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Copyright Š 2012 by Getty Stewart ISBN 978-0-9879238-0-6 Printed in Canada All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or used in any form by any means without the prior written permission of the author, other than short excerpts as may appear in book reviews.

Published by: Pursuit Communications Winnipeg, MB Canada R3L 1A2 Edited By: Arvel Gray Designed by: 6P Marketing Printed by: Gateway Publishing Back Cover Photo by: James Turner, Metro Winnipeg

A portion of net proceeds is shared with charities. This book is available to groups or organizations for promotional, fundraising or educational purposes. For details visit:

www.prairiefruit.ca


Table of Contents Acknowledgements ........................................................................... 6 Introduction ...................................................................................... 7  The Genesis of Fruit Share............................................................. 8 How to Use this Book .................................................................... 9 Sharing the Harvest ......................................................................... 10  Donating Etiquette ...................................................................... 12  Where to Donate ........................................................................ 13  Where to Find Fruit ..................................................................... 14  Kids & Fruit .................................................................................... 15  Preserving Overview ........................................................................ 17  Freezing..................................................................................... 18  Canning .................................................................................... 19  Dehydrating ............................................................................... 21  Apples and Crab Apples .................................................................. 25  General Info .............................................................................. 27  Harvesting Apples ....................................................................... 30  Storing Apples ............................................................................ 32  Preserving Apples ....................................................................... 33  Apple Recipes ............................................................................ 43  Grapes .......................................................................................... 59  General Info .............................................................................. 61  Harvesting Grapes ...................................................................... 62  Storing Grapes ........................................................................... 63  Preserving Grapes ...................................................................... 63  Grape Recipes ........................................................................... 67  Pears ............................................................................................. 73  General Info .............................................................................. 75  Harvesting Pears ......................................................................... 77  Storing Pears .............................................................................. 80  Preserving Pears ......................................................................... 81  Pear Recipes .............................................................................. 86 


Plums and Apricots.......................................................................... 95 General Info .............................................................................. 97  Harvesting Plums & Apricots ........................................................ 99  Storing Plums & Apricots ........................................................... 100  Preserving Plums and Apricots.................................................... 101  Plum & Apricot Recipes ............................................................. 107  Prairie Cherries ............................................................................. 117  General Info ............................................................................ 119  Harvesting Cherries .................................................................. 122  Storing Cherries........................................................................ 123  Preserving Cherries ................................................................... 124  Cherry Recipes ......................................................................... 131  Raspberries .................................................................................. 141  General Info ............................................................................ 143  Harvesting Raspberries .............................................................. 144  Storing Raspberries ................................................................... 145  Preserving Raspberries .............................................................. 146  Raspberry Recipes ..................................................................... 151  Rhubarb....................................................................................... 161  General Info ............................................................................ 163  Harvesting Rhubarb .................................................................. 164  Storing Rhubarb ....................................................................... 165  Preserving Rhubarb ................................................................... 166  Rhubarb Recipes....................................................................... 169  Saskatoons................................................................................... 179  General Info ............................................................................ 181  Harvesting Saskatoons .............................................................. 182  Storing Saskatoons ................................................................... 183  Preserving Saskatoons ............................................................... 184  Saskatoon Recipes .................................................................... 189  Strawberries ................................................................................. 199  General Info ............................................................................ 201  Harvesting Strawberries ............................................................. 202  Storing Strawberries .................................................................. 203  Preserving Strawberries.............................................................. 204  Strawberry Recipes .................................................................... 209  Index ........................................................................................... 221 


Acknowledgements Writing this book has been an incredible journey. I am honoured to have such talented and generous people in my life. Thank you to family, friends, colleagues, volunteers and fellow fruit enthusiasts from across the prairies for your support and encouragement. Special thanks to: My family for inspiring me. Darryl, you are my true love and I thank you for always being there. Aidan and Melanie, you are the best; thank you for the love and joy you add to my life. My friends for their laughter, brainstorming and help with taste testing. The recipe contributors for sharing their recipes: Aleta Allard, Andrea Bell Stuart, Betty Burwell, Carrie Roloff, Chris MacKinnon, Diana Mager, Jess Woolford, Judie Birch, Kansas Allen, Karla Fehr, Katie Anderson, Mary Heard, Randi Hunter, Sagan Morrow, Sheila Reed, Sherilyn Braun McDonough, Summer Hansell, Tam Andersen, Theo Smit, and Valerie Lugonja. The funders and community groups for their support: Canadian Home Economics Foundation, Food Matters Manitoba, Fruit Share, Manitoba Alternative Food Research Alliance, Manitoba Association of Home Economists, South Osborne Community Coop, and Winnipeg Foundation. The photographers for capturing the beauty of prairie fruit: Anthony Mintenko, Brenna George, Dean Kreutzer, Kansas Allen, Manitoba Agriculture Food & Rural Initiatives (MAFRI, Mike Deal, Richard St. Pierre, Rick Fisher, and Valerie Lugonja. My editor, Arvel Gray, and the proof readers for their keen eyes: Anthony Mintenko, Chris MacKinnon, Dean Kreutzer, Joan Stewart, Kelly Kluger, Rick Durand and Sherilyn Braun McDonough. The professionals for their expertise: 6P Marketing and Gateway Publishing. The fruit donors who shared their fruit for meticulous testing and tasting: Brenna George & Rick Fisher, Mary & John Heard, Monika & Ulrich Menold, Randi Hunter & Dennis Cunningham and many Fruit Share homeowners.


Introduction

There’s something magical about clusters of beautiful, fragrant blossoms brightening our landscape after a long, dreary winter. It is a welcomed sight and a sign of warm, sunny days ahead. Despite our frigid prairie winters and our short, hot summers, homeowners are able to grow a huge variety of fruit, ready to harvest in just a few short months. The list is impressive, including apples, apricots, crab apples, grapes, pears, plums, prairie cherries, raspberries, rhubarb, saskatoons, strawberries, blueberries, cranberries, currants, elderberries, goji berries, gooseberries, haskaps, kiwis, lingonberries, melons, seabuckthorn, and others. We grow good fruit! Let’s celebrate our backyard bounty and savour its goodness, picked fresh or preserved for later. You’ll find all the recipes and techniques you need in Prairie Fruit Cookbook: The Essential Guide for Picking, Preserving and Preparing Fruit. Introduction 7


The Genesis of Fruit Share I LOVE fruit. In fact, I love everything about fruit - growing it, picking it, preserving it and eating it. Local fruit has always been a part of my life. As a small girl in Germany, we would harvest and preserve the fruit from our backyard orchard and as a teenager in southern Manitoba, I picked saskatoons and chokecherries along the banks of the Souris River. When I moved to Winnipeg, I sourced fruit from Farmers’ Markets and U Pick farms, but it was becoming a mom that prompted me to take my passion for fresh, local fruits and veggies to the next level. I felt compelled to engage my children in some of the activities that I knew as a child and to nurture a sense of wonder and appreciation for the beauty, bounty and power of Mother Nature. Our exploration began with planting a garden, picking native fruit on hikes throughout the prairies, and playing “I Spy an Edible” wherever we went. It was during our playful search for edibles, that I began to notice how much of our backyard fruit is wasted. I saw fruit rotting on branches, attracting swarms of wasps, or dropping onto lawns and walkways in foulsmelling puddles. One day, I noticed bags and bags of big, beautiful eating apples lined up beside the garbage bin, ready for the landfill. My heart sank. Why would we let this delicious, nutritious food go to waste? It seemed such a shame. Three months later, I came across an article about volunteer fruit rescuing operations popping up in cities throughout North America, Europe and Australia. They follow a simple but brilliant concept - connect homeowners with surplus fruit with volunteers interested in picking that fruit. The picked fruit is divided evenly among the volunteers, the homeowners, and community groups eager to use fresh produce. I knew my community would benefit from a similar program. With the help and support of family, friends and local community organizations, we started a fruit rescuing and sharing group called Fruit Share. Fruit Share started in the summer of 2010 with 10 volunteers harvesting over 1,600 pounds of fruit from 20 homeowners. In 2011, it grew to a 8 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


stunning 201 volunteers harvesting over 7,300 pounds of fruit from 97 homeowners. This impressive growth demonstrated that there is renewed interest and desire in using prairie fruit. My work with Fruit Share showed me that many people simply don’t know what to do with our prairie fruit. That’s why I wrote this book - to make people aware of our local bounty and to give them the information they need to enjoy its peak flavour and quality. Whether you are a fruit seeker or a fruit sharer, this guide provides practical, timeless advice to help you identify, pick, prepare and share your harvest.

www.fruitshare.ca

How to Use This Book This book is divided into chapters according to individual fruits. When a fruit is in season, turn to that chapter for information on judging ripeness, harvesting, storing, preserving and preparing that fruit. I use the term Preserving to refer to all methods of preparing food for long term storage, i.e. canning, freezing, dehydrating, and jamming. In the chapter on Preserving (pg 17-24) you’ll find general guidelines for safety procedures, hot water baths, sterilizing jars, adjusting for altitude and checking for dryness in dehydrated foods. For specific recipes and preserving techniques for each fruit, refer to the preserving section in each fruit chapter. At the end of each chapter, you’ll find Other Recipes. These sections point to other fruit chapters where you can find more recipes to try with that particular fruit. Some are straight substitutions and some may require a little modification to adjust for juiciness or tartness. Have fun experimenting! With the exception of recipes contributed by others, all of the recipes in this book were tested in my home kitchen and critiqued by my family and friends. Recipes were tested in U.S. Standard measurements. Common metric measurements are also provided, although recipes have not been tested in metric.. Introduction 9


Sharing the Harvest If you have more fruit than you can manage, and want to avoid wasps, the smell of overripe fruit and the mess of crushed fruit on your lawn or walkway, here are some ideas for harvesting your fruit and putting it to good use.

Call a fruit picking group like Fruit Share to come and harvest your fruit for you. Fruit picking groups recruit volunteers interested in picking fruit and connect them with homeowners with surplus fruit. The fruit is typically shared between the homeowners, the volunteers and community organizations. Programs like Fruit Share exist in Winnipeg, Calgary, Victoria, Vancouver, Toronto, Hamilton and Guelph.

Host a picking party. Picking fruit is more fun when there are several

people doing it together. Serve some iced tea and a tray of cookies and you’re guaranteed to have a good time. Encourage the group to pick an extra bag for a senior down the street who may be unable to participate. It’s a great way to build positive relationships with your neighbours.

Prairie Fruit Rescuing Groups Too much fruit to harvest on your own? Interested in picking fruit in exchange for a share of the bounty? A fruit rescuing group like Fruit Share can help. For more information contact one of these prairie fruit rescuing groups. Calgary, AB Calgary Harvest 403-483-9797

www.calgaryharvest.com

Edmonton, AB Operation Fruit Rescue Edmonton 780-433-2235

www.ofre.wordpress.com

Winnipeg, MB Fruit Share 204-272-8520

www.fruitshare.ca

10 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Hire a neighbourhood teenager to harvest your fruit for you. If you

don’t know who to call, ask your community centre for a list of neighbourhood babysitters or dog walkers. These keen, young individuals might consider adding fruit picking to their repertoire of services.

Post a notice at your local garden club, church or community centre advertising delicious, free fruit available for picking. Put a classified ad in your community paper or online at sites like Kijiji or “Community” Buy and Sell. There are a lot of people who welcome the opportunity to get fresh, local fruit.

Ask vendors at your local Farmers’ Market if they would be interested in picking your fruit. Those that sell homemade preserves or fresh produce might be pleased to make good use of your crop. Ask a local community group to pick your fruit. Call groups like the

Boys and Girls Club, Scouts Canada, Brownies, school groups, etc. Suggest that they donate the fruit to a local food charity or use the fruit for their own purposes.

Call a neighbourhood development organization, community garden

club or another food group that offers food preserving workshops. These groups may appreciate free supplies.

Call a local Hutterite Colony to see if they would be interested in

picking your fruit. A listing of Hutterite Colonies in the prairies can be found at www.hutterites.org under the Hutterite Directory.

A little boy was having difficulty lifting a heavy stone. His father came  along, and noting the boy's failure, asked, "Are you using all your  strength?"   "Yes, I am," the little boy said impatiently.   

"No, you are not," the father answered. "I am right here just waiting,  and you haven't asked me to help you."                                                                                                        Author Unknown  Sharing the Harvest 11


Donating Etiquette If you are planning on donating your fruit to a local charity, there are some common courtesies you should consider: 

Deliver fruit as soon after harvesting as possible.

Call the organization to determine its ability to accept your donation, the exact drop-off location and the best delivery time.

Only donate fruit that you would consider eating yourself. Fallen fruit (fruit that has been on the ground), over-ripe fruit or heavily bruised fruit should be composted, not donated.

Choose clean, dry boxes, containers or cloth bags to transport fruit.

Fruit is best stored without moisture and should not be washed before donating. Organizations will wash the fruit prior to use.

Some organizations (call ahead) will also accept donations of homemade preserves and baked goods. These items should be dated and labeled with ingredient lists.

Most provinces have a provincial food donation act that protects food donors from any liability when making donations in good faith. These acts are designed to encourage individuals and organizations to make not-for-profit food donations.

Photo by Mike Deal, Winnipeg, MB.

12 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Where to Donate There are many individuals and organizations who would welcome a basket, bag or handful of fresh, local fruit. Use your imagination and talk to your friends and neighbours about those in your community who could benefit from your bounty.

Food Banks

A food bank is a centralized clearing house that collects food from available sources and distributes it to a number of agencies that feed the hungry. For a listing of food banks in your community, visit Food Banks Canada at www.foodbankscanada.ca.

Soup Kitchens

A soup kitchen is an establishment which offers meals to the needy free of charge or at very low cost. It may or may not be tied to a religious organization. To find soup kitchens in your community, do a web search with key words “(community name) soup kitchen” or call a food bank to refer you to a kitchen in your area.

Food Programs

Check your community newspapers or call your community development organization to find out what food programs in your neighbourhood could use fresh produce. It may be a cooking class for seniors, a nursery school breakfast program or a canning or preserving workshop.

Seniors Residences

Fruit Share donates much of its surplus supply to seniors. We deliver a box to the lobby of seniors’ complexes with a note encouraging them to share the bounty. The residents welcome the fruit and enjoy preparing favorite recipes from decades past.

Schools, Daycares and Nursery Schools

Kids love baking, cooking and exploring new things, and teachers and daycare workers have great imaginations. Turn fruit into a delicious, educational experience by offering it to a local school, daycare or nursery school.

Sharing the Harvest 13


Where to Find Fruit If you’re eager to get some local, prairie fruit, here’s where to track it down.

Your Neighbour’s Yard

Comb the neighbourhood for signs of unused fruit. Many homeowners with excess fruit are happy to share, especially if you offer to pick it for them. Knock on the door or drop a friendly note in their mailbox, notifying them that you’d be interested in helping them harvest those cherries, plums or pears.

Local Farmers’ Markets

You’ll find some of the tastiest and freshest prairie fruits at local Farmers’ Markets. To find out market hours and locations nearest to you, visit these web sites:

Farmers’ Markets Association of Manitoba – www.fmam.ca Saskatchewan Farmers’ Markets – www.saskfarmersmarket.com The Alberta Farmers’ Market Association – www.albertamarkets.com Specialty Grocers

Most urban centres have specialty grocers that feature local, fresh, organic or fair trade produce and groceries. These grocers know what’s growing in their community and stock some of the finest local produce available. If local fruit is in season, they’ll have it!

U-Pick Farms

Head outdoors and visit one of the many U-Pick farms offering fresh, local fruit right off the bush. Many of them also offer pre-picked fruit. To find out more about the U-Pick farms in your area visit the following:

Prairie Fruit Growers Association (Manitoba) – www.pfga.com Saskatchewan Fruit Growers Association – www.saskfruit.com Alberta Farm Fresh Producers Assoc. – www.albertafarmfresh.com

14 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Kids & Fruit Last summer, I offered a 13-year-old boy some freshly picked strawberries. He backed away in disgust and said, “Those look funny; they’re too dark. I don’t eat those kinds of strawberries.” I was shocked and dismayed. Who passes up fresh strawberries?! Have those tasteless, pale, store-bought wannabes really become the standard for the ideal strawberry? Let’s help our children recognize the value of what’s growing around them and appreciate the quality and flavour of fresh produce. Here are some handson ideas to involve them in identifying, picking, tasting and preparing local fruit. Play a game of “I Spy” with young kids. See if you can spot local fruit growing on boulevards, back lanes, parks, gardens, backyards, front lawns, etc. You’ll be surprised what you find.

Melanie (7) picking apples.

Taste as many varieties of prairie fruit as you can. You’ll find fresh, locally grown fruits at Farmers’ Markets or specialty grocery stores. Make freezer jam together. Freezer jam doesn’t require cooking but does require mashing fruit with a potato masher – a kid’s dream. Sure, it’s messy, but it’s a great way to get children excited about being in the kitchen. I do not recommend getting kids involved in canning regular jam – there’s too much hot water and hot, sugary fruit. Hold blind taste tests. Cut up a variety of fruit and ask kids to identify the samples. When I play this game with my kids, I cut up three different kinds of apples. (Sometimes I sneak in a pear, just for fun.) They cover their eyes and guess if it’s a green, red or yellow apple. I wish I could have done a blind taste test with that 13-year-old boy. If he was judging only on taste, I wonder which strawberry he would have preferred. Kids and Fruit 15


Go fruit picking together. I think strawberry picking is the easiest and most fun for kids. The strawberries are accessible and a bucket is quickly filled. Plan on picking just one or two baskets and buy the rest pre-picked so your kids don’t run out of patience. Many U-pick farms also offer some sort of play structure or a farm animal or two, to keep children amused. Bake together. Give your kids a task, even if it’s just licking the beaters used to whip cream. Start with easy recipes such as muffins, loaves, crisps, crumbles, smoothies, popsicles and gelatin desserts. Ask kids to help prepare fruit. My kids enjoy helping when they are given a responsible task like using a paring knife, or if there’s a special tool involved, like an apple-peeling machine or a cherry pitter. Children can peel apples, pit cherries, cap strawberries, cut rhubarb, wash saskatoons, use a food mill to separate fruit pulp from seeds, pick bugs and leaves from raspberries, and separate grapes from the clusters. Don’t forget to let them taste along the way! Help a neighbour. If neighbours are struggling to keep up with their abundance of fruit, take the kids and offer to help pick the crop. Demonstrate the act of sharing by making extra jam, loaves or pies to distribute to friends, neighbours or a local soup kitchen. Most importantly, have fun together! 16 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Preserving Overview Preserving is an ancient tradition of treating fresh food so it can be stored safely for future use. Preserving prevents food spoilage and destroys disease-causing microorganisms like bacteria, yeasts, or fungi that can cause food-borne illnesses. There are many preserving techniques, such as hermetically sealing cooked food, freezing, dehydrating, fermenting and vacuum-sealing. In this chapter, you’ll find general information about freezing, canning and dehydrating, as well as recipes and techniques throughout the book for freezing, canning, dehydrating, and making jams or jellies. Only the most common and practical food preservation techniques have been listed for each prairie fruit. For example, while it is possible to freeze or dehydrate grapes, the seeds in our prairie varieties don’t make either of these techniques very practical; therefore, these techniques are not included in this book. Our knowledge and tools as well as the genetic make-up of fruits and micro-organisms are constantly changing. The fruits chosen for each chapter are all high in acid (equal to or less than a pH of 4.6). High acid foods are among the safest and easiest foods to preserve, however, what your grandmother used to do may no longer be the safest or best way to preserve food today. The recipes in this book follow the practices recommended by The US National Centre for Home Food Preservation (www.nchfp.uga.edu) and Bernardin (www.bernardin.ca), two organizations that study food safety. If you’re new to the world of fruit preserving, welcome! You’ll soon find that it’s much easier than we are often led to believe. The trick is to start small. Why not begin by simply freezing two or three baskets of U-pick strawberries to enjoy throughout the year? Or, try making a batch of strawberry freezer jam – it doesn’t require any cooking and is irresistibly delicious. Wherever you start, enjoy!

Preserving 17


Freezing Freezing is my favourite method of preserving fruit – it’s fast and easy. Choose from: Dry Pack – Freeze without any added sugar. Best for whole, small fruit or berries which will be cooked or baked (applesauce, jam, muffins, crisps). Dry Sugar Pack – Freeze with sugar. Helps retain texture and shape of the fruit. Ideal for soft, sliced fruits like apricots, strawberries, plums and cherries or any fruit destined to become pie. Syrup Pack – Freeze with a liquid sugar solution. Best method for retaining shape and texture. Ideal for uncooked desserts like fruit cocktail.

Freezing Tips: 

Fruit can be safely frozen without sugar. It is often added to maintain colour and sustain texture. Fruit can also be frozen using unsweetened fruit juice instead of a sugar solution.

Leave adequate headspace to allow frozen food to expand.

Avoid glass containers in the freezer to reduce the risk of breakage.

Dry fruit well before freezing to keep ice crystals from forming.

Remove as much air as possible when freezing fruit to avoid freezer burn. An effective technique is to insert a straw into the freezer bag and form a tight seal around the straw with your hand. Suck the air out through the straw and seal quickly to prevent air from re-entering.

To remove ice crystals from frozen fruit, pour fruit into a colander and shake. The ice will fall through the colander while the fruit remains.

Frozen fruit is best used when it has not been thawed completely, unless specified in the recipe. Thaw fruit to the point where fruit pieces will separate. 18 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Canning For many years that big, enamel canner intimidated me and caused me to avoid canning. Once I began, it didn’t take long to realize how easy it is to make jam or “put up” a jar of fruit. Our grandparents canned fruits and vegetables in mass quantities in order to survive. Today, we have the luxury of making small batches and are free to can by choice rather than by necessity. Take advantage of that freedom - pick your favourite recipes and only can or jam what you want, when you want. Two techniques that are vital for safe canning are sterilizing the jars before they are filled and processing filled jars in a hot water bath. Sterilizing the jars is critical if the water bath processing time in the recipe is less than 10 minutes. You’ll find reference to these procedures throughout this book.

How to Sterilize Jars 1. Check jars for any cracks or chips along the rim. Cracked or chipped jars should not be used for canning. They may shatter from the heat or they may not create a tight seal, leading to spoiled food. 2. Wash jars, lids and equipment in hot, soapy water. Rinse and air dry. 3. Place jars upright on a wire rack in a canner or large pot (if doing a small batch). If you don’t have a wire rack, place screw bands on the bottom of the canner and place jars on top of those. 4. Fill canner and jars with water until they are completely covered. 5. Bring to boil and boil for 10 minutes. Boiling that much water will take at least 30 minutes, enough time to start preparing your food. 6. Canning lids (not the outer rim) need to be heated in a small pot of water to activate the seal; they do not need to be boiled. Follow the instructions on the lids, as some varieties have different requirements. 7. Keep jars and lids hot until ready to use. To prevent the glass from cracking, the jar and its contents should be about the same temperature. Preserving 19


How to Process Jars in a Hot Water Bath 1. Heat a canner or very large pot filled with enough water to cover jars with at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) of water. 2. Place filled jars in the water. Jars should be upright with space between each jar. 3. Bring the water to a boil. Continue to boil for the time specified in the recipe. It is important to start counting the processing time only when the water begins to boil. Processing time varies for each recipe, depending on type of fruit, type of preserve, jar size and altitude. If processing at elevations above 1,000 feet (306 m) you must increase cooking time as shown in the chart below. 4. Remove jars from water and let rest undisturbed for 24 hours. You may hear a “pop� as the jars form an airtight vacuum seal. 5. Check the seal after 24 hours of cooling. If the lid is concave and remains down when pressed, it is sealed. If the lids are loose and the centre pops up and down, they are not properly sealed. These jars should be used right away and stored in the fridge for up to 3 weeks. 6. Label and date your jars and store for up to a year.

Adjusting for Altitude If you’re canning at altitudes above 1,000 feet (306 m), you need to adjust the time that jars are kept in the hot water bath. Use this chart to reach and maintain temperatures necessary to kill dangerous bacteria. 1,001 to 3,000 feet (306 to 915 m) add 5 minutes 3,001 to 6,000 feet (916 to 1,830 m) add 10 minutes 6,001 to 8,000 feet (1,831 to 2,440 m) add 15 minutes 8,001 to 10,000 feet (2,441 to 3,050 m) add 20 minutes

20 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apple Measurements Here are some guidelines to help you determine how many apples you’ll need.

Imperial

1 lb apples = 3-4 medium apples 1 lb apples = 3 cups sliced apples 1 apple = 1 cup of sliced apples 3 lb or 9 cups = 1 quart or 2 pints or 4 cups applesauce 4 lb or 12 cups = 1 lb dried apples 1 peck apples = 10.5 lbs apples 1 bushel apples = 42 lbs apples

Metric 500 g apples = 3-4 medium apples 1 kg apples = 7-8 medium apples 1 apple = 250 ml sliced apples 4 apples = 1 litre sliced apples 3 kg or 4.5 litres apples = 2 litres applesauce 4 kg apples= 1 kg dried apples

26 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


General Info When I mention prairie apples, people instinctively pucker up and think of crab apples. Many are unaware that the prairies offer large, sweet eating apples which rival the size and taste of apples grown anywhere else.

Today’s cultivars allow growers a wide choice of fruit size, colour, ripening time, flavour, texture and tree size. In the spring, blossoms range from white and light pink to vibrant fuchsia. (Fuchsia blossoms are often an indication of smaller, more ornamental fruit.) Trees can be dwarf at 5-8 feet (1.5-2.5 m), full size at 10-20 feet (3-6 m) or espalier, when branches are trained to grow in a two dimensional direction, often against the side of a building or fence. The fruit itself comes in a variety of colours, including maroon, bronze, red, orange, yellow, gold, cream, green, and combinations of green with red or red with green. Ripening time can vary from early August to the end of September. The large assortment of apples makes identifying specific varieties tricky. Consider the size, colour, texture and overall shape of your apple as well as its normal ripening time. Take a few photos to a nursery specializing in fruit trees; they should be able to help you identify your specific variety. Whatever kind you have, the key is to enjoy! There are two main groups of prairie apples based on size – crab apples and apples. Occasionally, you may also hear the term “apple crabs” to refer to a cross between a crab apple and an apple. Apple crabs are typically 1½-2½ inches (4-6 cm) in diameter. They are sweeter than crab apples but do retain some tartness, which makes them perfect for juice, applesauce, pies, crisps and all sorts of baked goods. Apples and Crab Apples 27


Crab Apples These little gems are close descendants of wild apples, although backyard varieties are sweeter and not as woody as their undomesticated cousins. Today, crab apples are often used for landscaping because of their gorgeous, flowering blossoms, but crab apples also produce large amounts of edible fruit. And don’t be fooled, even those labeled ornamental are edible – they just may be too woody, tiny or tart to truly enjoy. Why not have a bite and see! Crab apples, in comparison to large, eating apples, are tart and firm. They’re also small, ranging from ½-2 inches (2-5cm). Due to their size, crab apples are best used for juice, jelly or applesauce, which allows their unique flavour and colour to be captured and enjoyed with as little work as possible. Crab apples may be green, yellow, red, burgundy, or any combination of these. This colour can impart a wonderful pink hue to their juice or jelly. Harvest times vary with variety. Some crab apples are ripe at the beginning of August; others aren’t ready until the end of September.

28 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apples Today, there are over 20 varieties of large, eating and baking apples that can be successfully grown in our harsh climate, and they’re spectacular! Each time I taste new varieties (and I still have many more to try!), I’m pleasantly surprised by their unique, intense flavour which can range from sweet to tart and tender to crisp. Even our kids comment on the bland taste of grocery store apples when our stock of prairie apples runs out. Some of the more common varieties include: Dexter Jackson, Fall Red, Gemini, Goodland, Goodmac, Millstream, Norkent, Norland, Prairie Magic, Prairie Sensation, September Ruby and Winter Cheeks. Luckily, for those of us with small yards, several of these can be purchased as dwarf trees which grow from 5-10 feet (1.5-3 m). This compact size makes harvesting much easier since the fruit is easier to reach and doesn’t require dangerous acrobatic feats on extension ladders! Smaller trees take up less garden real estate. This allows homeowners to grow two or three different varieties and harvest different coloured, textured and flavoured apples from mid-August to early October. Apple size varies from 2½-4 inches (4-10 cm). Size combined with their sweet taste make them perfect for eating right off the tree. They’re also ideal for juicing, preserving, baking, cooking or dehydrating. Apples are harvested from mid-August to late September.

Apples and Crab Apples 29


Harvesting Apples Prairie apples are harvested from early August to late September. Exact harvest times are dependent on variety and growing conditions. To determine the ideal harvest time, consider:

Colour Look for changes in the base colour or ground colour of your

apples (such as from green to creamy yellow). Once the ground colour has changed on most of the apple’s surface, it’s ready to harvest. Remember that the apples in the centre of your tree will be the last to change colour, and not all apples will ripen at the same time.

Separation from Tree Ripe apples

come off the tree easily. Test by holding the bottom of an apple, lifting it against the stem and twisting gently. If it separates from the branch without a forceful tug, it is ready to be picked.

Note: It is usual for some apples to drop before the majority of the tree is fully ripe. Do not assume that a few fallen apples mean the whole tree is ready to harvest.

Flavour Taste several apples from

different parts of the tree to check for The size and colour of these apples texture and sweetness. Apples ready indicate they’re not ready to harvest. For best flavour, don’t harvest too soon! for harvest are sweet and crisp. A hard, tart apple is under ripe, while a mealy, soft one is overripe – relative to variety, of course.

Pip Colour Cut open an apple and look at the colour of the seeds, called pips. Ripe apples have brown or dark-coloured pips.

30 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


How to Harvest Apples Start by removing any fallen apples to keep them separate from the fresh ones you pick. Any fruit that falls while you’re picking can be used, but apples that have been on the ground for a while are at risk of contamination and should be composted. Pick apples from the lower branches first to avoid bruising from ladders or fruit falling from upper branches. When picking, place your hand underneath the apple, roll the apple toward the branch and twist gently. The stem should break free from the spur. Avoid jerking or pulling the apple as this may remove the fruit spurs that are critical to next year’s crop. Your apple should have a stem, but the spur should remain on the tree. Two or more apples may be joined on one spur. They usually come off at the same time, so be prepared to catch them all. Place the apples in a bag or basket gently to avoid bruising. Empty your container frequently to avoid spilling or bumping apples. Place any heavily bruised or damaged fruit in a separate container. If left, they’ll quickly cause other apples to spoil. Damaged fruit should be used right away. Do not wash your apples until you’re ready to eat them. Unwashed apples keep longer than washed apples. Store in a cool dark area until ready to use. Apples and Crab Apples 31


Storing Apples Short Term Apples can be kept on the counter for up to 14 days. They can be stored for up to 6 to 8 weeks in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper.

Long Term To store boxes of fresh apples, choose tart, thick-skinned varieties which ripen late in the season; these varieties keep much longer than early season apple varieties which are often softer with higher water content.

Keep at a Constant Cool Temperature

A constant temperature just above freezing (34-38F or 2-4C) is ideal. An unheated basement, attic or closet on the north side of the house is suitable, as is a garage, as long as the temperature doesn’t fluctuate too much or go below freezing.

Sort

Apples with bruises, soft spots or other damage do not store well and may cause other apples to spoil. Use these apples immediately and do not store.

Store Unwashed

Direct contact with any water will cause apples to spoil more quickly.

Wrap

For extra-long storage, wrap apples individually in newspaper to prevent them from touching and losing moisture.

Check

Check apples regularly to catch any signs of deterioration. 32 Prairie Fruit Cookbook

Did You Know? Apples continue to ripen after harvest. Apples ripen 10 times more quickly at room temperature than when refrigerated. Smaller apples store better than larger apples. The saying ‘one bad

apple spoils the bunch’

is true. Apples give off ethylene gas which speeds ripening. Damaged apples give off ethylene more rapidly and will speed the decomposing of other apples in the container.


Preserving Apples Freezing Apples – Dry Pack Apples 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

any quantity

Wash, peel (optional), core and slice apples. Place in anti-browning solution (see below) until ready to pack. Drain well and pat dry with a clean tea towel. Place in a freezer bag and remove as much air as possible. Seal and freeze for 10 to 12 months.

Freezing Apples – Dry Sugar Pack Apples Sugar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

5 lbs 2 cups

2.2 kg 500 ml

Wash, peel (optional), and core apples. Slice to preferred size (depending on end use). Place apples in anti-browning solution (see below) until ready to use. Add sugar to fruit and mix gently until fruit is evenly coated. Pack fruit into freezer containers. Remove as much air as possible. Seal and freeze for 10 to 12 months.

Anti-browning Solution To prevent apples, pears or apricots from turning brown (oxidizing), soak in the following solution until you’re ready to use them. 1/4 cup (125 ml) lemon juice with 1 quart (1L water) OR 3 tsp (15 ml) ascorbic acid* in 1 cup (250 ml) water *Ascorbic Acid is another name for Vitamin C. It also helps prevent discolouration of fruits. It is available at pharmacies or stores which sell freezing and canning supplies. Apples and Crab Apples 33


Freezing Apples – Syrup Pack This method is best for apples that will be used for unbaked desserts. It retains a little more of the texture and flavour of apples. Sugar Ascorbic Acid Water Apples

2 cups ½ tsp 4 cups 5 lbs

500 ml 2 ml 1L 2.2 kg

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Dissolve sugar and ascorbic acid in lukewarm water. Stir until solution is clear. Cool. Wash, peel (optional), core and slice apples. Place in anti-browning solution (pg 33) until ready to pack. Place apple slices in a freezer bag or container. Cover with syrup leaving a ½ inch (1.2 cm) headspace. To keep apples covered in a container, place a crumpled piece of wax paper on top. 8. Seal and freeze for 10 to 12 months.

Makes: 5 cups (1.25 L) of syrup for approximately 15 cups (3.75 L) of fruit

Convenient Freezing Tips  Pre-measure apples and place only the amount needed for your favourite recipe in each freezer container.  Spread apple slices on a cookie sheet in a single layer and freeze. Once they’re frozen, pour into a freezer bag and seal. This allows you to shake out only what’s needed.  Prepare apples with spices, sweeteners and thickeners as you would for your favourite recipe and freeze in pre-measured amounts.  Freeze prepared apples in the shape of a pie plate.  Pre-make your apple pie or crisp and freeze.

34 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Canning Apples – Hot Pack with Light Syrup Apples can be canned in water, fruit juice, light, medium or heavy syrup. Sugar Water Apples

2 cups 10 cups 19 lbs

500 ml 2.5 L 8.6 kg

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Peel, core and slice apples. Place in anti-browning solution (pg 33) until ready to use. Boil sugar and water in medium saucepan until sugar has dissolved. Place apples in boiling syrup until heated through, about 5 minutes. Remove apple slices and pack in jars leaving a ¾ inch (2 cm) headspace. 6. Add syrup to cover apples, leaving a ½ inch (1.2 cm) headspace. 7. Remove air bubbles and add more syrup to keep headspace. 8. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 9. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 10. Process in hot water bath for 20 minutes. 11. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal. 12. Enjoy for up to 12 months. Makes: 7 quart (1 L) jars

Note: Apples can be canned using the raw pack method (not boiling apples first), however, the quality is not as good as with the hot pack method.

Apples and Crab Apples 35


Crab Apple Juice Thanks to Carrie Roloff, Fruit Share Volunteer, for this juicy recipe. Crab Apples Cream of Tartar Boiling Water Sugar

4 quarts 2 tbsp 5 quarts 1-2 cups

4L 30 ml 5L 250-500 ml

1. 2. 3. 4.

Wash apples, cut in half and place in large stock pot. Sprinkle apples with cream of tartar and cover with boiling water. Let stand for 24 hours. Pour through strainer or cheesecloth to capture all the liquid. Compost remaining pulp. 5. Pour liquid back into clean pot and bring to boil. 6. Sweeten to taste and continue to boil for 15 minutes. 7. Pour into hot, sterilized jars; leave ¼ inch (6 mm) headspace. 8. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 9. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 10. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes. 11. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal.

Makes: 9 quart (1L) jars

Apple Butter Applesauce, unsweetened Apple Cider Honey Cinnamon Allspice

7 cups 2 cups 1 ½ cups 1 tsp ½ tsp

1.75 L 500 ml 375 ml 5 ml 2 ml

1. In a slow cooker, combine all ingredients. 2. Cover and cook on LOW for 10 to 12 hours or until deep brown. 3. Spoon hot apple butter into hot, sterilized jars leaving a ¼ inch (6 mm) headspace. 4. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 5. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 6. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes. 7. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal. Makes: 7 half pint (250 ml) jars 36 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Crab Apple Jelly Crab Apple Jelly is an all-time favourite with its sweet/tart taste and beautiful ruby colour. The natural pectin content produces an excellent jelly without the need for commercial pectin. Crab Apples Water Sugar

12 cups 8 cups 3 cups

3L 2L 750 ml

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Wash crab apples and remove any leaves. Cut in halves or quarters, depending on apple size. Place apples in a large stock pot, add water and cover. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and let simmer for 15 minutes until apples are soft. Pour mixture into a jelly bag or sieve lined with cheese cloth. Allow to drain freely for 30 minutes or, to get the maximum amount of juice, leave for 6 to 8 hours. Jelly will turn cloudy if apples are squeezed at this stage. You should have 4 to 5 cups (1L) of juice. You may add up to ½ cup (125 ml) of water if you do not have enough juice. 6. Pour juice back into stock pot. 7. For each cup of juice, add ¾ cup (180 ml) of sugar. 8. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes or until jelly stage is reached. To test for proper jelly stage, place a small plate in the freezer. Put a spoonful of jelly on the plate and cool for 1 minute. If the mixture is firm, it is ready. While testing, remove the jelly from the heat; boiling too long may destroy the pectin. 9. When the mixture reaches the jelly stage, skim off foam. Pour hot jelly into hot, sterilized jars leaving a ¼ inch (6 mm) headspace. 10. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 11. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 12. Process in hot water bath for 5 minutes. 13. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal.

Makes: 4 half pint (250 ml) jars

Apples and Crab Apples 37


Pickled Crab Apples Thanks to Betty Burwell, a Home Economist from Saskatoon, SK, for this classic recipe featured on www.HomeFamily.net. Sugar White Vinegar Water Whole Cloves Cinnamon Stick Allspice Crab Apples 1. 2. 3. 4.

4 cups 2 cups 1 cup 1 tbsp 1 1 tbsp 4 lb

1L 500 ml 250 ml 15 ml 1 15 ml 2 kg

Combine sugar vinegar and water. Tie spices in cheesecloth and add to vinegar mixture. Bring to boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Wash crab apples and remove blossom end. Leave stem on for attractive “handles”. 5. Prick each crab apple 3 or 4 times with a fork to prevent splitting. 6. Add apples to syrup and simmer until apples are heated through but not soft, about 5 to 10 minutes. 7. Remove spice bag. 8. Pack apples into hot, sterilized pint (500 ml) jars. 9. Cover with boiling syrup leaving a ½ inch (1.2 cm) headspace. 10. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 11. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 12. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes. 13. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal.

Makes: 8-9 pint (500 ml) jars

38 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Spicy Ginger Apple Chutney Chutney, a Hindu word meaning strongly spiced, offers a sweet and savoury taste that goes well with barbecued or roasted meats like chicken, lamb or pork. It’s also great with soft cheese and crackers. Apples Red Bell Pepper Jalapeno Pepper (optional) Onion Brown Sugar Cider Vinegar Lemon Juice Raisins Ginger Root Dry Mustard Cumin Salt Cayenne Pepper Flakes

3 cups 1 1 1 1½ cups 1¼ cups 3 tbsp 1 cup ¼ cup ½ tsp ¼ tsp ½ tsp ½ tsp

750 ml 1 1 1 375 ml 310 ml 45 ml 250 ml 60 ml 2 ml 1 ml 2 ml 2 ml

1. Wash, peel (optional) and core apples. 2. Chop apples, peppers and onions into uniform fine or coarse pieces, according to how chunky you prefer your chutney. 3. Mix all ingredients in large stainless steel saucepan. 4. Bring to boil, stirring constantly. 5. Reduce heat and cook uncovered for 40 minutes or until mix thickens to a jam-like consistency. 6. Stir frequently. Test the chutney by drawing a line through the mix with a wooden spoon. It is done when no liquid fills the line. 7. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. 8. Pour chutney into hot, sterilized jars leaving a ½ inch (1cm) headspace. 9. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 10. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 11. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes. 12. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal. Makes: 7 half pint (250 ml) jars

Apples and Crab Apples 39


Dehydrated Apple Rings Apples Cinnamon 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

3 ½ tsp

3 2 ml

Wash, peel (optional) and core apples. Slice apples into ¼ inch (6 mm) slices. Place slices in an anti-browning solution (pg 33) if desired. Arrange slices on a dehydrator tray and sprinkle with cinnamon. Place on dehydrator screens and dehydrate at 135F (57C) for 6 to 10 hours. Apples should be dry and leathery with no tacky spots. 6. If using your oven, arrange apple slices on baking racks; set your oven to the lowest possible setting and watch apples carefully. Because most ovens will not go as low as a dehydrator, the finishing time will be much shorter. Depending on the air circulation in your oven, you may need to rotate the racks to ensure even drying. 7. Allow dehydrated apples to cool completely before storing in an airtight bag or container. 8. Store in a dry, dark place for several months.

40 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Raw Vanilla or Chocolate Apple Almond Bars Almonds Apples Apple Jelly or Honey Cocoa Powder (optional) Cinnamon Nutmeg Almond Extract

1 cup 3 ¼ cup 2 tbsp 1 tsp ¼ tsp ½ tsp

250 ml 3 60 ml 30 ml 5 ml 1ml 2 ml

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Grind almonds in food processor until fine. Transfer ground almonds to a bowl. Core and slice apples into quarters (no need to peel). Add apples to food processor and process until fine. Add chopped apples and remainder of ingredients to almonds. For chocolate version, omit cinnamon and nutmeg and replace with cocoa powder. 7. Blend well. 8. Spread mix on lined dehydrator screens at least ¼ - ½ inch (6 - 12 mm) thick. Score and separate the mix into bar shapes. Dehydrate at 115F (46C) for 20 to 24 hours, flipping bars halfway through. 9. Bars should be dry throughout but still pliable. 10. Cool completely and store tightly sealed in a dry, dark place for several months. Makes 18-24 bars 1x3 inch (2.5x7 cm)

Apples and Crab Apples 41


Spiced Apple Leather Thanks to Sagan Morrow, Fruit Share Volunteer, for this versatile recipe that you can adjust with your preference of seasonings and toppings. Apples (any variety) Applesauce or Apple Cider Almond Extract Cinnamon Nutmeg Ginger Raisins Walnuts or Sunflower Seeds (optional)

12 2 tbsp ½ tsp ¼ tsp ⅛ tsp ⅛ tsp ⅓ cup ⅓ cup

12 30 ml 2 ml 1 ml .5 ml .5 ml 75 ml 75 ml

1. Wash, core and quarter apples. Peeling is optional. 2. Chop apples into small pieces using a food processor. Transfer to bowl and mix in applesauce, almond extract, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and raisins. 3. Smooth mixture onto lined dehydrator screens at least ¼ inch (6 mm) thick. Sprinkle with nuts and seeds - if desired. 4. Dehydrate at 135F (57C) about 8 to 12 hours. 5. To bake in the oven, pour mixture onto parchment lined cookie sheets and bake at your oven’s lowest temperature for 6 to 10 hours. 6. Peel leather off lined sheets, roll and cut into strips. 7. Cool completely then store in an airtight container for months.

Applesauce Fruit Leather Using applesauce makes thinner, smoother leather more like fruit roll-ups. Applesauce Cinnamon Honey (optional) 1. 2. 3. 4.

2 cups ½ tsp 2 tbsp

500 ml 2 ml 30 ml

Mix all ingredients in a bowl. Pour mix evenly onto lined dehydrator screens ¼ inch (6 mm) thick. Dehydrate at 135F (57C) about 10 to 12 hours. To bake in the oven, pour mixture on parchment lined cookie sheets and bake at your oven’s lowest temperature for 6 to 10 hours. 5. Peel leather off lined sheets, roll and cut into strips. 6. Cool completely then store in an airtight container for months. 42 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apple Recipes Easy Applesauce An ideal recipe for those who don’t like peeling or coring apples – especially crab apples. Apples (any kind) Water

6 lbs 1- 2 cups

2-3 kg 250 - 500 ml

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Wash apples. (Do Not remove the core, peel or stems.) Cut apples into even sized chunks (halved or quartered). Pour 1 cup (250 ml) water into large stock pot and add apples. Cover and bring to boil. Turn heat to low and let simmer until soft, about 20 to 30 minutes. Stir frequently. Add more water if mixture is too thick or dry. Remove from heat when apples are soft and easily separate from peel. Separate cores, peels, and stems from the sauce with a food mill or by squeezing the mix through a strainer with the back of a spoon. 9. Add any spices or sweeteners as desired. Makes: 2 quarts (2 L)

Aidan (9) using the food mill to make applesauce. Apples and Crab Apples 43


Chunky Applesauce This applesauce recipe doesn’t require straining, but does require coring. You can easily modify the recipe for sweetness and texture, and choose peeled or unpeeled fruit. Apples (any kind) Water

6 lbs 1-2 cups

2-3 kg 250-500 ml

1. Wash and core apples. Peel or don’t peel apples – your choice. 2. Cut apples into quarters or halves. The exact size doesn’t matter, but keep pieces the same size so they will cook evenly. 3. Combine 1 cup (250 ml) water and apples in a large stock pot. 4. Cover and bring to a boil. 5. Turn heat to low and let simmer until soft, about 20 to 30 minutes. 6. Stir frequently. Add more water if mixture is too thick or dry. 7. Remove from heat when the apples are soft and to your desired consistency. The longer you cook the apples, the smoother your final sauce will be. 8. Add any desired spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla, etc.) or sweeteners such as honey, maple syrup, stevia or sugar. Makes: 2 quarts (2 L)

To can Applesauce: 1. Pour hot sauce into hot, sterilized jars; leave ½ inch (1.2 cm) space. 2. Use a plastic utensil to remove any air bubbles. Adjust headspace with more applesauce if needed. 3. Wipe rim with clean cloth and seal with hot sealing lid. 4. Screw band on top and tighten finger tight. 5. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes. 6. Remove jars. Cool undisturbed for 24 hours and check seal. 7. Enjoy for up to 12 months.

44 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Using your Applesauce There are lots of ways to enjoy fresh, homemade applesauce.

Eat it! Enjoy applesauce as a refreshing snack or dessert. Sweeten it. If you prefer a sweet applesauce, add a little sweetener at the

end of the cooking process. Try sugar, brown sugar, honey, maple syrup, agave juice, stevia or sucralose.

Spice it up. Cinnamon is perfect for applesauce, but try adding something different like pumpkin pie spice, allspice, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, or vanilla extract.

Make it savoury. To accompany meats like pork or lamb, leave out the sugar and toss in some herbs like rosemary, thyme or sage.

Use it as topping. Use it on top of granola, pancakes, ice cream, oatmeal, coffee cake, toast, cinnamon buns, etc.

Freeze it. Simply spoon into a container or freezer bag and freeze. Make popsicles. Spoon applesauce into a popsicle tray and freeze. Dehydrate it. Make your own fruit leather (pg 42) in a food dehydrator or oven for a tasty, portable snack.

Bake with it. Make applesauce muffins, breads, loaves, cookies, bars, etc. Cook with it. Use applesauce in pancakes, soups and stews. Lower the fat in baked goods. Use applesauce to replace the butter,

margarine or oil in your favourite recipes. A general guideline is to replace half the amount of fat in a recipe with an equal amount of applesauce. For example, if a recipe calls for 1 cup (250 ml) of oil, use ½ cup (125 ml) of oil and ½ cup (125 ml) of applesauce.

Lower the sugar in desserts. Use applesauce instead of sugar, honey or

syrup to sweeten non-baked desserts. You can even replace some of the sugar in baked goods with applesauce by one third, and decreasing the amount of other liquids in the recipe - exact amounts vary by recipe. Apples and Crab Apples 45


Classic Apple Pie Crust

All-purpose Flour Salt Sugar Butter (cold) Shortening (cold) Vinegar (cold) Ice Water

Filling

Apples * Sugar Cornstarch Cinnamon Salt Cider Vinegar

2 cups 1 tsp 1 tbsp 6 tbsp 6 tbsp 1 tbsp 5-7 tbsp

500 ml 5 ml 15 ml 90 ml 90 ml 15 ml 75-105 ml

6 cups ¾ cup 1½ tbsp ½ tsp ¼ tsp 1 tbsp

1.5 L 180 ml 23 ml 2 ml 1 ml 15 ml

* To use frozen apples simply mix frozen apples (thaw ‘til pieces separate) with remainder of ingredients and add an extra ½ tbsp (7 ml) cornstarch. Add an extra 10-20 minutes to baking time. Crust

1. Sift together flour, salt and sugar in large, chilled bowl. 2. Use pastry blender to cut in butter and shortening until crumbly with small bits of butter still intact. 3. Sprinkle vinegar and smallest amount of water over the flour mixture. 4. Mix with fork just until ingredients come together, add remaining water if needed. Large pieces of dough should stick together when patted. 5. Pat into a flat ball, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Filling 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Wash, core, peel and slice apples. Toss sliced apples in an anti-browning solution (pg 33) if desired. In large pot, mix sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, salt and vinegar. Add apples to saucepan. Cook on medium heat until apples lose moisture and sauce begins to thicken, about 8 minutes. 6. Cool completely. 46 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Assembly 1. Preheat oven to 450˚F (230C). 2. Place oven rack in lowest position and place a piece of aluminum foil on the oven bottom to catch any drips. 3. Cut dough into two pieces. Leave one piece in the fridge. 4. Lightly flour a rolling pin and a section of counter top. 5. Roll dough into a 12 inch (30 cm) circle starting from the inside out. To prevent sticking, lift and turn dough frequently. 6. Fold the dough over the rolling pin and transfer to pie plate. 7. Brush bottom pastry with 1 tsp (5 ml) of soft butter to prevent bottom crust from getting soggy. 8. Pour cold filling into pie. 9. Roll out remaining piece of dough. 10. Moisten the edge of the pie shell with a little water if needed. 11. Place the top crust over the apples. 12. Tuck excess pastry under the bottom crust and crimp edges. 13. Make five slits in the top crust to allow steam to escape. 14. Place pie on lowest rack and bake at 450˚F (230C) for 15 minutes. 15. Reduce heat to 400F (205C), cover edges with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. 16. Remove from oven and cool for 2 hours to let filling set. Makes: one 9 inch (23 cm) pie

Apples and Crab Apples 47


The Apple Pie Experiment I apologize to my poor family who suffered during the recipe testing phase of this book. They were my guinea pigs and had to taste samples of everything – such hardship! One night, there was nothing for supper except three different versions of apple pie. In fact, there was so much pie we had to call our friends for help. I was experimenting with apple pie baked with fresh apples, thawed apples, and apples frozen but not thawed. Here’s what we discovered:

Fresh Apples

Using fresh, prairie apples was everyone’s favourite and resulted in a classic apple pie. The apples retained their shape, were still slightly crisp and the sauce was just the right consistency.

Frozen, Not Thawed Apples

This pie stood up very well and some people couldn’t distinguish between it and the fresh apple pie. The apples held their shape and were only slightly softer than the fresh apples. The bottom crust was a little undercooked in some spots and the sauce was just a little runnier. When using frozen apples that have not been thawed, add an extra ½ tbsp (7 ml) cornstarch with the frozen apples and bake an extra 10 to 20 minutes.

Frozen, Thawed Apples

I thawed 7 cups (1.75 L) of apples over a colander overnight to get 4 ½ cups (1.125 L) of apples (compared to 6 cups (1.5 L) for the others). The apples completely lost their shape, turning into a dark, thick apple paste. The pie looked slightly concave and was quite sweet. The crust turned out well. Our judges gave it the bronze medal – they still enjoyed it, but they preferred the texture and flavour of the other two versions better. If your friends and family are anything like mine, they won’t really care which method you choose, they just want to eat pie!

48 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Pie Tips: 

Use a glass or dull-metal pie plate for best results. Aluminum pie plates prevent browning. Dark pans may cause too much browning.

Cover edges of crust with a ring of aluminum foil after the first 15 minutes of baking to prevent edges from getting too brown. To make the ring, cut a 12 inch (30 cm) square piece of foil. Cut out a 7 inch (17 cm) circle from the centre. Place on top of the pie.

Add vinegar to the crust ingredients to keep the crust tender.

Do not over-mix ingredients or knead dough too much. Overworking leads to gluten formation which will make the dough tough.

Start baking in a very hot oven for the first 15 minutes and then reduce the heat to finish baking. This will help the fat to create flaky pockets.

Slice your apples thin or precook the filling to avoid a gap between the filling and the top crust. Smaller pieces reduce air pockets. Precooking shrinks the fruit by reducing the water content.

To prevent a soggy bottom: coat the bottom of the pie crust with softened butter, an egg wash (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp (15 ml) water), or with fine crumbs such as graham wafers or gingerbread cookies. Keep the crust as cold as possible, cool the pie filling before pouring into the crust and bake at a high temperature.

Cool pie for 2 hours before slicing to allow the filling to set properly.

Cut at least 5 vents into the top pie crust to allow steam to escape.

Line the bottom of your oven with aluminum foil to catch any spills.

If using frozen fruit, thaw just until pieces separate. If the frozen fruit has too many ice crystals, place in a colander and shake over a sink. The ice crystals should fall through the holes, leaving the fruit intact. Add an extra 5 to 15 minutes to your baking time.

If baking a frozen pie, add 10-20 minutes to baking time.

For a shiny, brown crust, brush top with beaten egg.

Hide any leftovers! If you don’t, your pie will magically disappear before you have a chance to have a second piece. Apples and Crab Apples 49


Crab Apple Pie (no peeling or coring!) Thanks to Sheila Reed, Fruit Share Volunteer, for this great recipe using crab apples. If you want a higher pie, add more apples. Double Crust Pie Shell (pg 46) Crab apples Brown Sugar Lemon Juice Cinnamon Cloves All-purpose Flour Egg Butter, cut into small pieces

1 6 cups ½ cup 1 tbsp 1 tsp ¼ tsp 2 tbsp 1 2 tbsp

1 1.5 L 125 ml 15 ml 5 ml 1 ml 30 ml 1 30 ml

1. Preheat oven to 450 F (230 C). 2. Roll out half of the pastry and fit into a 9 inch (23 cm) pie plate. 3. Trim edge even with pie plate. 4. Wash and cut crab apples (see below). No need to peel or core! 5. Toss crab apples with sugar, lemon juice, spices and flour. 6. Mix egg with 1 tbsp (15ml) water. 7. Brush bottom pastry with half of egg wash to prevent a soggy crust. 8. Pour fruit into unbaked pie shell. 9. Roll out top crust, place on pie, crimp edges and cut 5 slits in top. 10. Brush remainder of the egg wash on the top crust. 11. Place pie on lowest rack and bake at 450˚F (230C) for 15 minutes. 12. Reduce heat to 350° F (180 C), cover edges with aluminum foil and continue to bake for 30 to 40 minutes. 13. Remove from oven and rest for 2 hours for filling to set. Makes: one 9 inch (23 cm) pie

Cut the Crab! Cutting and coring crab apples is time consuming and finger-numbing work. Here’s a tip to make this task a little easier. Rather than cutting and then removing the core, cut around the core. Simply place a crab apple on a cutting board and make 3-5 cuts all around the apple. Compost the core. 50 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Maple Apple Crisp This recipe is thanks to Aleta Allard, Fruit Share Volunteer. Adjust the syrup and sugar to suit your preference. Apples Maple Syrup All-purpose Flour Rolled Oats Brown Sugar Butter, diced 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

6 cups ¼ cup ½ cup ½ cup ¼ cup ⅓ cup

1.5 L 60 ml 125 ml 125 ml 60 ml 75 ml

Preheat oven to 375F (190 C). Wash, peel, core and slice apples. Place apples in an 8x8 inch (20x20cm) baking pan. Pour syrup over apples and stir until well distributed. In separate bowl, mix together flour, oats, and sugar. Using a pastry blender, cut in butter until mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle mixture evenly over apples. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until topping is golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 4-6 servings

Cobbler, Crisp or Crumble? Ever get confused by the terms cobbler, crisp or crumble? While each is a delicious fruity dessert, there are some minor differences: Cobbler : a biscuit like dough dropped on top of a fruit layer Crisp : a crunchy, crumbly topping made of oats or granola on top of a fruit layer Crumble: a crumbly topping or “streusel” typically made of flour, butter and sugar on top of a fruit layer

Apples and Crab Apples 51


Apple & Berry Cobbler You can vary this recipe by simply using a different type of prairie berry. Consider high bush cranberry, wild blueberry, saskatoon, raspberry, or blackberry.

Fruit Bottom

Apple, diced (fresh or frozen) Berries (fresh or frozen) Sugar Flour Cinnamon Lemon Juice Butter, diced

Topping

Lemon Juice Milk All-purpose Flour Baking Powder Sugar Butter, diced Milk

8 cups 1 cup ¼ cup 2 tbsp ½ tsp 1½ tbsp 2 tbsp

2L 250 ml 60 ml 30 ml 2 ml 23 ml 30 ml

1 tbsp 1 cup 2 cups 2 tsp ¼ cup ½ cup ½ cup

15 ml 250 ml 500 ml 10 ml 60 ml 125 ml 125 ml

1. Preheat oven to 400F (205C). 2. Mix apples, berries, sugar, flour, cinnamon and lemon juice. If using frozen fruit, thaw just until pieces can be separated. 3. Pour into 9x13 inch (23x25 cm) baking dish and top with butter. 4. Pour lemon juice into measuring cup and add milk. Rest for 3 to 5 minutes until milk thickens (or use 1 cup (250 ml) buttermilk). 5. Mix flour, baking powder and sugar in medium sized bowl. 6. Cut in butter with pastry blender or two knives until crumbly. 7. Add milk mixture. Stir with a fork just until dough comes together. 8. Drop by spoonfuls onto apples and berries. 9. Bake for 45 minutes or until top is golden brown. 10. Cool for 15 to 30 minutes before serving to allow filling to set. Makes: 9-12 servings

52 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apfel Kuchen (German Apple Crumb Cake) This was a standard Sunday afternoon coffee cake during my childhood. All-purpose Flour Sugar Cinnamon Butter, diced Egg Apples, sliced Icing Sugar

2 cups ½ cup 1 tsp 1 cup 1 3-4 1 tbsp

500 ml 125 ml 5 ml 250 ml 1 3-4 30 ml

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Preheat oven to 350˚F (180˚C). In medium bowl, combine flour, sugar and cinnamon. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or two knives until crumbly. Mix in egg until mixture resembles wet sand. Take out 1 cup (250 ml) of mix and reserve for top crumbs. Press remainder into the bottom and ½ inch (1.2 cm) up the sides of a lightly buttered 10 inch (25 cm) springform pan. 7. Arrange apples tightly in two layers on top of dough. 8. Sprinkle remaining crumb mixture over top of apples. 9. Bake for 50 minutes or until top is starting to turn golden brown. 10. Remove from oven and cool completely. 11. Sprinkle top with sifted icing sugar. Makes: one 10 inch (25 cm) round cake

Apples and Crab Apples 53


Honey Oat Apple Muffins Try this delicious, moist muffin with rhubarb, raspberries, saskatoons, cherries, currants, or blueberries. Large-flake Rolled Oats Buttermilk* Whole Wheat Flour Baking Powder Baking Soda Cinnamon Salt Honey Canola Oil Egg Apples, diced (fresh or frozen) Chopped Walnuts (optional)

1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1½ tsp ½ tsp 1 tsp ¼ tsp ½ cup ⅓ cup 1 ½ cup ¼ cup

250 ml 250 ml 250 ml 7 ml 2 ml 5 ml 1 ml 125 ml 75 ml 1 125 ml 60 ml

Topping Brown Sugar Cinnamon Chopped walnuts (optional)

2 tbsp ½ tsp 1 tbsp

30 ml 2 ml 15 ml

* To make a substitute for buttermilk place 1 tbsp (15 ml) lemon juice in a measuring cup; add enough milk to make 1 cup; let sit for 5 minutes. 1. Preheat oven to 375(190°C). Lightly grease a muffin pan. 2. In large bowl, mix oats and buttermilk; let stand for 15 minutes. 3. In separate large bowl, mix flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. 4. Mix honey, oil and egg with oats. 5. Stir wet ingredients into dry ingredients just until combined. Add apples and walnuts. 6. Spoon into muffin pan. 7. Combine topping ingredients. Sprinkle on top of muffins. 8. Bake for 15 to17 minutes until tops are firm to the touch. Makes: 12 muffins 54 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apple and Walnut Couscous Salad Couscous is a pellet-shaped pasta made from semolina. This North African staple is commonly steamed and served with vegetables and meat. Water Couscous Celery, diced Apple, diced Roasted Walnuts, chopped Fresh Parsley, chopped Green Onions, chopped Canola Oil Cider Vinegar Maple Syrup or Honey Dijon Mustard Salt and Pepper

1 cup ⅔ cup 2 stalks 1 ½ cup 1½ tbsp 2 tbsp 2 tbsp 1 tbsp 1 tbsp 1 tsp to taste

250 ml 150 ml 2 stalks 1 125 ml 23 ml 30 ml 30 ml 15 ml 15 ml 5 ml to taste

1. Bring water to boil. Add couscous. Remove from heat, cover and let sit for 5 minutes. Fluff with fork and cool completely 2. In large bowl, toss cooled couscous, celery, apple, walnuts, parsley and green onions. 3. In small bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, maple syrup, mustard, salt and pepper. Toss with couscous. Makes: 4 servings

Apples and Crab Apples 55


Beet & Apple Salad Use up extra beets and apples in this stunning, colourful salad sent to me by my friend Theo Smit, from Alliston, Ontario. Beets Apples Fresh Dill, chopped Olive Oil Red Wine Vinegar Dijon Mustard Honey Garlic Clove, crushed Caraway Seed Salt and Pepper 1. 2. 3. 4.

3-4 2 1 tbsp â…“ cup 2 tbsp 1 tbsp 1 tbsp 1 1 tsp to taste

3-4 2 15 ml 75 ml 30 ml 15 ml 15 ml 1 5 ml to taste

Cook beets in boiling, salted water until tender. Peel and dice. Wash, core and dice apples. DO NOT peel. Mix beets, apples, and dill in salad bowl. In large bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, mustard, honey, garlic, and spices. Toss with beets and apples.

Makes: 4 servings

56 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Apple Curry Soup This simple, elegant soup makes an impressive first course for any dinner. Onion, thinly sliced Butter Vegetable Stock Apples Curry Powder Lemon Juice Butter Cream * Salt Pepper All-purpose Flour

1 1 tbsp 4 cups 3 1 tsp 2 tbsp 2 tbsp ½ cup 1 tsp ½ tsp ¼ cup

1 15 ml 1L 3 5 ml 30 ml 30 ml 125 ml 5 ml 2 ml 60 ml

*Heating the cream will help prevent it from curdling when being added to a hot liquid. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In large soup pot, sauté onion in butter until soft. Add soup stock. Peel, core and slice apples. Add apples, curry powder and lemon juice to stock and bring to boil. Reduce heat and let simmer for 20 to 30 minutes until apples are soft. Use an immersion blender or blender to puree until fine. Add cream, salt and pepper. 7. If the soup is too thin, dissolve flour with in a small amount of the soup and return to the soup. Heat through and stir until soup thickens. 8. Garnish with sprig of curry plant or parsley. Makes: 4 servings Apples and Crab Apples 57


Other Apple Recipes Apples can be substituted in a number of recipes in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Applesauce popsicles – page 71 Apple and Walnut Loaf – page 86 Puffed Oven Apple Pancakes – page 87 Apple, Brie and Ham Panini – page 93 Apple Tart – page 108 Apple Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Apple and Raspberry Salad – page 159 Double Crust Apple Crisp – page 170 Apple Sour Cream Coffee Cake – page 171 Apple Honey Bran Muffins – page 172 Apple Saskatoon Crisp (Gluten Free) – page 194 Apple and Saskatoon French Toast Strata – page 196 Apple and Saskatoon Salsa Salad – page 197 Apple Crepes – page 211 Apple and Spinach salad – page 219

58 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Grape Recipes Grape juice or jelly can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Grape-tini – page 138 Grape Jelly Oat Squares – page 158 Grape Slush – page 176

72 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Plum and Apricot Recipes Diced or stewed plums and apricots can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Plum/Apricot Berry Cobbler – page 50 Maple Plum/Apricot Crisp – page 51 Plum/Apricot Kuchen (Plaufmen/Aprikosen Kuchen) – page 53 Honey Oat Plum/Apricot Muffins – page 54 Chocolate Apricot Tart – page 88 Puffed Oven Plum/Apricot Pancakes – page 87 Plum/Apricot Clafoutis – page 132 Plum/Apricot Banana Muffins – page 135 Plum/Apricot Almond Cake – page 153 Plum/Apricot Jam Oat Squares – page 158 Double Crust Plum/Apricot Crisp – page 170 Plum/Apricot Honey Bran Muffins – page 172 Plum/Apricot Fool – page 175 Saskatoon Plum/Apricot Crisp (Gluten Free) – page 194 Plum/Apricot Crepes – page 211 Plum/Apricot Spinach Salad – page 219

116 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Prairie Cherry Recipes Prairie cherries can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Choose according to the sweetness/tartness of your particular cherries. Cherry Cobbler – page 50 Maple Cherry Crisp – page 51 Honey Oat Cherry Muffins – page 54 Cherry Popsicles – page 71 Cherry Granita Slushy – page 70 Cherry and Walnut Loaf – page 86 Puffed Oven Cherry Pancake – page 87 Cherry Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Cherry Whole Wheat Cobbler – page 111 Cherry Lemon Muffins – page 152 Cherry Almond Cake – page 153 Cherry Jelly Roll – page 154 Chocolate Cherry Cups – page 156 Jiggly Cherry Squares – page 157 Cherry Jelly Oat Squares – page 158 Cherry Salad with Vinaigrette – page 159 Double Crust Cherry Crisp – page 170 Cherry Sour Cream Coffee Cake – page 171 Cherry Honey Bran Muffins – page 172 Cherry Fool – page 175 Cherry Lime Cheesecake Squares – page 191 Cherry Lemon Pound Cake – page 192 Almond Cherry Muffins – page 193 Cherry Crepes – page 211 Cherry Ice Cream Cake – page 217

140 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Raspberry Recipes Raspberries or raspberry puree can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Apple and Raspberry Cobbler – page 50 Maple Apple and Raspberry Crisp – page 51 Honey Oat Raspberry Muffins – page 54 Raspberry and Walnut Loaf – page 86 Puffed Oven Raspberry Pancake – page 87 Raspberry Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Apricot and Raspberry Cobbler – page 111 Raspberry Clafoutis – page 132 Raspberry Banana Muffins – page 135 No Bake Mini Raspberry Cheesecakes – page 136 Raspberry Sour Cream Coffee Cake – page 171 Raspberry Honey Bran Muffins – page 172 Raspberry Fool – page 175 Raspberry Lime Cheesecake Squares – page 191 Raspberry Lemon Pound Cake – page 192 Almond Raspberry Muffins – page 193 Raspberry Crepes – page 211 Raspberry Ice Cream Cake – page 217

160 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Rhubarb Recipes Rhubarb can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments and a little experimenting. Rhubarb Cobbler – page 50 Maple Rhubarb Crisp – page 51 Honey Oat Rhubarb Muffins – page 54 Rhubarb and Walnut Loaf – page 86 Rhubarb Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Rhubarb Cobbler (Whole Wheat) – page 111 Rhubarb Banana Muffins – page 135 Almond Rhubarb Muffins – page 193

178 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Saskatoon Recipes Saskatoons can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments or a little experimenting. Apple and Saskatoon Cobbler – page 50 Maple Apple and Saskatoon Crisp – page 51 Honey Oat Saskatoon Muffins – page 54 Puffed Oven Saskatoon Pancake – page 87 Saskatoon Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Apricot and Saskatoon Cobbler – page 111 Saskatoon Clafoutis – page 132 Saksatoon Banana Muffins – page 135 No Bake Mini Saskatoon Cheesecakes – page 136 Saskatoon Lemon Muffins – page 152 Saskatoon Sour Cream Coffee Cake – page 171 Saskatoon Honey Bran Muffins – page 172 Saskatoon Crepes – page 211

198 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Other Strawberry Recipes Strawberries can be used in several other recipes found in this book. Some are straight substitutions and some may require minor adjustments or a little experimenting. Apple and Strawberry Pie – page 46 Strawberry Upside-Down Cake – page 109 Strawberry Salad and Vinaigrette – page 114 Strawberry Balsamic Vinegar Sauce – page 131 No Bake Mini Strawberry Cheesecakes – page 136 Cheesy Strawberry Bites – page 139 Strawberry Coulis – page 151 Chocolate Strawberry Cups – page 156 Strawberry Salad with Vinaigrette – page 159 Strawberry Jelly Roll – page 154 Jiggly Strawberry Squares – page 157 Strawberry Jam Oat Squares –page 158 Stewed Strawberries and Rhubarb – page 169 Double Crust Strawberry and Rhubarb Crisp – page170 Strawberry and Rhubarb Meringue – page 174 Strawberry Fool – page 175 Strawberry and Rhubarb Crisp (Gluten Free) 194

220 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Index Alberta Farm Fresh Producers, 14 Altitude & Canning, 20 Apples and Crab Apples, 25-58 Canning & Jamming, 36-39,44 Dehydrating, 40-42 Freezing, 33-34 Harvesting, 30-31 Measurements, 26 Preserving, 33-42 Recipes, 43-58 Ripeness, 30 Storing, 32

Apple Measurements, 26 Apple Recipes & Preserves Apple Almond Bars, 41 Apple & Beet Salad, 56 Apple & Berry Cobbler, 50 Apple Butter, 36 Apple Chutney, 39 Apple Couscous Salad, 55 Apple Crumb Cake (Kuchen), 53 Apple Curry Soup, 57 Apple Leather, 42 Apple Oat Muffins, 54 Apple Pie, 46-47 Applesauce (Chunky), 44 Applesauce (Easy), 43 Applesauce Fruit Leather, 42 Crab Apple Jelly, 37 Crab Apple Juice, 36 Crab Apple Pie, 50 Dehydrated Apple Rings, 40 Maple Apple Crisp, 51 Other Apple Recipes, 58 Pickled Crab Apples, 38

Anti-browning Solution, 33 Apricots (see Plums & Apricots) Bars & Squares Apricot Biscotti, 112

Jiggly Raspberry Squares, 157 Raspberry Jam Oat Squares, 158 Rhubarb Oat Bars, 173

Beverages

Apricot Liqueur, 113 Crab Apple Juice, 36 Grape Granita Slushy, 70 Grape Juice, 64 Cherry Juice, 129 Cherry Martini, 138 Pear Smoothie, 92 Rhubarb Slush, 176 Strawberry Margaritas, 218 Strawberry Smoothie, 218

Cakes and Tarts Apple Crumb Cake (Kuchen), 53 Chocolate Pear Tart, 88-89 Plum Tart, 108 Plum Upside-down Cake, 109 Raspberry Almond Cake, 153 Raspberry Jelly Roll, 154-155 Rhubarb Coffee Cake, 171 Saskatoon Lemon Pound Cake, 192 Strawberry Flan, 214- 215 Strawberry Ice Cream Cake, 217 Strawberry Shortcake, 218

Calgary Harvest, 10 Canning, 19-20 Apples, 35 Applesauce, 44 Chokecherry Syrup, 128 Crab Apple Juice, 36 Crab Apples (Pickled), 38 Grape Juice, 64 Pears, 82 Plums & Apricots, 102 Prairie Cherries, 125 Prairie Cherry Juice, 129 Raspberries, 147, Saskatoons, 184 Index 221


Cherries (see Prairie Cherries) Chokecherries (see Prairie Cherries) Crab Apples, 28 Cutting Crab Apples, 50

Crab Apple Recipes & Preserves (also see Apple recipes) Apple Butter, 36 Apple Chutney, 39 Applesauce (Easy), 43 Applesauce (Chunky), 44 Applesauce Fruit Leather, 42 Crab Apple Jelly, 37 Crab Apple Juice, 36 Crab Apple Pie, 50 Pickled Crab Apples, 38

Crisps & Cobblers, 51

Apple & Berry Cobbler, 50 Apricot & Blueberry Cobbler, 111 Double Crust Rhubarb Crisp, 170 Maple Apple Crisp, 51 Saskatoon Rhubarb Crisp – Gluten Free, 194

Dehydrating, 21-24 Checking for Dryness, 23 Correct Temperature, 22 Dehydrating Apples, 40-42 Dehydrating Grapes, 64 Dehydrating Pears, 85 Dehydrating Plums & Apricots, 106 Dehydrating Prairie Cherries, 130 Dehydrating Raspberries, 149-150 Dehydrating Saskatoons, 188 Dehydrating Strawberries, 208

Desserts & Treats

Applesauce, 43-45 Apricot & Blueberry Parfait, 110 Apricot Biscotti, 112 Cherries Jubilee, 134 Cherry Gelatin, 138 Cherry Granita, 137 Chocolate Raspberry Cups, 156 Chocolate Strawberries, 215-216 Grape Gelatin, 68

222 Prairie Fruit Cookbook

Grape Granita, 70 Grape Popsicles, 71 No-bake Cherry Cheescakes, 136 Pearsauce, 83 Poached Pears, 90-91 Raspberry Coulis, 151 Rhubarb Fool, 175 Rhubarb Meringue Dessert, 174 Saskatoon Mini Cheescakes, 191 Sour Cherry Sauce, 131 Stewed Plums, 107 Strawberry Mousse, 210 Strawberry Puree, 209

Donating Etiquette, 12 Donating Fruit, 10-13 Evans Cherries (see Prairie Cherries) Farmers’ Markets, 14 Food Banks, 13 Freezing, 18 Apples, 33-34 Dry Pack, 18 Dry Sugar Pack, 18 Grapes, 64 Pears, 81 Plums & Apricots, 101 Prairie Cherries, 124 Raspberries, 146 Rhubarb, 165-166 Saskatoons, 184 Strawberries, 204 Syrup Pack, 18

Fruit Growers, 14 Fruit Leather, 22, 23 Apple Leather, 42 Applesauce Fruit Leather, 42 Cherry Fruit Leather, 130 Pearsauce Fruit Leather, 85 Raspberry Fruit Leather, 150 Saskatoon Fruit Leather, 188 Strawberry Fruit Leather, 208

Fruit Rescuing Organizations, 10 Fruit Share, 8-9, 10


Fruit Wax Bloom, 100 Grapes, 59-72

Canning & Jamming, 64-67 Dehydrating, 64 Freezing, 64 Harvesting, 62 Measurements, 60 Preserving, 64-67 Recipes, 68-72 Ripeness, 62 Stains, 67 Storing, 63

Grape Measurements, 60 Grape Recipes & Preserves, Grape & Lemon Jelly, 67 Grape Gelatin, 68 Grape Granita, 70 Grape Granita Slushy, 70 Grape Jam, 65 Grape Jelly, 66 Grape Juice, 64 Grape Pie, 69 Grape Popsicles, 71 Other Grape Recipes, 72

Granola, 110 Grape Stains, 67 Harvesting Apples, 30 Getting Help,10-11 Grapes, 62 Pears, 77 Plums & Apricots, 99 Prairie Cherries, 122 Raspberries, 144 Rhubarb, 164 Saskatoons, 182 Sharing the Harvest, 10-13 Strawberries, 204

Hot Water Bath, 20 Ice Cream, Gelato, Sherbet, Sorbet or Granita, 137

Cherry Granita, 137 Grape Granita, 70

Strawberry Ice Cream Cake, 217

Jams, Jellies & Chutneys Apricot Jam, 105 Apple Chutney, 39 Blue, Red & Lime Jam, 206 Chai Plum Jam, 104 Cherry Jelly, 126 Chokecherry Jelly, 128 Crab Apple Jelly, 37 Grape & Lemon Jelly, 67 Grape Jam, 65 Grape Jelly, 66 Ginger Rhubarb Marmalade, 168 Large Cherry Jam, 127 No-Pit Cherry Jam, 127 Pear & Rhubarb Jam, 84 Plum & Apple Chutney, 103 Raspberry Mint Jam, 148 Rhubarb Jam, 166 Rhubarb Marmalade, 167 Rhubarb Pineapple Jam, 167 Saskatoon Jam, 185 Saskatoon Jelly, 187 Strawberry Freezer Jam, 205 Strawberry Margarita Jam, 207

Kids and Fruit, 15-16 Muffins & Loaves Almond Saskatoon Muffins, 193 Apple Oat Muffins, 54 Cherry & Banana Muffins, 135 Pear & Walnut Loaf, 86 Raspberry Lemon Muffins, 152 Rhubarb Honey Bran Muffins, 172 Mongolian Cherries (see Prairie Cherries)

Nanking Cherries (see Prairie Cherries)

Oper. Fruit Rescue Edmonton, 10 Index 223


Oven Dehydrating, 24 Pears, 73-94

Canning & Jamming, 82-84 Dehydrating, 85 Freezing, 81 Harvesting, 77-79 How to Ripen, 79 Measurements, 74 Ornamental, 76 Preserving, 81-85 Recipes, 86-94 Ripeness, 79 Storing, 80

Pear Measurements, 74 Pear Recipes & Preserves Chocolate Pear Tart, 88-89 Dehydrated Pear Slices, 85 Maple Syrup Poached Pears, 91 Orange Poached Pears, 91 Other Pear Recipes, 94 Pear & Rhubarb Jam, 84 Pear & Walnut Loaf, 86 Pear, Brie & Ham Panini, 93 Pearsauce, 83 Pearsauce Fruit Leather, 85 Pear Smoothie, 92 Poached Pears, 90-91 Puffed Oven Pear Pancake, 87 Red Wine Poached Pears, 90

Pies

Apple Pie, 46-47 Cherry Pie, 133 Crab Apple Pie, 50 Grape Pie, 69 Pie Tips, 48-49 Saskatoon Pie, 190 Strawberry & Rhubarb Pie, 213 Pin Cherries (see Prairie Cherries)

Pitting Cherries, 123 Plums and Apricots, 95-116 Canning & Jamming, 102-105 Dehydrating, 106 Freezing, 101 224 Prairie Fruit Cookbook

Harvesting, 99 Measurements, 96 Peeling, 103 Preserving, 101-106 Recipes, 107-116 Ripeness, 99 Storing, 100

Plum & Apricot Measurements, 96 Plum & Apricot Recipes & Preserves Apricot & Blueberry Cobbler, 111 Apricot & Blueberry Parfait, 110 Apricot Biscotti, 112 Apricot Jam, 105 Apricot Liqueur, 113 Chai Plum Jam, 104 Dehydrated Halves, 106 Dehydrated Slices, 106 Other Plum & Apricot Recipes, 116 Plum & Apple Chutney, 103 Plum Pizza, 115 Plum Salad & Vinaigrette, 114 Plum Upside-down Cake, 109 Plum Tart, 108 Stewed Plums, 107

Popsicles, 71 Prairie Cherries, 117-140 Canning & Jamming, 125-129 Dehydrating, 130 Freezing, 124 Harvesting, 122 Measurements, 118 Pitting, 123 Preserving, 124-130 Recipes, 131-140 Ripeness, 122 Storing, 123

Prairie Cherry Measurements, 118 Prairie Cherry Recipes & Preserves Cheesy Cherry Bites, 139 Cherries Jubilee, 134 Cherry & Banana Muffins, 135 Cherry Clafoutis, 132 Cherry Fruit Leather, 130 Cherry Gelatin, 138


Cherry Granita, 137 Cherry Jelly, 126 Cherry Juice, 129 Cherry Martini, 138 Cherry Pie, 133 Cherry Sauce, 131 Chokecherry Jelly, 128 Chokecherry Syrup, 128 Dehydrated Cherries, 130 Large Cherry Jam, 127 No-bake Mini Cheesecakes, 136 No-Pit Cherry Jam, 127 Other Cherry Recipes, 140

Prairie Fruit Growers Assoc., 14 Preserving, 17-24 (see also Canning, Dehydrating, Freezing, Jams & Jellies) Safe Practices, 17

Raspberries, 141-160 Canning & Jamming, 147-148 Dehydrating, 149-150 Freezing, 146 Harvesting, 144 Measurements, 142 Preserving, 146-150 Recipes, 151-160 Ripeness, 144 Storing, 145

Raspberry Measurements, 142 Raspberry Recipes & Preserves Chocolate Raspberry Cups, 156 Dehydrated Raspberries, 149 Jiggly Raspberry Squares, 157 Other Raspberry Recipes, 160 Raspberry Almond Cake, 153 Raspberry Coulis, 151 Raspberry Fruit Leather, 150 Raspberry Jam Oat Squares, 158 Raspberry Jelly Roll, 154-155 Raspberry Lemon Muffins, 152 Raspberry Mint Jam, 148 Raspberry Salad & Vinaigrette, 159

Rhubarb, 161-178 Canning & Jamming, 166-168

Composting, 163 Freezing, 165-166 Harvesting, 164 Measurements, 162 Poisonous Leaves, 163 Preserving, 165-168 Recipes, 169-178 Ripeness, 164 Storing, 165

Rhubarb Measurements, 162 Rhubarb Recipes & Preserves

Double Crust Rhubarb Crisp, 170 Ginger Rhubarb Marmalade, 168 Other Rhubarb Recipes, 178 Rhubarb Barbecue Sauce, 177 Rhubarb Coffee Cake, 171 Rhubarb Fool, 175 Rhubarb Honey Bran Muffins,172 Rhubarb Jam, 166 Rhubarb Marmalade, 167 Rhubarb Meringue Dessert, 174 Rhubarb Oat Bars, 173 Rhubarb Pineapple Jam, 167 Rhubarb Slush, 176 Stewed Rhubarb, 169

Ripeness of

Apples, 30 Grapes, 62 Pears, 79 Plums & Apricots, 99 Prairie Cherries, 122 Raspberries, 144 Rhubarb, 164 Saskatoons, 182 Strawberries, 202

Romance Cherries, 119-121 Safe Canning, 17 Salads & Dressings Apple & Beet Salad, 56 Apple Couscous Salad, 55 Plum Salad & Vinaigrette, 114 Raspberry Salad & Vinaigrette, 159 Saskatoon Salsa Salad, 197 Index 225


Rhubarb, 165 Saskatoons, 183 Strawberries, 203

Strawberry Spinach Salad, 219

Saskatchewan Fruit Growers, 14 Saskatoons, 179-198

Strawberries,199-220

Baking Tips, 189 Canning & Jamming, 184-187 Dehydrating, 188 Freezing, 184, 186 Harvesting, 182 Measurements, 180 Preserving, 184-188 Recipes, 189-198 Ripeness, 182 Storing, 183

Canning & Jamming, 205-207 Dehydrating, 208 Freezing, 204 Harvesting, 202 Measurements, 200 Preserving, 204-208 (also see Canning, Dehydrating, Freezing) Recipes, 209-220 Ripeness, 202 Storing, 203

Saskatoon Measurements, 180 Saskatoon Recipes & Preserves Almond Saskatoon Muffins, 193 Dehydrated Saskatoons, 188 Other Saskatoon Recipes, 198 Saskatoon Biscuits, 195 Saskatoon Freezer Jam, 186 Saskatoon French Toast Strata, 196 Saskatoon Fruit Leather, 188 Saskatoon Jam, 185 Saskatoon Jelly, 187 Saskatoon Lemon Pound Cake, 192 Saskatoon Mini Cheesecakes, 191 Saskatoon Pie, 190 Saskatoon Rhubarb Crisp, 194 Saskatoon Salsa Salad, 197 Saskatoon Sauce, 189

Smoothies, 92, 218 Sour Cherries (see Prairie Cherries) Sterilizing Jars, 19 Storing Apples, 32 Dehydrated Food, 24 Grapes, 63 Pears, 80 Plums & Apricots, 100 Prairie Cherries, 123 Raspberries, 145

Strawberry Measurements, 200 Strawberry Recipes & Preserves

Blue, Red & Lime Jam, 206 Chocolate Strawberries, 215-216 Dehydrated Strawberries, 208 Other Strawberry Recipes, 220 Strawberry & Rhubarb Pie, 213 Strawberry Crepes, 211 Strawberry Flan, 214- 215 Strawberry Freezer Jam, 205 Strawberry Fruit Leather, 208 Strawberry Ice Cream Cake, 217 Strawberry Margarita Jam, 207 Strawberry Margaritas, 218 Strawberry Mousse, 210 Strawberry Puree, 209 Strawberry Shortcake, 212 Strawberry Smoothies, 218 Strawberry Spinach Salad, 219

Temperature-Dehydrating, 22, 24 Tempering Chocolate, 156, 216 U-Pick Farms, 14

The End 226 Prairie Fruit Cookbook


Prairie Fruit Cookbook is your definitive source for identifying, harvesting, storing, preserving, preparing and sharing locally grown fruit. Filled with practical tips and timeless advice, this inviting guidebook will soon become your favourite reference for nine different prairie fruits, including:   Apples and Crab Apples Grapes Pears Plums and Apricots Prairie Cherries Raspberries Rhubarb Saskatoons Strawberries   Author and Professional Home   Economist, Getty Stewart, loves prairie fruit – growing it, picking it, preserving it and eating it! In 2010, she founded Fruit Share – an organization that harvests and shares surplus fruit growing in backyards throughout Winnipeg. Her easy-to-read cookbook with full colour photographs and more than 150 tested recipes and techniques, features oldfashioned favourites like rhubarb crisp and strawberry shortcake, and inspired new dishes like chai plum jam, apple couscous and saskatoon salsa salad.  www.prairiefruit.ca

Made in Canada $19.95

Profile for Getty Stewart

Prairie Fruit Cookbook:The Essential Guide for Picking, Preserving & Preparing Fruit  

The definitive source for identifying, harvesting, storing, preserving, preparing and sharing locally grown fruit. Filled with practical ti...

Prairie Fruit Cookbook:The Essential Guide for Picking, Preserving & Preparing Fruit  

The definitive source for identifying, harvesting, storing, preserving, preparing and sharing locally grown fruit. Filled with practical ti...

Profile for getgetty
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