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WYOMING WATERSHEDS PROGRESS REPORT

2015


ACRONYMS IN THIS PUBLICATION BLM - Bureau of Land Management BMP - Best Management Practices CD - Conservation District CRM - Coordinated Resource Management DEQ - Department of Environmental Quality EPA - Environmental Protection Agency FFA - Future Farmers of America NRCS - Natural Resources Conservation Service TDS - Total Dissolved Solids TMDL - Total Maximum Daily Load USDA - United States Department of Agriculture USFWS - United States Fish and Wildlife Service UW - University of Wyoming WACD - Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts WDA - Wyoming Department of Agriculture WRC&D - Wyoming Resource Conservation and Development WWDC - Wyoming Water Development Commission WWTP - Waste Water Treatment Plant WYDOT - Wyoming Department of Transportation WDEQ - Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .....................................................................................................................................1


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Table of Contents

STATEWIDE WATERSHED PLANNING EXECUTIVE SUMMARY BEAR RIVER BASIN Uinta County Conservation District BELLE FOURCHE BASIN Campbell County Conservation District Crook County Natural Resource District BIG HORN RIVER BASIN Popo Agie Conservation District Lower Wind River Conservation District Hot Springs Conservation District Washakie County Conservation District South Big Horn Conservation District Meeteetse Conservation District Shoshone Conservation District Powell/Clarks-Fork Conservation District GREEN RIVER BASIN Sweetwater Conservation District Sublette County Conservation District Uinta County Conservation District LITTLE SNAKE RIVER BASIN Little Snake River Conservation District NORTH PLATTE RIVER BASIN Laramie Rivers Conservation District Natrona County Conservation District Platte County Resource District POWDER RIVER BASIN Campbell County Conservation District Lake DeSmet Conservation District Powder River Conservation District SOUTH PLATTE RIVER BASIN Laramie County Conservation District SNAKE RIVER BASIN Campbell County Conservation District Teton County Conservation District TONGUE RIVER BASIN Goose Creek Watershed Prairie Dog Watershed Tongue River Watershed CONSERVATION DISTRICT CONTACTS APPENDIX


Statewide Watershed Planning Status

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During the reporting timeframe, the Big Horn and Greybull Rivers TMDL, the Belle Fourche TMDL, Crow Creek TMDL and Shoshone River TMDL were completed and approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency. As part of these TMDL’s 18 waterbodies that were previously listed as Category 5 Streams where Use(s) were not Supported, are now classified as Category 4A Streams, where Use(s) are not Supported w/ USEPA Approved TMDLs. The local conservation district’s efforts in these areas are focused on implementing recommended measures outlined in these TMDLs. New efforts have included updating existing watershed plans to develop new goals aligned with recommendations outlined in the TMDLs as well the initiation of Level 1 watershed studies and Small Water Project developments through the Wyoming Water Development Commission. The Teton Conservation District and Sheridan County Conservation District have developed Watershed Based plans for the Flat Creek watershed in Teton County and Prairie Dog Creek and the Tongue River watersheds in Sheridan County and continue to implement practices outlined in those plans. The Sublette County Conservation District is also in the process of developing a Watershed Based plan for the Little Sandy watershed with a locally led watershed steering committee. Over the past few years, WACD also worked with local districts to produce videos, funded in part with a Clean Water Act section 319 from the WDEQ / US EPA, highlighting projects implemented by landowners and homeowners in Carbon, Platte, Teton, Sheridan, and Hot Springs counties. Projects included innovative septic systems with the Teton Conservation District, small acreage management with the Sheridan County Conservation District, an animal feeding operation project with the Platte County Resource District, a grazing management project with the Hot Springs Conservation District and a Stream / River Restoration project with the Little Snake River Conservation District. The projects were implemented in partnership with the local Conservation Districts and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. These videos are available at https:// www.youtube.com/user/ConserveWY. The Association would like to again thank the WDEQ / US EPA and the Wyoming Nonpoint Source Task Force for the Clean Water Act 319 funding to help make this publication possible. The Association is also appreciative of the on-going support and commitment of the Wyoming state Legislature and the partnership with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. These partnerships are all vital to these water quality restoration efforts across our state. To view this report and additional watershed information please visit www.conservewy.com.

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Executive Summary

The Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts is pleased to once again report on the local, grassroots efforts to restore the water quality on Wyoming’s impaired and threatened waterbodies as identified by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ). This report contains a summary of the efforts that have occurred within Wyoming’s watersheds by landowners, local districts, and numerous local, state and federal partners. The initial Watershed Progress Report was published in 2005, with additional reports every odd number year following, however this report generally covers from the summer of 2011 through the summer of 2014. During this reporting timeframe, Muddy Creek and McKinney Creek in the Little Snake River Conservation District (LSRCD) originally listed in 1996, were delisted due to these implementation efforts. The LSRCD led efforts to implement best management practices (BMPs) to address sediment resulting from habitat degradation. Water quality has improved, prompting WDEQ to remove both segments from the state’s 2012 list of impaired waters. Due to further sediment remediation efforts led by the District, the WDEQ removed another portion of Muddy Creek from the 303(d) List in 2014. For additional information about these delisted waters, please visit the WDEQ Section 319 Nonpoint Source Program Success Story webpage at http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/success319/upload/wy_muddymckinney. pdf Portions of North Fork Crazy Woman Creek were also delisted in 2012 and the remaining impaired segment was delisted in 2014. The 1996 listing for bioindicators as a cause of habitat alterations was a mistake and the listing was removed from the 2013 303(d) list. A further report completed by WDEQ demonstrated that sediment is no longer impairing the aquatic life other than fish and cold water fisheries uses and therefore, the impaired segment has been removed from the 303(d) list in 2014. The Conservation Districts have again compiled specific BMPs implemented within watersheds with impairments. These practices are grouped into seven categories and displayed on the districts watershed map along with a detailed snapshot of the overall watershed investment. The seven categories are generally based on the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality’s Best Management Practices manuals including: Animal Waste; Cropland, Pasture / Hayland; Grazing, Rangeland; Hydrologic Modifications; Stream Restoration; Septic System; Urban and Silvaculture. Nearly 1110 BMPs were recorded for this report. They wouldn’t have been possibly without contributions from landowners, county commissioners, various state and federal agencies, the local conservation districts and other sources.


Uinita County Conservation District

Bear River Basin

Activities and Progress

in the Bear River watershed consisted of three riparian fencing and stream restoration projects, one wetland enhancement project, eight water control structures, four spring development projects and two pipeline projects - one for irrigation and one for stock water. UCCD spent most of 2013 and 2014 assisting with the development of the WDEQ Sediment TMDL on the Upper Bear River. UCCD and the Upper Bear River Watershed Steering Committee provided data they had been collecting over the past several years and also assisted with public out-

The Uinta County Conservation District (UCCD) continues education and outreach efforts in the watershed through classroom visits and field trips to the river to teach about watersheds and water quality. UCCD was involved with the Upper Bear River Trout Unlimited fish tagging project with the Evanston Middle School 7th grade science class and assisted with several field trips to the stream to teach students how to sample water and interpret their results. Implementation activities that occurred during the reporting timeframe Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...........................................................................................................5


reach and encouraging public participation throughout the process. UCCD hosted three public meetings, participated as a member of the Technical Advisory Committee and submitted comments on the public draft.

UCCD is currently updating the district’s existing Sampling and Analysis Plan and plans to continue monitoring in the future to collect long term trend data to further test existing water quality conditions and to maintain a strong data set. UCCD plans to incorporate additional Monitoring Results sampling sites as suggested in the TMDL implementaThe Uinta County Conservation District (UCCD) mon- tion plan. Further monitoring will also help to develop itored five sites on the Bear River, two on Sulphur Creek plans for BMP implementation. and one on LaChapelle Creek from 2011-2013. Data collected included Total Dissolved Solids, discharge, temperature, Total Suspended Solids, pH and other parameters related to the physical and chemical properties of the stream. The data was collected during high flow in the spring and low flow in the fall. Data collected by UCCD from 2007-2012, along with data from USGS, the Utah Department of Environmental Quality and stream surveys conducted by SWCA in Local landowners, Uinta County School District #1, 2013, were used in the TMDL analysis. The data showed that sediment loading into the impaired segment of the Upper Bear River Trout Unlimited, Wyoming LandBear River comes from both point and non-point sourcscape Conservation Initiative, Wyoming Departes, all of which vary throughout the year and by location ment of Agriculture, Partners for Fish and Wildlife within the watershed. Instream erosion (bank erosion Program, USDA NRCS, Wyoming Wildlife and Natand channel bed erosion) was identified as a significant ural Resource Trust. source of sediment in all sub-watersheds that contribute to the impaired reach. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .....................................................................................................................................6


Crook County Natural Resource District

Bell Fourche Basin

vironmental Quality (WDEQ) between 2011 – and the spring of 2014. The CCNRD utilized guidance from the Landowner Advisory Committee (LAC) in implementing water quality improvement projects by meeting with the LAC and providing monthly updates to the CCNRD Board of Supervisors and Crook County Commissioners. Additionally, the CCNRD provided a water quality Best Management Practice tour to the Wyoming Nonpoint Source Taskforce, as well as presented to the Northeast Basin Advisory Group. Between 2011 and 2014 activities within the watershed included 5 off-stream watering improvement projects, 4 septic system remediation projects, and 21 informational and educational events with approximately 463 participants. The CCNRD’s Septic System Cost-Share Program encourages Crook County residents to replace failing or failed septic systems for the purpose of reducing pathogen effluent into

Activities and Progress

The Crook County Natural Resource District (CCNRD) continues to work on improving the water quality in the Belle Fourche watershed by informing, educating and assisting landowners with water quality enhancement “Best Management Practices,” that will sustainably maintain the health of streams within Crook County in an effort to meet respective water quality standards through the use of continued monitoring for the purpose of ultimately meeting the standard and delisting the impaired streams. CCNRD personnel coordinated, administered, and managed water quality improvement grants from the Wyoming Department of Agriculture (WDA) and the Wyoming Department of EnWatersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..........................................................................................................7


surface and groundwater. The CCNRD’s Septic System CostShare Program provided costshare up to fifty-percent [50%] of the septic system remediation project or of the Crook County average, whichever is less, to the approved applicant for installation of a single-family dwelling septic system. The Septic System Cost-Share Program has been successful at replacing several “straight-pipes” that lead directly to streams.

Monitoring Results

CCNRD personnel have been sampling water quality within Crook County since 1996. Between 2011 and 2014, the CCNRD sampled water quality throughout the Belle Fourche River Watershed, on the Belle Fourche River and Donkey Creek, for ammonia, chloride, total coliform, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) impairments. CCNRD personnel sampled and monitored for pollutants of concern listed on the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ)’s 303(d) list of impaired streams and collected data describing stream flow and weather conditions, as well as monitored the basic water quality parameters of temperature, pH, conductivity, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and turbidity. E. coli levels were analyzed in the CCNRD laboratory by the accepted Colilert method utilizing “in-house” equipment. Ammonia and chloride samples were sent to the University of Wyoming laboratory for analysis.

The CCNRD is in the process of analyzing the water quality data monitored between 2011 and 2014. The district made a change to the monitoring program in 2014 by reducing the downstream sites of the Belle Fourche River and focusing more on the confluence of the Belle Fourche River and Donkey Creek. The CCNRD is working closely with various agencies, including neighboring Campbell County Conservation District, to determine patterns and trends within water quality data and are trying to hone in on sources of impairment within the Belle Fourche River Watershed.

Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Crook County Residents, Landowner Advisory Committee, Campbell County Conservation District. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ....................................................................................................................................8


Campbell County Conservation District

Bell Fourche Basin

Activities and Progress

of 2014. Data gathered from the monitoring project was analyzed and compiled into a Final Data Analysis Report with a draft of the report being sent to WDEQ for review in May of 2014. In 2014, the CCCD received a Water Quality grant from WDA to conduct monitoring with PyrosequencingÂŽ at three (3) sites on Donkey Creek and two (2) sites on Stonepile Creek to be conducted between 2014 - 2016. Also in 2014, the CCCD entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Crook County Natural Resource District (CCNRD) to cooperatively sample the lower portion of Donkey Creek and its confluence with the Belle Fourche River to better understand the impairment and help both Districts in improving water quality. The Belle Fourche River TMDL was approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and WDEQ in December of 2013. The CCCD continued to partner with the City of Gillette on the Gillette Fishing Lake, which was listed in 2008 as impaired for sediment and phosphorous. A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) has been approved by EPA for the Gillette Fishing Lake which includes recommended BMPs designed to reduce the sediment and nutrient loading within the Lake. The

The Campbell County Conservation District (CCCD) continued to monitor water quality on Donkey Creek, Stonepile Creek and the Belle Fourche River for E-coli, Turbidity, pH, stream temperature, dissolved oxygen, discharge rate, and specific conductance. CCCD also collected samples for inorganic chemistry including chlorine, ammonia, and phosphorus. Each site was monitored 10 times during the Primary Contact season (May – September) from the spring of 2011 to the spring Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..........................................................................................................9


CCCD helped with the implementation of sediment ponds located at the inlet of the lake along with wetland enhancements to improve nutrient capturing. WDEQ is providing monitoring efforts with field assistance from the CCCD, on Gillette Fishing Lake to monitor the effectiveness of the BMPs. The District was also active on the City of Gillette Storm Water Advisory Committee and Technical Committee, with the approval of The Storm Drain Design Manual in 2012. CCCD Staff and an Earth Team volunteer placed storm drain stickers on South Douglas Highway and in newly developed areas in 2011. The Campbell County Conservation District is a cosponsor of the Level I Belle Fourche River Watershed Study in partnership with the Crook County Irrigation District, CCNRD, Wyoming Water Development Commission and Water Development Office. RESPEC Consulting & Services have been awarded the contract to provide the Study. The CCCD is committed to sharing and protecting our community’s water ecosystem and encourages citizens to learn more about protecting our valuable water resources. World Water Monitoring Challenge (WWMC) is an excellent initiative designed to promote education and personal stewardship. While engaged in this annual event, students learned about the watersheds in which they live, how watersheds work and how pro-

trailer in partnership with 20 other exhibitors to 714 students in 2012, 744 in 2013 and 757 in 2014. The district continues to publish newsletters every other month to 1200 patrons and distributes 300 copies of “Barnyards and Backyards” four times a year. The district also updated the “Living on a Few Acres in Campbell County” booklet and distributed “A Guide for Proper Pet Waste Disposal”, and “Grazing Livestock on Small Acreages” brochures at a booth during the Campbell County Fair. Two CCCD staff provided site reviews for BMP projects in 2013-2014 to verify 3 past AFO projects and 1 past septic project are continuing to be successful.

Monitoring Results

tecting their waters can have beneficial impacts downstream. Activities included water monitoring, studying macro invertebrates, weed identification, migratory birds, predators and rabies education and a hands-on water erosion exhibit all taking place at Gillette Fishing Lake. Sage Valley Jr. High 7th grade students participate annually, with 244 students participating in 2011, 300 in 2012 and 169 in 2013. The district also demonstrated the Enviroscape model to 433 students of all ages in 2012, 113 in 2013, and 394 in 2014. The CCCD organizes, hosts and provides an activity during the Ag and Natural Resources Expo which is held annually for all Campbell County 3rd grade students. The district has demonstrated a water erosion

Results indicate that bacteria concentrations are still problematic in both Donkey and Stonepile Creeks. A review of field measurements indicated that the elevated bacteria concentrations correlated with discharge rate, stream temperature and turbidity. These relationships suggest that spring runoff may influence the streams and that bacteria may be associated with the agitation of sediment. Results also indicated that bacteria concentrations in Stonepile Creek may influence Donkey Creek. Results of the inorganic samples indicate that 10% of chloride concentrations exceeded the WDEQ chronic criteria (230mg/L). Downstream sites on Donkey Creek exceeded the ammonia aquatic life criteria a total of 9 times, and all occurred during the primary contact recreation season. Additional nutrients, nitrate nitrite and phosphorous, were also found to be elevated on both streams during the primary contact recreation season.

Private Landowners, Campbell County Commissioners, Campbell County Cattlewomen, City of Gillette, Black Hills Corporation, Anadarko, CC Farm Bureau, BKS Environmental Associates, Inc., WalMart, WDEQ, WDA, NRCS.

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Popo Agie Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Activities and Progress

The Popo Agie Conservation District expanded the collection of discharge data and sampled for E. coli during the 2012-2014 primary contact recreation seasons. Sampling occurred at seven monitoring sites on the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River and two monitoring sites on its tributary Hornecker Creek, to assess Best Management Practice (BMP) effectiveness. To reduce erosion, improve efficiency and water conservation, numerous irrigation improvement projects were implemented including the installation of 57,000 feet of gated pipe; 20,292 feet of buried pipe; seven sprinkler irrigation systems; 35 water control structures; 2,800 feet of stream bank stabilization, and two windbreaks. The district also offered free and re-

duced cost well water testing resulting in 144 tests. Strategies to improve grazing management within the watershed included the installation of 72,264 feet of fence, brush management on 63 acres, and livestock water development which included two wells, one spring, 11 water troughs and 13,116 feet of pipeline. The District sponsored two Rangeland Health Assessment Program (RHAP) projects, co-sponsored a Spring Development Tour, hosted a series of Hay & Pasture Renovation Workshops, and participated as partners in two Coordinated Resource Management (CRM) teams. The Gardening and Backyard Living Expo was designed by the PACD in partnership with UW Extension in 2012, to educate and motivate attendees to develop good stewardship practices on their property. Workshops provided resources and ideas that enhance sustainable economic and ecological practices. The Expo reached nearly 2000 people annually. PACD partnered with the Lander Middle School to create a “Clean Water…It Maters!” campaign to educate the community about watersheds and non-point source pollution - sixth graders utilized radio, seventh graders utilized video, and eighth graders created a pamphlet. PACD reached approximately 1200 students annually with watershed and natural resource

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lessons. PACD also partnered with Lander fifth graders to adhere decals around town that remind people to pick up their pet’s waste and that anything that goes down the storm drain goes directly to the river. Shower timers and rain gauges were developed with a wise water use message and distributed at several events. A second printing of the Popo Agie Watershed Posters was completed. On July 22, 2013, a lightening started wildfire burned approximately 1,335 acres of Federal, State, and Private Land in Sinks Canyon. The fire charred slopes and barren landscapes were ripe for mass erosion and siltation of the Popo Agie River. Stakeholders organized to install short-term erosion control measures to keep the silt and carbon loads from entering the river and the downstream drinking water supply for the town of

Lander. Long-term rehabilitation efforts included planting native seeds, shrubs, and invasive species treatment.

Monitoring Results

Prior to 2012, E. coli concentrations for Middle Fork and Hornecker Creek sites exhibited a general downward trend at the same time that higher flows occurred. In 2012 and 2013, E. coli concentrations increased substantially during lower flow conditions. 2014 E. coli concentrations decreased which coincided with an increase in flow. Intensive gathering of discharge data helped PACD correlate bacterial concentrations and discharge. While bacterial concentration and load data results suggests that previously installed BMPs are not enough to meet water quality standards it has helped with the identification of priority areas, non-point sources and most importantly provided definite direction for future BMP development.

Bureau of Land Management, City of Lander, County10, Environmental Protection Agency, Fremont Broadcasting, Fremont County Commissioners, Fremont County School District 1, Fremont County Weed and Pest, Lander Journal, Landowners/Homeowners, Lowham-Walsh Engineering, Museum of the American West, Natural Resources Conservation Services, Popo Agie Conservation District, State Engineer’s Office, State Forestry, State Grazing Board, The Nature Conservancy, US Army Corps of Engineers, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Water Quality Technical Advisory Group (TAG), Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Transportation, Wyoming Game & Fish, Wyoming Water Development Commission. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................12


the classification of Poison Creek changes from primary to secondary recreational use. Ocean Lake was listed for sediment in 1996. A TMDL was written by WDEQ in 2009. The LWRCD continues to work with landowners to implement Best Management Practices to reduce sediment transport to Ocean Lake from the nine drains entering the Lake. A Level 1 Study was sponsored by LWRCD for the Badwater and Poison Creek Watersheds. Eight small water projects were approved by the Wyoming Water Development Commission. The LWRCD Manager participated in the WACD / University of Wyoming, Water Quality Re-certification training in 2014 and is certified to conduct water quality monitoring. The Enviroscape was used to teach 250 fourth grade students about water quality and how to prevent contamination and the LWRCD sponsored a soil health workshop in cooperation with the NRCS where ten producers participated.

Lower Wind RIver Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Monitoring Results

Muddy Creek— A grant from the Wyoming Department of Agriculture was used to conduct speciation testing on waActivities and Progress ter and fecal samples within the watershed. The The Lower Wind River Conservation District Pennsylvania State University E. coli Reference (LWRCD) continues to work on three impaired waters, including Muddy Creek, Poison Creek and Ocean Lake. Muddy Creek and Poison Creek were listed as impaired in 2002 for exceeding the E.coli standard. The LWRCD has monitored water quality in both creeks for several years. An effort was made to determine the source of E.coli in Muddy Creek. Poison Creek has been listed as impaired from the confluence with Boysen Reservoir to a point two miles upstream, which is listed as primary recreation use. Two miles to the east of Shoshoni, Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................13


Center conducted the lab tests. In 2012, 17 samples (a mix of both water and feces samples) were collected and analyzed to determine relationships using the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Two of the water samples from different site locations were 100% related using the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, indicating that the E.coli measured in the tests were coming from the same source even though they were miles apart in distance. None of the E.coli in the animal feces samples was related to the E.coli measured in the water samples. In 2013, 17 samples were again collected and similar results were obtained. Two of the water samples were 94% related to each other but none of the E.coli from animal fecal samples were related to the E.coli in the water samples.

Ocean Lake— Through a WDA grant, about 1180 Tons of rip-rap rock was hauled to Drain #4 of Ocean Lake and placed in the drain to stabilize the bank. Photos indicate that the water was slowed and the vegetation has begun to grow where the rock was placed. A second grant has been received to continue the bank staPoison Creek—During the reporting timeframe, moni- bilization project. A grant was received to help design toring on Poison Creek did not occur due insufficient wetlands at the ends of some drains to reduce sediment flows and pending approval of the WDEQ Categorical transport to Ocean Lake. Use Attainability Analysis.

Natural Resources Conservation Service, Landowners, Fremont County Commissioners, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Ducks Unlimited, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Wyoming Water Development Commission, University of Wyoming Agricultural Extension Service, Wyoming Ag in the Classroom, Midvale Irrigation District. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................14


Hot Springs Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

installed and nine landowners completed noxious weed stream bank improvement projects along Owl Creek by removing Russian olive trees and tamarisk. The HSCD is attempting to bring the Owl Creek watershed steering committee together again to update the watershed plan and assist landowners to find funding for future projects and developments. HSCD held a meeting in May 2013 with Cathy Rosenthal, WACD Watershed coordinator and Ron Vore, WWDC project manager, to discuss watershed planning options and the WWDC small waters program with landowners. HSCD sent a follow up survey to landowners and the survey results indicated that the majority of landowners desire to pursue funding for projects

Activities and Progress

The Owl Creek watershed plan was completed in 2006. Many aspects of the watershed plan have been implemented in the watershed including educational workshops, tours of the watershed, grazing management plans, noxious weed controls, a quarterly newsletter, and a district website. Several projects have been installed with assistance from the NRCS since 2011 and many project applications are currently on hold and in the planning stages with NRCS. An AFOCAFO project was completed, an irrigation management project was Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................15


for water quality improvements. A follow up meeting was held in November 2014 with landowners where it was decided to move forward with looking into funding for small water projects and a Level 1 Study to be conducted within the watershed by the Wyoming Water Development Commission and possibly update the Watershed Plan at the same time. The Kirby Creek CRM, has had two Level 1 Studies completed, the initial study in 2005, and an updated Level 1 study which was finished in 2010. Three Water Quality Section 319 grants were used for installation of many different projects between 2005 and 2010 which included streambank restorations, many miles of water pipelines, stock and storage tanks, watering tanks, fences, grazing management plans, noxious weed treatments, solar pumping units and reservoir structures. The HSCD was selected to highlight some of these projects in a Grazing Management Best Management Practices video produced by WACD and the WDEQ in 2013 with landowner Everett Jones.

The Big Horn/Greybull River TMDL was completed on April 30, 2014. The HSCD participated on the technical advisory committee. The Cottonwood Grass Creek Watershed had a Level 1 study completed in October 2007 and the Buffalo Creek watershed area had a Level 1 study completed in March 2012. Although these two watersheds are not listed as impaired the landowners have utilized the studies applying for small water projects in the watershed. Many projects have been completed to the benefit of the entire watershed; noxious weed treatments, irrigation improvement projects, many miles of water pipelines, stock and storage tanks, watering tanks, grazing management plans, and fencing.

Monitoring Results

Water quality monitoring on Owl Creek has continued with grants from the WDA and WACD. A report of the 2010 sampling was written in 2011 and submitted to WDA with water quality results entered into a database. A new WDA water quality grant was obtained in 2012 which continued to monitor the Owl Creek and Kirby Creek watersheds. The water quality sampling is on-going and the data shows that the creeks have maintained the water quality levels that were shown in previous studies and there are no dramatic changes to report.

Owl Creek: Landowners, Hot Springs Conservation District, Hot Springs County Weed & Pest District, the Arapahoe Ranch, Owl Creek Irrigation District, WWDC, NRCS WDA, Hot Springs County Commissioners, WACD Kirby Creek: Landowners, Hot Springs Conservation District, Hot Springs County Weed & Pest District, WDA, WDEQ, WWDC, WWNRT, Hot Springs County Commissioners, Kirby Creek Coordinated Resource Management Group and the NRCS. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................16


Washakie County Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Activities and Progress In 2012, the Washakie Watershed Steering Committee was formed to assist WCCD in the development of an updated watershed plan. The committee selected a smaller sub-watershed area to work towards implementation efforts; the Bighorn RiverSlick Creek Watershed. During the course of monthly planning meetings, a specific water quality project was identified, which would reduce bacteria loading into Sage Creek. The WCCD worked with NRCS to design the project and a $30,000 grant from Wyoming Department of Agriculture was applied for and received, to help cost share with landowners on a buried waste ditch, off site water, and inadequate septic systems

in that watershed. Within the same sub-watershed, WCCD received an NRCS National Water Quality Initiative grant for $691,128.00, which assisted local producers with installing 11 pivot sprinklers and in 2013 was again approved for $622,083.00 to assist local producers with installing 7 more pivots and 5 buried pipe/gated pipe projects. In addition, and under the umbrella of the Bighorn River-Slick Creek Watershed Plan, WCCD received a Wyoming DEQ 319 grant for $226,802.00, which will also provide funds for Cropland, Rangeland, Riparian, Urban, and Small Acreage BMP implementation. Presentations were given during two sessions at WESTI Ag Days, which included updating the public of implementation activities within the Big Horn River Watershed Plan over the past five years. WCCD was involved with the WDEQ in the development of the Bighorn/Greybull River Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), in the capacity of participation on the technical review team and providing comments to the draft. The final TMDL was approved by EPA in April of 2014. Since July 1, 2011, in addition to the above implementation efforts, the WCCD, using local funds, assisted landowners and residents with implementation

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of 11 Cropland and 2 Grazing BMP’s. NRCS has assisted landowners with 55 Cropland, 8 Grazing, and 6 Hydrologic/Stream Restoration BMP’s. WCCD has assisted the Wyoming Game & Fish and Washakie County Weed & Pest District with the administration of a Wyoming Wildlife Natural Resource Trust Fund grant for the treatment of 5053.3 acres of riparian corridor for Salt Cedar and Russian olive, increasing the riparian health condition to capture runoff in the Cottonwood Grass Creek watershed. In addition, utilizing an implementation grant from Wyoming Department of Agriculture (WDA), WCCD assisted with 4 septic systems, 10 irrigation controllers used for lawn water efficiency and reduction of runoff, and 12 dog waste stations, which were installed in all parks and along walking paths in Washakie County. Again utilizing funds from WDA which were set aside for water quality purposes, WCCD coordinated cost share funds to 15 landowners for their water well tests and also provided those funds for supplies for water quality testing by local high school students. Several tours were organized and hosted by WCCD. One tour included a feedlot BMP within the Nowater watershed for the Bighorn/Greybull River Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) technical review team. Another tour for the Nonpoint Source Task Force was conducted to view some of the potential BMP implementation projects described in WCCD’s 319 grant proposal. In addition, WCCD hosted a tour, associated with the EPA Urban Small Waters grant, for interested engineering firms, highlighting the key areas where stormwater entered the Big Horn River and other waterways and regarding surrounding land uses and infrastructure details. As part of the Bighorn River Watershed plan implementation, WCCD conducted a tour of an array of completed BMP’s which included an Irrigation project, Hoop House, Worland City Park Dog Waste Stations, and a windbreak. WCCD hosted a Rural Living Workshop in Ten Sleep using a grant received by the Wyoming Small Acreage Team. The workshop included topics of Wyoming Water Law, weeds, small acreage grazing, and water well testing information and cost share. Another workshop was hosted by WCCD to educate and promote residents on the use of PV Solar. Five local Ag producers served on a panel to discuss their experiences with their PV

Solar Livestock Watering systems and a local solar distribution contractor gave a live demonstration on PC solar. WCCD was also awarded a $60,000 Urban Small Waters Grant from the EPA. This grant was used to complete an assessment of the City of Worland’s storm drain system infrastructure, including the development of a GIS map, Best Management Practice option identification, and an Implementation Plan. WCCD is utilizing the completed assessment information to help educate and inform local residents of the types of BMPs that can be installed and/or practiced to reduce bacteria from the city’s run-off into the Big Horn River. Third grade students were educated about the water cycle with a demonstration and hands-on experiences using WCCD’s Enviroscape®, and Groundwater models. Each year, WCCD helps organize and assist with World Water Monitoring Day, which includes educating sixth grade students about natural resources while rotating through stations. As part of the water chemistry station, test kits are provided by WACD to measure pH, Dissolved Oxygen, and turbidity. WCCD also assists with water quality monitoring and stream health activities with Worland High School Advanced Biology students. WCCD staff attended the Wyoming State Fair where they assisted with demonstrating the stream trailer to fair attendees to show how BMP’s can reduce erosion. WCCD developed Storm Water Awareness brochures. These are distributed throughout the year along with other water quality publications developed by WCCD including “Washakie County Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems” and “Living on a Few Acres in Washakie County”.

Washakie Watersheds Steering Committee members include local landowners and residents, local resource professionals, and representatives from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Wyoming Game & Fish Department, Farm Service Agency, Washakie County Conservation District, City of Worland, The Nature Conservancy, Bureau of Land Management, and Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts.

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South Big Horn Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Activities and Progress

and livestock contributions to E. coli loading. The district is concentrating on one area to find out if by making the needed changes, it would make a difference in the water quality of the area. Seventeen sampling sites are being monitored that include three sites on Dry Creek, two sites on the Greybull River, three sites on Shell Creek, two sites on Beaver Creek, two sites on the Nowood River, two sites on Paintrock Creek and one site on the Big Horn River. Sampling is conducted twice per year, once in the spring during high flow and once in the fall during low flow following Wyoming Data Quality standards and the Sample and Analysis Plan. The District continues to work with landowners that need septic systems replaced or systems installed for non-existent systems. While the District does not currently have any cost share funds to help financially, the District is able to give advice and direction to landowners and homeowners for places to obtain assistance. In addition, the District has been working with NRCS, Game and Fish Department, and Wyoming Natural Resource Trust on multiple projects to remove Russian Olive/

The Big Horn River Watershed Implementation Plan was completed in 2007. With the completion of the Big Horn River TMDL in 2014, the South Big Horn Conservation District will not be updating the Watershed plan immediately. The district plans to apply for DEQ 319 funding to address issues identified in the TMDL and has begun working on addressing those issues with landowners and the public within the watershed. The district recently held several landowner meetings to encourage landowners to identify projects that can be implemented to reduce human Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................19


Salt Cedar on the Nowood River, Shell Creek, Greybull River and Dry Creek. During the reporting timeframe, other water quality related projects implemented in the watersheds by the NRCS included three pivot systems, five gated and buried pipeline projects, two single gated pipeline projects, two concrete ditch projects, one fencing / off site water project, and five Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMP).

Monitoring Results

The SBHCD sends data that has been collected during the monitoring season, to WWC Engineering to be analyzed. A review of the data found that all the samples collected during this reporting period met the 5 samples obtained during separate 24 hour periods during a 30 day period. The E.coli geometric means appear to be lower in the spring and higher in the fall on both Shell Creek and Beaver Creek. On Paintrock Creek and Nowood River it is just the opposite. Generally, E.coli exceeds the standard of 126 col./100 mL in the spring when the water is higher and is more likely to drop when the water is lower in the fall. A strong correlation

between E.coli and turbidity was observed, which can be typical given that both stream bed-sediments and the microbes settled within them are subject to entrainment (Nagels et al. 2002) as flow velocity increases. Inorganic water chemistry samples are also collected on all sites twice a year and analyzed by WWC Engineering.

Private landowners, ranchers, farmers, local businesses, conservation district supervisors, NRCS personnel, and the county planning office, Wyoming Game & Fish, Wyoming Water Development Commission, Wyoming Natural Resource Trust, and the State of Wyoming, Dept. of Agriculture.

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................20


Meeteetsie Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

River watershed, in 2011. The TMDL was approved by EPA on April 30th, 2014. MCD was a member of the TMDL technical steering committee and provided information and comments throughout the process. In the past three years the district and NRCS have initiated numerous projects in the watershed. Over $1 million has been spent in Farm Bill funding on management practices including certified nutrient management plans, water control structures, waste storage facilities and irrigation sprinkler systems to reduce erosion into the Greybull River. In addition to on the ground implementation, the district has hosted several workshops, including one on rotational grazing. MCD also held small acreage workshops in cooperation with PCFCD, CCD, UW extension, NRCS and Park County Weed and Pest. The district continues to work with Meeteetse Schools on educating youth about water quality and the local watershed. The MCD has and will continue to provide pertinent information to landowners within the district boundary via a biweekly newsletter (Trail News) and Barnyards and Backyards publication. MCD is an active supporter of the WDA Rangeland Health Assessment program and supports cooperative monitoring

Activities and Progress

The Meeteetse Conservation District (MCD) continues to conduct intensive E. coli sampling and evaluates a number of other parameters on the Greybull River watershed at a minimum of five sites within the District. The district continues to work under the Greybull River Watershed Water Quality Management Plan that was approved and incorporated in the MCD’s Land Use Management and Resource Conservation Plan on January 5, 2011. DEQ initiated a TMDL on the Big Horn River watershed, including the Greybull Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................21


for rangeland health. MCD had one sign up for the RHAP program in 2014.

Monitoring Results

The Greybull River has been listed as impaired for fecal coliform (E. coli) bacteria upstream from its confluence with the Big Horn River to the Sheets Flat Bridge since 2002. Conclusions from the District’s project investigating E. coli in streambed sediments indicated that clays, silts, and sands are consistently under erodible or transport capable conditions throughout the entirety of the sampling season. E. coli populations were found in the streambed sediments at the beginning of the sampling season indicating that they exist year round in the stream system. More precisely, the study found that “with an increase in discharge, E. coli levels in the channel sediment decrease as E. coli levels in the water column increase, with a significantly greater level sampled throughout the water column (Depth-Integrated) compared to the surface only. E. coli levels in the water column were also generally inversely correlated with precipitation” (Beaugh, Corey J., E. coli Distribution and Streambed Processes of the Greybull River, Department of Renewable Resources, April 2011).

Sampling completed each year has maintained its consistency with the results of the grant project. The Meeteetse Conservation District continues to implement best management practices along the Greybull River; and although data results show levels of E.coli below the primary recreation standard above the impairment, E. coli counts remain high on the impaired reach of the Greybull River.

Big Horn Basin Resource Conservation and Development Council, BLM, Greybull Valley Irrigation District, Hot Springs Conservation District, Local landowners and residents, Meeteetse Conservation District, NRCS, The Nature Conservancy, Park County Planning Department, Park County Weed and Pest, Powell Clarks Fork Conservation District, South Big Horn Conservation District, TU, UW Department of Renewable Resources, UW Extension, USFS, Wyoming Game and Fish, Wyoming State Legislatures, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, USDA NRCS Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................22


Shoshone County Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Activities and Progress

The Shoshone Conservation District (SCD) prioritized water quality in its Land Use Management and Resource Conservation Plan in 2012. The district has carried that out by participating on the TMDL steering committees and attended public meetings for the Bighorn and Greybull Rivers TMDL and the Shoshone River TMDL, and implementing numerous projects with the NRCS within the Shoshone and Big Horn Lake Watersheds. Some of those projects include assisting producers with closing 4395 ft. of drains, piping and burying

13,700 ft. of canals and laterals, sponsoring the Yellowtail CRM to remove Russian olive, Salt cedar and noxious weeds on 867 acres from important riparian areas along the Shoshone and Big Horn Rivers; and providing assistance to rehabilitate eight septic systems. The district also planted sorghum-sudangrass on 840 acres, some of which were on riparian areas, to provide cover and forage for wildlife.

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................23


The SCD staff keeps up to date with offered trainings in GIS, NEPA policy, equipment and sampling protocol. With a large part of the lands within the district being managed by the federal government, the SCD Board and staff actively participate in the resource planning processes of the Shoshone and Big Horn National Forests and the Bureau of Land Management, and is a member of the Local Government Cooperating Agencies group.

Monitoring Results

The district conducted E. coli monitoring in 2012 on the impaired waterbodies within the district’s boundaries. Results indicated that these waters continued to exceed the primary recreation standard (May – September) of 126 cfu / 100 ml. The SCD did not collect monitoring data in 2013 or 2014. The district is targeting available funds to on the ground projects that reduce risks to water quality.

Big Horn County, Big Horn County Weed and Pest, Bighorn National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, Deaver Irrigation District, Globe Canal, Lovell Elementary School, Lovell Irrigation District, NRCS, Rocky Mountain FFA, Shoshone National Forest, WACD, Wild Turkey Federation, WY Dept. of Agriculture, WY Dept. of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Game and Fish, Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust, Yellowtail CRM

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................24


Powell/Clarks-Fork Conservationn District

Big Horn River Basin

Activities and Progress

Between 2011 through 2014, implementation projects by the Powell Clarks Fork Conservation District (PCFCD), and NRCS within the Shoshone River and Bitter Creek Watersheds have included six Russian olive removal projects, 11 additional brush management projects, two septic system replacement projects, six projects converting flood irrigation to sprinkler systems, and 37 other irrigation management projects including gated pipe, buried pipe and irrigation structure projects. In addition to on-the-ground implementation, the district participated in

the selection of the Shoshone TMDL contractor, participated on the Technical Advisory Committee, and attended public meetings about the TMDL. The PCFCD provided comments to the Shoshone River TMDL document which was approved by WDEQ and EPA in 2014. The district continues to meet annually with the Shoshone River steering committee to discuss goals accomplished during the previous year and goals for the upcoming year. The PCFCD applied for a Section 319 grant in 2013 and received funding in 2014 to replace 20 failing septic systems, and to provide small acreage pasture management opportunities to landowners within in the Shoshone River watershed. The district in partnership with the Meeteetse Conservation District and Cody Conservation District, Park County Weed and Pest, Park County Master Gardner’s, and UW Extension held a Living on a Small Acreage workshop in 2014 in Powell. The workshop, aimed at small acreage owners, included topics on weed management, water quality, and livestock management/health. The district manager also presented at Wild West River Days in Cody in 2013, Wyoming Rural Water in 2014, and to the Park County Realtors in

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .........................................................................................................25


Monitoring Results

The PCFCD continues to monitor water quality on Bitter Creek and on the Shoshone River for E. coli, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH. During the reporting timeframe, the results of the monitoring indicate that sites along Bitter Creek and the Shoshone River remain impaired. The Shoshone River results continue to indicate that E.coli counts increase further downstream. The district plans to build in a before and after monitoring component with the septic replacement projects, the small acreage projects and possibly with large acreage production sites to determine if there are improvements in the water quality after the implementation practices have been installed. Testing will occur upstream and downstream of the individual projects both 2014, and attended Module II Water Quality Training before and after implementation. In the spring of 2014, presented by WACD and the University of Wyoming in the district initiated a pilot project with a producer in 2014. the watershed. The testing is ongoing with results to be analyzed in 2015.

NRCS, Park County Weed and Pest, University of Wyoming, Park County Master Gardeners, Meeteetse CD and Cody CD Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ...................................................................................................................................26


Sweetwater County Conservationn District

Green River Basin

Activities and Progress

From July 2011 through June 2014 the Sweetwater County Conservation District (SWCCD) continued to collect water quality and flow data within the Bitter Creek Watershed. The District continued to work closely with WDEQ in collection and compilation of water quality and flow data in the watershed, and to prepare for the pending WDEQ development of TMDLs addressing the 303d impairment listings. The District conducted monitoring at project legacy sites in 2011 to allow assessment of any water quality changes from earlier sampling. WDEQ provided pressure transducers at select sites to continuously monitor flow depth and flow in conjunction with channel ratings. With WDEQ input during 2012, District sampling

was focused to obtain synoptic measurement of quality paired with flows across the watershed. During 2013, the SWCCD did not conduct sampling as it was decided, based on WDEQ input, that it would provide little benefit to the TMDL development at this point. WDEQ placed automatic samplers at select sites in the watershed with the intent of capturing high flow quality samples to augment the data set. The SWCCD supported the 2013 WDEQ high flow sampling by providing local personnel (along with WDEQ and BLM) to collect samples from the automatic samplers following runoff events. During 2014 the District again collected samples at project legacy sites to evaluate whether water quality changes may be occurring. The District completed a compilation of an electronic comprehensive project data report for the Bitter Creek watershed studies in 2013. This report contains information collected for the watershed project from inception in 2004 through 2012. The District has collected a substantial amount of data and this report was prepared with intent of standardizing the electronic data set, and assembling all project files into one location. The SWCCD hosted the Bitter Creek Watershed Advisory Group (BKWAG) meetings in the spring of 2012, 2013, and 2014 to evaluate yearly moni-

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................27


toring needs and consult with WDEQ on District contributions to TMDL development. WDEQ proposed that TMDL development would begin during the summer of 2014, but this has been delayed and is believed that the TMDL will begin in 2015. The District will have an active role including selection of, and participation on, the project Technical Advisory Committee. In 2011, World Water Monitoring Day was conducted with the Rock Springs Junior High Qwest class. In 2012, the Upper Bear & Upper Green Trout Unlimited, along with WDEQ-AML, and SWCCD, planted 160 trees to reclaim a mine site. Also in 2012 the SWCCD participated in the Sweetwater County Resource Rendezvous, which highlights school age education on the importance of healthy land=healthy water. Over 1200 students attended the event. In June 2012 the SWCCD, Trout Unlimited and the Boy Scouts built enclosures and planted 90 aspen trees along Red Creek to help re-establish an aspen stand and improve the watershed. The District continues to work with agencies, local landowners and Anadarko to develop a means of stabilizing the head cut along Bitter Creek east of Rock Springs. The District completed a subsurface exploration core drill in two locations to determine site suitability. The results proved that the site area was suitable for constructing a new drop structure at the proposed project. The end goal of the project is to stabilize the banks, protect the stream, and improve flood protection, grazing activity and keep invasive fish species from going farther upstream. The stabilization of this reach will reduce sediment loading within the stream and protect riparian features upstream.

Monitoring Results

Monitoring conducted from July 2011 through June 2014 served to supplement previously collected water quality and flow data used to gauge the accuracy of the 303(d) E. coli and chloride impairment listings within the Bitter Creek watershed. The water quality and flow data will be used by WDEQ to establish TMDLs for the

watershed. Much of the sampling conducted in this period was done to verify the consistency of previous results over time, and to increase the number of samples paired with measured flows to characterize loading. Continued monitoring of the project legacy sites has served to establish that both E. coli and chloride concentrations have been somewhat variable over time at most sites, however monitoring results continue to demonstrate impairments. Chloride concentrations in Killpecker Creek and its tributaries continue to indicate a source area contributing to elevated chloride concentrations occurs south of the Highway 191 crossing, possibly within the native soils of the area. The recent synoptic monitoring for E. coli downstream of Rock Springs shows that concentrations are generally lower than 2004 through 2010 concentrations and may signify an improvement in the water quality. Sampling conducted from 2011 through 2014 has added 103 E. coli and 87 chloride results paired with site flow measurements, significantly increasing the size of the project data set. This provides a very robust data set from which to develop E.coli and chloride loads in evaluating the TMDLs for the watershed. The project data set also provides a detailed baseline of water quality over the last decade for use in gauging effectiveness of mitigation measures or in placing in context any water quality or flow variations within the watershed in the future.

Natural Resource Conservation Service, Bitter Killpecker Creek Watershed Advisory Group (BKWAG), USDOI Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Town of Rock Springs, Sweetwater County, Local Landowners, Trout Unlimited, Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, UCCD, SCCD, Wyoming Water Development Office Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................28


Sublette County Conservationn District

Green River Basin

ing and the SWCCD splits the cost of the monitoring efforts. The Little Sandy River was placed initially on Wyoming’s 303(d) List in 1996 for not supporting its coldwater fisheries and aquatic life, other than fish, uses below Elkhorn Junction. It was then removed in 1998 because there were inadequate credible data to justify the listing. WDEQ began monitoring the Little Sandy again between 20042008. The results of the monitoring indicated that a section of the Little Sandy River was not supporting its cold water fishery and aquatic life other than fish uses, due to sedimentation and was added to the 303(d) list in 2012. In 2011, the SCCD met with the Little Sandy Grazing Association and WACD to discuss WDEQ’s intent to list the Little Sandy River for sediment, to develop a planning strategy to potentially identify sources and to develop goals to reduce the sediment contributions. A steering committee was formed and held monthly meetings through 2014. In 2011, the SCCD hired a private consultant to complete a preliminary assessment of the section of the Little Sandy River that has been

Activities and Progress

The Sublette County Conservation District (SCCD) has been monitoring surface water on the Big and Little Sandy Rivers in both Sublette and Sweetwater counties since 2008. Two sites have been established on each river, where chemical, biological and physical data are collected. The SCCD collects chemical samples five times per year and aquatic insects in the fall. The district has established a partnership with the Sweetwater County Conservation District (SWCCD), where the SCCD provides the manpower to conduct the monitorWatersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................29


listed by the WDEQ. The results of the assessment were evaluated by the steering committee and future stream restoration is being considered pending a professional evaluation of the stream and available funding. The WDEQ has been heavily involved with the planning process and is working with the committee on the development of a Watershed Based plan for the Little Sandy watershed. Through the planning process, the SCCD has applied for grants to further the sedimentation study. The committee is still compiling information and hopes to complete the Watershed Based plan in the near future. The SCCD has also conducted some range monitoring in the watershed during the reporting timeframe and has assisted the WDEQ with stream monitoring.

Monitoring Results

SCCD is preparing a report utilizing the biological (macroinvertbrate (aquatic insect) data collected at the four sites since 2008 to determine the biological condition of both rivers. Results are pending upon release of this report in 2015.

Sweetwater County Conservation District, WGFD, BLM, Little Sandy Grazing Association, WACD, WDEQ, WDA, Private landowners, Sublette County Commissioners, NRCS

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .................................................................................................................................30


Uinta County Conservationn District

Green River Basin

The District offered cost share assistance for AFO projects, septic system remediation, and other projects to improve the water quality within the watershed. UCCD also assisted several producers with flood recovery by providing cost share assistance for projects such as stream bank stabilization, diversion repair and headgate replacement. UCCD continues to provide assistance and education to homeowners and landowners to improve the watershed. UCCD spent most of 2013 and 2014 assisting with the development of WDEQ E. coli TMDLs on the Blacks Fork and Smiths Fork Rivers. UCCD and the Blacks Fork/Smiths Fork Watershed Steering Committee provided data they had been collecting over the past several years and also assisted with public outreach and encouraging public participation throughout the process. UCCD hosted three public meetings, participated as a member of the Technical Advisory Committee and submitted comments on the public draft. The UCCD along with the Lincoln County Conservation District and Sweetwater County Conservation District as cosponsors, applied for a Level

Activities and Progress

The Uinta County Conservation District (UCCD) continued to monitor for E.coli, pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids and other parameters at several sampling sites along the Blacks Fork and Smiths Fork Rivers. The sampling took place at a number of sampling sites multiple times each year to determine the effectiveness of practices installed within the watershed and to collect baseline data for further understanding of the watershed. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................31


1 Watershed Study in 2013 for the Blacks Fork, Smiths Fork, Hams Fork, and Henry’s Fork Watershed areas. The conservation districts are eligible to sponsor projects with homeowners and landowners located in the watershed areas with the completion of the Wyoming Watershed Development Commission (WWDC) Level I Watershed Study in 2015.

Monitoring Results

Monitoring data for the 2011-2013 monitoring seasons have not been thoroughly analyzed, however, UCCD plans to have a comprehensive analysis of all the data they have collected since 2002 in the future. Preliminary results of monitoring completed have indicated that E.coli concentrations at some sites remain above the WDEQ primary recreation standard, while other sites show lower concentrations. Analysis of the UCCD plans to review and update the Blacks Fork/ 2010 data indicated that bacteria concentrations had decreased and significant improvements were Smiths Fork Sampling and Analysis Plan in 2015 and to continue monitoring in the future. noted at several sites.

Local landowners, Uinta County School District #6 and #4, Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, USDA NRCS, Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust, SWCCD. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................32


Macro Invertebrate samples are taken on West Fork of Loco Creek and 14 sites along Savery Creek and its tributaries. Additional monitoring includes Lost Creek, Haggerty Creek and the Belvidere ditch for copper, flow, and macro invertebrates. There are two permanent sites on Muddy Creek in the section west of Highway 789. These two stations monitor stream discharge, pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Turbidity, Conductivity and Temperature. Lab samples are sent to a lab on a sampling rotation and discharge measurements are taken at the same time. An additional site was added in 2011 on the lower section of Muddy creek to monitor for the selenium listing. Macro invertebrates were sampled on a five-year rotation on nine sites on Muddy Creek.

Little Snake River Conservationn District

Little Snake River Basin

Monitoring Results

Activities and Progress

The Little Snake River Conservation District (LSRCD) has been monitoring the water quality on Savery Creek and Muddy Creek since 1984. One permanent station has been placed along Savery Creek for monitoring flow and temperature. Lab samples are taken on a sampling rotation with a flow measurement. Thirteen temperature sensors have been used to monitor the temperature for fish since 2012. A permanent station has been placed in the West Fork of Loco Creek. This permanent station monitors stream discharge, pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Turbidity, Conductivity, and Temperature. Lab samples are taken on a rotation.

The Muddy Creek watershed has shown continued improvement. The implementation of numerous BMP’s over the years have lead to the delisting of Upper Muddy Creek from the 303(d) list in 2012. The stream continues to narrow and deepen to form stable terraces; providing habitat for several fish species such as Cut Throat Trout, Flannel Mouth Sucker, Roundtail Chub and Bluehead Suckers. The increase in pond and wetland development on Muddy Creek west of 789,

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................33


LSRCD and partners have worked together to restore and improve fluvial wetlands and riparian habitat on seven miles of the Little Snake River and two miles of Battle Creek. This river work has reduced the occurrence of flooding in the Town of Baggs, improved water quality and provided fish passage through eight irrigation structures. A Stream / River Restoration Best Management Practices video was produced in 2014 with the LSRCD, landowners, contractors and WACD to highlight these projects and to educate others on how to implement these type of practices.

riparian fencing, cattle rotation, and vegetation planting have helped increase the water quality in this section of Muddy Creek. The district continues to work with WDEQ to correctly classify this section of Muddy Creek and sees potential for delisting in the near future. The district has worked with WDEQ on monitoring protocols for the West Fork of Loco Creek and is working with BLM on rotational grazing efforts. The district will continue to monitor chemical, biological and physical parameters of this stream. Savery Creek has shown improvement since the completion of the High Savery Dam. This stream is listed for Habitat Degradation. This stream used to go intermittently dry. The district continues to monitor flow from two permanent gauging stations.

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Wyoming Water Development Office, Wyoming Wildlife Natural Resources Trust Fund, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, United States Fish and Wildlife Service Partners Program, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Bow Hunters of Wyoming, Carbon County, USDA Bureau of Land management, Wyoming State Forestry, Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, CUPCA, NAWCA, Town of Baggs, Medicine Bow National Forest, Nature Conservancy, Trout Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, Landowners, SER Conservation District, Sweetwater County Conservation District, State of Wyoming, Wyoming State Engineers Office, Wyoming Department of Transportation.

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................34


Laramie Rivers Conservationn District

North Platte River Basin

Activities and Progress

The district and NRCS also cost shared with several landowners on post-fire erosion mitigation projects in the Laramie Range and Medicine Bow mountain Range. The project in the Medicine Bows was a 160 acre re-seed, just a

Between 2011 and 2014, the Laramie Rivers Conservation District (LRCD) has successfully completed the Laramie River Restoration project, designed to drastically reduce non-point source sediment pollution in the City of Laramie. LRCD has also collaborated with NRCS on one stream bank restoration project upstream of Woods Landing on the Big Laramie and one stream bank project upstream of Millbrook Lane in the Little Laramie drainage. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................35


few miles above the Big Laramie River. LRCD has also successfully applied for a Watershed Study for the Upper Laramie Basin through the Wyoming Water Development Commission, which will commence in 2015. The watershed study will open the door for identifying and funding upland water developments designed to draw wildlife and livestock away from stream banks.

Monitoring Results

Two segments of the Big Laramie and two segments of the Little Laramie River were listed for exceedences of E. coli Bacteria in 2011. In 2012, two of the four reaches did meet standards for E. coli and two did not, during the primary recreation season (May – September). In 2013 none of the sites met the standard for E. coli during the primary recreation season. In 2014 sampling was abandoned due to high water at all sites, making it impossible to obtain data from which to calculate geometric means throughout the recreation season. Options for moving forward are currently being evaluated for the 2015 season.

Community residents and landowners, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality and the Environmental Protection Agency, Wyoming Natural Resource Trust, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, US Fish and Wildlife Service, City of Laramie, Albany County Commissioners, University of Wyoming, Rotary Club of Laramie, Groathouse Construction, Habitech Inc., WWC Engineering, Olson Excavating Inc. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................36


Natrona County Conservationn District

North Platte River Basin

Activities and Progress

The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) initiated a TMDL for selenium for the North Platte River in late 2009. The NCCD provided RESPEC, the contractor chosen to develop the TMDL, with over ten years of credible water quality data. Several landowner meetings were held to inform the public about the TMDL development, as well as to receive feedback. The TMDL was developed and submitted to the WDEQ in September of 2011. The final approval by USEPA has been delayed until site specific criteria can be developed for the tributaries in the TMDL analysis area. It is expected that the site specific criteria development will take about two years, followed by a rule making. After the criteria have been approved, the TMDL will be written to the new criteria. With the completion of the TMDL Implementation Plan in 2011, NCCD’s board discussed the development of a new watershed plan and updated the district’s Sampling and Analysis Plan to correlate with this plan. In 2011, the NCCD received a Section 319 Project Grant through WDEQ which has provided funding for implementation projects as outlined in the TMDL Implementation Plan for reducing selenium. This Segment I grant also supplied the funds for increased water quality sampling and analysis in the watershed. By install-

Due to the underlying geology of Natrona County, several waterbodies in the county are listed as impaired for selenium in Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality’s Wyoming Water Quality Assessment and Impaired Waters List (2012 Integrated 305(b) and 303(d) Report). Selenium is mobilized from the Cody Shale that underlies much of Natrona County. The Natrona County Conservation District (NCCD), along with the NRCS Casper Field Office has taken a proactive approach to manage the levels of selenium that are transported through our waterways by implementing conservation practices and Best Management Practices (BMPs) on Natrona County’s irrigated farmland and non-irrigated rangelands. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................37


ing pipelines and replacing earthen ditches, as well as updating inefficient flood irrigation to sprinklers, selenium transport can be managed. From July of 2011 through June of 2014, in collaboration with landowners, the NRCS and Casper Alcova Irrigation District (CAID), and NCCD has lead the efforts to convert 505 acres of flood irrigation to sprinkler, and has replaced earthen ditches with over 18,561 feet of pipeline. By the completion of Segment I, over 700 acres of flood to sprinkler irrigation will be completed, and over 35,000 feet of earthen ditches will be replaced with 25,000 feet of buried pipelines. In February of 2014, the Middle North Platte Level I Watershed Study was completed by the WWDC on behalf of the NCCD. The watershed study was a comprehensive evaluation of watershed function, wetland and riparian conditions, geomorphic classifications, and water development opportunities on irrigated lands, rangelands, wetlands, and streams. The purpose of the study was to combine existing data with project generated data into a Watershed Management and Rehabilitation Plan, which included potential improvements based on the information gathered during the inventory. After the inventory, proposed irrigation projects, opportunities, and recommendations were developed. The WWDC and NCCD accomplished several objec-

tives during the watershed planning but also importantly fostered communication about watershed conditions and issues among residents and landowners. The NCCD plans to apply for further WDEQ 319 funds in the fall of 2014 to continue the implementation of BMPs and to continue to improve the water quality of the Middle North Platte Watershed.

Monitoring Results

The NCCD continues to collect monthly water quality samples in approximately 16 locations throughout the watershed, to be analyzed for selenium. According to the January 2014 “Report of Selenium Levels in the Streams of the North Platte River Associated with the Kendrick Watershed Irrigation Project” completed by InterTech Environmental & Engineering, there continues to be an overall downward trend of the selenium levels in the watershed. The trend analyses indicate that statistically significant reductions in selenium levels are observed at Poison Spring Creek, the downstream site of Poison Spider Creek, the Lower South Fork of Casper Creek, Johnson Reservoir Drain, Upper Casper Creek and the two North Platte River monitoring stations. As of the summer of 2014, the District began sampling additional sites on the North Platte River to determine if the river may be eligible for delisting from WDEQ’s Water Quality Assessment and Impaired Waters List.

Natrona County Natural Resources Conservation Service, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, US Environmental Protection Agency, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Local Landowners, Casper Alcova Irrigation District, Natrona County Commissioners, City of Casper, Wyoming Water Development Commission, Natrona County Weed & Pest, US Bureau of Reclamation, Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................38


Platte County Resource District

North Platte River Basin

Activities and Progress

the PCRD planted approximately 831 trees which have helped with erosion and participated in one Russian Olive Removal project that included removal on three acres on the banks of Rock Creek. The NRCS has been working on an AFO/CAFO project in the Rock Creek watershed for the past five years including

The Platte County Resource District (PCRD) continues to work on water quality issues within the district. The Rock Creek watershed plan was completed in 2007. As part of the districts commitment to the watershed planning effort and implementation, the district has worked with landowners and partners to implement irrigation efficiency practices, range management practices, invasive species control, residue management, agriculture waste management projects and windbreak plantings. During the reporting timeframe, Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................39


a waste storage basin that will separate solids and liquids. This will pump to a pivot for the removal of remaining waste, fertilizing crops grown on the owner’s property. There will also be a diversion around the feedlot. In 2013, the district assisted with the BMP video project highlighting an Animal Confined Feeding Operation Project. The video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/user/ConserveWY.

Monitoring Results

Due to insufficient flows, the district did not conduct monitoring during this timeframe. Implementation activities and BMPs have been and continue to be developed to affect the stream in a positive manner.

Local landowners, NRCS, Platte County Resource District, Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................40


Powder River Basin

Campbell County Conservation District

project was analyzed and compiled into a Final Data Analysis Report with a draft of the report being sent to WDEQ for review in May of 2014. In 2013, CCCD applied for and received a section 205j grant from WDEQ to continue monitoring on the Little Powder River with the addition of using Pyrosequencing® technology in order to more effectively access the source(s) of the E. coli impairment. Two CCCD staff provided site reviews for BMP projects within the watershed in 2013-2014 to verify 8 past AFO projects and 12 past septic projects are continuing to be successful. Between 2011 –2014 most Best Management Practices implemented in the watershed included a combination of off stream water development, off stream livestock shelter and improved grazing management projects. The CCCD organizes, hosts and provides an activity during the Ag and Natural Resources Expo which is held annually for all Campbell County 3rd grade students. The district has demonstrated a water erosion trailer in partnership with 20 other exhibitors to 714 students in 2012, 744 in 2013 and 757 in 2014. The district continues to publish newsletters every other month to 1200 patrons and

Activities and Progress

The Campbell County Conservation District (CCCD) continued to monitor water quality on Little Powder River and Middle Prong of Wild Horse Creek for E-coli, Turbidity, pH, stream temperature, dissolved oxygen, discharge rate, and specific conductance. CCCD also collected samples for inorganic chemistry including chlorine, ammonia, and phosphorus. Each site was monitored 10 times during the Primary Contact season (May – September) from the spring of 2011 to the spring of 2014. Data gathered from the monitoring Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................41


distributes 300 copies of “Barnyards and Backyards” four times a year. The district also updated the “Living on a Few Acres in Campbell County” booklet and distributed “A Guide for Proper Pet Waste Disposal”, and “Grazing Livestock on Small Acreages” brochures at a booth during the Campbell County Fair.

Monitoring Results

For the Little Powder River, results indicated that bacteria concentrations overall are continuing to decrease beside the fact that concentrations increased in 2013. WDEQ’s single sample maximum concentration was exceeded 15 times, with the majority occurring after precipitation events. Additionally, sulfate and chloride concentrations increased when compared to previous results, while Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) concentrations were significantly lower, at both sites, than concentrations previously measured. CCCD will continue to monitor the Little Powder River with the addition of DNA pyrosequencing. The CCCD intention is to determine the source of the bacteria impairment and more effectively target Best Management

Practices (BMPs) to reduce bacteria concentration, improve water quality and eventually delist the stream. For the Middle Prong Wild Horse Creek, in 2013, the WDEQ released the Draft Categorical Use Attainability Analysis (UAA) for Recreation for public comment. In the UAA the WDEQ examined all the rivers and streams in Wyoming using certain watershed criteria agreed upon by the EPA. The UAA determined and changed the classification of some streams in Wyoming. The UAA affects a number of streams and draws in Campbell County by changing their designation from primary to secondary contact recreation. Pending the final decision by EPA on the UAA, Middle Prong of Wild Horse Creek will change designation from Primary Contact to Secondary Contact water body. Based on the 2010 - 2013 monitoring results the stream would meet the secondary standard for E. coli resulting in a delisting of the lower portion of the stream.

Private Landowners, Campbell County Commissioners, Campbell County Cattlewomen, City of Gillette, Black Hills Corporation, Anadarko, CC Farm Bureau, BKS Environmental Associates, Inc., WalMart, WDEQ, WDA, NRCS.

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WDEQ is proposing to apply the secondary drinking water maximum containment level (SMCL) of 50 ug/L for manganese to actual drinking water sources. If approved, WDEQ will evaluate each of the manganese drinking water listings and move to de-list those that are not drinking water sources. As it is highly unlikely that the creek will ever be used as a drinking water source due to its intermittent hydrology, the District has requested that WDEQ re-evaluate and assess the segment for removal from the 303(d) list.

Lake DeSmet Conservation District

Powder River Basin

Activities and Progress

The Lake DeSmet Conservation District (LDCD) continues to track the status of both Crazy Woman Creek and North Fork Crazy Woman Creek. The District has provided comments and feedback to WDEQ on these listings and their potential removal from the impaired list. Crazy Woman Creek - Lower Crazy Woman Creek was added to the 303(d) list in 2002 for manganese. DEQ indicated in 2012, that as part of the triennial review, Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................43


North Fork Crazy Woman Creek – North Fork Crazy Woman Creek (NFCWC) was added to the 303(d) List in 1996 for habitat degradation, nutrients and bioindicators. Bioindicators were removed as an impaired use from the 303(d) list in 2012. In 2008, and during the reporting timeframe, WDEQ conducted additional monitoring on NFCWC to determine designated use support. The additional data collection along with historic data and information concluded that habitat degradation is no longer a threat. The habitat degradation and nutrient threats on NFCWC are considered remediated and both impairment are proposed to be removed from the 2014 303(d) list. NFCWC was placed in category 4C (A use impairment is not caused by a pollutant, but

instead by anthropogenic non-pollutant stressor(s); A TMDL is not required) for the 2014 Integrated Report.

Monitoring Results

During the 2011 and 2012 field seasons, District personnel assisted and worked cooperatively with WDEQ to conduct additional monitoring on NFCWC and additional waters in the District.

Private Landowners, NRCS, LDCD, Energy Minerals Counties Coalition (formerly the Coalbed Methane Counties Coalition), WDEQ, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, State Forestry, Johnson County Weed & Pest. * No additional funds were expended in the Crazy Woman watershed during this time period due to the pending data analysis on North Fork Crazy Woman and the pending approval of the recommendations provided on Crazy Woman Creek. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................44


Powder RIver Conservation District

Powder River Basin

site specific selenium criteria on Murphy Creek to the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ). This UAA provides credible data that supports that the selenium found in Murphy Creek is a natural condition, preventing the attainment of the streams designated uses. The UAA petitions for a change in the selenium standard. As of November 2014, WDEQ plans to submit the site specific selenium criteria to EPA for review by February 2015. The PRCD stopped water quality monitoring at the end of 2012 monitoring season as it was determined there was enough baseline data to accurately characterize the water quality in the streams. These impaired streams are scheduled to have Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in 2020, except for Salt Creek which is scheduled for 2015 (Draft 2014 Integrated 305(b) and 303(d) Report, WDEQ). Since July 2011 the PRCD has continued to install best management practices to improve water quality. They included: 13,581 feet of fence, three stock water tanks, one storage tank, the drilling of a well, 5,061 feet of stock water pipeline (for off-site water) and 900 feet of irrigation pipe to deliver water to a wheel line sprinkler on irrigated cropland. Outreach activities for the past two years have included articles in the District Newsletter Activities and Progress (distributed to over 300 residents) regarding In 2011 and 2012 the Powder River Conservawater quality issues, hosting the World Water tion District (PRCD) continued their contract with WWC Engineering (WWC) to conduct water quality monitoring on the South Fork of Powder River, Murphy Creek, Willow Creek and Powder River. The PRCD works with the Natrona County Conservation District (NCCD) to monitor shared streams (South Fork of Powder River and Willow Creek) that are impaired within the two Districts. The water quality information that the PRCD collects from these streams is provided to the NCCD. In 2011 the PRCD through the assistance of WWC submitted a Use Attainability Analysis (UAA) for Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................45


Monitoring Day with the Kaycee Middle School Science Classes teaching them the importance of good water quality and its benefits to the environment. As well, the District offers an Annual Private Well Water Testing Day were landowners can test the quality of their drinking water. Approximately 20 residents take part in this annual event.

Monitoring Results

Throughout 2011 and 2012 the PRCD contracted WWC to continue their monthly monitoring at the sites located on the South Fork of Powder River, Murphy Creek and Willow Creek. The sites have been monitored monthly since May 2008 for total and dissolved selenium as well as general water quality. In March 2012, WWC com-

menced monitoring at one site of the Powder River near Sussex. The monitoring was a result of the WDEQ adding the Powder River to the 303(d) list in 2012 because of total arsenic concentrates above the WDEQ criteria. South Fork of Powder River- During the 2011-2012 sampling period, 17 samples were collected. The WDEQ standard was exceeded 14 times during this sampling period. A total of 41 samples, since 2008, have been collected and approximately 93% of those samples have exceeded the WDEQ standard for total selenium. The results of these samples show that although the maximum

measured total selenium concentrates have increased, the average annual total selenium concentrations have decreased since 2008. Murphy Creek (Sites MC-1 & MC-2)- A total of 17 samples were collected from each site. Total selenium at site MC-1 exceeded the WDEQ standard in 12 of the 17 samples, while the standard was exceeded in 47% of the samples collected at site MC-2. The majority (58%) of the total selenium concentrations were higher at the downstream site compared to the upstream site. In 2012 total selenium concentrations were lower than measured in previous years. Willow Creek-A total of 22 samples were obtained during the 2011-2012 sampling season. In 2011 the majority (55%) of the total selenium concentrations measured below the detection limit. While in 2012 all of the total selenium measurements were below the detection limit. Since May 2008, 51 samples have been collected and analyzed for total selenium. Approximately 25% of the samples have exceeded the WDEQ criteria. Powder River- Nine samples were collected during 2012 and analyzed for general water quality as well as total and dissolved selenium and arsenic. Water quality results indicated that the stream is dominated by sodium and calcium cations and chloride and sulfate anions. Total arsenic and selenium concentrations were measured below the detection limit throughout the monitoring project. Overall, the 2011 monitoring results were comparable to previous years while the total selenium concentrations measured in 2012 were lower than compared to samples collected between 2008 and 2011.

Local Landowners, Powder River Watersheds Steering Committee, Natrona County Conservation District Natural Resources Conservation Services, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Bureau of Land Management, Johnson County School District #1-Kaycee

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Laramie County Conservation District

South Platte River Basin

Activities and Progress

TMDLs (E. coli, Sediment and Selenium) for portions of Crow Creek flowing through Cheyenne. All TMDLs for the impaired portions through Cheyenne are scheduled for approval from EPA in early 2015. Recent BMPs implemented by LCCD throughout the watershed include nine spring development projects, 7,500 feet of riparian fencing to prevent offroad vehicle damage, stormwater erosion workshops, 100+ acres of grass seeding to prevent urban erosion, six riparian restoration projects, and numerous classroom education presentations. LCCD, in cooperation with NRCS, also helped landowners install six irrigation water pipelines reducing water loss, replaced 50 irrigation pumps and motors improving energy efficiency and helped permanently retire 494 irrigated acres across the county helping to reduce water-use and subsequently begin to stabilize the Ogallala Aquifer. The LCCD held and participated in several public outreach events including a Stormwater Management workshop, three Ag. Expos with LCCC, participated in three World Water Quality Monitoring days, and gave numerous classroom presentations. The district also distributed 10 newspaper inserts related to water quality. The District maintains an ac-

The Laramie County Conservation District (LCCD) initiated watershed based planning efforts in the early 2000’s. LCCD facilitated the development of two watershed plans including the Crow Creek Watershed Plan (approved 2004) and the Upper Crow Creek Watershed Plan (approved 2007). Most of the goals and objectives identified within these plans have been completed or are in their final stages of implementation. In support of these plans, LCCD provides public information and outreach on a host of watershed improvement projects. In addition, LCCD has been heavily involved with the Department of Environmental Quality’s(DEQ) development of three Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................47


toring within the Upper Crow Creek Watershed was conducted under an MOU with the Laramie Rivers CD and US Forest Service for both Middle Fork Crow Creek and North Branch North Fork Crow Creek (NBNF). In total, 195 E. coli samples were collected across two sites from 2011-2014, along with 130 turbidity samples and 130 flow measurements. This data will be utilized for TMDL development on Middle Fork scheduled to begin in early 2015.

Monitoring Results

tive water quality monitoring program. In 2011, 189 bacteria samples were collected at eight sites in the Cheyenne area of Crow Creek Watershed; 159 turbidity samples were analyzed and 100 flow measurements were taken across the same sites. Sampling in 2011 focused on contributions from Cheyenne’s storm drain system, with samples being collected from six storm drain outfalls and two tributaries to Crow Creek (Dry Creek & Clear Creek). This data was used as supplemental data for the both the sediment and E. coli Crow Creek TMDLs. Monitoring in and around the Cheyenne area was placed on hiatus during the 2012-2014 sampling seasons while the District awaited TMDL development. Moni-

Samples collected along Cheyenne’s portion of Crow Creek in 2011 were consistent with previous year’s efforts. In addition, the storm drain sampling conducted in 2011 also provided supplemental data that LCCD believed was necessary for TMDL development. Bacteria and turbidity levels in the Upper Crow Creek Watershed were consistent with previous year’s results with Middle Fork exceeding both primary and secondary contact recreation standard in all years and NBNF attaining secondary contact standards in all years except 2013. This is important since 2013 represented the first years since 2005 that NBNF exceeded the secondary contact requirement. With NBNF finally being designated as a secondary contact stream based on DEQ’s state wide UAA (pending final approval by EPA), LCCD believes the stream will attain the secondary requirements and could be petitioned for delisting if no exceedances occur during the 2015 sampling season.

Partners include the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust, WDEQ/USEPA, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Trout Unlimited, Audubon Society, Back County Hunters and Anglers, the Greater Cheyenne Greenway Committee, Cheyenne LEADS, Laramie County, the City of Cheyenne, WYDOT, US Forest Service, Curt Gowdy State Park, USDA/NRCS, and the Pole Mountain Grazing Association. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................48


Star Valley Conservation District

Snake River Basin

which was severely flooded in 2011. The NRCS and SVCD combined WDA grant funds and Emergency Watershed Protection funding to implement bank stabilization and corral relocation for the property owner. The Star Valley Conservation District used WDA grant funding to purchase a portable, solar stock watering system for use on Little Greys Cattle Allotment. Cattle on the Little Greys Cattle Allotment were congregating in a small portion of a riparian area as a low water crossing and as a water source. The solar trailer provides a source of potable off stream water so the cattle will not continue to water at the crossing, use the area as a low water crossing or create new mud holes. Activities and Progress During the reporting timeframe, SVCD conThe Star Valley Conservation District (SVCD) ducted a septic system education and cost is involved with TMDL development in the Salt River Watershed. The Salt River Watershed TMDL is expected to be completed by September 2015. SVCD is participating on the Technical Advisory Team and with public education for the project. The Star Valley Conservation District worked with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Wyoming Department of Agriculture (WDA) to move corrals off of Tin Cup Creek Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................49


share program. SVCD held three septic system workshops and provided the education materials online and through email. Workshops were held in Afton on May 22, 2013, in Etna on May 29, 2013 and in Thayne, on August 21, 2013. Sixty-five people attended the work-

shops and 125 people accessed the education information via email. The septic program included cost-sharing on septic system pumping. Through this program 88 septic tanks were pumped.

Monitoring Results

SVCD personnel continued water sampling efforts on the Salt River and Stump Creek. Between 2011 and 2014, 714 samples were collected and analyzed for E. coli. During this time period there has been no significant change in water quality in the Salt River and Stump Creek.

NRCS, WDA, WACD, Lincoln County Planning, Little Greys Cattle Allotment, KSRV Radio, BridgerTeton National Forest.

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Snake River Basin

Teton County Conservation District

Activities and Progress

of activities in this reporting period to achieve water quality, aquatic habitat and riparian habitat goals. TCD worked with its partners to construct the Karns Meadow Stormwater Treatment Wetland in the Town of Jackson. The constructed wetland became operational in 2012 and filters pollutants from 27% of the Town’s stormwater runoff infrastructure. In addition, TCD continues to partner with the Town of Jackson’s Public Works Department to improve stormwater collection systems in order to reduce negative effects on Flat Creek. This is being accomplished through implementation of a series of best management practices including street sweeping and the installation of storm scepters to collect sediment in the stormdrain system. The District also completed the remainder of the Flat Creek Enhancement project, with the goal of improving and restoring habitat for native Snake River Cutthroat Trout, by mitigating winter flooding due to ice dams. Additional instream habitat enhancement was supported by the district on the National Elk Refuge reach of Flat Creek, a Blue Ribbon native trout fishery. The work on the Elk Refuge contributes to aquatic health of the listed reach of Flat Creek, which is immediately downstream. As a result of the ongoing efforts of the District and its

The Teton Conservation District continues to implement best management practices, coordinate with stakeholders, provide educational material, and monitor stream health on Flat Creek in the Snake River Drainage. The Flat Creek Watershed Management Plan provides a clear outline to address Flat Creek’s 303(d) listing as a threatened stream for habitat degradation as it flows through the Town of Jackson. The management plan was approved in 2008 and was developed in lieu of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), and outlines the commitment of many local stakeholders. The District has undertaken a series Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................51


partners to improve stream health on Flat Creek, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality is conducting an assessment of the reach’s ability to support its designated uses, and its threatened status on the 303(d) list. TCD participates on annual Flat Creek cleanup events, which include an educational presentation regarding the District’s efforts to improve this local icon and resource. TCD has worked with the Town of Jackson to install signs on all new sewer drains that say “No Dumping, Drains to Stream.” A petition has been made by landowners along Flat Creek to initiate the formation of the Flat Creek Watershed Improvement District, which would exist completely within the 303(d) listed portion of Flat Creek. This new special district would levy funds to help improve aquatic habitat conditions in Flat Creek through town, while also working to mitigate winter time flooding. Part of the Conservation District’s initial responsibility in the Watershed Improvement District’s formation is to provide funding for the startup of this special district, if its formation receives voter approval.

Monitoring Results

Chemical, physical, and biological data has been collected for 14 years under the Flat Creek Sampling and Analysis plan, including sampling sites in Flat Creek, and reference sites on Cache and Nowlin Creeks. Chemistry data shows that cations, anions and trace metals are below State and Federal water quality standards. TCD

partnered with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in 2013 and 2014 and completed targeted monitoring of stream health parameters to assess Flat Creek’s listing status. This shift in sampling methodology acknowledges the progress made with watershed improvements towards the ultimate goal of removing Flat Creek from Wyoming’s 303(d) Impaired Waters List. Monitoring of inputs and effluent from the Karns Meadow Stormwater Wetland Facility on Flat Creek in 2012 and 2013 showed marked improvements in water quality after filtering through the constructed wetland. Following the Sample and Analysis Plan (2012), created specifically for the functional assessment of the constructed wetland complex, Alder Environmental LLC. demonstrated its success. Total suspended solids were reduced on average by 89%; throughout sampling nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia decreased in concentration by 95%; and across sampling events E. coli bacteria decreased by 85%. This stormwater treatment facility filters effluent from known problem areas including livestock pens, dirt parking and snow storage areas, Snow King Mountain and Cache Creek. The completion of construction and the follow up sampling results of this facility are very encouraging, and has been an exemplary collaborative effort that will reduce urban water quality degradation in Flat Creek for years to come. Continued chemistry and stream health monitoring in Flat Creek will be completed on a yearly basis.

The Town of Jackson, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Jackson Hole One Fly, 1% for the Tetons, Jackson Hole Land Trust, Trout Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, United States Geological Survey, Local landowners.

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The City of Sheridan and Sheridan County take a very active role addressing issues in the Goose Creek Watershed. In 2012, the SCCD partnered with Sheridan County to conduct outreach/workshops for septic systems. The SCCD participated with the City of Sheridan in developing a Watershed Control Plan to address water quality concerns at the intake for the municipal water supply. The City of Sheridan has secured additional 319 and other funding to address water quality concerns related to urban runoff. The SCCD provides additional technical and/or funding support on these and other activities. In partnership with the City of Sheridan, the Downtown Sheridan Association has requested a study through the Corps of Engineers to evaluate historic channelization/flood control practices through the City of Sheridan. As part of the on-going effort to address bacteria and sediment concerns, SCCD continues to offer financial and technical assistance for water quality improvement projects. For this reporting period, SCCD relocated one set of corrals, worked with a small acreage operator to close two water gaps and install off-channel stockwater, replaced two septic systems, replaced one irrigation diversion,

Goose Creek Watershed

Tongue River Basin

Sheridan County Conservation District

Activities and Progress

The Sheridan County Conservation District (SCCD) has been involved in the Goose Creek Watershed since 2000. Activities include monitoring, planning, project development, and outreach. The Goose Creek Watershed Plan was first completed in 2004. WDEQ developed a TMDL for the Goose Creek Watershed in 2010; the steering committee developed an Implementation Strategy to prioritize recommendations from the TMDL. Implementation is on-going and includes outreach activities and project development. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................53


and stabilized stream banks/channels on one stream segments within the City of Sheridan. Through these projects, SCCD has completed a total of 13 corral relocations, 10 septic system replacements, 2 diversion replacements, 2 fencing/ stockwater projects, and 3 stream bank/channel stabilization projects. SCCD continues to encourage willow-cutting establishment on streambanks with the water jet stinger and sprigged willow cuttings at 4 sites in this period. Annual watershed steering committee meetings and an annual watershed newsletter provides information and updates to Goose Creek residents. The Goose Creek Watershed Newsletter is distributed by the City of Sheridan in their utility billings. Over 26,000 Newsletters and 300 letters containing septic system information were distributed to residents within the watershed between 2011and 2014. In 2013-2014, SCCD revised the distribution schedule for watershed newsletters so that they are distributed in the winter to promote participation in steering committee meetings and participation in cost-share programs.

Monitoring Results The initial Goose Creek Watershed Assessment was completed in 2001-2002; subsequent interim monitoring occurred in 2005, 2009, and 2012. In 2012 there were 24 sample stations: four on Goose Creek, six on Big Goose Creek, six on Little Goose Creek, and one each on Soldier Creek, Beaver Creek, Park Creek, Rapid Creek, McCormick Creek, Kruse Creek, Jackson Creek, and Sackett Creek. Parameters included bacteria, turbidity, temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, discharge, macroinvertebrates, and habitat. Despite years of monitoring, there has been no obvious trend in water quality that can be related to watershed improvement efforts; bacteria levels decrease in some years only to increase in other years.

Landowners and Residents, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Wyoming Game and Fish, Wyoming Wildlife Natural Resource Trust, Sheridan County Public Works Department, the City of Sheridan, the Downtown Sheridan Association, Sheridan College, the Nature Conservancy, and the Sheridan Community Land Trust. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................54


items. Implementation of the plan is on-going and includes outreach activities and project development. As part of the on-going effort to address bacteria and sediment concerns, SCCD continues to offer financial and technical assistance for water quality improvement projects. For this reporting period, SCCD worked with a landowner to install riparian fencing and off-channel stockwater and replaced four septic systems. Through these projects, SCCD has completed a total of 2 corral relocations, 7 septic system replacements, 2 diversion replacements, and 2 fencing/stockwater projects. Annual watershed steering committee meetings and an annual watershed newsletter provides information and updates to Prairie Dog Creek residents. Over 1400 Newsletters were distributed to residents within the watershed between 2011and 2014. In 2013-2014, SCCD revised the distribution schedule for watershed newsletters so that they are distributed in the winter to promote participation in steering committee meetings and participation in cost-share programs.

Prairie Dog Watershed

Tongue River Basin

Sheridan County Conservation District

Activities and Progress

The Sheridan County Conservation District (SCCD has been involved in the Prairie Dog Creek Watershed since 2007. Activities include monitoring, planning, project development, and outreach. The Prairie Dog Creek Watershed Plan was developed to meet the requirements of an EPA Watershed Based Plan and was approved by EPA/WDEQ in 2011. The plan includes information on bacteria load and load reduction estimates and subwatershed characterizations. SCCD worked with landowners to develop goals, objectives, and action Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................55


Monitoring Results The initial Prairie Dog Creek Watershed Assessment was completed in 2007-2008; subsequent interim monitoring occurred in 2011 and 2014. There were eight sites on Prairie Dog Creek and one each on 4 tributaries, including Dutch Creek, Wildcat Creek, Meade Creek, and Jenks Creek and one site on Prairie Dog Ditch. Parameters included bacteria, turbidity, temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, discharge, macroinvertebrates, and habitat. Despite years of monitoring, there has been no obvious trend in water quality that can be related to watershed improvement efforts; bacteria levels decrease in some years only to increase in other years.

Landowners and Residents, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Sheridan County, and Sheridan College. Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................56


Tongue River Watershed

Tongue River Basin

Sheridan County Conservation District

Activities and Progress

tion of the plan is on-going and includes outreach activities and project development. Recently, there has been more attention to the watershed from other groups, including The Nature Conservancy and the Sheridan Community Land Trust. Partnering with these entities on individual projects will continue to benefit the watershed. In 2013, SCCD partnered with the Sheridan County Public Works Department to initiate a channel survey for the Tongue River upstream of Dayton. Barr Engineering completed the project in 2014; the next steps will be to follow-up with landowners interested in moving forward with some of the recommendations. As part of the on-going effort to address bacteria and sediment concerns, SCCD continues to offer financial and technical assistance for water quality improvement projects. For this reporting period, SCCD worked with a small acreage operator to install fencing along a riparian area and install off-channel stockwater, replaced a septic system, replaced an irrigation diversion, and stabilized stream banks/channels on four separate stream segments (one of which was approximately 2 miles long). Through these projects, SCCD has completed a total of 6 corral relocations, 7 septic system replacements, 8

The Sheridan County Conservation District (SCCD) has been involved in the Tongue River Watershed since 1996. Activities include monitoring, planning, project development, and outreach. The Tongue River Watershed Plan was first completed in 2000; the plan was updated in 2012 to meet the requirements of an EPA Watershed Based Plan. The Tongue River Watershed Management Plan was approved by EPA/WDEQ in 2013. The plan includes information on bacteria load and load reduction estimates and subwatershed characterizations. SCCD worked with landowners to develop goals, objectives, and action items. ImplementaWatersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................57


diversion replacements, 4 fencing/stockwater projects, and 9 stream bank/channel stabilization projects. SCCD continues to encourage willow-cutting establishment on streambanks with the water jet stinger and sprigged willows at 4 sites during this period. Annual watershed steering committee meetings and an annual watershed newsletter provides information and updates to Tongue River residents. 3482 Newsletters were distributed to residents within the watershed between 2011and 2014. In 2013-2014, SCCD revised the distribution schedule for watershed newsletters so that they are distributed in the winter to promote participation in steering committee meetings and participation in cost-share programs.

Monitoring Results

The initial Tongue River Watershed Assessment was completed in 1996-1999; subsequent interim monitoring occurred in 2003, 2006, 2010, and 2013. Interim monitoring in 2013 extended the monitoring area downstream to the Montana border; there were nine sites on the Tongue River and one each on 7 tributaries, including Prairie Dog Creek, Goose Creek, Wolf Creek, Five Mile Creek, Columbus Creek, Smith Creek and Little Tongue River. Parameters included bacteria, turbidity, temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, discharge, macroinvertebrates, and habitat. Despite years of monitoring, there has been no obvious trend in water quality that can be related to watershed improvement efforts; bacteria levels decrease in some years only to increase in other years.

Landowners and Residents, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Wyoming Game and Fish, Wyoming Wildlife Natural Resource Trust, Sheridan County Public Works Department, Towns of Ranchester and Dayton, Sheridan College, The Nature Conservancy, Trout Unlimited, and the Sheridan Community Land Trust.

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Campbell County Conservation District PO Box 2577 601 4J Ct, Suite D Gillette, WY 82717 307-682-1824 (phone) 307-682-3813 (fax) www.cccdwy.net icd@vcn.com Cody Conservation District 1145 Sheridan Ave, Suite 5 Cody, WY 82414 307-899-0037 codycd@bresnan.net

Conservation District Contacts

Converse County Natural Resource District 911 Windriver Drive Douglas, WY 82633 307-358-3050 michelle.huntington@wy.nacdnet.net www.conserveconverse.org Crook County Natural Resource District PO Box 1070 117 S. 21st Street Sundance, WY 82729 307-283-2870 sdm.mason@gmail.com www.ccnrd.org

Laramie Rivers Conservation District 5015 Stone Road Laramie, WY 82070 307-721-0072 tony.hoch@lrcd.net www.LRCD.net North Platte Valley Conservation District 1441 East M, Suite B Torrington, WY 82240 307-532-4880 karri.ellis@wy.nacdnet.net www.conservegoshen.com Platte County Resource District 1502 Progress Court Wheatland, WY 82201 307-322-9060 brady.irvine@wy.nacdnet.net www.conservewy.com/pcrd Popo Agie Conservation District 221 S. 2nd Street Lander, WY 82520 307-332-3114 pacd@wyoming.com www.popoagie.org

Powder River Conservation District PO Box 48 Dubois-Crowheart Conservation District Kaycee, WY 82639 PO Box 27 307-738-2321 706 Meckem Street anita.bartlett@wy.nacdnet.net Dubois, WY 82513 www.powderrivercd.org 307-455-2388 Powell-Clarks Fork Conservation District dccd@dteworld.com 1017 Highway 14A Powell, WY 82435 Hot Springs Conservation District 307-754-9301 601 Broadway, Suite A ann.trosper@wy.nacdnet.net Thermopolis, WY 82443 www.pcfcd.org 307-864-3488 www.conservewy.com/hscd.html Saratoga-Encampment-Rawlins Conservation District Lake DeSmet Conservation District PO Box 633 621 West Fetterman 101 Cypress Avenue Buffalo, WY 82834 Saratoga, WY 82331 307-684-2526 307-326-8156 www.ldcd.org jarrunner@gmail.com Laramie County Conservation District www.sercd.org 11221 US Highway 30 Sheridan County Conservation District Cheyenne, WY 82009 1949 Sugarland Drive, Suite 102 307-772-2600 Sheridan, WY 82801 info@lccdnet.org 307-672-5820 www.lccdnet.org carrie.rogaczewski@sccdwy.org http://www.sccdwy.org/

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Shoshone Conservation District 359 Nevada Avenue Lovell, WY 82431 307-548-7422 shoshonecd@tctwest.net South Big Horn Conservation District 408 Greybull Avenue Greybull, WY 82426 307-765-2483 janet.hallsted@wy.nacdnet.net www.conservewy.com/sbhcd Lincoln Conservation District PO Box 98 110 Pine Street Cokeville, WY 83114 307-279-3256 brenda.lazcanotegui@wy.nacdnet.net www.lincolnconservationdistrict.org Lingle-Fort Laramie Conservation District 1441 East M, Suite B Torrington, WY 82240 307-532-4880 karri.ellis@wy.nacdnet.net www.conservegoshen.com Little Snake River Conservation District PO Box 355 285 North Penland Street Baggs, WY 82321 307-383-7860 lsrcd@yahoo.com Lower Wind River Conservation District 508 N. Broadway Riverton, WY 82501 307-856-7524 cathy.meyer@wy.nacdnet.net Medicine Bow Conservation District PO Box 6 510 Utah Street Medicine Bow, WY 82324 307-379-2221 justin@medbowcd.org www.medbowcd.org Meeteetse Conservation District PO Box 237 910 Park Avenue Meeteetse, WY 82433 307-868-2484 mcd@tctwest.net www.meeteetsecd-wy.gov

Natrona County Conservation District 5880 Enterprise Drive, Suite 100 Casper, WY 82609 307-261-5436 Ext 103 lisa.ogden@wy.nacdnet.net www.nccdwyoming.com

Washakie County Conservation District 208 Shiloh Road Worland, WY 82401 307-347-2456 wccd@rtconnect.net www.washakiecd.com

Niobrara Conservation District PO Box 659 Lusk, WY 82225 307-334-2953 lshaw@wyoming.com

Weston County Natural Resource District 1225 Washington Boulevard, #3 Newcastle, WY 82701 307-746-3264 www.westoncountynrd.org

South Goshen Conservation District 1441 East M, Suite B Torrington, WY 82240 307-532-4880 karri.ellis@wy.nacdnet.net www.conservegoshen.com Star Valley Conservation District PO Box 216 61 E. 5th Avenue Afton, WY 83110 307-885-7823 bashworth@starvalleycd.org www.starvalleycd.org Sublette County Conservation District PO Box 647 1625 W. Pine Street Pinedale, WY 82941 307-367-2257 sccd@sublettecd.com www.sublettecd.com Sweetwater County Conservation District 79 Winston Drive, Suite 110 Rock Springs, WY 82901 307-362-3062 admin@swccd.us www.swccd.us Teton Conservation District PO Box 1070 420 W. Pearl Avenue Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-2110 randy@tetonconservation.org www.tetonconservation.org Uinta County Conservation District PO Box 370 100 East Sage Street Lyman, WY 82937 307-787-3794 ksabey@bvea.net www.uintacountycd.com

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 .................................................................................................................................60


Appendix

Animal Waste Best Management Practices * Corral Relocation Corral Relocation AFO / CAFO Animal Feeding Operation--New water well, tanks, 900 feet fence on 849 acres Conservation Stewardship Program (ANM) Waste Storage Facility Animal Feeding Operation / Confined Animal Feeding Operation Animal Waste Best Management Practices Nutrient Management Plans AFO project on Smiths Fork Cropland, Pasture/Hayland Best Management Practices * 900 ft. Irrigation Pipeline Agriculture Secondary containment Canal lateral - 2700 ft. piped and buried Closed 4395 ft. of drains Conservation Stewardship Program (CROP) Cropland, Pasture/Hayland Best Management Practices CSP - Cropland, Pasture, & Rangeland Dirt Ditch Elimination, Pivots, Irrigation Delivery, Dike Repairs, Gated Pipe, Irrigation Water Management Irrigation Conveyance, Reservoir, Sprinkler, Structures, Pumping Plants Irrigation diversion and storage ponds Irrigation Diversion Replacement Irrigation Gated Pipe Irrigation improvement--buried pipe on 100 acres Irrigation Pipeline Irrigation Pipeline Irrigation Pipeline Irrigation Pipeline Irrigation Pumping Plant Irrigation Structure Irrigation System, Sprinkler Irrigation System, Sprinkler Irrigation System, Sprinkler Irrigation System, Sprinkler Irrigation-water control structure Irrigation Water Management Irrigation Water Management Irrigation Water Management (IWM) Irrigation Water Management--Buried pipe on 50 acres Irrigation Water Management--Gated Pipe on 159 acres Irrigation Water Management--Install center pivots on a total of 258 acres Irrigation Water Management--Install pivots on 675 acres Irrigation-center pivot Irrigation-gated pipe Pumping Facility Reduced Tillage Various irrigation projects Vegetation plantings for wildlife habitat - 840 acres Water Control Structure

District # of each SCCD 1 SVCD 1 HSCD 1 LWRCD 1 MCD MCD PCRD PACD CCCD UCCD

2 1 2 3 2 1

PRCD PCFCD SCD SCD MCD PACD NCCD WCCD

1 4 1 4 6 42 18 66

NCCD HSCD SCCD PCFCD LWRCD UCCD SVCD LSRCD MCD SVCD PCFCD PCFCD SVCD LSRCD MCD UCCD HSCD PCFCD SVCD LWRCD LWRCD LWRCD LWRCD UCCD UCCD MCD PCFCD PCFCD SCD MCD

51 3 2 7 1 1 4 2 1 6 6 6 3 1 2 1 5 2 5 2 4 4 6 3 1 2 13 22 46 4

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................61


Grazing / Rangeland Best Management Practices *

District

# of each

13,581 ft. Fence 2800 ft. of Cross Fencing projects 5,061 ft. of Stock Water Pipeline Big Laramie upland post-fire reseeding (160 Acres) Conservation Stewardship Program (Range) Critical Area Planting Fabricated Windbreaks Fencing Fencing Fencing Fencing/prescribed grazing (West Fork Loco Creek) Grazing BMP (SGI) Herbaceous Weed Control Irrigation pumps / motors Irrigiation water pipelines Livestock Fence Livestock Pipeline Livestock Pipeline Livestock Pumping Plant Livestock Water Tank Livestock Water Tank and Pipeline Livestock Water Well and Tank Obstruction Removal Pest Management Pipeline Pipeline Pipeline and off site watering facilities Portable of stream watering trailer purchased for use on Little Greys Cattle Prescribed Grazing Prescribed Grazing PV Solar, Grazing Management, Stockwater Pipelines Rangeland Best Management Practices Retired 494 irrigated acres with 4 to 5 different landowners Riparian fencing and water developments for 69 acres Management, Pumping Plant, Prescribed Grazing Solar well tanks for livestock water Spring development Spring development and grazing plan Spring development projects Stock & Wildlife Water Conveyance, Well & Watering Facility Stock and Irrigation ponds Stock Water Facilities (Stock Tanks) Stock Water Facilities (Storage Tanks) Stock water pipeline Stockwater Development/Riparian Fencing Upland Wildlife Habitat Management Water Control Structure Water Well Water Well Water Well, Tank and Pipeline Water Wells Watering Facility Watering Facility Weed Management

PRCD LSRCD PRCD LRCD MCD MCD CCCD CCCD NCCD SVCD LSRCD CCCD MCD LCCD LCCD CCCD SVCD CCCD SVCD CCCD CCCD CCCD MCD SVCD CCCD MCD HSCD SVCD MCD PCFCD WCCD PACD LCCD UCCD NCCD UCCD UCCD UCCD LCCD NCCD LSRCD PRCD PRCD UCCD SCCD MCD CCCD CCCD PRCD CCCD LSRCD MCD SVCD HSCD

1 4 1 1 2 1 10 5 1 1 2 10 1 50 6 2 2 5 1 12 24 3 3 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 10 12 5 1 11 1 4 1 9 23 4 3 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 11 1 6 2 1

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................62


Appendix—Continued

Hydrologic Modifications/Stream Restoration Best Management Practices * District Big Laramie Streambank Restoration 7,500+ feet of buck and pole fence to prevent damage from unauthorized off-road vehicles on the Pole Mountain at 96 sites Brush Management Coal Gulch Wetlands Dike Fencing Fencing Fish Barriers; Dirtyman, Hells Canyon Flood Recovery/bank stabilization Grade Stabilization Structure Grade Stabilization Structure Habitat Enhancement Projects Hydrologic Modifications/Stream Restoration Best Management Practices Little Laramie Streambank Restoration/Irrigation Diversion Muddy Creek Wetlands Obstruction Removal Off-stream watering water quality improvement BMP projects: fencing, solar units, pipelines, wells, tanks, etc Pierotto Diversion Structure Planted 160 trees to reclaim a mine site and re-establish native vegetation Pond Pond Sealing Precision Land Forming Reconstruction of 8 diversion structures - 7 miles of river restoration and 2 miles of stream resoration Red Creek Habitat Improvement Project- Built enclosures and planted 90 aspen trees along the creek Riparian Fencing Riparian plantings to restore stream crossing damaged by off-road vehicle use on the Pole Mtn. Unit of the MBNF. Russian Olive & Salt Cedar Removal (5053.3 acres) Russian Olive removal Russian Olive removal - 3 acres Russian Olive removal (1401 acres) Russian Olive Treament Russian Olive/Salt Cedar removed, 867 acres (CRM) Yellowtail Habitat Spring Development Spring Development and Fence (23,000 feet) on 251 acres Stormwater Wetland Installation Stream channel/bank rehabilitation Stream Gaging Stream restoration and riparian enhancement Streambank and Shoreline Protection Streambank Improvement - Russian olive tree and tamarisk removal Structure for Water Control Tree/Shrub Establishment Water Control Structure Water Development--Well, Fence (1300 feet) riparian Water Well Wetland creation and enhancement, 16.4 acres Wetland enhancement and stream restoration Wetland Restoration Willow establishment on streambanks (with stinger)

# of each

LRCD LCCD

1 96

PCFCD LSRCD MCD SVCD MCD LSRCD UCCD SVCD MCD TCD PACD LRCD LSRCD SVCD CCNRD

11 1 1 1 6 2 4 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 5

SWCCD SWCCD MCD MCD SVCD LSRCD

1 1 1 1 1 8

SWCCD

1

SCCD LCCD

1 6

WCCD PCFCD PCRD SBHCD MCD SCD MCD LWRCD TCD SCCD TCD UCCD SVCD HSCD SVCD SVCD UCCD LWRCD MCD UCCD UCCD CCCD SCCD

22 6 1 35 2 2 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 9 2 4 8 1 1 1 1 1 8

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ........................................................................................................63


Septic System Best Management Practices *

District

Septic System Replacement Septic Systems Pumped Septic System Replacement Septic System BMP’s Septic system remediation projects Septic System Replacement

SCCD SVCD PCFCD WCCD CCNRD SCD

Silvaculture Best Management Practices *

District

Aspen Health and improvement 1800 acres Hazardous Fuels Juniper treatments/ mule deer winter range and Sage Grouse Improvements Urban Best Management Practices * Street Sweeping Grass seeding along the Cheyenne Greenway to prevent wind and water erosion Laramie River Restoration Project Final Phase I and all of Phase III Storm Scepter Installation Urban Best Management Practices Urban Run off-BMPs Well Testing (15), Irrigation Controllers (10), Dog Waste Stations (12), Rain Barrels (6), HHW Collection Day Events (2), Small Acreage Worskshop (1), EPA Urban Small Waters Project (1)

LSRCD LSRCD LSRCD District

# of each 7 88 2 4 4 8 # of each 1 1 4 # of each

TCD LCCD

3 1

LRCD TCD PACD SCCD WCCD

1 1 2 1 47

Disclaimer for Appendix:

*These numbers, and other figures in this document, are comprised of the individual internal assessments of districts throughout the state, representing the implementation and tracking of those independent local government entities and their assessment of which projects in each area represent water quality benefits within the watershed entailed in this report. Those individual assessments were compiled by the staff at WACD to create a picture of the implementation efforts statewide. Changes in individual districts methods of tracking, partnerships, or assessment of BMP effectiveness for water quality, could potentially affect the numbers in this report. However, based on what WACD considers the best available data, this is an accurate assessment of implementation throughout the state.

Watersheds Progress Report / 2015 ..................................................................................................................................64


Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts

517 E. 19th Street • Cheyenne, WY 82001 Phone (307) 632-5716 • Email: bobbie.frank@conservewy.com • www.conservewy.com


Watersheds progress report