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2019 PROJECT FUNDING NEEDS


Our Happy Place

GLACIER’S VISTAS ARE ABSOLUTELY MAGNIFICENT, AND WE KNOW YOU’VE GOT A FAVORITE VIEW YOURSELF. For so many of us, Glacier is our “Happy Place,” and we get involved because we want it to remain so. The Conservancy’s grants team has a bird’s-eye view across the park’s 2019 funding needs. It is an honor to have this insight, and such a strong collaborative relationship with the park. We are thrilled to share this landscape with you in these pages. The grants process begins in January, when park staff brings forth a broad selection of grant requests, which Glacier’s NPS leadership team then prioritizes before presentation to the Conservancy’s Grants Committee in April. Then begins the deep dive, when committee members immerse ourselves in “the book” of grant requests, emerging a few weeks later to meet with the park team for any clarifications. The list is then distilled into the projects that bring the most value to our donors and to the park, while aligning with our mission to preserve and protect the park. During the process, we learn an amazing amount about park funding streams, research opportunities, resource protection issues, and visitor experience enhancement. An example of a big reach is the purchase of a DuraPatcher machine used to repair deteriorated sections of Glacier’s historic roads. Historically, this type of project falls outside of our funding areas but when park managers presented this need and the hurdles faced in acquiring it through NPS funding channels, we jumped into action. Through a generous donation from The Dennis & Phyllis Washington Foundation, we purchased the DuraPatcher, greatly increasing the efficiency of road repairs throughout the park. We promise you, the view is spectacular when seen through the prism of this year’s 64 selected projects, and we invite you to share the view we so cherish as you explore the slate of requests for 2019!

Lacy Kowalski Grants and Projects Manager 2

Margaret Notley Grants Committee Chair Board of Directors


Going to the Sun Road / © Eric Melzer Cover: Iceberg Lake / © Kyle Martin


Half the park

happens after dark

Logan Pass Milky Way / © Connor Welles

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When Mark Wagner retired from his longtime role as Glacier’s East Side Interpreter last year, the park had just reached a major milestone, receiving designation as the world’s first International Dark Sky Park. Years in the making, this designation requires a long-term commitment to preserving and educating visitors about the importance of night skies. Along with numerous other achievements throughout his NPS career, Mark was responsible for establishing Glacier’s most popular interpretive program, Half the Park Happens After Dark, and growing it to reach more than 30,000 visitors each year.

In 2018, following his passion for this program, Mark joined the Conservancy as the Astronomy Program Manager, to assist the park in transitioning the Half the Park Happens After Dark program to new leadership. A major focus will be overseeing the installation of a state-of-the-art observatory in St. Mary. This dome will permanently hold two telescopes allowing for in-depth viewing opportunities for visitors, school groups and researchers. Once constructed, the observatory will be equipped with large monitors for viewing the wonders of the night sky, allowing even more visitors to learn the importance of preserving our dark skies -- not only to view wonderful celestial objects, but as critical periods for many animal and plant species, and directly connected to human health and well-being.

Inside observatory / skyshedpodmax.com

Observatory / skyshedpodmax.com


FDR Commemorative Trip August 4, 2016 / Jacob W. Frank

Message from glacier national park

SUPERINTENDENT JEFF MOW

“T

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, rear seat on left, arrives at Logan Pass in on August 5, 1934, the year after Going to the Sun Road had been opened to the public. / NPS

oday, for the first time in my life, I have seen Glacier Park.

that significantly improve the visitor experience and preserve

Perhaps I can best express to you my thrill and delight by

the place for future generations. From Gracie the Bark Ranger

saying that I wish every American, old and young, could have been

to helping make Waterton Glacier International Peace Park

with me today. The great mountains, the glaciers, the lakes and

the first cross-boundary “Dark Skies” designated park in the

the trees make me long to stay here for all the rest of the summer.”

world, private philanthropy through the Glacier National Park

These words were spoken from Two Medicine Lodge on Sunday,

Conservancy continues to fund critical educational, preservation

August 5, 1934, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a nationally

and research projects that, put simply, would not happen without

broadcast radio “fireside chat” after he, Senator Burton K. Wheeler,

our philanthropic partner and the generous donations that support

and Montana Governor Frank Cooney drove the recently completed

this important work.

Going to the Sun highway. In this publication, you get a chance to see the 64 projects presented Last year, when one million people visited Glacier Park in July

by Glacier National Park staff for which the Glacier National Park

alone, it felt a little bit like “every American, old and young” had

Conservancy has agreed to raise funds and provide grant support

taken Roosevelt up on his “wish.” By the time 2017 came to a close,

in 2019. When fully funded, these grants will provide over $2.7

our park welcomed some 3.3 million visitors, an all-time record,

million in private funding to critical education, research and

even with the impactful fire season we experienced.

preservation projects across Glacier National Park. The power of this partnership is clear every day in everything we do at the park and

Making it through a year like 2017 takes an exceptional team

in the experience every park visitor has literally from the moment

working together toward a common goal. For Glacier Park, and

they reach the entry gate and begin their Glacier experience.

for many of the national parks across America, this team includes

We’re proud to be a part of this strong and vibrant public-private

an official philanthropic partner that assists with funding and

partnership and look forward to meeting our shared mission of

project support. In our case, that partner is the Glacier National

protecting and preserving this place we simply call “The Park.”

Park Conservancy. Working together, the park and the Glacier Conservancy implemented projects across Glacier National Park

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Education

Citizen Science at Bowman Lake / Jacob W. Frank

Expand Citizen Science Opportunities FUNDING NEEDED: $75,000 Since 2005 the Glacier National Park Citizen Science Program

help gather valuable data zzzzzzzzzfor Park managers while creating

has used citizen scientists to collect population data on “species

an informed group of visitors who become actively involved in Park

of interest,” or species thought to be in decline in the Park. Due to

stewardship. The Glacier National Park Conservancy supports the

shrinking budgets NPS can no longer fund this critical research.

Park’s Citizen Science programs at 100 percent. Without donations to

This program is a double win: It uses adult and student volunteers to

the Conservancy, these research programs simply would not happen.

Summer Youth Engagement Initiative FUNDING NEEDED: $33,100

BACKCOUNTRY RANGER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM FUNDING NEEDED: $19,850

The National Park Service has identified the need to connect

This project will increase the number of backcountry intern

our national parks. This innovative program uses a multifaceted

This significant investment is based on the success of the current

children with parks as one of the top five critical issues facing

approach to engage youth, provide experiential opportunities

and forge connections during the summer at Glacier. From

staffing the Apgar Nature Center to supplying 24,000 Junior Ranger booklets, this grant provides multiple touchpoints with

families and kids on their summer break. It also funds teacher rangers for formal children’s programs and activities, maintains a

campground children’s lending library and provides professional development opportunities for local teachers.

21ST CENTURY PARK RANGER FUNDING NEEDED: $34,000 Even John Muir split his time between being outdoors and dealing with the then-current publishing demand to sit and write

in his journal about what he saw and experienced. And aren’t we glad he did? This grant recognizes that in the 21st century,

technology is changing what being a “ranger” looks like, and funds two hybrid positions that provide half of the experience

in the field and half in the office. The resulting combination of metrics, technology, management, visitor interaction and field work will benefit both the interns and the Park. 8

positions supported by the Glacier Conservancy from one to three.

program (Glacier’s own Chief Ranger, Paul Austin, began as a Student Conservation Association intern) and increased pressure

on the backcountry. Expanding the program and providing young leaders with an understanding and appreciation for the wilderness

will have a meaningful, positive effect on long-term preservation of the Park’s backcountry.

Funding Transportation for School Field Trips FUNDING NEEDED: $28,000 In the 2017 - 2018 school year, the Conservancy funded 65 travel

grants to nearby schools. Increasingly, schools have no budget for field trips and the Conservancy must bridge the gap to help

students get to the Park to connect classroom curriculum with in-Park programming. Most of the funding is awarded to schools

in underserved communities where, on average, 45% of kids on

the field trips have never been to Glacier National Park. Kids who experience the resource will become the next generation of stewards for the Park.


DEPLOY LIVE WEBCAMS IN THE PARK FUNDING NEEDED: $22,000 In spring 2018 a bear hibernating in a tree in Glacier went viral,

capturing the attention of the nation, and even the world. Webcams

provide a wonderful opportunity for people to connect with Glacier and nature. This project would fund six cameras that the Park

may use as needed for wildlife sightings, public meetings, Park programming, and even fires.

INTERPRETIVE YOUTH INTERNSHIP PROGRAM FUNDING NEEDED: $30,000 Each of the eight interpretive interns employed through this

half the park happens after dark FUNDING NEEDED: $66,920 Designated the world’s first crossboundary Dark Sky Park in 2017, Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park now enters a project expansion phase that includes installation of a state-of-the-art observatory in 2018. This grant will expand astronomy education with nightly programs at the St. Mary observatory and Apgar Visitor Center, the popular Star Parties at Logan Pass, and development of Dark Sky educational and promotional materials for local communities.

historically successful program will have substantive interaction

with an estimated 1,500 visitors to Glacier Park during the summer season. Funding for these stipend-based youth internships are

not eligible for federal funding, and depend on partner support to provide this win-win experience for the interns and public they serve. Program alumni often go on to have enriching careers in the National Park Service.

Columbia Falls high school cooperative greenhouse winter internship FUNDING NEEDED: $3,060 Glacier National Park and School District 6 in Columbia Falls

have a cooperative greenhouse located on the campus of Columbia

Falls High School. This program funds a winter intern who is responsible for greenhouse operations and will mentor students in the propagation and maintenance of up to 6,000 native plants for use in Glacier Park restoration projects.

Under the stars in the mountains / © Travis Burke Photography

Native AMERICA SPEAKS FUNDING NEEDED: $58,000 This award-winning program, now in its 35th year at Glacier

National Park, is the longest-running indigenous speaker series in the National Park Service. Our grant funds 100 events in the Park each year, attended by more than 7,500 visitors. This program provides a unique window into the meaning and history of the place

we now call Glacier National Park from the different perspectives of the Blackfeet, Salish, Pend d’Oreille, and Kootenai peoples.

TRIBAL OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT FUNDING NEEDED: $40,457 Expanding and enhancing interactions with tribal communities is crucial to the long-term health of Glacier National Park. This grant provides the Park with resources to commit personnel to the important work of building trust and community with tribal stakeholders. North American Indian Days, Browning, Blackfeet Indian Reservation / Donnie Sexton

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Education

Glacier Youth Conservation Corps DELIVERING HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES FOR THE PARK’S NEXT GENERATION OF STEWARDS FUNDING NEEDED: $101,800

Veterans Green Corps TRANSITIONING FROM THE MILITARY TO THE CIVILIAN WORKFORCE FUNDING NEEDED: $30,200 Our slogan this year is The Corps is the Core. The Glacier Youth Corps, the Blackfeet Corps and the Veterans Corps are truly the “core” of both the work that takes place to preserve the place we so treasure, and of who we are as a people. They are – and we are – about hard work, community, commitment, service, personal growth and leaving a place better for our having been there. Whether it’s young people getting a start in the Youth Corps or Veterans getting a new start, the Conservation Corps work changes lives in a way that few other investments can. These projects are made possible through a partnership with Montana Conservation Corps

t

Additional Education Projects Archaeology Education Trunk - $10,134 The Archeology Education Trunk is a mini-exhibit of archaeological objects used to engage with students and other groups during outreach events.

Ranger Pocket Reference - $2,648 This small booklet fits in a Ranger’s uniform pocket and contains a vast breadth of critical reference materials, all available at a glance.

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Ranger-Led Field Trips, Distance Learning Classroom Visits - $76,547

Provides education and training to enhance ranger-led field trips, classroom visits and distance learning programs.

Investing in Teachers: A Forest for Every Classroom - $25,305 Provides professional development opportunities for up to 30 educators from schools around the country.

Science & Resources Management Intern - $3,060

Scholarships for NPS Staff - $3,500

This paid internship will allow a local high school or college student to work with Science and Research staff.

Provides training for a variety of on-the-job-related issues and topics for Glacier National Park staff.


Corps members building trail in Glacier / MCC

Adventures in many glacier! CORPS MEMBER NOAH BLANTON RECOUNTS HIS EXPERIENCE HELPING INCREASE TRAIL ACCESSIBILITY IN GLACIER IN 2017

A

fter two weeks of orientation, training, and preparing for

these trails,” and “Wow, I never thought this much work went

the first hitch of the fall season, the time had come for

into maintaining these trails. I have a newfound appreciation!”

our crew to graduate from recent recruit, to crew member for

These benevolent words tremendously fueled our passion to

the Montana Conservation Corps. Our mission: to remodel the

serve. After our eight-hour days along the trail beneath Grinnell

Swiftcurrent Lake trail into an Americans with Disabilities Act-

Peak, our crew would go on after-work hikes to explore the

approved trail to provide accessibility for people who also wish

surrounding areas. During our first 10 days in Many Glacier,

to experience the serenity of Glacier National Park. Little did

we saw more diverse wildlife than most of our crew had seen

we know how fruitful yet tiresome this first hitch would be. The

in their lifetimes. Not even five minutes after passing through

project was funded by the Glacier National Park Conservancy,

the NPS gates, we drove past a black bear. The entire crew

a private non-profit organization whose overall mission is to

bubbled with excitement! We had two close encounters with

support different projects and events in the Park by “providing

a mother black bear and her cub. One during the early hours

support for preservation, education, and research through

of the day, and the other following the walk back from dinner.

philanthropy and outreach.” Through the guidance of our

Our crew leaders handled the situations calmly and with the

project leader Brian, we were able to remodel over 900 feet

professionalism and risk management that the MCC instills

of the Swiftcurrent Lake trail into a handicap-accessible trail.

in its members. What an unforgettable experience! We even stumbled along the trail right into a mama moose and her

Our crew was exposed to the generosity and appreciation

calf. The calmness and serenity of the moment will never be

of passersby along the trail. The kind remarks boosted the

forgotten by our crew! All of these awesome encounters with

energy and productivity of our crew to a level that seemingly

nature and the humans who crossed our paths motivated our

impressed our crew leaders and project partners. Folks would

crew to continue to work hard, persevere, and have a great time

say things such as,“Thank you so much for the work that do on

serving the trails in Glacier National Park! 11


WORKING TOGETHER TO PRESERVE GLACIER PARK


Mountain Goat above Hidden Lake / © Yifan Bai


Preservation

Native Fish Conservation in the Crown of the Continent FUNDING NEEDED: $ 97,300 A critical part of keeping Glacier Park’s ecosystem intact is the protection of our native cold water trout. The Park’s population of migratory bull trout in alpine lakes and native westslope cutthroat trout is under threat from both intentional introduction of nonnative fish and migration of non-native species into the Park.

Federally-threatened bull trout / Joel Sartore

Funding from the Glacier National Park Conservancy will allow the Park and other partner agencies to significantly leverage public funds to implement a highly technical, four-phase initiative that spans the Park -- from Camas Lake, Evangeline Lake and Quartz Lake to multiple lakes and streams in the St. Mary River drainage and beyond.

Backcountry Invasive Weeds Management FUNDING NEEDED: $20,000 Noxious weeds are a major threat to any ecosystem. While the Park continues to make significant investments in this area, private support is needed to provide additional boots on the ground, and to survey and map noxious weed infestations across all of Glacier National Park. By pinpointing and moving the needle in the most threatened backcountry areas, and increasing the reach of the NPS employee inspects kayak for AIS / NPS

Prevent Catastrophic Mussel Infestation in Glacier Park FUNDING NEEDED: $130,000 In the past two years, the number of boats and other watercraft inspected as they enter Glacier Park increased from 1,000 in 2016 to over 13,000 in 2017. Continuing this program is critical not only

Park’s limited resources, the provision of additional manpower and research tools will bring greater success.

Rehabilitate Trails Accessing Three Mountain Lakes FUNDING NEEDED: $62,627

to the Park’s pristine waters, but to the greater ecosystem of the

This project addresses much-needed tread maintenance on 5.4

Columbia River Basin.

miles of trail that access three mountain lakes. The trails included are: part of the historic Piegan Trail along St. Mary Lake, a 2.1

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This project will provide private funds to leverage significant

mile section on the south side of Two Medicine Lake, and a shorter

federal and state resources being allocated for this effort, and will

section on the north side of Two Medicine Lake leading to No

support inspection stations in Polebridge, Two Medicine, St. Mary,

Name Lake. These three trails are used by an estimated 98,000

Many Glacier and Apgar.

hikers every year.


Swiftcurrent Water Bottle Filling Station FUNDING NEEDED: $7,700 Two Medicine Water Bottle Filling Station FUNDING NEEDED: $6,750 This project is simple, effective and smart and may

provide the best conservation and visitor experience “bang for the buck.” Keeping hikers hydrated is a critical safety issue across the park. By providing

visitors with an easy, efficient, and safe way to get water, this project will not only address a health and

safety issue but will go a long way toward helping

eliminate the waste related to single use plastic water bottles, 80 percent of which end up in landfills.

This project will provide for the

purchase and installation of two additional ADAcompliant water fountain and bottle fill stations -- one

at Two Medicine “showcase” comfort station, and the other at the Swiftcurrent picnic area.

Wheelchair friendly parking lot at Mauna Loa Lookout / Janice Wei

Lower McDonald Falls Accessible Trail

FUNDING NEEDED: $77,000

Swiftcurrent Accessible Trail

FUNDING NEEDED: $106,462

As visitation to Glacier grows, the number of people with mobility issues who want to experience its trails and campgrounds is growing as well. This project expands the existing Swiftcurrent Lake accessible trail and adds an accessible trail at Lower McDonald Creek Falls.

Operate Spring Hiker Biker Shuttle on the West Side FUNDING NEEDED: $75,500 The experience of riding the Going to the Sun Road in spring,

This is the fourth year for this overwhelmingly popular and

when it is open for bikers and hikers but closed to cars, is quickly

growing project. This year’s grant will continue to expand the

becoming a “bucket list” item for cyclists from around the world.

existing service on the Park’s west side, develop infrastructure on

Glacier’s spring scenery rivals the best rides in Europe while

the east side, and explore connectivity to the Gateway to Glacier

for the hardcore athlete, the ride would rank among the top 20

Trail and the Park bike path within West Glacier.

toughest climbs in the Tour de France.

This project has been accepted for the Whitefish Community Foundation’s Great Fish Challenge. If you wish to support this project, you can contribute directly to the Conservancy or visit greatfishchallenge.org, and donate directly to the Whitefish Community Foundation on behalf of the Glacier Conservancy July 26 to September 14.

Bikers at the loop on Going to the Sun Road / Jake Bramante

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Preservation Create Safe Opportunities to View Wildlife

Bear Management Fund: Protect Bears and Visitors in Real Time

FUNDING NEEDED: $112,990

FUNDING NEEDED: $6,000

We’ve all had the experience of seeing a

Glacier National Park is home to the

few cars stopped on the road with people

highest density of grizzly bears in the lower

interested in something going on up the hill.

48 states. Add 600 or so black bears and

Our natural reaction is to slow down and see

3 million human visitors a year and the

what everyone is looking at. If it’s a bear or

stage is set for a management challenge

a group of bighorn sheep, the odds are that

of significant consequence. Thanks to

we, too, will stop. This happens all the time

prioritization by the Park and steadfast

in Glacier Park and these animal-induced

support from the Conservancy, Glacier

“jams” can cause safety issues for both the

National Park boasts one of the most

animals and the humans watching them.

successful bear management programs in the world with less than one bear per year

FUNDING NEEDED: $2,200 Named for its view of 50 snow-capped peaks, this beautiful and epic backcountry location is iconic for hikers, and an important corridor for the Park’s grizzly bear population. In its second year, this project would outfit a volunteer backcountry host position in a wall tent from the beginning of August until late September. A rotating crew of

removed due to management concerns.

volunteer hosts are specifically trained

Visitor Service Assistant (VSA) program by

2019 funding provides critical resources

to provide up-to-date trail routing, and

funding and training eight paid positions and

to allow the Park to enhance current

additional volunteer positions in high-traffic

prevention-related tools and to ensure

areas throughout the Park. This will create

resources, equipment, and properly trained

a safer and more satisfying experience

staff are available to respond to any bear-

for visitors while helping to train a future

related emergencies that may arise.

This project would continue the already proven program of supporting the Park’s

generation of potential Park rangers.

Grizzly Sow & Cub Crossing Highway / NPS Adams

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Reduce Conflict Between Humans and Grizzlies at Fifty Mountain

to help prevent conflicts with wildlife and be in radio contact to send and receive emergency updates and information.


Rangers Chatting with Visitors / Jacob W. Frank

Preventative Search and Rescue FUNDING NEEDED: $67,750 When it comes to hiking safety in Glacier National Park,

begin. Data from other parks with similar programs shows

the old maxim that “an ounce of prevention is worth a

that just making sure hikers have proper gear, sufficient

pound of cure” holds true. This innovative grant would

water, and are aware of the adventure on which they are

fund paid positions plus additional volunteers to interact

embarking can decrease search and rescue calls by as

with visitors to prevent common problems before they

much as 45 percent.

Connecting People with Park History: Increase Access to Historical Archives FUNDING NEEDED: $17,000 The writers, interpreters and scholars who tap Glacier National Park’s archives can discover an inspirational treasure trove of photographic images, historic maps and a rich documentary record of the Park’s century-long history. This project expands public access, both online and on-site, to these fascinating photographs and historic chronicles by enhancing existing posting of documents on the Montana Memory Project website (montanamemory.org) and providing summer staff-support researchers.

Left: Bears on the road near Avalanche Campground 1948 / Philip C. Johnson Right: Man playing with bear at Granite Chalet 1924 / Morton Elrod

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Additional Preservation Projects Sperry Chalet -- Phase II 2019 will see the completion of the restoration of the historic Sperry Chalet project in which the Glacier Conservancy has played such a critical role. This multi-million dollar public-private partnership will require significant ongoing support from the Conservancy’s Sperry Action Fund established in 2017. Sperry Chalet 1915 / R.E. Marble

Respond to Increased Visitor-Wildlife Encounters - $25,000 Provides additional staff to increase response to visitor and wildlife encounters along trails and roadside pullouts.

LiDAR at Granite Park Chalet - $17,000

Enhanced topographic data (to one-foot contour level) will guide future facility management issues at the historic Granite Park Chalet site.

Young Scholar Research Fellowship - $10,000

Improve Winter Emergency Response - $24,000

Increased winter usage of our million-acre park has the mostly 15+-year-old “fleet” of eight snowmobiles in need of modernization.

Increasing Ranger Station Staff at Many Glacier Valley - $17,000

Continues the Glacier National Park Conservancy - Jerry O’Neal Research Fellowship program, funding at least two $1,000 - $5,000 research fellowships for college students.

With daily counts of 400 or more visitors, this grant provides funding for a ranger in the Many Glacier Ranger Station to help visitors in this increasingly popular area.

Park Produced Publications - $52,100

Addressing the Impacts of Increasing Visitation - $60,500

The impact of the Glacier Conservancy’s work begins at the Park gate with publications, funded by this grant, which are provided to every visitor entering Glacier National Park.

Granite Park Chalet Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning - $4,000

Capture and analyze visitor-use data to educate and inform a response to dramatically increased Park visitation and trail usage.

Maintaining Wildlife Connectivity in the Crown of the Continent - $30,043

Think of this as an MRI for an historic building. The result will be robust structural and status data that will be a valuable historic resource plus a working document, providing real-time data on the health of this iconic structure.

Conduct a public map-a-thon, deploy trail cameras and utilize GIS technology to determine appropriate potential locations for wildlife crossings on the Highway 2 corridor.

Restoring Harlequin Duck Habitat Along Upper McDonald Creek - $5,000

Establishes a baseline by which to measure future changes in plants and plant communities that contribute greatly to the Park’s overall biodiversity.

Protection of Harlequin Duck habitat will be significantly advanced by the reclamation of native areas damaged by increased off-trail use.

Purchase Laser Engraver for Glacier’s Sign Shop - $20,000

This purchase represents the completion of an equipment upgrade program, the result of which is a more efficient and impactful inhouse sign shop to help inform park visitors.

Rehabilitate Virginia Falls Bridge - $7,700

Rebuild existing footbridge and improve trail tread to alleviate safety concerns and improve visitor experience.

Replace Lake McDonald Ranger Station Barn Roof - $28,000

This project will replace the existing deteriorated roof with a fireretardant, cedar-shingle roof to match the historic pattern of the building.

Replace Walton Ranger Station Foundation - $30,000

This structure’s pier construction allows the building to move seasonally. A new, permanent foundation will be an important safety and access improvement.

Employee Health and Wellness - $5,500

This vibrant public-private partnership includes numerous local

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businesses and invests in the delivery of a vibrant health and wellness program for Glacier National Park staff.

Rare Plant Monitoring - $4,000

Grinnell Glacier Picnic Area Restoration - $3,000

The second phase of this critical project will restore over a quarter acre with 1,000 native plants.

Collaborate with Transboundary Conservation Partners in the Crown of the Continent - $20,000 Provides critical support for large landscape and transboundary partnership efforts in the larger Crown of the Continent structural context.

Advanced Life Support and Emergency Rescue A.L.E.R.T. Sustainability - $100,000 A community first responder that flies over 20 medical response flights per year in Glacier Park, A.L.E.R.T. is adding a second helicopter to meet increased demand.

Operational Effectiveness - $7,500

Supports expenses related to meetings, conferences and other official functions for which government funds are not available.

Purchase AEDs for Two Medicine and Walton Ranger Stations - $3,735

A life was saved in 2017 by a Glacier Conservancy-funded AED and subsequent A.L.E.R.T. medical evacuation. This grant would deploy two additional units in strategic locations.


Research

Survey Glacier’s Lynx Population FUNDING NEEDED: $74,300 Lynx are a secretive forest carnivore that has been little studied in Glacier National Park, even though the Park composes a significant portion of core lynx habitat in the northern Rockies. This landmark project will use 300 remote cameras to document large-scale distribution and abundance patterns of lynx within the Park’s confines.

Lynx / Kent Miller

Glacier’s Birds and Bats 2018 is the Year of the Bird, so it is fitting that the Park and the Glacier Conservancy have identified four research projects related to avian species for funding. Together, these four projects represent a strong commitment to state-of-the-art research on species of concern that, in many ways, define Glacier Park.

Harlequin Duck Migration Study $33,040

Glacier’s Bat Program $24,928

Eagle & Raptor Counts $25,752

Black Swift Monitoring $20,784

Left to Right: Harlequin Duck / Jacob W. Frank, Black Swift / Aaron Maizlish, Golden Eagle / Kent Miller, Brown Bat / Steven Kersting

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Research

Bison and Elk / Donnie Sexton

The Iinnii Initiative: Monitoring Impacts to Elk Herds FUNDING NEEDED: $70,750 As the Blackfeet Tribe and the Park work toward the reintroduction of bison (“iinnii” in Blackfeet) into Glacier, it is important to understand the impact of this historic initiative on resident elk herds. This three-year research project will track individual elk fitted with GPS radio collars to record habitat use and act as a predictor of changes in landscape use when the iinnii are finally reintroduced to the Park.

Mountain Goat Study FUNDING NEEDED: $41,400 Leverage existing NPS funding to add significant actionable value to this groundbreaking three-year study.

Translocation of Alpine Stoneflies FUNDING NEEDED: $22,844

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Grizzly grazing / Arthur T. LaBar

Grizzly Bear Diet Study: Cutworm Moths FUNDING NEEDED: $93,500 Small but apparently delicious, Army Cutworm Moths can comprise

This innovative project will study the feasibility of translocating Alpine

50% of a grizzly bear’s annual caloric intake. As consideration

Stoneflies to new habitats or to supplement existing populations.

for delisting the Grizzly approaches, we need to understand the

Stoneflies rely on glacial streams and snowmelt to survive. Glacier

Grizzlies’ diet in Glacier National Park. This study will be the first

loss has reduced their populations to near-extinction.

ecosystem-wide project to find out why, where, and how.


$2,334,236

4 Rehabilitate Trails Accessing Three Mountain Lakes

TOTAL FUNDRAISING AMOUNT NEEDED

5 Operate Spr ing Hiker Biker Shuttle on the West Side 6 Swift curren t Water Bottle 7 Tw Filling St o Me ation dicin 8 L e Wa owe ter B ottle rM 9 cDo Fillin Be g n S a tatio ld C ar n 10 Ma ree k Fa nag Cr lls A ea em 11 te cce ent ssib Re Sa F un 12 le T fe du d rail Op ce In po 13 Co cr rtu ea nfl Pr ni t s i c ev ies e tB Ac en to et ce Vi e we ta ss w en tiv Wi to H e l dl um Hi Se ife s an to ar sa ric ch n a an dG lA rc d riz hi Re zli ve es sc s at ue Fif ty M ou nt ain

n atio serv Con ation Fish Infest ussel ative M N ic 1 roph st ta a vent C 2 Pre nagement Weeds Ma try Invasive 3 Backcoun

2019 Breakdown of Park Needs

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We believe in the wo rk the Glacier Cons ervancy does each year in Gl acier National Park and want to give back to the park. The proces s of establishing an acco unt to donate mont hly is quick, easy and very convenient for our budget conscious family. Do nating monthly als o helps the Conservancy by knowing exactly ho w much money they can co unt on when plann ing future projects. The direct value of our donatio ns can be personally wi tnessed upon each visit to this truly unique wonder of these gr eat United States. Not on ly are the results of their efforts as clear as th e Montana mountai n air and vast as our grea t Big Sky, but they are done with the highest lev el of fiscal transparen cy, responsibility and honesty. -- Corby and Shanno

Conservancy in our We chose to include Glacier portion of our assets estate plan so that a specific wonderful work that could be used to further the to preserve and Glacier Conservancy is doing erience for current enhance the Glacier Park exp ny great memories and future generations. So ma ily since we started have been made for our fam 1980s. visiting the park in the early ignated five The process is simple -- we des rialized our mo me and , charities in our will help the Glacier to , now ting wri commitment in re. We hope our Conservancy plan for the futu others to include commitment will encourage estate plans. Glacier Conservancy in their -- Mark and Judy, Spokane, Was

22

hington

n, Lolo, Montana


How to Give

Grizzly Bear / Donnie Sexton

Donate

Tax-Advantaged Giving

ONLINE AT GLACIER.ORG

BY MAIL

Montana has a special tax credit that allows you to credit

GNPC, P.O. Box 2749, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 •

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE MONTANA TAX CREDIT FOR ENDOWMENT GIVING

a gift to one of our permanent endowments against your

MONTHLY GIVING – join our monthly donor program

Become a Friend of Glacier

tax liability. •

You can avoid capital gains taxes on appreciated securities

When you renew your commitment to the park with any gift of $35 or more, you’ll receive a passport coupon book for over $500 in discounts at participating businesses and a 15% discount

GIFTS OF APPRECIATED SECURITIES

by donating them to Glacier. •

TAX-FREE IRA TRANSFERS

every time you shop at one of our Park Stores or online.

You can avoid paying income tax on as much as the first

Matching Gift Programs

your IRA by making a donation to GNPC.

$100,000 of your required minimum distribution from

If your employer has a matching gift program, you can double your impact for Glacier.

ESTATE PLANNING

There are many ways to leave a lasting legacy through helping Glacier.

Glacier License Plates

Memorial and Honor Gifts

Ask for Glacier plates when registering your vehicle at the DMV.

Honor someone special or a special occasion with a lasting gift.

Your fee will support projects throughout the park. For further information call Nikki Eisinger at 406.892.3250 or email nikki@glacier.org Tax ID #/EIN: 56-2579734

GNPC is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization and all contributions are fully tax-deductible.

23


GLACIER NATIONAL PARK CONSERVANCY 402 Ninth St. W. • P.O. Box 2749 Columbia Falls, MT 59912

Glacier.org

Going to the Sun Road, Glacier National Park / Donnie Sexton

FSC Logo Printed on Forestry Stewardship Council certified paper with BioRenewable Ink.

The printing of this publication has been made possible through the generous support of Charter Communications

2019 Project Funding Needs  

This guide provides an overview of Glacier National Park's most critical current needs, from using the latest technology to connect the park...

2019 Project Funding Needs  

This guide provides an overview of Glacier National Park's most critical current needs, from using the latest technology to connect the park...

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