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G

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L

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M. Arch 2012 Sam Fox School of Architecture & Visual Arts Wa s h i n g t o n U n i v e r s i t y i n S t . L o u i s B.S. Arch 2009 Ta u b m a n C o l l e g e o f A r c h i t e c t u r e & U r b a n P l a n n i n g University of Michigan c . 9 8 9 .4 3 0 . 7 7 3 9 e. lam pe.gabriel@gmail.com


Ta b l e

6-7

o f

C o n t e n t s

About me

Projects

flinthills2011studio.wordpress.com

Mentors

8-25

Elevating Wisdom

Phil Holden

w w w. h o l d e n a r c h i t e c t s . c o m

26-49

Bridging Barriers

We n d e l l e B u r n e t t e

w w w. w e n d e l l b u r n e t t e a r c h i t e c t s . c o m

50-57

Sandbar Cottage

Andrew Cruse

w w w. m a c h a d o - s i l v e t t i . c o m

58-63

Mississi ppi Pavilion

Melissa Harris

w w w . t c a u p . u m i c h . e d u /a r c h i t e c t u r e / f a c u l t y /

64-83

C o n t i n u o u s Vo i d s

Steven Leet

h t t p : / /s a m f o x s c h o o l . w u s t l . e d u / p o r t f o l i o s / f a c u l t y/

84-85

BaySail

Peter Anderson

youtube

Sung Ho Kim

x.l.–t.i.m.

w w w. y o u t u b e . c o m /w a t c h ? v = 4 n X h - 7 2 t r f s


A b o u t

m e

M

any of my best childhood memories sprung from the nearby Sturgeon Creek. I t wa s my e s c a p e f r o m s c h o o l , f a m i l y, a n d f r i e n d s ; i t wa s my Shangri-la: a place where I could remotely distance myself from all pressures. Catching crawfish, bullfrogs, and tadpoles I soon became interested i n e c o l o g y t h a t l e a d m e t o e n t e r c o l l e g e s t u d y i n g c h e m i s t r y a n d b i o l o g y. H o w e v e r, i n t h e l a b d i c t a t e d b y e n d l e s s p r o t o c o l s I f o u n d m y s e l f s k e t c h ing stereochemistry and discovering different relationshi ps among parts in space, which resulted in my transition to the field of architecture. There are many struggles that I’ve encountered in architecture that are s i m i l a r t o t h o s e t h a t I h a v e f o u n d i n c h e m i s t r y a n d b i o l o g y. Ta k i n g c h a n c e s i s p a r a m o u n t i n b o t h f i e l d s o f s t u d y. M e d i c i n e i s n o s t r a n g e r t o f a i l u r e a n d i t m a y b e i t s b e s t a l l y. To d i s c o v e r n e w a n t i b o d i e s , m e t h o d s o f t r e a t m e n t and find potentially harmful environments, medicine is constantly proposi n g h y p o t h e s e s t h a t t u r n o u t i n c o r r e c t i n h o p e s o f l e a r n i n g s o m e t h i n g n e w. Architecture may not be as straightforward as medicine in its methodology but its progress lies in the concept: learning from its failures. Often in architecture studio I feel tem pted to do the same, because I know i t w o u l d g e t m e a g o o d r e v i e w. P o s t m o d e r n i s t d a n c e c h o r e o g r a p h e r Tw y l a Tharp explains this inner struggle whether to stick with the old or take a c h a n c e w i t h t h e n e w. “ Yo u t r i e d p o s s i b l y t h e s a m e o l d t h i n g . G u e s s w h a t , it still works. If it stands that you took a chance and it didn’t pan out t h i s t i m e . Yo u r i n t e l l e c t t e l l s y o u t o c h a n g e s o m e t h i n g . ” B u t u n l i k e m e d i cine, what works in architecture may not be as clear as whether a vaccine prevents a particular viral infection. For exam ple, in architecture we can measure discrete things such as light, sound, forces at work, and potential e n e r g y u s a g e , a s we l l a s i n d i s c r e t e t h i n g s l i ke f l ex i b i l i t y a n d p r o d u c t i v i t y. But even with this data it is hard to distill how it will influence one’s experience of the space.


It is in this obscurity of what works in architecture that I find intriguing. There are many different answers to one problem. This is due to the fact that those decisions which influence our design stem from data based on em pirical results; some quantitative, some qualitative and others theoretical. As the amount of available data grows, such as those extracted from economics, climate, politics, building and zoning codes and aesthetics, collaborating this data will become more com plex and so will be the measure of success of one’s design. I believe the success of a building may not just include the measured natural light in a building but also the number of sick days em ployees may take in that building. I hope by gaining work experience that I will become more k n o w l e d g e a b l e o n t h e i n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r i t i e s d i s c u s s e d a b o v e . Wo r k i n g o u t t h e s e scenarios through trial will lead to better decision-making and better design in the future.

7


E l e v a t i n g

St

W i s d o m

. louis

T h e s i s L o n g - t e r m

P r o j e c t

c a r e

f a c i l i t y

S i t e : 1/4 mi south of Busc h Stadium, Downtown St. Louis, Missouri Objective: To rethink the traditional building typology of long-term care facilities to reduce the anxieties associated with people of age going through a difficult time. The long-term care facility is elevated above a market, automobile repair shop and playground. The form of the facility adapts in relation to the more public programs below, allowing residents views and sounds of their community. The bars promote the elderly to interact with the public below while not compromising the security the form provides. The bars span long distances and are supported by the public landscape below that reaches up in a pyramid form while doubling as egress. Spaces inside the pyramids are alloted to medical services for the residences. Professor Philip Holden, Degree Project May 3, 2012


9


s i t e

l o c a t i o n


p r o g r a m

o f

c o m m u n i t y

s p a c e s

s t r u c t u r e

d i a g r a m

11


13


15


l e v e l

B

17


l e v e l

1

19


l e v e l

2

21


c o n v e n t i o n a l

p l a n s

l e v e l B


l e v e l

1

l e v e l

2

23


25


B r i d g i n g

S

B a r r i e r s

trong City, Kansas

F l i n t

H i l l s

V i s i t o r

•

We n d e l l

C e n t e r

•

B u r n e t t e C a b i n s

Site: Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Strong City, Kansas Objective: Design a Visitor Center and overnight accommodations to promote tourism and knowledge of the Flint Hills. The specific site I choose is situated on the opposite side of the historic Spring Hill Ranch, connecting the more traveled west side of the preserve with the east side. The Visitor Center bridges Fox Creek housing a restaurant, ranger offices, campground amenities, and an art gallery including all associated support services. The most public part of the building, the lobby and restaurant are placed at the end of the building path allowing a procession of experiences that culminates with a view of the hill. Thirty cabins along a fence line stand five feet above ground acting as a framing device for the landscape and providing a bridge across the fence. Charred-wood siding fireproofs the cabins from the burning of the grasses. The black-boxed cabins floating above the grasses will aid the subtle beauty of the landscape in juxtaposition to the ever-changing colors of the grasses. Professor Wendell Burnette, Studio 600 May 6, 2011


27


t a l l g r a s s

p r a i r i e

n a t i o n a l

p r e s e r v e

c o n c e p t m a p


29


v i s i t o r

p r o g r a m

c e n t e r

d i a g r a m

v i s i t o r

c e n t e r


c a b i n s a l o n g f e n c e

c a m p g r o u n d

l i n e F R E E

R A N G E

p a r k i n g

v i s i t o r

c e n t e r

c a b i n s

f a r m

a l o n g

h e r i t a g e

f e n c e l i n e

s i t e

p l a n

31


v i s i t o r

v i s i t o r

c e n t e r

c e n t e r

p l a n


33


s o u t h

e l e v a t i o n

v i s i t o r

c e n t e r


35


l o n g i t u d i n a l

s e c t i o n

Z 2

l o n g i t u d i n a l

s e c t i o n

Z 1


37


t r a n s v e r s e

s e c t i o n

X 3


39


v i s i t o r

c e n t e r ' s

g a l l e r y

s p a c e

41


C A B I N S

p l a n

t y p e

1

p l a n

t y p e

2

cabins along fence line with charred


-wood siding for grass fire protection

43


C A B I N S

s e c t i o n

B B


e l e v a t i o n

s e c t i o n

C C

s e c t i o n

A A

s e c t i o n

D D

45


c a b i n

t u b

e n t r y

c a b i n

47


c a b i n

l i v i n g

49


S A N D B A R

B

C O T TA G E

aton Rouge, louisiana

Site: Clam Isle, (back channel) Mississippi River, Baton Rouge The cottage is a kit of parts where all building materials can be found from an ordinary lumber store. Designed in six repetitive sections (three on each side) –each will be built prior to being barged across the Mississippi to be erected on piles. The form of the cottage is a simple A-frame with flanking cross walks on both the upper and lower levels. The sound structural integrity of the form will allow a third of the building to act as lift for a personal watercraft; a must for the constant water level changes in the river. The tectonics of the building are expressed due to the need to provide north and south ventilation during the hot and humid months. A facade made of many louvers will screen the sun but still allow occupants inside the cottage to be connected to the outdoors. Professor Andrew Cruse, Integrated Building Systems, May 2010


51


53


s t r u c t u r e

h i e r a r c h y


c o m p l e t e

s t r u c t u r e

55


f a c a d e

a s s e m b l y

57


M i s s i s s i p p i

D

P a v i l i o n

ubuque, Iowa

Site: Eagle Point Park, Bluffs of Dubuque, Iowa The pavilion is located next to Iowa's scenic Great River Road and allows visitors a place to stop and enjoy views up and down the Mississippi River and into Wisconsin. The form of this space derived from the repetitive structural system that lodges itself into the side of the bluff for support. The pavilion relies on exposing the structural framework to express its lightness. Different structural materials were chosen to further exploit the play of forces. For example, the roof concentrates rain water onto concrete walls that do not touch the floor. Sunlight reflecting off the water will bring attention to the space between the floor and the wall making one question his or her stability. Professor Melissa Harris, Studio UG2 Dec 12, 2006


59


3 2 x 2 4

g r a p h i t e

t w o

p o i n t

p e r s p e c t i v e

61


t r a n s v e r s e

s e c t i o n


p i n n e d

j o i n t ,

c e i l i n g

p i n n e d

g l a s s

f l o o r

c o n n e c t i o n

j o i n t ,

f l o o r

63


C o n t i n u o u s

St

V o i d s

. louis

Site: Delmar Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri Project: Residential housing Tubes are both inherently open and closed. It depends on the orientation of the tube that one looks at it. Look at the tube in its longitudinal elevation and it appears to be closed. Now look at the tube in its transverse section. The tube is open and captures light similar to a camera aperture. It is through this logic the I derived the spaces of the residence. The open space of the tube would be allotted to public space while, the closed space of the tube would be areas that are more private. Since Missouri is Mark Twain territory its necessary to have outdoor spaces for each unit for children to grow or for adults to relax. Outdoor fire pits will provide a space for social gatherings outdoor in the fall and winter months. Light-wells sculpted after the bulkheads of those ships who pass on the Mississippi River provide diffused light to the private areas. Professor Steven Leet, Studio 419 Dec 10, 2009


n o r t h

p e r s p e c t i v e

o n

D e l m a r

B o u l e v a r d

65


u n i t

o u t d o o r

s p a c e

a n d

l o w e r

l e v e l

l i v i n g


67


69


g r o u n d

l e v e l


71 s e c o n d

l e v e l


t h i r d

l e v e l


73 f o u r t h

l e v e l


A

B

C D

C

u n i t

t y p e s


A

loft space on second level of unit type 2

B

kitchen and bar on lower level of unit type 2

C

st a i r s i n u n i t t y p e 3 a n d 4

D

entry space that leading to kitchen and living area in unit type 3

75


n o r t h

e l e v a t i o n


77


79


81


p h y s i c a l

m o d e l

first

show

images

o f

a s s e m b l y

circulation

core

p r o c e s s

followed

by

services

and

dwelling

units


83


B AY S A I L the

B

ay

Site: Saginaw River (near mouth of bay), Bay City, Michigan Project: Offices • learning center • boat storage P e t e r A n d e r s o n | Dow Howell Gilmore & Associ ates Inc. Aug 10, 2009

The project was designed by Peter Anderson where I was to aid in modeling, renders and boards for a fundraising presentation on behalf of BaySail.


85


G

a b

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i

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l

L

a

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c . 9 8 9 .4 3 0 . 7 7 3 9 e. lam pe.gabriel@gmail.com

4 4 4 8 N Ve r i t y R d Sanford, Michigan 48657 87


LAMPE works 12  

architectural design portfolio

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