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T RANSFORMATION

Augusta, Georgia


TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S • Message from the President, Page 2 • Transformation of an Enterprise, Page 4 • Our History, Page 7 • Georgia Health Sciences Enterprise Today, Page 8 • Strategic Planning: The Process, Page 14 • Mission, Values, and Vision, Page 19 • Achieving the Vision, Page 22 • Strategic Priorities, Page 24 • Summary, Page 42 • Appendices: Transformation 2020 Steering Committtee and Council Members, Page 44

Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


“Georgians deserve a world-class, public medical university, and it will be a priority of this administration to have a medical school among the top 50 nationally. This is something we can do, and with your help, we will!” – Governor Nathan Deal

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A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Friends, During my Inaugural Address last May, I promised to oversee the creation of a new and greater tomorrow. Since then, we have been in the midst of a rich transformative period, which continues today. And the scope of our metamorphosis has broadened even further. Our enterprise, Georgia’s academic health center, will soon consolidate with our sister institution, Augusta State University (ASU), to form a brand-new university . . . a university that will create Georgia’s fourth comprehensive research university, and will soon become one of the nation’s leading institutions of higher learning. This consolidation represents the single greatest event in the history of our universities since Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU) became a free-standing university in 1950 and ASU became a four-year institution in 1963. Consolidation will eventually require the alignment of two Strategic Plans: the one you hold in your hand or view on your screen, and the one that ASU is operating under at this time. As the two universities become one, many changes will be necessary to align our missions and tap into the boundless potential that lies ahead. This requires great clarity about our existing strengths and the myriad opportunities on the horizon for each entity. The Strategic Plan for the new university will be based on a solid foundation of strategic thinking. And for this, our plans—the starting point for our exciting journey together—must be as dynamic, far-reaching, and future-oriented as possible to ensure a whole that is exponentially greater than the sum of its parts. This is the Georgia Health Sciences Strategic Plan—Transformation 2020, the road map that clarifies our strengths, our goals, our hopes, and our aspirations as we prepare to join the ranks of the great American Research University. Our enterprise’s mission, both in its current incarnation as a health sciences university and its future incarnation as a vital component of a comprehensive university, is nothing less than leading the state and nation to better health.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


Governor Deal articulated our vision best in his 2012 State of the State address— “Georgians deserve a world-class, public medical university, and it will be a priority of this administration to have a medical college among the top 50 nationally. This is something we can do and with your help we will!” And simply put, that is our goal: to make certain that Georgia has a top-50 public academic health center. Transformation 2020 will help ensure that we are on the right path. No single individual, and no single institution, can do this alone. Transformation 2020 requires teamwork, collaboration, and bridge-building. These are the elements we have set in motion. The time is right, the elements are in place, our passion is focused, and the road map is in your hands. Greatness does not happen by accident; it is the result of concerted efforts to highlight a mission, create a vision, and determine the values that will actualize our goal. And it results from having a clear strategic plan that will guide us into the future, facing a changing, challenging, and exciting environment. This plan enables us to begin to articulate the related strategies and tactics of each of our missions, colleges, support systems, and structures . . . a clear strategic path. The journey ahead is brighter and more exciting than at virtually any other period in our enterprise’s history since its founding in 1828. Thank you for playing a vital role in our transformation. Sincerely,

Ricardo Azziz, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A. Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Medicine President, Georgia Health Sciences University CEO, Georgia Health Sciences Health System

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T R A N S F O R M AT I O N O F A N E N T E R P R I S E

“This is our future, and we are shaping it together.” – President/CEO Ricardo Azziz

Georgia Health Sciences University houses the state of Georgia’s only public medical college—the Medical College of Georgia—and the state’s only College of Dental Medicine, along with Colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Graduate Studies and Nursing. But GHSU is much more than a university. As the state’s sole public academic health center, the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise represents a statewide vision for health care education, biotechnological development, public health, disease prevention, and advanced clinical care. Its goal for the 21st century is to optimize its role as the state’s academic health center through unique strategies and innovative partnerships.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


I . I N T RODUC T I O N

GHSU is much more than a university. As the state’s sole public academic health center, the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise represents a statewide vision for health care education, biotechnological development, public health, disease prevention, and advanced clinical care.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


This strategic plan articulates the ideals, beliefs, and aspirations that will chart our path to a greater future and inspire our greatest achievements. It is a roadmap to excellence, a clear and resounding affirmation not only of the enterprise’s current identity, but of its evolving and transformational impact. This enterprise will appear very different in the year 2020, building on a strong past to realize its full potential in roles including: • A recognized state and national thought leader • The partner of choice for colleges, universities, hospitals, and health systems • A high-tech, high-touch educational hub for advanced/ graduate health professions education • An innovative research and biotechnology leader • A respected provider of high-quality specialized clinical care to an expanded region • A massive and growing economic engine for Georgia and the region Thank you for taking the time to share in our vision as we advance our mission. “ I know the University System of Georgia will be continuously proud of what has been done here and what will be accomplished in the future.” – Henry “Hank” M. Huckaby University System of Georgia Chancellor

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“ Our folks really come every day giving their heart and soul to the institution.” – Dr. Gretchen Caughman, Provost

Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


OUR HISTORY Georgia Health Sciences University traces its roots to 1822, when Dr. Milton Antony led a group of Augusta physicians to establish the Medical Society of Augusta. He and Dr. Joseph Adams Eve received a state charter in December 1828 to establish a Medical Academy of Georgia. The founding faculty opened the academy, and in December 1829, the curriculum was expanded to two years, culminating in a doctor of medicine degree. The institution’s name was changed at that time to the Medical Institute of Georgia, then changed again four years later to the Medical College of Georgia. In 1873, the school became the Medical Department of the University of Georgia, an affiliation strengthened by legislation in 1911. The University System of Georgia, governed by a Board of Regents, was established in 1932, and the school’s name was again changed in 1933 to the University of Georgia School of Medicine. In 1950, the Board of Regents cleared the path to optimize GHSU’s full potential by declaring it an autonomous university. The name of the newly independent university reverted to the Medical College of Georgia, taking the university’s name from the former name of the medical school.

“Georgia Health Sciences University is second to none in its commitment to serving our fellow man.” - Dr. Lois Taylor Ellison Provost/Professor Emeritus and Medical Historian

The university opened its College of Nursing in 1956, its College of Graduate

in Residence

Studies in 1962, its College of Allied Health Sciences in 1968, and its College of Dental Medicine in 1969—now educating the full spectrum of health professionals while continuing to provide exceptional health care and make invaluable contributions to research. These contributions included Dr. Raymond Ahlquist’s research laying the groundwork for beta-blocking drugs, for which he received the Albert Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award; Dr. Jerry Buccafusco’s development of novel Alzheimer’s therapies and biomarkers for early detection of the disease; Dr. Robert G. Ellison Sr.’s performance of Georgia’s first open-heart operation using bypass; Dr. William F. Hamilton’s groundbreaking work in cardiology, for which he received the American Heart Association’s Gold Heart Award; Dr. Titus H.J. Huisman’s identification of thalassemia and other hemoglobin variants that led to nationwide newborn screenings for hemoglobin-related disorders; Dr. Virendra Mahesh’s groundbreaking ovulation research; Dr. Paul McDonough’s studies

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


shedding unprecedented light on gender-related disorders; the identification by Drs. Andrew Mellor and David Munn of the role of an enzyme called IDO in selectively suppressing the immune system; Dr. Robert B. Greenblatt’s studies laying the groundwork for fertility and birth-control treatments; Dr. Virgil P. Sydenstricker’s development of a blood transfusion system that laid the foundation for blood banks; Dr. Corbett H. Thigpen’s research that revolutionized the understanding of sociopathy and other personality disorders; Dr. Richard Torpin’s invention of tools for tasks such as uterus-

Full integration in leadership of the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise rapidly created a growth-oriented environment that has greatly helped advance our state, national, and international prominence as an academic health center, biomedical research engine, and health sciences university.

packing and X-ray imaging to make childbirth immeasurably safer; and Dr. Joe Z. Tzien’s identification of a protein that enables selective memory elimination. Our practicing alumni also contributed vigorously to many research initiatives, including pioneering work in post-traumatic stress disorder and office-based epidemiologic research. In 2011, the university’s name changed to Georgia Health Sciences University, reflecting its tremendous growth as the state’s academic health center and health sciences university. The university acknowledged a wellspring of past achievement by retaining the name, the Medical College of Georgia, for its medical school.

T H E G E O R G I A H E A LT H SCIENCES ENTERPRISE T O D AY In 2010, the Georgia Health Sciences University President also assumed the roles of Chief Executive Officer of the Georgia Health Sciences Health System and Chairman of the Boards of the Health System and Medical Center. This full integration in leadership of the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise rapidly created a growth-oriented environment that has greatly helped advance our state, national, and international prominence as an academic health center, biomedical research engine, and health sciences university GHSU offers more.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


than 60 programs in its Colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, and Nursing, as well as in the 13th-oldest and sixth-largest medical school in the nation, the Medical College of Georgia. In addition to housing the state’s only college of Dental Medicine, GHSU’s College of Allied Health Sciences and Graduate Nursing degree programs are the largest of their kind in the state. GHSU graduates are among the best-prepared in the country, significantly impacting the health care, education, and research workforce statewide and beyond. The university addresses current and emerging health care needs, educating highly skilled professionals in a technologically advanced environment. These technological advances include simulation training, distance-learning, and Internet-based instruction, all of which have vastly increased access to a GHSU education.

GHSU graduates are among the bestprepared in the country, significantly impacting the health care, education, and research workforce statewide and beyond.

“The faculty is GHSU’s biggest asset. They’re always willing to help you.” - Medical College of Georgia Student Vijayalaksh Sundaram

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Our distinction as the state’s academic health center ensures access statewide and beyond to the highest-quality health care, the newest biomedical breakthroughs, and cutting-edge technology.

GHSU also houses a thriving research enterprise, focusing on areas including neuro- and behavioral sciences, cardiovascular biology, cancer, regenerative and reparative medicine, preventive health, and personalized medicine and genomics. Recent breakthroughs include selective suppression of the immune system, removing memories without damaging brain cells, and inhibiting a protein that promotes cancer growth. GHSU was recently named one of the nation’s top-15 places to work by The Scientist, and our sponsored research funding has increased 146 percent in the past decade. The university has also partnered with neighboring federal, military, and veteran facilities to develop innovative research and educational programs. Our distinction as the state’s academic health center ensures access statewide and beyond to the highest-quality health care, the newest biomedical breakthroughs, and cutting-edge technology. Our integrated and closely aligned Georgia Health Sciences Health System includes the Georgia Health Sciences Medical Center, specializing in the needs of the acutely ill in an

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


ethnically diverse region; the award-winning Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center, the second-largest children’s hospital in Georgia; the Georgia Health Sciences Cancer Center, the first of its kind in Georgia to offer Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials; and the Georgia Health Sciences Medical Associates, a multi-specialty group that is the largest of its kind in the region. These facilities, which include more than 80 specialty clinics, host over 500,000 patient visits annually. The Georgia Health Sciences University and Heath System partner with many state, active military, and Veterans Affairs agencies to manage health care at facilities including East Central Regional Hospital, the Georgia Department of Corrections, and the Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home. The Georgia Health Sciences Health System also hosts over one-quarter of all of Georgia’s postgraduate medical educational (residency) slots. As a pioneer in Patient- and Family-Centered Care, Georgia Health Sciences collaborates with patients and their families in every aspect of treatment. The campus is also characterized by the extensive volunteerism of staff, students, and faculty locally, regionally, and throughout the globe.

“Georgia Health Sciences has always excelled in compassionate and cutting-edge care. Recent innovations, including our pioneering role in Patient- and Family-Centered Care, add new dimensions to our contributions in this vital area” - David S. Hefner CEO, Georgia Health Sciences and Medical Associates EVP for Clinical Affairs

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The Georgia Health Sciences University and Health System campuses are

The Georgia Health Sciences enterprise is critical to the region, the state of Georgia, the nation, and the world. The enterprise contributes over $12 billion annually to Georgia’s economy.

undergoing extensive expansion, producing greater than 30 percent more graduates than a decade ago. Over 60 percent of GHSU graduates live in Georgia, immeasurably enhancing their communities’ economies and quality of life. In addition, GHSU faculty and students provide care at more than 800 ambulatory care clinics, practices, and hospitals statewide. Our role as the state’s academic health center and our location as a border city ensure wide reach throughout Georgia and large parts of South Carolina. For example, the GHSU College of Nursing has a campus in Athens and a teaching site in Columbus. GHSU’s Medical College of Georgia, which produces one in five of all practicing physicians in the state, recently opened a campus in Athens in partnership with the University of Georgia and additional clinical training campuses in Albany, Rome, and Savannah. This expansion will enable the college to increase its class size to 300 students yearly by 2020, making it one of the largest medical schools in the nation. The College of Dental Medicine, the state’s only dental school, is increasing its class size from 63 to 100, facilitated by an award-winning new clinical training facility to accommodate significant growth and cutting-edge strategies and approaches to clinical training and practice. The College of Allied Health Sciences is the largest school of its kind in the state, and the College of Graduate Studies trains over 200 scientists and researchers in numerous biomedical and health science disciplines. The Georgia Heath Sciences enterprise is critical to the region, the state of Georgia, the nation, and the world. The enterprise contributes over $12 billion annually to Georgia’s economy. In addition to its more than 10,000 employees

“I’ve learned so much about myself at GHSU.” - College of Nursing Student Erin Pippin

and 2,400 students, the enterprise creates more than 50,000 additional jobs statewide. Our enterprise is one of Georgia’s top-20 employers and the Augusta area’s second-largest employer, with over $2 billion annually in direct economic impact on the local economy. In the past decade alone, the enterprise has infused over $18 billion into the region, including over $1 billion in

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uncompensated care to the community, improving the lives of countless families. The enterprise has been a champion for diverse populations for decades, providing incalculable care to socioeconomically disadvantaged citizens. Such a mutually beneficial relationship serves everyone’s interests. For example, GHSU and Health System have contributed greatly to ensuring our region’s continued economic growth, supporting Augusta’s inclusion in Forbes Magazine’s 2009 list of top-50 “getting richer” and “fastest-recovering” cities. Business Week in 2010 cited Augusta as having the 11th-strongest job market recovery following the recent recession, along with the 21st-strongest housing market. Metro Monitor in 2010 called metropolitan Augusta’s economy the seventh-best in economic resilience. Southern Business & Development called Augusta a top-10 megasite in 2009, and the Brookings Institute ranked the city 21st in strongest-performing metropolitan areas in 2010. Kraft cited Augusta

The enterprise has been a champion for diverse populations for decades, providing incalculable care to socioeconomically disadvantaged citizens.

as a “Best Town in America” finalist in 2010. The Georgia Health Sciences University and Health System are critical partners for the success of our region and the state.

“GHSU is a huge asset to the city of Augusta, particularly in its recent expansion efforts. We’re very happy to have it right here in Augusta, Georgia.” - Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver

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THE PROCESS In August 2010, Georgia Health Sciences launched the campus engagement process under the mantle of Enterprise-Wide Strategic Planning (ESP), an “It has been a privilege to

enterprise-wide process of collaboration, self-appraisal, and beginning

facilitate a process in which

assessment, to optimize its role as Georgia’s health sciences university and

every member of the Georgia

academic health center.

Health Sciences community was invited to participate.” - Dr. Joseph Hobbs

The ESP Task Force was charged with producing information in 90 days to guide and focus short-term goals while supporting a long-term strategic initiative.

Senior Associate Dean

Task force members identified problems and future-focused solutions regarding

for Primary Care and

educational excellence, research growth, clinical integration/development, and

Community Affairs

workforce development. The process engaged hundreds of leaders, students, faculty, staff, and community members throughout the enterprise. ESP’s progress and activities, which were widely publicized, yielded 200 initiatives, 80 of which have been addressed. Progress on the remaining initiatives is ongoing. (Visit www.esp.georgiahealth.edu for more information.) With the momentum, energy, and ideas generated by ESP, the enterprise moved on to a longer-term planning process: Transformation 2020. The name reflects the enterprise’s goal of transforming into a highly integrated, worldclass organization that exemplifies excellence in biomedical and health science education, research, and clinical service. An executive-level Transformation 2020 Steering Committee was charged with establishing the overall direction of the process, appointing council co-chairmen and members to redefine the mission, values, and vision, and develop enterprise strategies. While a Georgia

“This document belongs to

Health Sciences Project Team provided staff support and planning expertise,

the entire enterprise, and it

the Steering Committee seated a Transformation 2020 Council, a 45-member

clearly bears the mark of those

team of enterprise administrators, faculty, students, staff and community

who carry out its mission.”

representatives. (See Appendices, Page 44.) The council was tasked to oversee

- Joe Thornton Assistant Vice President of Ambulatory Care Finance

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details of the planning process and content; appoint strategic priority work group co-chairs and sub-group members; and review and refine enterprise strategies, goals, and objectives.

Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


I I . ST R AT EG I C PL A N N I N G :

Transformation 2020 is the over-arching strategic plan that serves as the

framework for tactical planning within individual enterprise components (including five colleges, a Research Institute, and Health System) and its support systems (including philanthropy, facilities, financials, workforce, communications, and community and external affairs). The plan’s Mission, Values, and Vision statement drew heavily on prior statements from the three enterprises originally part of the enterprise: GHSU, Georgia Health Sciences Medical Center, and Georgia Health Sciences Medical Associates, and modified through individual feedback obtained from enterprisewide surveys and other means of communication. Of the approximately 900 members of the Georgia Health Sciences community who responded to a survey about proposed statements for the enterprise’s Mission, Values, and Vision,

Transformation 2020 is the over-arching strategic plan that serves as the framework for tactical planning within individual enterprise components and its support systems.

more than 90 percent agreed that the verbiage reflected their beliefs of the purpose and values of the enterprise. The University System of Georgia Board of Regents then went on to approve the enterprise’s Mission Statement.

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The next step for the Transformation 2020 Council was to appoint Strategic Priority Work Groups to identify priorities derived from our Mission and Values that would enable us to achieve our Vision in the face of uncertainties, challenges, and possibilities. These priorities guided the development of our goals and objectives. Throughout the process, Council and Task Force members conducted extensive research to benchmark, quantify, and justify their data, studying best practices and strategic priorities in like and aspirant institutions in the focus areas

Everyone who offered feedback received a personalized response, either in person, over the phone or via customized email messages.

of education, research, clinical care, diversity, partnerships, and resources.

Not a single concern went unaddressed.

in the process. A website, www.georgiahealth.edu/transformation2020, was

The result? The most inclusive, representative, forward-thinking, and far-reaching document in the history of our enterprise.

print, digital and video messages served as reminders that every voice would be

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Once the information was collected, critically assessed, and vetted, a professional writer was tasked to compile the now-voluminous data into a stirring and coherent narrative that would inspire, energize, and motivate the Georgia Health Sciences community and its many illustrious partners throughout the state, community, and nation. This narrative became the draft of this document. The next step was to engage every member of the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise, ensuring a truly grass-roots sense of investment and participation created to house the draft as well as collateral and related materials. For four weeks in late 2011/early 2012, enterprise members were encouraged to read the draft and offer feedback, both as a whole and section by section. Ongoing heard and every concern would be addressed. An extra week was then added to the feedback deadline to even further reinforce the importance of inclusion and enterprise-wide participation. Throughout the process, everyone who offered feedback received a personalized response, either in person, over the phone or via customized email messages. Several feedback respondents expressed their surprise and appreciation that their concerns were personally addressed and taken so seriously.

Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


In the month of January 2012, the feedback was collated, categorized, and thoroughly studied by Council members, who served as representatives for every component of the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise. Not a single concern went undiscussed or unaddressed. The professional writer then revised the document to reflect revisions agreed upon by the Transformation 2020 Council. The result? The most inclusive, representative, forward-thinking, and far-reaching document in the history of our enterprise. Even more importantly, it was Georgia Health Sciences’ rich and distinguished history that shaped the road map to its future. The Georgia Health Sciences enterprise has always epitomized integrity, compassion, excellence, and the other principles that are now being formally adopted. It was these qualities that led to historic breakthroughs in areas including cardiovascular disease, nutritional deficiencies, sickle cell disease and neurological disorders. As these major breakthroughs have unfolded, Georgia Health Sciences has gone about the day-to-day business of educating future health care professionals, developing new treatments and cures, and caring for our citizens. The future envisioned by Transformation 2020 embraces a broadened and global role for current achievements and the countless advances that will spring from an environment adapted to optimize our growing aspirations. This document outlines the Mission, Values, Vision, Strategic Priorities, Goals, and Objectives identified through our Transformation 2020 process, and critically necessary to advance the institution in a future- and growth-oriented manner.

“It makes me very proud to travel through campus and know it’s growing. Not only is it surviving, it’s actually thriving.” - Dr. Tammy J. Robinson GHSU Alumna

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M I SS I O N , VA L U ES , A N D V I S I O N This Strategic Plan shares the enterprise’s mission, articulates the values that will guide us, and envisions what the enterprise will look like in 2020 and beyond.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


I I I . T R A N SF O RM AT I O N 202 0 ST R AT EG I C PL A N N I N G :

OUR MISSION Success very much depends on knowing what you are about, what your purpose is. In this vein, the mission of the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise is:

To lead Georgia and the world to better health by providing excellence in biomedical education, discovery, and service. Every member of our faculty and staff serves a unique role, but an encompassing sense of service is the common denominator. This is what a computer programmer on campus, for instance, has in common with a cardiothoracic surgeon, or what a statistician has in common with a pharmacologist. Georgia Health Sciences’ mission distills the role of every member of the enterprise to its essence: better health. Georgia Health Sciences’ administrators, educators, clinicians, researchers, and staff are all working together as an integrated high-performing team to promote better health. It is difficult to imagine a more worthy purpose than this. Our mission inspires our noblest efforts, our brightest ideas, our highest degree of enthusiasm—in short, the very best we have to offer. The collective impact of these countless individual initiatives is incalculable, but our Mission Statement articulates that impact as succinctly as possible: better health.

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O U R VA LUES Fundamental to advancing our mission are the values we espouse and embrace. Our values reflect our core and basic beliefs, shaping our every interaction and activity. Our seven Values reflect many related principles, which are represented as “word clouds.” The values serve as the anchors, while the word clouds encompass the scope and breadth of each value. They are:

• Collaboration, reflected in collegiality, stewardship, partnership, and teamwork Achieving our vision will require every member of the enterprise, both individually and collectively, to address our environmental challenges with all of the dedication, passion, and focus we can muster. Our mission demands our best efforts.

• Compassion, reflected in social responsibility, respect, empathy, and caring

• Diversity, reflected in heterogeneity, awareness, fairness, and equality • Excellence, reflected in effectiveness, distinction, and quality

• Innovation, reflected in novelty, passion, initiative, and creativity

• Integrity, reflected in reliability, accountability, responsibility, transparency, honesty, dependability, and trust

• Leadership, reflected in professionalism, honor, vision, and courage These values articulate the concepts that shaped and informed our mission. Our values inspire every member of the enterprise to provide our best efforts. These values represent the very soul of the enterprise.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


OUR VISION Success requires knowing both where we are and where we want to go. Our mission distills our collective purpose to its essence, articulating the common denominator of ongoing efforts. Our values articulate our core beliefs and guiding principles. But what will propel us toward an even brighter and more exciting future? This is where our vision comes in to play:

To be a globally recognized research university and academic health center, while transforming the region into a health care and biomedical research destination. Our vision reflects our role to train the leaders of tomorrow while creating new knowledge and novel discoveries, suggesting relevance far beyond the borders of our community. This will ensure global recognition of Georgia Health Sciences’ high quality, impeccable standards, and unwavering integrity. Our vision also speaks to our role as an economic engine statewide and beyond, prompting health care tourism and global recognition for cutting-edge discoveries and patient- and family-centered health care. Achieving our vision will require every member of the enterprise, both individually and collectively, to address our environmental challenges with all of the dedication, passion, and focus we can muster. Our mission demands our best efforts.

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ACHIEVING THE VISION Transformation 2020 may seem bold and ambitious, but it is necessary and achievable. Transformation, which implies a greater degree of change than the norm, is necessary when the external environment is changing rapidly and when an institution has far to go to meet current challenges. The incremental changes

The time to act is now. With the right vision, leadership, support, and stewardship, Georgia Health Sciences will emerge as the next great American academic health center. This is an invigorating period in the life of our university, and a tremendous opportunity for every member of the Georgia Health Sciences community. Our transformation will define the institution, the region, and the state for decades to come.

that have sustained the enterprise over the last several years will be inadequate to overcome current and future challenges, which include sharply declining state support, increasing health care demands, and a radically changing health care environment. Transformation requires effective leadership at all levels and a commitment to the process from every member of the enterprise. We must be willing to move out of our comfort zone and take risks. The time to act is now.

HOW WILL THE ENTERPRISE LOOK IN 2020? With the right vision, leadership, support, and stewardship, Georgia Health Sciences will emerge as the next great American academic health center. The full integration of the enterprise’s academic and clinical leadership and administrative support has been key—a pivotal step in ensuring full alignment of the enterprise and its people. Our growing stature will enable us to meet current and emerging health professions workforce needs and the escalating health care challenges of a growing and diverse population. We will train the workforce of the future, emphasizing interprofessional teamwork, personalized care, prevention, and treatment that addresses social, cultural, and economic implications. Our growing research enterprise will feature a high-quality, collaborative, and efficient system that readily translates discoveries to the patient and the community. We will proactively address the needs of our population, particularly in the fields of cancer, neuro- and behavioral health, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic/adipose/diabetic disorders. Areas of focus will include reparative and regenerative medicine, public and preventive health, pediatrics and early-life determinants, and personalized and genomic medicine.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


I V. T R A N SF O RM AT I O N 2020 :

We will transform our clinical facilities into a health care destination by leveraging our excellent reputation in Patient- and Family-Centered Care, committing to interprofessional care, forming robust new partnerships, strategically investing resources, and optimizing patient care quality and outcomes. These goals will require significant investment—investment of public and private dollars, of philanthropic and community support, and considerable effort by the enterprise’s leadership, faculty, and staff. But the return on investment will be considerable, including hundreds of new jobs, millions of additional dollars in tax revenues, and an even greater economic impact than we already impart. Pathways to our success include: • Articulating a big and inspiring dream while embracing bold and achievable long-term goals • Building the great internationally recognized academic health center of the future

“We can only succeed

if we embrace the future by embracing change . . . together.” - Dr. Ricardo Azziz President/CEO

• Optimizing our unique assets while investing in infrastructure • Enhancing community relations and support while leveraging local, regional, and state partnerships • Building philanthropy through initiatives that generate widespread enthusiasm and engagement • Enhancing branding/communications efforts to ensure a national audience for our many achievements and a recruitment base for growth This is an invigorating period in the life of our university, and a tremendous opportunity for every member of the Georgia Health Sciences community. Our transformation will define the institution, the region, and the state for decades to come. Every member of the enterprise is a participant in this transformation, and all will reap the benefits of its fully realized potential.

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S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T I E S • Strategic Priority 1: To lead in the education and training of advanceddegree future-oriented health sciences and health care professionals, while providing an exceptional and innovative learning experience •  Strategic Priority 2: To generate outstanding translational and transdisciplinary research, synergizing with our clinical and educational strengths and addressing the health and health care needs of our communities • Strategic Priority 3: To develop a future-oriented and efficient health care system that delivers excellent quality and value, addresses the needs of our communities, enhances access to complex care, and maximizes our research and educational objectives. • Strategic Priority 4: To foster a culture of diversity and inclusion across the enterprise that optimizes access and opportunities for individuals underrepresented in the health sciences, serves as a catalyst for new ideas, generates discoveries and solutions that address health disparities, and responds to the needs of our communities • Strategic Priority 5: To maximize synergy, collaboration, integration, and effectiveness across and at all levels of the enterprise, ensuring the timely success of our vision • Strategic Priority 6: To support enterprise growth and development by efficiently utilizing resources, leveraging new revenue sources, and increasing staff and leadership efficiency and effectiveness through incentive alignment and accountability Georgia Health Sciences’ Strategic Priorities, derived from our Mission and Vision, and informed by our Values, will ensure success in the face of uncertainty, challenges, and possibilities. These priorities draw heavily on the past while boldly embracing a bright future. Some priorities overlap from one component of our mission to another. This is no accident, for the success of each individual component depends on the success of the others. It is excellence in biomedical and health science research, for instance, that leads to exciting new cures, treatments, and discoveries that translate into excellence at the

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


V. T R A N SF O RM AT I O N 202 0 ST R AT EG I C P R I O R I T I ES

bedside and in the classroom. The word “excellence,” therefore, appears in many contexts, all vital to advancing the enterprise’s mission. Other Strategic Priorities are more specific to individual components of the mission. Transformational clinical care, for instance, requires nimble responsiveness to the needs of the region and community. What health care issues have persisted from one generation to the next? Which new ones are emerging? What is the state of society’s collective health? Why do health disparities exist? It is our responsibility as an academic health center to address these and many other questions. In addition to the collective yet individualized nature of our Strategic Priorities, the scope of the mission should also be evident. We are privileged to hold a unique and vital role in Georgia. We educate future generations of health care professionals and researchers. We treat patients, optimizing their health while curing, treating, or forestalling disease. We forge new ground in discovery. We model our unwavering commitment to diversity and continually redouble our efforts to improve. We form vital partnerships to leverage our assets for the good of society. We are grateful and responsible stewards of public resources, working diligently to give society the greatest possible return on its investment. All areas represented in the enterprise’s Strategic Priorities have guided the development of our goals and objectives.

S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 1 • To lead in the education and training of advanced-degree futureoriented health sciences and health care professionals, while providing an exceptional and innovative learning experience As the largest single source of degree-granting health professions programs in the state, Georgia Health Sciences University is characterized by academically outstanding students, a strongly committed faculty, a technologically infused


curriculum, a robust network of community-based education partners, affordable tuition, state-of-the-art facilities, and many other assets. And consistent with the stated goals of Complete College Georgia (http://www. usg.edu/educational_access/documents/CCG.pdf), GHSU strives to ensure the maximum retention and graduation of its students. But the university must recruit additional faculty and develop other campus resources to increase training capacity. Needed resources include innovative faculty development opportunities, scholarship support, distance-education infrastructure, evidence-based education research, philanthropy, education/ research facilities, and a network of clinical venues and educational partnerships. Obstacles such as declining revenues, including state support, are inevitable but surmountable, and the educational payoffs substantial. Investment in education improves health profession shortages statewide and beyond; expands opportunities in research and technology transfer, among other areas; expedites improvements in educational delivery; and increases student pipeline and scholarship opportunities. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 1: To deliver excellent education and training via high-capacity advanced-degree programs throughout our expanded educational footprint to address the needs of the communities we serve. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Recruit, develop, support, and retain exemplary educators. o Value, recognize, and reward effective and innovative teaching and learning outcomes. o Partner with academia, industry, and the community to establish learning communities and partner with technical, two-year, and four-year colleges to develop health care education options. o Create appropriate research and new systems that promote excellence in data tracking, assessment, and educational model development. o Infuse curricula with mobile, web-based, and other appropriate technologies to enhance learning.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


o Expand public and preventive health and health policy programs. o Expand access and increase the quantity and quality of graduate student enrollment. • Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 1: To create robust programs and resources that enhance and sustain well-qualified, diverse applicant pools and prepare graduates for success in a diverse workforce for Patientand Family-Centered, culturally appropriate care delivery to diverse populations. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Strengthen and enhance access to student pipeline programs and recruitment initiatives by establishing and supporting an interprofessional team to identify and recruit students and expanding enrollment collaboration with community colleges and area universities. o Design new programs to prepare talented students for success and develop and implement geographically dispersed models for enrichment programs. o Cultivate major gifts and philanthropy that support student incentives, scholarships, stipends, and special student programs and initiatives. o Establish and/or strengthen relationships to enhance recruitment of diverse students, particularly minorities under-represented in health care and science. o Create and reward an environment that supports interprofessional, team-based, and Patient- and Family-Centered educational and research experiences. o Expand and promote nontraditional, rural, and international educational experiences. o Promote cultural awareness via enterprise-wide activities and initiatives, including our Quality Enhancement Plan. o Increase collaboration and partnerships with international and minority-serving educational institutions.

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• Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 1: To provide a learning environment that promotes interprofessionalism, creativity, lifelong learning, leadership, evidence-based education, and the ability to shape the future of health care and biomedical research. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Create vision teams to explore opportunities for future health care models; sponsor enterprise-wide projects rewarding innovative models for future health care; develop a funded Educational Futures Group to propose visionary educational models; and sponsor shortterm sabbaticals to encourage creativity. o Create interprofessional programs and courses for students emphasizing critical thinking and creative problem-solving, including forums to address topical health care issues, and experiences that emphasize practice innovation, innovative care technologies, and commercialization of intellectual property and entrepreneurial health services. o Provide expanded opportunities for dual-degree and certificate programs. •  Goal 4 of Strategic Priority 1: To create models optimizing academic support resources and aligning education with prominent research areas to graduate high-quality biomedical and health care professionals. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Develop innovations to optimize effectiveness in urban, rural, and international education sites, including consistent, service-oriented, top-performing information technology and telehealth support programs and personnel to support distance education. o Create faculty development and leadership models to foster innovation. o Adopt best practices that identify, nurture, disseminate, and reward educational and research methodologies across the enterprise.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


o Develop an academic support center for students and expand library resources and services, including sustained resources to improve student academic support, and strengthen/sustain simulation and other educational technology support. o Align select educational programs with areas of institutional research focus and strength, including recruiting renowned research faculty who reflect our strategic priorities, and expand/support research-oriented student fellowship programs that complement institutional research strengths.

S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 2 • To generate outstanding translational and trans-disciplinary research, synergizing with our clinical and educational strengths and addressing the health and health care needs of our communities Georgia Health Sciences University has a highly productive research faculty, significant National Institutes of Health funding, an environment rich in opportunities for population-based research, excellent core facilities for basic science research, internationally recognized research programs and growing translational research through the GHSU Discovery Institutes. Funding sources must be expanded to support the information technology infrastructure, commercialization of intellectual property and advancement of our national reputation to facilitate the enterprise’s strategic research initiatives. Key recent recruits and other opportunities, including external research collaborations and alignment with Board of Regents initiatives, address needed components for research growth. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 2: To be a nationally and internationally recognized leader in clinical, translational, and community-based research. Objectives to achieve this goal are to:

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o Recruit internationally recognized scholars in areas of strategic and clinical priority. o Critically evaluate recruitment and retention efforts to develop best practices. o Develop an Institute of Public Health and Prevention to support clinical, translational, and health services public health and preventive research. o Develop an infrastructure to support innovative patient-oriented research. o Develop an infrastructure to support evidence-based education research. o Identify disease populations that are under-served, and link clinical service lines with existing areas of research strength. o Develop research capabilities of current faculty who have been historically engaged in the enterprise’s teaching mission. •  Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 2: To have an outstanding culture of collaboration and interdisciplinary research. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Broadly communicate research efforts on campus both internally and externally. o Incentivize interdisciplinary partnerships, particularly clinicianresearcher partnerships, using internal mechanisms such as the intramural grants program. o Establish enterprise-wide research networks and groups in strategic areas of research growth (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes/ obesity, neuroscience/stroke, community-based research, cancer, and regenerative medicine). • Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 2: To be a valuable partner that effectively leverages external relationships to grow the research enterprise. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Identify and cultivate relationships with University System of Georgia and other institutional partners that can enhance strategic areas of research growth (e.g., public health and personalized medicine).

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


o Facilitate joint ventures with industry partners (e.g., the pharmaceutical industry) to increase basic science funding. o Develop external collaborations with regional partners (e.g., the Savannah River National Laboratory, the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morehouse College, and Emory University). o Facilitate collaboration with external research consortiums (e.g., the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research and National Cancer Coalition) to enhance Georgia Health Sciences’ participation in National Institutes of Health multi-centered clinical trials. • Goal 4 of Strategic Priority 2: To provide an innovative and creative research environment that fosters novel research approaches, leading to discoveries with significant therapeutic and economic impact. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Stimulate and reward faculty members’ entrepreneurial activities,

“It’s everything I expected and more. GHSU instructors are the best I’ve ever had.” - Respiratory Therapy Student Chris Truelove

including the submission of invention disclosures and patent applications. o Stimulate high-risk, innovative projects using internal mechanisms such as the intramural grants program. o Engage the Office of Technology Transfer to optimize the commercialization potential of university technologies and promote opportunities for faculty innovation, entrepreneurship, and commercialization. o Promote Georgia Health Sciences inventions and technologies nationally and internationally.

S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 3 • To develop a future-oriented and efficient health care system that delivers excellent quality and value, addresses the needs of our communities, enhances access to advanced and complex care, and maximizes our research and educational objectives.

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The Georgia Health Sciences enterprise is uniquely positioned to leverage capabilities across education, research, and patient care to lead in many areas of health care, including population-based health care and research initiatives. As the state’s sole academic health center, the enterprise fills several unique roles in Georgia, including serving as the state’s resource for advanced and complex care, housing the region’s only children’s medical center and the state’s only dental school. Our world-renowned reputation in Patient- and FamilyCentered Care and interprofessional teamwork adds depth and dimension to our clinical capabilities. New opportunities, such as expanding partnerships and developing niche markets emphasizing complex care, promise a strong infusion of untapped potential to address the ongoing challenges of the health and health care environment. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 3: Attain national and international recognition as an integrated, innovative academic health system demonstrating excellence in patient care, biomedical research, and health science education. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Create a culture of integration and innovative problem-solving that empowers employees to identify and remove the physical, administrative, and accounting obstacles that hinder efficiencies and collaboration. o Develop and implement a plan and expected outcomes for enterprise integration that is clearly and consistently shared with all stakeholders. o Create, implement, and sustain an aggressive marketing presence characterized by a single identity with a central theme of excellence in clinical care, research, and education. o Promote and support professional development as an enterprise priority. o Facilitate interdisciplinary education and research initiatives among the colleges. o Cultivate and reward innovative advances in all aspects of the enterprise.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


• Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 3: Consistently develop and provide highquality, culturally appropriate, cost-effective Patient- and FamilyCentered Care emphasizing distinctive advanced and complex care. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Utilize a multidisciplinary team to provide outstanding patient care. o Implement best practices throughout the health system and eliminate unnecessary variation in care. o Promote a culture of information- and data-sharing at all levels of the enterprise. o Create and sustain a culture of Patient- and Family-Centered Care throughout the enterprise. o Adopt efficient, timely, and customer-friendly administrative mechanisms. o Create a primary care model that offers cost-effective services and clinical training for all related disciplines. o Develop a unified quality improvement plan by identifying key and relevant quality indicators for the clinical enterprise. o Identify key health care providers to champion the quality improvement plan. o Promote the use of patient and caregiver assessments and individualized care plans. o Establish new and unique accountability systems for health care providers. o Implement an enterprise-wide electronic health record system to support quality care with improved real-time availability and transparent quality indicator information, and the research foundation for population-based biomedical informatics. o Centralize health records/practice management systems in all clinical areas.

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• Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 3: Improve community health by leveraging coordinated interprofessional care and partnering with existing community and regional health care assets. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Engage the communities we serve to identify their needs to optimize health and wellness. o Create innovative multi-site clinical community services optimizing interprofessional and team-based care models. o Design and implement population health management strategies. o Improve access to services throughout the continuum of care. o Develop, implement, and evaluate improved referring provider strategy. o Expand strategic partnerships and affiliations.

S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 4 • To foster a culture of diversity and inclusion across the enterprise that optimizes access and opportunities for individuals under-represented in the health sciences, serves as a catalyst for new ideas, generates discoveries and solutions that address health disparities, and responds to the needs of our communities. We are proud of our highly diverse campus, our role as the largest health care provider for the underserved citizens of the state, and our participation in cuttingedge research addressing health care disparities among different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. But more can be done. Our students, staff, and faculty, for instance, should reflect and appreciate the racial and ethnic diversity of the state and communities we serve. Cross-cultural competencies must be consistent along the education continuum. Health disparities—including disparities in treatments and outcomes—must be mitigated by continuing focused efforts in education, research, and clinical service. A concerted and enterprise-wide emphasis on diversity promises many benefits, including improved population

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


health, increased pipeline programs, new research avenues, and the opportunity to serve as a true role model of inclusion and health equity statewide and beyond. The appointment of a Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion and the identification of cultural competency as the theme of our Quality Enhancement Plan set the stage for building an academic health center community poised to meet the needs of the communities we serve. The future is very bright for this area of emphasis. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 4: Demonstrate and communicate a sustained commitment to diversity and inclusion. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Develop state-of-the-art inclusive practices and policies and ensure they are implemented/embraced across the enterprise. o Demonstrate ongoing cultural competency development. o Support and empower individuals to remove cultural barriers. o Encourage participation of diverse vendors.

“It is a privilege to oversee efforts to create a center of gravity around Georgia Health Sciences’ diversity efforts.” - Dr. W. Kent Guion

o Support activities that celebrate and recognize diversity.

Vice President for

o Articulate benchmarks for success and ensure accountability.

Diversity and Inclusion

• Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 4: Lead in attracting and retaining highly qualified individuals from diverse backgrounds. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Develop innovative ways to recruit, mentor, and retain diverse individuals. o Foster a nurturing environment for individual development. o Encourage heterogeneity at all levels throughout the enterprise. o Secure resources to sustain diversity and inclusion priorities. • Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 4: Enhance efforts to generate solutions to health disparities. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Create innovative approaches and discoveries to serve communities of need both locally and internationally. o Facilitate effective and collaborative interactions focused on health disparities.

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S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 5 • Strategic Priority 5: To maximize synergy, collaboration, integration, and effectiveness across and at all levels of the enterprise, ensuring the timely success of our vision Georgia Health Sciences’ five colleges, clinical facilities, and other components will function best with a sense of unity, over-arching purpose, and collective identity. Recent efforts have greatly improved this environment with a full alignment of the enterprise’s academic, clinical, and research entities. But more must be done to ensure we are all on the same page and moving in the same direction. Transformational times require extraordinary effort, enthusiasm, and dedication, all of which demand a common sense of purpose. We will rise to this challenge, and the state of Georgia will be the beneficiary as we optimize our resources in support of education, research, clinical mission, and strategic initiatives. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 5: Create a culture in which individual and team excellence is the norm and exceptional customer service is expected, supported, and rewarded. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Provide an easy process for faculty, employees, students, and patients to suggest service improvements and enhancements. o Regularly reinforce, recognize, and reward the service improvements of individuals and teams. o Incorporate customer services and Patient- and Family-Centered Care principles and behavioral standards into performance evaluations and curricula. o Develop internal customer service agreements to be initiated across disciplines and business units within the enterprise. o Develop a system to measure customer satisfaction for all constituents.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


•  Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 5: Enhance recruitment, retention, and faculty mentorship by promoting excellence through professional and interprofessional faculty development. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Support participation in professional organizations and societies. o Develop a robust retention program. o Develop an environment that promotes professional and personal work/life balance. • Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 5: Cultivate a collaborative, enriching work environment that encourages open, honest, and constructive two-way communication. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Encourage electronic communications while ensuring alternative, appropriate means of communication for those lacking ready access to computers. o Promote the Georgia Health Sciences enterprise brand by adopting the brand standards for all communications. o Develop

and

implement

protocols

to

facilitate

efficient

communications, ensuring the right message for the right venue. o Develop a comprehensive system of continuous communication education.

S T R AT EG I C P R I O R I T Y 6 • To support enterprise growth and development by efficiently utilizing resources, leveraging new revenue sources, and increasing staff and leadership efficiency and effectiveness through incentive alignment and accountability The Georgia Health Sciences Enterprise has always prided itself on efficiency, but the economic landscape has never demanded more discipline and dedication. Declining revenues on every front and a weakened economy statewide and

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nationally portend even more austerity ahead. We are responding by sharpening our focus as never before, addressing our weaknesses and concentrating on areas of strength. Every member of the enterprise is responsible and accountable for efficiency and effectiveness not only in individual venues of work, but for the success of the entire enterprise. We will implement effective processes and procedures; improve and address the deficiencies of our infrastructure; ensure the maximal value of each and every member of our organization using accepted metrics, and leadership, faculty, and staff development; and garner significant and meaningful support by our philanthropic community. • Goal 1 of Strategic Priority 6: To enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the enterprise’s administrative, academic, and clinical infrastructure, systems, and processes. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Use uniform processes, benchmarking standards, analytical tools, and consistent reporting to evaluate effectiveness, manage initiatives, and improve operations. o Streamline the organizational structure by developing and implementing a workforce management process, aligning position titles, and continuing integration of administrative, academic, and clinical functions. o Evaluate programs and initiatives using sound principles that address costs, benefits, risks, and market potential. o Optimize resource management by aligning fund flow across the mission and assessing faculty effort and productivity in clinical, academic, research, and other areas. o Optimize the efficiency of energy and other limited resources by promoting environmental awareness.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


• Goal 2 of Strategic Priority 6: To optimize the existing resources and identify new resources to meet growth requirements. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Optimize transparency, ownership, and efficiency by engaging students, faculty, and staff in planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. o Leverage the use of the enterprise’s total debt capacity to maximize opportunities for public/private capital ventures for research, clinical, and academic facilities. o Leverage resources by expanding partnerships with the international, national, regional, and local communities as well as with other health care providers and industry. o Increase the engagement of alumni. o Meet targeted enterprise needs by optimizing federal funding opportunities. • Goal 3 of Strategic Priority 6: To optimize productivity, decision-making capabilities, accountability, and growth potential by investing in leadership effectiveness. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Optimize effectiveness and accountability through a standardized process to evaluate senior leadership, faculty, and staff based on alignment with strategic priorities and the use of measurable goals and objectives. o Invest all enterprise leaders in advancing enterprise goals through an incentive pay methodology and structure that shares common outcome measures. o Foster faculty members’ educational, clinical, research, and leadership capabilities by investing in professional development and leadership development programs.

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o O  ptimize faculty and staff recruitment, retention, and productivity through innovative employee-sensitive policies, practices, and programs that establish Georgia Health Sciences as an employer of choice. o Standardize the talent recruitment and selection process by optimally identifying and evaluating potential leadership candidates. • Goal 4 of Strategic Priority 6: To ensure that facilities and infrastructure fulfill the needs of our academic, clinical, and research programs by constructing facilities and developing infrastructure capacity to meet the highest performance and sustainability standards and ensure efficient and effective operation. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Regularly assess current academic, clinical, and research space utilization to inform decisions regarding new or renovated facilities, ensuring that facilities meet needs while optimizing current use of space. o Ensure that new facilities qualify for LEEDS certification. o Leverage the enterprise’s total debt capacity to enable greater opportunities for public/private capital ventures for research, clinical, and academic facilities. • Goal 5 of Strategic Priority 6: To advance a coordinated philanthropic strategy to increase and enhance fundraising activities to support the enterprise’s vision, mission, priorities, and programs. Objectives to achieve this goal are to: o Ensure that expanding fundraising initiatives are linked to strategic priorities through a continuous planning process.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


o Enhance relationships with our natural partners to secure increased levels of engagement in enterprise efforts and

support for

enterprise needs. o Develop an integrated, collaborative, and multi-dimensional program of fundraising focused on medical center needs. These priorities as a whole draw on our considerable existing strengths, including serving as the largest source of degree-granting health professions programs in the state; boasting a highly productive research faculty focused on translational science; and housing unique clinical facilities characterized by nationwide prominence in many clear areas of clinical excellence, provided in a culture of respect for individual diversity and Patient- and Family-Centered Care. But existing strengths alone will not vault the enterprise to the next level. Transformational change requires bold action, and the university must aggressively recruit additional excellent faculty, cultivate new partnerships, increase diversity, grow National Institutes of Health and other federal funding, invest in infrastructure, and support other institutional priorities. This will require unprecedented commitment, enthusiasm, resilience, and flexibility. The rewards of tending to the needs that have in some cases been long overlooked are vast. Exciting opportunities exist in many critical areas including public health, faculty training, pipeline programs, emerging technology, community- and population-based research, technology transfer, expanded clinical initiatives, niche markets in health care, and addressing the state’s unmet health care needs.

“It’s the best school

Transformational change is no longer optional, hypothetical, or conceptual. It is

- Dr. Donald Baxter

I could imagine.”

well underway, and the destination will be nothing short of exhilarating.

Medical College of Georgia Alumnus

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SUMMARY The Transformation 2020 Strategic Plan reflects a series of choices: a choice about what type of institution Georgia Health Sciences will become, a choice about the vision and values that will guide the path, a choice about what the enterprise will look like a decade from now. Choices require much thought and deliberation. The enterprise must concentrate on areas of greatest strength, areas that optimize society’s return on its investment while ensuring benefits that will far outlast this Strategic Plan. Such ambition is not without risks and is not immune to criticism. Failure to achieve one or more of these goals is always a possibility, yet we accept that risk, knowing that the greater good will always be served by our best efforts.

The path ahead is a vital and noble one.

The path ahead is a vital and noble one, even if a few missteps along the way

We must seize this window of opportunity to create a bigger, brighter future than any past generation has dared to contemplate.

the energy, insights, and creativity of each member of the enterprise advance the

are part of the journey. Our challenge is simple: Can we envision a wholly transformed institution? Can process? Can we demand more of ourselves, both individually and collectively, than was ever thought possible? This is a defining moment in our history, and we must seize this window of opportunity to create a bigger, brighter future than any past generation has dared to contemplate. This isn’t to say that our distinguished forebears weren’t bold enough. They certainly were, which is why we have come as far as we have. But transformational times require transformational action. We must honor our forebears’ example by taking this institution to the next level. Developing a plan and implementing a plan are two very different things. This Strategic Plan is a roadmap, and everyone on board must keep their eyes on the destination. Detours, delays, and distractions are constant threats. We must have the courage and resilience to stay on course.

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Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


V I . SUM M A RY

Keep in mind that this document is just a start—an overarching strategy that will drive tactical planning among our Colleges, Health System, Research Institute, practice groups, and other components of our enterprise. This document will serve as a roadmap to our mission-based teams who will develop the specific tactics to effect and ensure the success of our stated goals and objectives at every level of our enterprise. Transformation 2020 also will serve as a launching point when GHSU consolidates with Augusta State University. We must be clear on who we are before we can determine who we aspire to be. A resounding affirmation of our identity—our mission, values, vision, and priorities—will ensure that we bring our best efforts to the table when we join ranks with an illustrious sister institution.

History has laid the groundwork for us. The future demands our best efforts. Let’s get started. For more information, please visit www.georgiahealth.edu/transformation2020

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APPENDICES TRANSFORMATION 2020 STEERING COMMITTEE:

• Mr. Rich Bias—Senior Vice President for Ambulatory and Network Services, Georgia Health Sciences Health System

• Dr. Ricardo Azziz—GHSU President, Georgia Health Sciences Health System Chief Executive Officer • Dr. Gretchen Caughman—Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost • Mr. David Hefner—Executive Vice President for Clinical Affairs and Chief Executive Officer, Georgia Health Sciences Medical Center and Medical Associates • Dr. Mark Hamrick—Senior Vice President for Research • Mr. Dennis Roemer—Interim Senior Vice President for Finance, Chief Financial Officer • Mr. Bill Bowes—Interim Senior Vice President for Administration, Chief Administrative Officer • Ms. Susan Barcus—Senior Vice President for Advancement and Community Relations/ Chief Development Officer

TRANSFORMATION 2020 COUNCIL:

• Ms. Patricia Brownlow—Vice President for Finance, Chief Financial Officer, Physicians Practice Group • Dr. Peter Buckley—Dean, Medical College of Georgia and Chair, Physicians Practice Group Board of Trustees • Ms. Nadia Butler—President, ESi Acquisition Inc. and member, Georgia Health Sciences Health System Board • Dr. Richard Callan—Chair, College of Dental Medicine Department of General Dentistry • Dr. Ben Cheek—Member, Georgia Health Sciences Health System Board • Dr. Roman Cibirka—Vice President for Instruction and Enrollment and Associate Provost • Dr. Marie Collins—Chair, College of Allied Health Sciences Department of Dental Hygiene

• Dr. Joseph Hobbs (Co-Chair) J.W. Tollison, M.D., Distinguished Chair, Senior Associate Dean for Primary Care and Community Affairs • Mr. Joe Thornton (Co-Chair) Assistant Vice President of Ambulatory Care Finance • Dr. Andrew Balas—Dean, College of Allied Health Sciences • Ms. Jeanette Balotin—Chief of Staff, Medical College of Georgia • Ms. Deb Barshafsky—Senior Director, Executive Communications

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• Ms. Beth Brigdon—Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Information Technology

• Dr. Mariana D’Amico—Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy • Dr. Connie Drisko—Dean, College of Dental Medicine • Mr. Doug Duncan—Vice President, MAU Workforce Solutions • Dr. Kevin Frazier—Vice President for Student Services and Development • Dr. Varghese George—Chair, College of Graduate Studies Department of Biostatistics

Leading Georgia and the world to better health.


• Dr. Stephen Gilliam—Assistant Professor, College of Nursing Department of Biobehavioral Nursing

• Dr. Michael Madaio—Chair, Medical College of Georgia Department of Medicine

• Mr. Bryan Ginn—Interim Executive Director for Government Relations

• Ms. Caitlin Madigan—Student, College of Graduate Studies

• Ms. Rhonda Graybeal—Owner, Hang Ups Inc. and Chair, Georgia Health Sciences Medical Center Board Planning and Development Committee

• Dr. Lucy Marion—Dean, College of Nursing

• Dr. Kent Guion—Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion

• Mr. Cobbs Nixon—Vice President, Blanchard and Calhoun Insurance Agency Inc. and member, Georgia Health Sciences Health System Board

• Dr. Thomas Hopkins Jr.—Member, University System of Georgia Board of Regents and Chair, Georgia Health Sciences Health System Board Planning and Development Committee • Mr. Philip Howard—Vice President for Facilities Services

• Ms. Elizabeth Meehan—Associate Vice President, Community Relations

• Dr. Julian Nussbaum—Professor and Chair, Department of Ophthalmology and Co-Director of the Georgia Health Sciences University Vision Discovery Institute • Ms. Sheila O’Neal—Interim Vice President for Communications

• Dr. William Kanto—Interim Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer, Georgia Health Sciences Health System

• Mr. Robert Osborne—Executive Vice President, Georgia Bank and Trust, and member, Georgia Health Sciences Foundation

• Ms. Julie Kerlin—Chief Advocacy Officer and Vice President for Government Affairs

• Mr. Julian Osbon—President, Osbon and Associates, and member, Georgia Health Sciences University Research Institute

• Mr. Douglas Keskula—Associate Dean for Administration, College of Allied Health Sciences

• Dr. Shirley Quarles—Chair, College of Nursing Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing

• Dr. Stilianos Kountakis, Professor, Medical College of Georgia Department of Otolaryngology

• Dr. Lloyd Schnuck—Member, Medical College of Georgia Foundation Board

• Dr. Edward Inscho—Interim Dean, College of Graduate Studies

• Mr. Franklin Smith—Interim Chief Operations Officer, Physicians Practice Group

• Dr. Jill Lewis—Associate Professor, College of Dental Medicine Department of Oral Biology

• The Hon. David D. Watkins—Richmond County State Court Judge • Ms. Pam Witter—Director, Quality Enhancement Plan

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Transformation 2020  

This is the Georgia Health Sciences Strategic Plan - Transformation 2020, the road map that clarifies our strengths, our goals, our hopes, a...

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