowski 06 Team: Ian Brooks / Ermir Gjoka

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Untitled C. Athanassiou / N. Cichanowski This objects form is derived from dropping a rigid sphere onto an elastic surface whose perimeter has been contrained. The resulting form resembles the formation of a droplet, a seemingly simple phenomenon that results from the complex interaction of gravity, cohesion, surface tensions, and the electromagnetic force. Through the use of Maya, Rhino and Grasshopper we captured this ephemeral, F[PCOKECPFĆ€GGVKPIUVTWEVWTGET[UVCNNK\KPIKVU form using laser cut wood veneer. Illuminated from the inside this installation forces the viewer to consider time, space, and their mortality.

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Untitled C. Athanassiou / N. Cichanowski

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Untitled Z. Horowitz / F. Bucci Vernizzi This installation utilized modern digital fabrication techniques to facilitate an experiment which highlights the fundamental properties of light. Using Maya, a tree-like form was developed. +V DGICP CV VYQ UGRCTCVG NKIJV ſZVWTGU YKVJ VYQ individual branches having their own unique RCVVGTPCPFECUECFGFVQYCTFVJGƀQQTYJGTGVJG patterns overlapped creating a more opaque skin. Employing Maya’s animation tools to simulate real world gravitational forces our initial form was optimized. The isocurves derived from this enhanced shape acted as a series of tensioned strands serving as a structure with which we could maintain the form when hung from the ceiling. These isocurves also delineated a system of polygonal panels which make up the form. Using Rhinoceros with the Grasshopper plug-in we developed a script to customize the paneled system with two different patterns. The experiment focused on two opposing branch shapes that combine and funnel the light down to one common trunk. Each branch was designed to have its own individual and opposing properties (size, color, and panel pattern) to see how the light might interact differently within them.

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Untitled Z. Horowitz / F. Bucci Vernizzi

PANEL A

PANEL B

PANEL A + PANEL B

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Monster Pants G. Nakata / C. Richardson Monster pants is a study of the convergence of two parts into one. This shape was tested KP VJG JQTK\QPVCN QTKGPVCVKQP YJGTG QPG ſZGF point could capture two separate views on the opposing end. This scheme was abandoned as we wanted to optimize the structural characteristics of the tessellated surface in a XGTVKECNEQPſIWTCVKQPYJGTGVJGUVTWEVWTGCVTGUV was self-supporting. During construction the assembly was constructed from the single base and erected like a tree, branching off halfway to form the two opposing ends. The triangular tessellation allowed us to EQOHQTVCDN[ ſV VJG FGUKTGF IGQOGVT[ VJGTGD[ creating a smooth surface on the interior with GZRTGUUGF EQPPGEVKQP ſPU QP VJG QWVUKFG emphasizing the tessellation patterning and ITCFKGPV ECWUGF D[ VJG UJCFQY QH GCEJ ſP QP the surface. 6JGſPCNKPUVCNNCVKQPCRRGCTUVQITQYQWVQHVJG ground and converge at one point, like a pair of RCPVUƀCTKPIQWVVQCEEQOOQFCVGVJGUVTWEVWTCN loads throughout the twisting geometry.

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Monster Pants G. Nakata / C. Richardson

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Siphon J. Chen / D. Franck

297”

The purpose of this installation is engage users to explore the surrounding environment of the visual funnel. The two most porous openings can be accessed from the mezzanine level and centralizes the view to one opening on the lower level. The pattern on the installation follows the visual ƀQYHTQOOQUVRQTQWUCVVJGDGIKPPKPIVQNGCUV porous at the single opening below. Each panel consists of double layered mylar- a matte white translucent side and a metallic purple side. The cut pattern varies from a very porous end on the portions closest to the walkway, to the opaque section to siphon the view towards the bottom further emphasizing the portal of view.

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196”

Most Porous (Most Tails) gradient gradient

Least Porous (Least Tails)


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Siphon J. Chen / D. Franck

67”

32.5”

Most porous

Least porous Most porous

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Verizon L. Weinstock / N. Butterini $[ WVKNK\KPI VJG OQUV VTCHſEMGF URCEG KP VJG Spitzer School of Architecture, we endeavored to create an installation that would visually enliven and anchor the busy space. Using both 3-dimentional modeling programs and parametric program aids, our design grew through a cross pollination of concepts and forms explored in the various computer programs (Maya, Rhino, and Grasshopper).

Finally, the point of connection between the lower, string half and the upper, mylar panel half was moderated by the use of lightweight binder and paper clips; visually highlighting the point of connection.

Once we achieved our desired form, we divided the design into lower and upper halves. The top half was made from parametrically produced, laser cut, mylar panels. The bottom half was made from manually cut heavy string, each forming a catenary curve. The strings lengths were determined by parametric aids.

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Verizon L. Weinstock / N. Butterini

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Untitled I. Brooks / E. Gjoka 1WT ſPCN RTQLGEV KU VQ OCMG CP FQWDNG EWTXGF perforated wall panel that can be linked together to create a larger partition. We created CPKPƀCVCDNGOQNFQWVQHNCVGZCPFſNNGFKVYKVJ two-part expandable foam. The mold is a sandwich jig that has a grid of holes which can be plugged or left open depending on design of individual panel. In this way, a single jig can be WUGFVQETGCVGKPſPKVGXCTKCVKQPUQHYCNNRCPGNU The mold is reusable and thus all panels will be cast with a single mold then attached together, potentially with a tensioned wire.

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Untitled I. Brooks / E. Gjoka

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Advanced Computing Spitzer School of Architecture

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Advanced Computing at CCNY Spitzer School of Architecture  

This course aims to exploit the newest digital design and fabrication tools in ways that will advance all stages of architectural production...

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