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GENEVA QUARTERLY PROJECTING LIGHT ON THE HOLIDAY SEASON

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BEHIND THE COVER.. LITERALLY. Old-school projectors like the one on the cover of this year’s second issue of the Geneva Quarterly grow increasingly rare as Geneva campus continues to change. In order to snap the cover photo, executive editors Ian Comuzzie and Skylar Tippetts brought a projector from the science department over to an empty classroom in the new Grammar School campus while it was still in the final stages of construction. The overhead projector combines classic Grammar School tradition with the newlybuilt campus, and the light represents the joy of the fast-approaching Christmas season.

COVER PHOTO BY IAN COMUZZIE AND SKYLAR TIPPETTS

MISSION STATEMENT

The Geneva Quarterly, a student-led publication of Rhetoric School, serves to provide Geneva and surrounding communities with relevant and accurate news, opinions and entertainment centered around our student culture. Our staff strives to instill boldness, creativity, and excellence in each reader through our published work. We aim to discover the truth laced into our community with integrity and to write all pieces from a Biblical worldview to the glory of Jesus Christ.

SUBSCRIBE!

To buy a subscription, contact: rryden@genevaschooltx.org To advertise, contact: TheGenevaQuarterly@gmail. com For other inquiries, contact: rryden@genevaschooltx.org This is a publication for: Geneva School of Boerne 113 Cascade Caverns Road Boerne, TX 78015

SCHOOL INFO.

The Geneva School of Boerne exists to provide a classical education from a Biblical world view, to equip students for a lifetime of learning, service and leadership to the glory of Jesus Christ. Rhetoric student population: 212 Rhetoric faculty population: 32 Staff credits and colophon on back cover.


EDITORS’ NOTE ARIANNA FLORES

DEAR READER,

‘Tis the season to be jolly! The approaching holiday is a beloved one because of all the joy and rest that the break offers. In light of the season, the Quarterly Staff presents what it is like to celebrate this time of Christians along with other traditional, quirky and fun ways to spend your time off. The holiday is not just celebrating Christmas, so in this issue the staff also highlights the excitement and spirit of the new year through stories that share how our campus and our community are changing, and inspiring change. So as the holiday approaches don’t forget to enjoy the company, the break from school, and the gift Christmas remembers: Jesus. May your days be merry and bright, Jessica Wheeler, with Skylar Tippetts and Arianna Flores

SKYLAR TIPPETTS

JESSICA WHEELER

PHOTOS BY IAN COMUZZIE


CONTENTS

CAMPUS CULTURE 10. FOLLOW THE NAIL TRAIL / FEATURE New Grammar School campus replaces old classroom portables.

18. GENEAGLE GAZETTE

A glance at some of the interesting things you wish you knew about campus people and random facts you may quickly forget.

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THE SCORE

BIG PICTURE

OUT OF THE BOX

The new Logic School Athletic Director Karen Wright is a more than welcome addition to the athletic program.

Students dive into the Young Life ministry through work crew.

Geneva’s student movie critic gives a unique movie list to get you in the Christmas spirit.

50. MERRY CHRISTMAS / OPINION

61. THE PINKINGTON PRESS / SHORT STORY

24. SHE’S DOING IT WRIGHT 29. CONCUSSIONS

The GQ dives into the world of concussions in order to identify what they are, how they occur and how to prevent them.

40. YOU WERE MADE FOR THIS 56. CINEMA SEASON / / FEATURE OPINION

The Christian origins of Christmas formed today’s holiday celebration .

Guest contributor writes the second installment of a continuous short story.

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CAMPUS CULTURE


PHOTOS BY SKYLAR TIPPETTS


BY CHARLOTTE WALKER

ART THROBS As the art program grows, students pursue their creative passions.

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While Geneva is known for its stellar classical Christian education, that reputation was not built by one single person, but by many different figures working together over the years. This successful diversity is very apparent in the Rhetoric art program at Geneva. The program is composed of incredibly talented Rhetoric School students and their teacher, Mrs. Cathy Lester. This year’s program is the biggest it has ever been. What distinguishes Geneva’s art program from others is its focus on God’s creation and how the students can honor God through their artistic abilities. “I think the big difference in art at Geneva and, in say, a public school is that we do not create art that is all about self expression,” said Lester. “We try to portray a bigger picture, with art that is something that hopefully causes people to kind of stand in awe of what God has created, and the ability He has given to people to do this.” Lester continued to explain that, classically speaking, the students use the same techniques learned and used by artists throughout history. This includes learning how to use different mediums such as charcoals, paints, pencils and pastels. Students also use classical subject matter, like nature, stories from the Bible and mythology as opposed to a more contemporary art class where they might make things out of recycled material. They learn how to draw from observation, measure and compare shapes and sizes, and see values such as lights and darks rather than creating art with a computer. Everything the students create is handmade with technique. “The advanced rhetoric class is so experienced,” Lester remarked, “it is almost like an independent or individual studies program, where they focus on an area they are really interested in.” Since each student has different interests and preferred mediums, Lester gives her students the freedom to choose what they paint or draw depending on which medium they enjoy or which they would like to try. Regardless of the medium, the subject matter always focuses on honoring God. Lester speaks highly of her students saying, “The reason these students are successful is because they continue and stick with it and they don’t give up or get frustrated.” The Geneva art program has grown throughout the years, with the help of devoted students and faculty to become a thriving place where young artists can learn, develop and hone their skills.


Senior Adison Cate is completing her water color for the San Antonio Student Western Art competition in January.

ADISON CATE

“I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED ART SINCE I WAS LITTLE; I WOULD ALWAYS DOODLE AND DRAW WHEN I WAS A KID.” A pencil drawing is what junior Ross Kirchner is preparing for competition in January.

ROSS KIRCHNER

“[ART IS] KIND OF A PLACE WHERE YOU CAN ESCAPE EVERYTHING AND JUST DRAW.” Senior Ryne Hutton is featured in sophomore Nathan Zuniga’s colored pencil western art.

NATHAN ZUNIGA

PHOTOS BY BRADEN HALL

“ART REALLY RELAXES ME. IT MAKES ME REALLY CALM AND IT’S REALLY SATISFYING WHEN EVERYTHING COMES TOGETHER.” 9


NEW GRAMMAR SCHOOL CAMPUS REPLACES OLD CLASSROOM PORTABLES.

FOLLOW THE NAIL TRAIL BY CAROL METZGER

PHOTOS BY IAN COMUZZIE PHOTOSHOP BY RUTH WACKER Desks line the new classrooms in the Grammar campus.

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Brown loafers and navy blue striped Keds follow the nails in the planks of the boardwalk with one foot in front of the other. For the past 13 years, Grammar School teachers have used the “nail trail” to keep their students walking in a straight line. However, moving into the new Grammar School campus this winter means everyone must say goodbye to many aspects of the old campus, including the beloved boardwalk. In 2004, the Geneva School of Boerne moved from its temporary campus at St. John Lutheran Church in Boerne to its permanent campus on Cascade Caverns Road. With only a few portables and an unpaved road, the current graduating class of 2017 began its very first day of kindergarten there. At that time, there was no competition gym, football field, or even MPB. “I loved when we had P.E. in that tiny classroom and our assemblies were outside on the playground” said Senior Erin Kasprowicz, who has attended Geneva since 2004. Almost 13 years later, with a whole additional Rhetoric School campus, a new competition gym and the Lyceum building complete, Geneva is about to finish its next big project: Phase One of the new Grammar campus. Fundraising for the new campus began in the fall of 2014. Kindergarten, first grade and second grade classes moved into the new building toward the end of November and early December. Grammar School Headmaster Mrs. Jessica Gombert, who in 2004 was the half-day kindergarten teacher, has witnessed the amazing growth of Geneva and now has had an active role in the design of the new campus. “From St. John’s to coming out here—not having power, or a driveway—and teaching kindergarten in the portables for the first time, to now moving into this beautiful space, I have seen how God has provided for us along the way,” said Mrs. Gombert. “We’ve never been without. We’ve always been able to do what we needed to do. Because these building are wearing out, we need that space. It’s not just a want, and I think that’s a really powerful thing.” In 2004, right before the school year began, the Boardwalk was built. However, before it was constructed, teachers had to begin moving supplies into their classrooms over the summer. This meant that teachers and parents had to lift boxes, books, and desks up from the ground way into the classrooms above in the portables. Accordingly, the creation of the boardwalk became the cornerstone of the campus. As Geneva grew, the new parts of campus appeared as extensions of the original boardwalk. The design of the Logic and Rhetoric campus in many ways was

“FROM ST. JOHN’S TO COMING OUT HERE—NOT HAVING POWER, OR A DRIVEWAY—AND TEACHING KINDERGARTEN IN THE PORTABLES FOR THE FIRST TIME, TO NOW MOVING INTO THIS BEAUTIFUL SPACE, I HAVE SEEN HOW GOD HAS PROVIDED FOR US ALONG THE WAY.” based off of and resembles the original campus. While the Rhetoric School has its own boardwalk, for the class of 2017, the original boardwalk holds a special place in their hearts. While the atmosphere around the school buzzes excitement over the new building, for many older Geneva students it was bittersweet to see the old campus go. “Seeing the old campus go makes me pretty sad, but I also understand that the old campus was pretty much a safety hazard,” joked Senior Coggin Galbreath, who started at Geneva in first grade. When Geneva originally purchased the portables that contained the old Grammar classrooms, they were already ten years old and had been previously used by The Regents School of Austin. Although they were a huge blessing to the Geneva community at the time, the current Grammar students were in dire need of a new campus. With flickering ceiling lights and uneven floors, there was a need for something new. While the old Grammar campus may seem worn out now, to the class of 2017, the original Grammar campus was a new and untrodden stomping ground. With no fancy playground equipment, imaginations ran wild at recess. Whether it was making houses for crickets out of the rocks or tying Zach Arthur to a tree because he requested it, students used their creativity to entertain themselves. Students would pick wild blackberries in the bushes and run up and down the giant dirt pile coined “Mount Geneva.” However, one of the biggest differences between the new campus and the old will be the absence of the boardwalk, the wooden planks that formed the outdoor hallways of the campus. “I liked to crawl underneath it and find all the summer reading medals that people had dropped,” said Galbreath.

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Big windows stretch to the ceiling in a common space room of the new Grammar campus.

“IT’S BEEN CLEAR THAT HIS HAND HAS ORCHESTRATED THE TIMING, THE DESIGN AND EVERY LITTLE DETAIL.” Alumni Davis Metzger (2015) and Ethan Ryden (2015), who frequently ventured under the Grammar boardwalk when they were younger, reported finding, “three lunch boxes, a flag, and an iPod nano.” “I remember one time my teacher dropped an earring and it fell through the crack of the boardwalk. A couple days later a buddy of mine and I crawled under there—army style—for about 30 minutes and eventually ended up finding it,” said Senior Zachary Arthur. “Problem solved.” “[I remember] staring down at the nails while walking on the boardwalk, and Skylar was trying to talk to me,” said Senior Julie Perez. “I knew we were not supposed to talk and that Skylar would get in trouble, so I just kept my mouth shut and looked down. Mrs. Dunn

12 CAMPUS CULTURE // FEATURE

thought it was me talking, but I threw Skylar under the bus and she got her clip moved.” The boardwalk is, and was, more than just some pieces of wood nailed together. It represents both the literal and figurative foundation of Geneva. It was where the current seniors sat at the end of the school day when Mrs. Gombert used a bull horn to call names for pick-up. It was where second graders dressed as Egyptians to mourn the death of a mummified chicken. It was where students paraded around in their fictional-character costumes during Book Week. It was where kids grew up. Although the new campus will not have a boardwalk, the classrooms will be open to the outside, having the same outdoor feeling as the old campus.


“The excitement that I feel is that the space is usable and every nook and cranny is accounted for,” said Mrs. Gombert. “There is no wasted space. But my favorite thing is the Scripture stone.” Graciously donated by the Leeder family, a ten foot stone sits in the front of the new campus. On the stone, Colossians 3:17 is engraved saying, “Do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus.” This verse will stand as a reminder to all for years to come that our intentions as a school are not out of personal gain, but to further glorify God. Walking into the new Grammar School building, Mrs. Gombert envisions a “memory wall” filled with pictures of the old campus for all to see. “I don’t want us to forget where we started. When someone walks in they can remember, ‘oh yeah, we didn’t always have this.’ When I was the kindergarten reading teacher, we didn’t even have a walkway to the office—we walked on pallets that grass comes on. We have come a long way.” Director of Development Amy Metzger looks forward to adding a new page to Geneva’s history. “This whole campaign has been an exercise in seeking the Lord’s direction and trusting in His faithfulness. Like every other big “move” in the history of the school, I’m so thankful that our current Geneva families, like those that have come before, get to be a part of building this school… this mission,” said Metzger.

While the excitement grows for all the new opportunities the new campus will bring, a sense of sentimentality for the old campus is increasing as well. 2016 marks the year where the boardwalk ends, and the sidewalk begins.

2016 MARKS THE YEAR WHERE THE BOARDWALK ENDS, AND THE SIDEWALK BEGINS.

The hallways in the new Grammar campus are a first for Geneva architecture.

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Cheerleader Senior Freshman Junior Sophomore Debater McLain Brock

PHOTO BY JACQUELINE KNOX 14


SKIRTING AROUND THE RULES The Rhetoric School Handbook mandates that girls wear a “Parker Uniforms’ navy or plaid skirt with modesty shorts (skirt must reach to within two inches of the top of the knee).” Yet the topic of skirt-length is one of the most highly debated uniform issues on campus. The GQ put together a list of the most typical excuses and comments girls rattle off when teachers nag about skirt appearances.

BY BRADEN HALL

SENIOR

“I don’t care anymore. The hem is ripped, the zipper is broken and I fixed everything with staples.”

JUNIOR “Apparently I grew a little, but it’s not like my skirt is super short or anything… Maybe 2.2 inches above the knee…” “My skirt has paint on it from art, and my parents won’t buy me a new one. I had to roll it to cover up the stains.” “I’m short, no one will notice.”

DEBATER “You don’t want to argue with me about this.”

“Would you buy your child a new skirt their last year of private school? We have college to pay for.”

“What can they do, I’m going to be free in a year.”

SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN “Since we finally realized I won’t grow, we decided to get a skirt that actually fits!”

“I realized that last year it was super short.” “I promise it won’t go any longer.”

“My mom made me get a skirt which is way to big in order for me to “grow into it”. Ugh.” *rolls up skirt five times instead* “Everyone else wears it like this.” “I am trying to tan.”

CHEERLEADER MCLAIN BROCK “My school skirt isn’t shorter than my cheer skirt…”

“I am wearing a skirt because I want to.”

“It just feels natural.”

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G S T E K C I T HE SAIDSS AW E R D ! SAD S E Y S DAN E I T S AW Y O B SIC H U M IES H AD THE TABLES HAVE TURNED BY KATELYN DAVIS

Guys and girls give advice on how to approach the first ever Sadie Hawkins winter dance.

cket? for the ti y a p y u g the Q: Should man, so ole of the nt Wilr e th g are takin ophomore Gra -S A: “They uld pay!” they sho k liams don’t thin epends. I he should d it , it a wait, w ay, but s A: “Wait, e her to p cott Standerfer c r fo ld u more S you sho !” –Sopho anyways nd drive pick up a to e v a h l the gir Q: Should the guy? ould pick e, she sh id r t e e w , while I ’s got a s ear] a suit w to A: “If she r the e expect [h if you don’t know se me up. I t, u c , be au dress. B ou should y k wear the in th rfer do not –Stande .” d r a parents I w k ill be aw azy then it w ed in a cr k s a g in e ith b u okay w Q: Are yo ant way? orks... I w w e r fi t c e I exp t want a LUTELY. really jus I , A: “ABSO y ll a tu g. Ac everythin –Williams e.” k milksha asked? out being b a s u o v u ner Q: Are yo nderfer ked.” –Sta s a t e g I if be lucky A: “I will r date to st ask he u m l ir g think the Q: Do you dance? less dance, un to s y u g k s re. That should a them befo ancto n e A: “Girls k o never sp e while d you have no silenc ; d r a w k aw would be liams il W – ing.”

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S L R I G D R A W K W SHE SAIDTICKE S E DI MUSI E C N D R A W K W KINS W A H IR SHO A H Q: How should the guy react after being asked?

A: “They should definitely looked pleased and not disappointed in the least bit, and they should say thank you and yes! After that, they should give me a hug. Also, they shouldn’t assume that because I ask them we are dating.” –Senior Esther Rosheger Q: Should the guy still offer to pay for his ticket?

A: “Yes, 100 percent. Chivalry is not dead, and I don’t have any money!” –Sophomore Eleanor Galbreath Q: Do you have to ask him to dance?

A: “Yeah, because if you ask him out then you must ask him to dance too.” –Junior Grace Zara Q: Is it important that he hangs out with you at the dance?

A: Yes, but not like 24/7 clingy. I need wiggle room. I mean, it would be weird if neither of us hung out with our friends.” –Zara

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GENEAGLE GAZETTE After polling a random sample of the Rhetoric student body about their Christmas traditions :

64%

A glance at some of the interesting things you wish you knew about campus people and random facts you may quickly forget.

BY RUTH WACKER

72%

36%

28%

REAL TREE

ARTIFICIAL HOUSE TREE LIGHTS

NO HOUSE LIGHTS

44%

56%

60%

40%

OPEN GIFTS OPEN GIFTS TRAVEL DEC. 25 DEC. 24

STAY HOME


MERINGUE KISSES A WACKER FAMILY RECIPE

Beat into soft peaks: 2 egg whites 1/8 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. cream of tartar 1 tsp. vanilla Add gradually while mixing: 3/4 cup sugar Fold in: 6 oz. mini chocolate chips 1/4 cup chopped nuts (optional) Line baking pans with paper Drop batter by spoonfuls Bake at 300o for 25 minutes Makes 2-3 dozen cookies

If you are looking for a last-minute gift for a good friend, you can never go wrong with our list.

GO-TO GIFTS FOR THE AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT:

VINYL SOCKS JOURNAL COFFEE MUG AMAZON GIFT CARD

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A GUIDE FOR THE ULTIMATE HOLIDAY REJUVENATION TREATMENT BY SKYLAR TIPPETTS

GRAPHIC BY RUTH WACKER

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THE DEAL At the Geneva School of Boerne, completing the entire first semester is an accomplishment. Teachers bombard students with assignments while still expecting excellence through the end of quarter two. Like any school with the intentions of fostering an intellectually challenging atmosphere, Geneva’s curriculum tends to overwhelm, or “stress out,” students. When this occurs, pupils have trouble letting go of the robotic mindset that is required for midterms and the like. Christmas break is a two-week period intended to relieve students of their P.T.S.S.D. (Post-Traumatic School-Stress Disorder). In the hopes of helping students regain their academic stamina prior to the commencement of quarters three and four, the break allows students to rejuvenate using the three-phrase cycle of a North Canadian grizzly bear:: hibernation, food coma, and socialization.

1. HIBERNATION Studying for midterms typically results in minimal hours of sleep for average exam preparation. Initially, it is difficult for students to function without sleep. However, by the time students turn in the first of their three essays and projects and have successfully (or unsuccessfully) taken half of their exams, students run on three things and three things only: 1) Adrenalin 2) Caffeine (whether it be coffee or the artificial stimulants located in the warning labels of beverag-

es such as Red Bull and Monster) and 3) The seemingly unattainable glimpse of a two-week Christmas break shining as a shimmering beacon of hope to all of the poor souls who decided it would be beneficial to sign up for both AP Chemistry as well as AP Physics (and AP Latin…and AP AP, an advanced placement course only the most advancedly-placed students are offered by the Di[e] Advanced Placement Board).The reason the break from school serves as such

incentive to finish the semester is not because students resent the high standards of academia placed on them and are eager to leave. Rather, over time, Geneva students have been modified to operate under the same standards as North Canadian grizzly bears. Completing midterms is comparable to a grizzly’s will to survive; Christmas break is an accurate reflection of the North Canadian grizzly’s hibernation period. Therefore, Christmas break = hibernation.

2. FOOD COMAS Not unlike North Canadian grizzlies who store up food for the winter, students spend their pre-hibernation time storing up good grades. Since studying for finals inhibits students from finding time to eat, all their food consumption must occur over the course of Christmas break. This is why it is a necessity for students to feast abundantly. The never-ending consumption of Christmas cookies (for only two weeks) at a constant rate triggers a student’s sleeping instinct. This is a crucial step to the rejuvenation cycle. Without eating five full meals a day, students are prone to academically-induced insomnia, a condition in which students forget how to sleep due to the constant stream of information circulating through their minds. With the proper intake of food, students’ bodies can allow themselves to catch up on the sleep lost during pre-hibernation stages.

3. SOCIALIZATION With balancing an even ratio between eating and sleeping, it is difficult for students to fit socialization into the Christmas break rejuvenation schedule. Additionally, students who are in the midst of hibernation cannot handle very much regular social activity because their ability to communicate was compromised during their pre-hibernation obsession with text books and computer screens. It is important, however,

to be mindful of the young people’s need for interaction with their peers from a nonacademic stand point (DieAP projects do not count as socializing). To fit the feasting and napping criteria, friends can partake in such activities together. They can even blankly stare at the occasional Christmas movie playing in the back ground, as long as they have a bowl of popcorn in front of them. 21


THE SCORE


PHOTO BY KATELYN DAVIS


SHE’S DOING IT THE WRIGHTWAY

Coaches often play a pivotal role in the success and failure of their teams. Having a coach believe from the bottom of her heart that you will succeed to the best of your abilities is a blessing Geneva has in Coach Wright.

BY NATHAN YOUNG At the beginning of the school year, the Logic School Athletic Director position was created at Geneva. Karen Wright, a seasoned and highly qualified athlete herself, has filled the spot and is more than your typical coach. With more than enough qualifications and experience, Wright took on this new position and has also assumed the responsibility of coaching strength and conditioning in all athletic programs. Before coming to Geneva, Wright built up quite the résumé. She ran track, coached track and strength-and-conditioning, and served as Marketing and promotions Coordinator, all at the collegiate level. She even played professional football in the WPFL (Women’s Professional Football League) and competed in the league’s first-ever Super Bowl. And, bringing together her faith and knowledge of athletics, Wright has served as an Area Representative for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA). Coach Wright and her husband came to the Boerne area because of his job in the military, and they immediately became interested in Geneva as a school for their three sons. Wright says, “We are very passionate about our kids’ education, so that was the first step,” said Wright. “[Geneva] called me and said that they were thinking about adding my position, and they asked me to do it.” Although Wright has been a part of far more prestigious athletic programs than Geneva’s, she’s happy to be here. “It’s an honor for me. I’m thrilled that the coaches believe in me and are willing to hand over the athletes to me... it’s a big deal,” she said. “The biggest thing that I see in [Geneva athletes] is willingness to accept me and what I do as a coach,” Wright said. “The fact that [they] buy in and believe 24 THE SCORE

In her first year at Geneva, Coach Karen Wright oversees Logic School athletics.


in what I do has spoken volumes compared to other places I’ve been.” The athletes at Geneva have meshed well with Wright’s encouraging and energetic coaching style, and she has noticed their eagerness to strive to be their best. “Since I started, my prayer has been that they would buy in to what I am trying to do. These kids are sold out, and that is my favorite part. I just love it!” Wright has been working with the varsity football team since the start of the season, and the players truly trust her instruction. Sophomore and varsity football player Scott Standerfer said, “I love the fact that she’ll yell at you when you’re doing something wrong, but she’ll yell a million times louder when you do something right.” Wright finds the perfect mix of correction and encouragement to motivate her athletes, and uses her knowledge of the field to prepare the athletes for the challenges that come their way. “She knows and understands so much about the human body and how to prepare us for doing our best,” said freshman Joel Calderon. At the core of Wright’s coaching philosophy is the idea that nothing comes easy and hard work pays off. “The quote that I use most often is ‘work hard, be great.’ What that entails is that what you put into everything we are doing is what you will get out of it,” Wright said. Since many of her accomplishments have come through hard work, Wright tries to push her athletes to do the same. “My goal is that you realize: (A) what I’m trying to do is best, (B) I love you guys, and (C) I’ll yell at you sometimes, but you guys know it’s out of love and encouragement.” With all her experience and knowledge of athletics, it’s hard to argue with her method. Because Coach Wright has been through all of the same workouts during her many years of training, she knows what her athletes are going through. “I will never ask [my athletes] to do something that I haven’t done myself. I’ve done their workouts before, and I realize they’re hard,” Wright said. In the midst all of all the drills, running and weight lifting, Wright urges her athletes to aim for something higher than just being good at a sport. Wright believes that “God put in me a heart to serve Him first and foremost, and to use gifts that He has given me to glorify Him.” Attempting to instill in her athletes this same mindset, Wright helps keep their minds focused on the right things. Wright’s favorite Bible verse is Proverbs 19:21 which says, “Many are the plans in a man’s heart, but it is the Lord’s purpose that will prevail.” Because she has seen the value and impact of this truth played out in her life, Wright applies it to dealing with wins, losses, injuries, and all other aspects of sports. Because her faith, family, talent and experience all contribute to her coaching style, Wright will continue to be a game-changer for Geneva’s athletic programs.

Wright, known for her tough workouts is seen here overseeing a Logic School P.E. baseball game.

Having a good sense of humor is key to athletics.

PHOTOS BY KATELYN DAVIS 25


IT

RUNS RUNS RUNS RUNS

TH

M tr K th

BY AISLING AYERS

IN THE FAMILY

PARENTS MENTOR THEIR CHILDREN IN ATHLETICS PHOTOS BY BRADEN HALL

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THE DANIELS TRACK ON

Mrs. Jill Daniels, science department head, oversees the track program, and coaches her twin daughters, Kaila and Karlie. The girls have followed in their mother’s footsteps in their athletic pursuit of track.

AYERS: (Jill) How long have you been coaching track,

and have you had any involvement with track prior to coaching? JILL DANIELS: I ran track in high school, in college at South Dakota State University and at Moorhead State University. Before Geneva, I coached track for three years and then I didn’t coach for quite a while. When I moved back to Texas eleven years ago, we started the track program at Geneva. I helped out with volunteering because there were not any official coaches at the time. Later, when Karlie and Kaila began running track, I began coaching again. AYERS: (Jill) Is running track in college something that you would encourage your daughters to pursue? JILL DANIELS: Of course, if our kids wanted to go play collegiate sports we would be supportive of it. But we do know the reality [of playing a collegiate sport]. Both my husband and I stopped collegiate sports our junior year because you just cannot do it if you want to put academics first. AYERS: (Kaila and Karlie) Growing up, how has your mom encouraged you to continue to pursue track? KARLIE DANIELS: She would always talk about her track stories, and hearing those really created an interest and a desire for me to want to run track at a young age. KAILA DANIELS: Like Karlie said, hearing all of my mom’s stories made me want to try track and see if I could one day do as well as she did. Also, having the relationships that I have had on the track team has really pushed me to continue to run and support my teammates. It really is different than all other sports and the bond is similar to one that you have with a family. AYERS: (Kaila and Karlie) Is it harder having a mother who is so knowledgeable about track, compared to other parents who might give less critique to their kids than your mom gives to you?

KAILA DANIELS: I

think that having my mom have so much knowledge about track and correct running form, for example, is a big reason why I became so successful in my track career. It is hard sometimes hearing the criticism that she gives, but it has definitely helped me become a better track athlete. [Criticism] is definitely needed for you to pursue [track]. KARLIE DANIELS: It is different when your mom is the coach and is so knowledgeable about track. She knows how to critique how you run, but does not do it offensively. Other parents would just say, ‘oh, you did well,’ but they don’t know what to say to make you better. JILL DANIELS: I think I am pretty good about not being mean about what I say, I guess, to all of my athletes. I don’t really yell, but I am more about trying your best and going for personal bests. Our radar is always ‘this is where we are at’ and ‘here are the records.’ Our focus has always been personal focus, because of the big 5A schools that we compete against. I would say I am probably the biggest cheerleader out there, and probably the sappiest one. Whenever we pray before relays, I always start to tear up. It is probably going to be even worse this year because the girls are seniors. AYERS: (Jill) If you had to pick one piece of advice to give to your daughters regarding finishing high school and beginning college, what would it be? JILL DANIELS: I think that probably the best advice is to be yourself. It’s pretty easy to get caught up in fads and peer pressure, to do things that maybe you wouldn’t really want to do because you just want to fit it. Leaving Geneva, this nice, safe environment, [and going] into the real world, it can be hard to feel like you fit in because it is a different place. Do your best, try your hardest, persevere, don’t give up on yourself, and don’t let people pressure you. Always remember that God has a bigger plan, and it will not always be the same as your plan. He knows what you need and He knows what direction He wants you to go. When doors close, others open, and remember to follow those doors that open because that might be God’s big plan for you. And it’s hard to remember sometimes that what we want isn’t always what He wants. 27


ONE ON ONE WITH THE CALDERONS

AYERS: (Tracy) What college did you play basketball for, and for how long?

TRACY CALDERON:

University of Alabama for all four

years.

AYERS: (Joel) Growing up, how has your mom influenced you to be the best basketball player you can be, and inspired your love for the game? JOEL CALDERON: She has helped a lot. In every game, I can always hear her talking to me and giving me advice from the stands. She is always there to practice with me and just improve my game however she can. AYERS:

Is basketball something that is still important to your family today? JOEL CALDERON: YES, it definitely is. We love basketball. TRACY CALDERON: YES. We encourage [Joel] towards whatever sport he is interested in at the time, but with basketball, that is something that we promote and encourage Joel to pursue year-round. His strengths are in athletics, and we want to play to his strengths. If he was strong in or loved something else, then we would encourage that as well.

AYERS:

(Joel) Does playing college basketball, or any sport in college, ever interest you? JOEL CALDERON: Yes, but I would enjoy college even if I do not end up playing basketball.

AYERS:

(Tracy) How was being a Christian athlete at college more difficult than you thought it was going to be? TRACY CALDERON: When I was recruited, a priority for me was to be on a team where I was comfortable and found people with similar values. On my first visit to Alabama, the college knew me and they took me to church. I easily found people that I fit in well with and that were like me. I knew that my coaches were Christians and that that was important to them, so that really is why I chose to attend Alabama. When I went there, I was around a group of Christian friends, but not everyone was a Christian, obviously. I was faced with all kinds of things; you really do see it all in women’s athletics. But there were certainly people like me and you just learn to find affinity with people.

AYERS: (Tracy) What is the most important piece of ad-

Mrs. Tracy Calderon, who oversees the Grammar School P.E. program, coaches son Joel, freshman. Having played college basketball, she encourages her son in the same sport. 28

vice that you would give to Joel about the game of basketball, or high school in general? TRACY CALDERON: The most important advice I could give would be to work hard. If you’re going to commit to something, you need to do the best you can and never do anything halfway. It’s not always going to be fun, and the work might get boring, but this is what you have committed to and you need to make it a priority. Regarding academics, this is Geneva, and you need to make academics your priority by doing the best you can with that. You can’t forsake athletics for academics and vice-versa.


GET YOUR HEAD IN THE GAME BY JACQUELINE KNOX

The GQ dives into the world of concussions in order to identify what they are, how they occur and how to prevent them.

. .

con cus sion /kən’kəSHən/ noun

1. a biomechanically induced syndrome of neural dysfunction. 2. a bruise to the brain. PHOTOS BY JACQUELINE KNOX

29


Concussion, starring Will Smith, was released in the winter of 2015. The film shed light on the issue of concussions in the NFL and the dangers they present to a player’s health. Ever since Concussion was released, athlete concussions were hurled even further into the national spotlight. Because a number of Geneva athletes suffer head injuries every year, the topic of concussions has worked its way into the Geneva spotlight. A concussion can have a huge impact on a student’s academic and social life. Concussed students have missed weeks of school, causing them to get very behind in their schoolwork. Students have missed finals and their grades have suffered because of concussions. Concussions can cost sports teams games because athletes are out in order to recover. Concussions are serious and can have lasting effects. According to the American Academy of Neurology, a “concussion is a biomechanically induced syndrome of neural dysfunction.” During a concussion, the biomechanical forces applied to the head cause alteration to brain physiology. “It is typically a diffuse process that causes disruption of functional brain networks, particularly those involved in memory and balance,” said Dr. John Sladky, board-certified neurologist and Geneva dad. During a concussion, axons, which connect the different brain regions to each other, are stretched, which causes brain connectivity to decrease. This is why some patients have trouble focusing on and grasping concepts.

“IN SIMPLE TERMS, CEREBRAL CONCUSSION IS A BRUISE TO THE BRAIN,” EXPLAINED DR. BOB BOWER, BOARD-CERTIFIED ADULT NEUROLOGIST AND GENEVA PARENT. “A human brain has the consistency of gelatin and yet resides within a fortress of hard bone. When the brain either accelerates or decelerates abruptly, the brain 30

can come in contact with its hard surroundings and experience injury,” he said. Concussions are categorized into three different grades; the first grade is the mildest. In a grade-one concussion, there is no loss of consciousness and concussive symptoms last for less than 15 minutes. The subject also experiences impermanent confusion. Grade-two concussions also have no loss of consciousness and impermanent confusion. However, grade-two’s concussive symptoms last for longer than 15 minutes. Grade-three concussions occur if there is a loss of consciousness, whether for five seconds or two minutes, and are the most severe type of concussion. While there is a long list of different concussive symptoms, one of the more common symptoms is memory loss. Senior and varsity athlete Tyler Navarro has received multiple concussions while playing football. However, he doesn’t remember exactly how each one occurred. “I had to watch a video or have my teammates tell me what happened,” said Navarro, recounting one of his concussions. Headaches, dizziness, confusion and trouble balancing are also among the most common symptoms. Patients may also occasionally experience nausea, attention difficulties and behavioral changes. These symptoms usually resolve themselves in a couple of days and most athletes usually fully recover within 3-4 weeks.

Although most athletes recover quickly, there is always the possibility of chronic long-term conditions. Post-traumatic headaches and mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are among these conditions. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE, is also another one of these conditions. CTE is a progressive degenerative disease caused by multiple blows to the head, and it can only be fully confirmed during an autopsy. Because of this, some NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE post-mortem. The fact that more and more NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE, has put concussions on everyone’s radar. Even though concussions have always been somewhat common, the number of reported cases grows higher each year. “My feeling is that athletes are getting bigger, faster, and stronger and therefore can deliver higher impact blows and that the subtle signs of concussion are being more readily recognized,” said Dr. Sladky. “Between 1.6 and 3.8 million sports-related concussions are estimated in the United States annually, particularly in youth athletes,” reported the American Academy of Neurology. Football, rugby and ice hockey are the most common sports where boys receive concussions, while soccer and basketball are the most common for girls. Senior and varsity athlete Ally Dollander received a concussion during a soccer game last year.


DONT HIDE IT. REPORT IT. TAKE TIME TO RECOVER.

“I was playing goalie, so I ran out and dove on the ground to get the ball. Another player had followed through and kicked [me] right on the side of my head behind the ear,” she said. Dollander is among many athletes that have received concussions playing girls’ soccer. If an athlete gets a concussion, it is crucial that they respond and treat them properly. Following a head injury, an athlete should first report to a clinic or emergency room in order to confirm they have a concussion. After receiving a confirmation, athletes should spend the next few days resting. Once concussive symptoms begin to fade and the athlete is no longer limited in day-to-day activity, he or she may return to school. However, a return to school does not mean concussive symptoms are completely gone. Most athletes will still experience headaches and trouble focusing. After experiencing a concussion during a football game, sophomore and varsity athlete Devon Ahrens “had a really tough time focusing at school. I would go and then not remember anything from that day because I couldn’t focus.” Ahrens missed around three weeks of school at the beginning of this year due to his condition. Once a physician determines that concussion symptoms are completely gone, the athlete may begin the graduated exertion process that is required in order for them to play in their sport again. This is a five-step process that ensures the athlete is ready to participate in a full-contact sport again. If at anytime during this process the athlete experiences concussive symptoms, the athlete must tell the physician and restart the process. Most sports leagues have rules in place that ensure athletes do not permanently damage

their brains due to head injuries. In TAPPS, if an athlete receives four concussions they are no longer able to participate in sports. Because of this rule, athletes are now taking precautions to prevent concussions. Sophomore and varsity athlete Ben Ross received a concussion during a football game last year and is taking extra steps to ensure he does not get another. “I do try and protect myself. I try and keep my head out of all contact. I always have that fear of hitting my head and getting another one and not being able to play football,” said Ross. Football is the number one cause of concussions at Geneva. There has been controversy over whether or not to let athletes play because of the amount of injuries it causes, specifically concussions. Dr. Bower,a doctor and Geneva dad, has a son on the football team and expressed his concerns about the safety of his son, freshman Seth Bower. “I do worry about my son getting a

concussion playing football,” said Dr. Bower. “Yet, I also realize he can get a concussion riding in a car, climbing stairs and certainly when playing with his brothers.” In football, all athletes are required to wear helmets in order to lessen the chances of a serious head injury. Despite the extra protection, concussions are still a prevalent problem. Although some Geneva athletes have invested in more expensive but “safer” helmets, “no conclusive evidence supports one helmet over another in the prevention of concussions,” said Dr. Sladky. “Helmets do prevent against more serious head injuries such as intra cranial bleeds and skull fractures.” If you or anyone you know experiences concussion-like symptoms, be sure to get in contact with a doctor. Concussions are serious and are not something to ignore. Try to protect your brain and keep your head out of all contact. Don’t hide a concussion. Report it and take time to fully recover.

31


BIG PICTURE


PHOTO BY LUKE BOWER


Mr. Tye instructs one of his students in the many driving programs he offers.

DRIVING IN THE FAST LANE Mr. Steve Tye opened his driving school last month to add yet another job to his long list.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TYESDRIVINGSCHOOL.COM

BY JAYNE GOODMAN

34

Classroom instruction is another aspect of Tye’ Driving School.


F M

R

umors have spread like a wildfire around the Geneva campus that Mr. Steven Tye, beloved Rhetoric School teacher, has opened his very own driving school. Well, it’s true, all of it. A long time ago in a state far, far away Tye began his work as a driving instructor. Now, he is training a new generation of students in Boerne to become certified drivers. If you decide to take his classes, may the “Ford” be with you. Tye’s driving legacy stretches far beyond the town of Boerne. Rewind back to when Tye and his wife, Jane-Alice, used to live in California. One day, a thought occurred to him as he watched a car pass by him on the road. “You know what, I like driving and I like cars, so maybe I’ll be a driving instructor,” said Tye. “Teaching kids about cars seemed like a natural blending of my passions.” He turned his idea into reality when his autoshop teacher asked him to teach a class on the Wankel Rotary Engine that Tye knew a lot about. He rocked his part-time job as a driving instructor for a year but then was called by God to be a school teacher in Oklahoma. He obediently moved his wife and newborn baby Mae to Oklahoma City, only to find out a week before the school year began that his promising new position was eliminated. Tye had just moved halfway across the country, needed to provide for his wife and newborn and had no family nearby. But, the Lord faithfully provided Tye with another job as a driving instructor. Teaching behind the wheel again made Tye more joyful, and emboldened his faith as a Christian, he said. “It was an exercise in faith and trust to be sure,” said Tye. Tye has now been working as a teacher at Geneva for five years and has opened his own driving school. The long and dreary process of opening his school has also been another trust exercise, said Tye. But the year and a half of waiting is over. Besides helping students get their license, Tye looks forward to being in one of the most memorable

The “Tie” logo is prominently featured and his trademark symbol.

experiences of a student’s life: learning to navigate behind the wheel, he said. Tye also said he is excited to have honest conversations with his driving students because, for some odd reason, when 15 year olds are frantically driving a metal box that weighs a ton they tend to be more open. “One time,” said Tye, remembering his days as a driving instructor in California, “I was teaching this girl who was overly nervous and her parents were really concerned because they said she was constantly worried she was going to hit someone or something.” Tye managed to calm her down as he sat with her in the car, but after about ten seconds on the road of irony, a bird slams into the windshield and explodes everywhere. So whether or not you are looking for a more enjoyable way to get through the process of earning your license (which may involve a feathery explosion of bird on your windshield), or you simply want a qualified driving instructor’s help, Tye is very possibly the teacher for you. Tye’s Driving School is now open, located on 1595 S Main Street. The courses range from the beginning of the driving process all the way to earning a license, through instruction in the classroom and guided drives.

Mr. Tye test drives his new company car.

PHOTOS BY LUKE BOWER

35


BANG FOR YOUR BUCK

Take your pick of the litter with this comprehensive guide to fireworks for the upcoming holiday season.

BY DANIEL GROVER

PHOTO BY BRADEN HALL

My favorite time of year is almost upon us. No, not Christmas, but the magical time of year when those mostly-abandoned warehouses around San Antonio turn their lights on and begin selling dynamite to giddy adults and children alike. Fireworks are more than just a blaze of sparks shooting into the sky. To me, they are a way of life. But, being a poor high school student, I always struggle justifying spending money on something that is gone in under a minute. So, here is how to get the biggest bang for your buck when it comes to New Year’s fireworks.

8. SMOKE BOMBS ($1-5)

While these do not always put on the biggest show, they are a fairly safe way to prank your friends (or enemies). These are cheap and can be bought in large packs to stock up for the rest of the year.

7. FIRECRACKERS ($3-10)

Known for their loud bang, these classic fireworks are a great way to wake up the neighbors or scare your dog. The reason these are so high on the list is due to the lack of show involved with them; they aren’t particularly crowd pleasing.

6. EGG-LAYING HENS ($2-4)

They are not your average firework price but are certainly an attention grabber. Hens lay their eggs prior to piercing your ears with a bloodcurdling scream. They are usually a little expensive for my taste, but if you are willing to spend a little more or at least rummage up some coupons, then you may be able to afford a few of these.

36


5. FOUNTAINS ($2-50)

While they range in price greatly, they also range in performance. Depending on which one you buy, these will shoot streams of sparks about 7 feet into the air. The more you spend on these, the longer the show. But the unsatisfying thing about these is their lack of bang and that is, after all, what we want.

4. ROMAN CANDLES ($6-12)

These usually come in packs of fairly large quantities, equipped with a 12-shot duration and an impressive height. These are a very upclose, involved firework because you are able to hold them right up until the action.

3. TANKS ($2-6)

Feeling like a general is fun for anyone, and these tanks are a great way to do it. They spray sparks out of their front and even shoot forward a little bit so that your army can advance. It is especially fun to light two facing each other and see who wins.

2. LADY BUGS ($4-6)

These are named after the harmless little bug, but these spinners will scare you half to death when they shoot up 50 feet into the air and land in your neighbor’s yard. They are very good for the price and are, in my opinion, one of the best fireworks out there.

1. MORTARS ($15-200)

The first time I bought these, I was surprised they were legal for commercial use. These are the kind of fireworks you would see at a rodeo or fair; they sky-rocket into the air then burst with different colors. They’re a classic when it comes to fireworks and my number one way to get the most bang for your buck.

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RIGHT ON TARGET BY LUKE BOWER

STUDENTS REFLECT ON ANOTHER SEASON OF HUNTING IN THE SOUTH. Taking aim at his first dove of the season, freshman Will Bower has a steady hand.

38


It’s a dark, cool morning in Junction, Texas. My gun points towards the massive buck standing on the dew-covered field. I place my finger on the trigger, breathe and fire. The sound, now echoing through the valley, portraits a sure hit. But the deer is gone. I scour the edge of the woods, looking for the faintest sign of movement. There is no trace of the wounded animal. We quickly find the blood trail and follow it deep into the woods where the still warm corpse of the buck lays. We drag the corpse from the reaching arms of the woods. This kill will be a silver medal. In most places, changing temperature and falling leaves triggers the excitement of the quickly approaching Christmas season. However, a new season has begun in Boerne that has Santa’s reindeer staying in the North Pole. It’s hunting season, the most exciting season for any true Texan. Whitetail deer season is the star on top of the hunting Christmas tree. From November 5th to January 1st, hunters in counties across Texas have more than enough time to get the perfect buck.

Freshman Cole Dutton describes deer hunting as “an adrenaline rush above all others. When it all comes down to one shot, anything can happen.”

“AN ADRENALINE RUSH ABOVE ALL OTHERS.” While hunting whitetail deer is very popular in Texas, not everyone hunts deer during the winter. Freshman McLain Brock went on a challenging but thrilling Elk hunt earlier this year. “It was an unforgettable experience because I was able to mix it up and shoot something I don’t always get to shoot,” said Brock. “Even though the odds are stacked against you, it makes it all the more rewarding when you get the kill.” No matter how dedicated the town of Boerne might be to hunting,

Waiting for a flock of doves, Will Bower stands with his 12 gauge rifle.

DETAILS:

there are the few who take a stand against it. An anonymous Geneva student argues that children under the age of six should not be allowed to hunt because during their developmental stage kids can be greatly affected by things giving them an adrenaline-fueled high such as hunting. The student states that kids shouldn’t be acquainted with weapons because “once comfortable with killing animals, who knows what will be killed next.” With easy access to super markets, there is no real need for hunting, making it cruel and heartless to unnecessarily hurt animals in this way, he said. Most students at Geneva have been hunting since early childhood. Freshman Hanson Brown hunted his first time when he was only five years old. “Even though I was so young, being able to combine the outdoors with guns in a way that had a reward at the end made it an experience I will never forget,” Brown said. Whether it’s for bonding, an adrenaline rush or an opportunity to expand your trophy collection, hunting is part of Boerne even vegans can’t take away.

PHOTOS BY LUKE BOWER

GOOSE SEASON: NOVEMBER 5-FEBRUARY 5 BAG LIMIT: 15 BIRDS DUCK SEASON: DECEMBER 3-JANUARY 29 BAG LIMIT: 5 MALLARDS DOVE SEASON: DECEMBER 17-JANUARY 8 DAILY LIMIT: 15 BIRDS TURKEY SEASON: NOVEMBER 5-JANUARY 1 BAG LIMIT: 4 BIRDS WHITE TAILED DEER: NOVEMBER 5-JANUARY 1 BAG LIMIT: 5 DEER, NO MORE THAN 2 BUCKS FOR MORE INFORMATION, CHECK THE HUNTER’S HANDBOOK.

39


YOU WERE MADE FOR THIS

BY MATTHEW SCHRODER

STUDENTS DIVE DEEPER INTO YOUNG LIFE’S MINISTRY THROUGH WORK CREW

The sun sets behind the mountains overlooking Trail West camp in Colorado, where Jessica Wheeler volunteered on work crew as a housekeeper. PHOTO COURTESY OF ADISON CATE 40 BIG PICTURE // FEATURE


SERVICE. COMMUNITY. GIVE-BACK.

T

hese three words, suggested by Geneva’s Development Director Mrs. Amy Metzger (and in another life, a full-time employee with Young Life) perfectly encompass Young Life’s work crew experience. Known internationally as a prominent Christian ministry, Young Life serves to introduce today’s youth to the Christian faith and is centered around sending kids to experience “the best week of their lives” at one of the many Young Life camps stationed across North America. At these camps, teenagers from all over the world encounter Christ for the first time through an intentional, artfully planned week of adventure and close fellowship. Work crew is a branch of Young Life through which high school students travel to a Young Life camp for a month-long shift, working behind the scenes to make that life-changing camp experience happen for hundreds on hundreds of campers each week. While at camp, work crew teens could be assigned any number of jobs, from dish washing to lawn mowing to housekeeping; almost anything under the sun. One of the primary goals of the work crew staff is to provide completely anything and everything that their campers may possibly need. This ranges from making three meals a day of actually agreeable food, washing all of the campers’ bedding, to cleaning cabin toilets, bathrooms, etc. Altogether, the work crew staff makes the campers’ temporary cabin and camp feel safe and loving. They give them a home away from home in order to make their camp experience comfortable, breaking down barriers to prepare them for receiving the Good News. “The transition from being a camper to working behind the scenes as a member of work crew was more surprising than I thought,” said Junior Ruth Wacker, who worked as a Tawashi (made-up Indian title for the housekeeping staff) at Southwind in Florida during the summer of 2016. “I knew I would enjoy it, but as a camper I never realized the amount of unnoticed detail and work that goes into Young Life. Every activity and scheduled order of every evening was carefully planned and though out for a certain purpose and seeing the thought that goes into each choice was impressive.” Even though the main mission of Young Life’s work crew is to supply the means necessary to make camp run without a hitch, their impact echoes well beyond the spotless dishes and 41


Ruth Wacker (top) and her fellow work crew housekeepers left handprints on the walls of the laundry room at Southwind camp in Florida.

PHOTO COURTESY OF RUTH WACKER the green grass. For one, there is a fair amount of evangelizing that happens across camp, both between the staff and the campers. “There’s a lot of opportunity for people to share their testimony, and everyone is kind of expected to share what they have experienced,” said Geneva math instructor Mrs. Susan Greenlees, who served as a Tawashi boss during the summer of 2016 for Southwind. She herself went to a Young Life camp as a high school student, and her own two Geneva graduates are still very involved with the ministry. While it may be difficult for many to share their life story who have never had to do it before, many will agree that it is well worth it. “Growth doesn’t come from comfort” said Wacker, looking about on the experience of sharing her personal testimony. Throughout the years, many Geneva parents, teachers, graduates and current students along with their families have been involved in Young Life in more than one way. To just name a few, the Millet, Greenlees, Wacker, and Metzger families have had close ties with the ministry. There is an almost farfetched amount of people who have been impacted by Young Life in just the Geneva community alone. “I am struck that you can’t go too far in a room of adults without finding somebody for whom this ministry has had some kind of pretty remarkable impact on their life,” said Mrs. Metzger. If you were to stand up at an assembly and ask 42 BIG PICTURE // FEATURE

“IT WAS SUCH A HUMBLING BUT LOVEFILLED EXPERIENCE THAT I REALLY THINK EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE A TASTE OF.”

for a show of hands for all the people who have been exposed to the ministry of Young Life, the result would be surprising in a good way. Because of its impact, many of the kids who go to a Young Life camp turn around and volunteer at camps for work crew in order to show their thankfulness and give back. “Often times, kids who do work crew are former campers who were deeply impacted by their experience at camp. Then they go through training that next year at home in their area to then be able to go back to camp,” said Mrs. Metzger. “Ever since I moved to Boerne, I knew about Young Life, camp, and work crew. After going as a camper to Sharptop Cove after my sophomore year, I realized what a truly fun and beautiful thing Young Life camp was, and I wanted to dive deeper into the ministry. Although I had little fears, I pretty much always knew volunteering at work crew was something I wanted to aim for because I wanted kids to experience the same thing I did,” said senior Arianna Flores, who served as a cook for Washington Family Ranch in Oregon, Young Life’s largest summer camp. “When I was 15, my cousins from Oregon, who were a little bit older than me and were leaders at this camp, invited me to go to this Young Life camp in Canada called Malibu Club. It was over the top impressive, just a great experience,” said Metzger about her first experience with Young Life. Although Young Life started with a staff in the sin-


gle digits in one location when it was founded in 1941, it has since grown into an international organization with clubs meeting on six of the seven continents. Clubs are area-based, weekly meetings full of singing, skits, and scripture. Young Life clubs in Boerne are based at both First Baptist Church and Currey Creek. Because of the considerable amount of denominations that make up the Christian faith, the number of local youth groups keeps growing. However, as Mrs. Metzger points out, Young Life isn’t meant to be a separate youth group. “It’s not really replacing a youth group of a church…but very much at the heart of Young Life is that high school kids would hear the gospel…but then would be plugged into their church to make a difference,” explained Metzger. The opportunity Young Life gives to modern youth is invaluable, and work crew makes it all possible. “Everyone should do work crew because through serving you learn more about yourself and God than you ever can at home, and you build authentic relationships with incredible people. There is nothing like making a visible difference in people’s life from hard

work,” said Wacker. “Overall, it was such a humbling but love-filled experience that I really think everyone should have a taste of,” said Flores. “At Geneva, we read famous works by theologians almost every week in humanities, and every Monday during assembly Mr. Shelton cracks open a Bible and practically spoon-feeds us truth. And that’s awesome. But at work crew, I met people who helped me deepen my relationship with Christ like never before, people who weren’t forced to read scripture for homework or whose parents didn’t encourage them to go to church. Yet they showed me a love that was so deep, I could literally feel Jesus shining straight through them. My eyes were really opened to new experiences, and it was mind-blowing. While there are other options to spend your summer, there are none more satisfying, tougher, uplifting and overall selfless ways to do so. “Doing work crew gave me the opportunity to be the hands and feet of Jesus for someone else, and that was truly humbling and inspiring,” said senior Jess Wheeler, a Tawashi at Trail West in Colorado.

Camp cook Arianna Flores (second from the left) throws up the “YL” sign with her work crew friends at Washington Family Ranch in Oregon.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARIANNA FLORES

REQUIREMENTS FOR SERVING ON WORK CREW ARE AS FOLLOWS:

You must have completed grades 10, 11, or 12 in high school and not yet started college. You should consider yourself a Christian and be striving to follow Jesus. You must participate in a Work Crew training course prior to your departure. Work crew training starts in January. If you’ve attended a Young Life summer camp and are interested in volunteering for work crew, talk to a Boerne Young Life leader soon. If you haven’t experienced the best week of your life at a Young Life camp, sign-ups are now open for 2017 both online and through a Young Life leader. This summer, Boerne Young Life is going to camp at Frontier Ranch in Colorado. 43


2016 HAS BEEN FULL OF QUIRKY MUSIC, TRENDS AND VIRAL VIDEOS.

BY SARA BETH STOLLE

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE 44 BIG PICTURE

A YEAR IN REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE PASSED – WE ARE ALL “SOMEWHAT SLIGHTLY DAZED.”

“BACK AT IT AGAIN WITH THE WHITE VANS!”YES, THE VIDEOS OF DANIEL AND HIS WHITE SNEAKERS WERE A 2016 FAD. “HAMILTON”- ALL OF A SUDDEN, EVERYONE IS INTO MUSICALS.

“WORK” BY RIHANNA- GET OUT. THE DAB- NOOOOOOO.

“PANDA” BY DESIGNER- PANDA PANDA PANDA WOO. MUSIC ICON PRINCE DIED- WE ALL CRIED PURPLE TEARS.

“ONE DANCE” BY DRAKE- IT WAS RUINED BY THE RADIO. HARAMBE- LONG LIVE.

WARRIORS LOST THE NBA CHAMPIONSHIP- OH NO!


JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

HIDDLESWIFT- TAYLOR SWIFT’S 607TH BOYFRIEND TOM HIDDLESTON WAS TAKEN THEN SINGLE ALL IN AN INSTANT. “CAN’T STOP THE FEELING” BY JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE- NOOOOOOO.

RYAN LOCHTE EMBARRASSED AMERICA. POKEMON GO- ONLY SIX PEOPLE WERE RUN OVER DURING THE THREE DAYS THAT THIS APP WAS A THING.

“JU JU ON THAT BEAT” BY ZAY HILFIGER & ZAYION MCCALL – NO, THIS DOES NOT MEAN YOU CAN DANCE.

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION- SNL HAD A FIELD DAY MAKING FUN OF “THE LESSER OF TWO EVILS,” HILLARY CLINTON AND DONALD TRUMP.

CUBS WON THE WORLD SERIES – A 108-YEAR DRY SPELL WAS BROKEN. TRUMP IS PRESIDENT ELECT.

STAR WARS ROGUE ONE- X-WING VR MISSION PREMIERED DECEMBER 16. IT WAS AN X-WIN...

45


HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO FREDERICKSBURG BY ANNA RIEDLINGER

A VINTAGE BIKE SITS OUTSIDE OF AN ANTIQUE STORE IN FREDERICKSBURG. ANNA RIEDLINGER WALKS THE TRAILS OF THE WILD SEED FARM.

EXPLORING THE UNEXPLORED IN FREDERICKSBURG ALL PHOTOS BY RUTH WACKER

RIEDLINGER, TAKES A DETOUR IN AN ICE CREAM SHOP, CLEAR RIVER.

46 BIG PICTURE

AN ELDERLY GENTLEMAN ENJOYS THE SPACE INSIDE PIONEER MEMORIAL LIBRARY.


PIONEER MEMORIAL LIBRARY

Something about this library makes it seem very elevated. Whether it’s the grand staircases going to the second floor or the old wooden chairs at every window, it definitely has a noble feel to it. If you frequently pretend to be Belle from Beauty and the Beast, this library would fit you nicely. The pioneer memorial library is tucked in the middle of Main Street and is definitely worth the stop.

CHRISTMAS IN THE SQUARE

If for some reason you’ve been living in a cave and don’t already know it, Christmas is almost here. And let me tell you, Christmas in Fredericksburg is over all fantastic. Beautiful lights, outdoor ice skating, hot cider and grumpy old German men wearing their lederhosen are only 45 minutes away. So go and take some pictures of old people for me down in the main square.

MARBURGER ORCHARDS

On you’re way into Fredericksburg off of highway 87 there is a little family-owned orchard. I’ve been to this orchard more than once. On one occasion, they were no longer letting us pick fruit when we arrived. But once we saw the fresh peaches and blackberries, Ruth Wacker and I couldn’t resist. The fruit was so good but I’m pretty sure our blackberrystained lips and fingers blew our cover. Marburger Orchards is very unpredictable when it comes to their hours, so be sure to check their website for details about when to visit and what is in season. But over all it’s so fun to eat fruit you picked with your own hands.

WILD SEED FARMS

I have vague memories of going here for a Grammar School field trip, but all I remember is a lot of flowers, some butterflies and Scott Standerfer getting in trouble for running. But from what Mrs. Ryden tells me, it’s super cool. Not only can you buy seeds here, but you can cut your own bundles of flowers to take home. It’s a beautiful place to take beautiful people.

47


OUT OF THE BOX


PHOTO BY KATELYN DAVIS


THE ORIGINS OF THE CELEBRATION BY EMME OWENS GRAPHIC BY ANNA RIEDLINGER

Twinkling lights line the houses on your street. Red, silver, green and gold ornaments cover your Christmas tree. You walk in your house and the door closes behind you trapping the sharp, cold wind that cuts through your coat outside. As you walk in your house you smell that sharp, cinnamon, I-feel-like-I’mabout-to-sneeze, but sweet smell of a real fir tree and hot cider combined. As you sip a cup of the cider and sit by the crackling fire your face begins to glow with warmth and a twinkle of joy. This is Christmas. If you were to go back hundreds of years, the Christmas celebration with Christian roots looked very different than it does today. While today we celebrate Christmas on December 25th with the exchanging of gifts, where Santa Claus comes and celebration begins, the origin of the Christmas season is a little different. The celebration of Christmas actually started with the Advent season as a lead into the day Christ was born. It begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas and continues for 12 days after Christmas ending on January 6th with the feast of the Epiphany (the commemoration of Christ and the Magi). December 25th was the first day of the Advent season with a feast. It was the start of the celebration for the birth of Christ. Originally, the cele50 OUT OF THE BOX // OPINION

bration would continue for 12 days after Christmas to show further appreciation and recognition for those who died for Christ (the martyrs, the babies killed by Herod and some of the apostles) and, those in need. This is where the origin of the 12 days of Christmas came into being. While in the past, Christmas celebrations started on Christmas Day, now, many simply stop their celebration the day after. But it is important to remember what Christmas truly celebrates because God’s gift of His son and everlasting life is something no other person can replicate. It is truly amazing and deserves more than a day of celebration. There are many traditions we use today that have a deeper meaning that has been forgotten. The Christmas tree itself started as a pagan decoration in the winter months in Rome but evolved into a Christian decoration that is meant to depict Biblical themes. Evergreen trees were considered an ancient symbol of life in the midst of winter and the Romans decorated with these trees and branches to honor the emperor. The tree did not start to symbolize Christmas until the Renaissance, where it was used in plays to depict Biblical themes in the church’s worship. This became a major controversy and the plays were banned from being showed in public, but many still wanted to cel-


ebrate so they decorated the evergreen trees in their homes to remember the tradition of watching the plays they once enjoyed. This initiated the tradition of the Christmas tree. Today, almost every home has a decorated tree, and every tree is unique to each family in its own way The tradition of giving gifts began when the three wise men brought gifts for baby Jesus, but the true first gift was a gift from God when He sent His one and only son Jesus Christ to save the world. Today, Santa Claus and gift giving is often a tradition many families participate in. The Santa Claus legend began with the story of St. Nicholas. St. Nicholas was born into a rich family around the 300’s and became a well-known saint in the Greek and Latin churches. He was a very selfless and generous man. St. Nicholas is known as the man who saved three young girls from prostitution by leaving enough money for their dowries in their stockings that hung above the fireplace. St. Nicholas continued to give to those in need and was known to have a soft spot in his heart for children. He did not keep any of his money for himself, but gave it all away for the betterment of others. The tradition of St. Nicholas has been passed down through many generations and cultures, and his name has changed due to these

different cultures in Europe that participate in the tradition. The Protestant countries started calling it the legend of Sinterklass and Martin Luther later changed this to Christ Child. In Germany, Christ Child is pronounced Chriskindl, but over the years Christkindl started being pronounced Kris Kringle. Today, this magical man is known as Santa Claus. He is an image of Christ because he gives how Christ gave. While many believe Santa Claus is the ultimate symbol of the secularization of Christmas, it really is a reminder of what Christmas should be about: giving and not receiving. He represents how Christians should act by giving to those in need and expecting nothing in return. While the holiday becomes more and more controversial for today’s world where it is more polite to say, “Happy Holidays” and where nativity scenes are forbidden in front of City Hall, it is a reminder to all who follow Christ, that the origins of this holiday are truly something worth celebrating. From the holiday to the tree to the gifts, Christmas truly is a wonderful time of the year. Although it was something different many centuries ago, the meaning behind it all is still the same, give how God gave to us. 51


WHILE MANY BELIEVE SANTA CLAUS IS THE ULTIMATE SYMBOL OF THE SECULARIZATION OF CHRISTMAS, IT REALLY IS A REMINDER OF WHAT CHRISTMAS SHOULD BE ABOUT: GIVING AND NOT RECEIVING. 52


THE RANT

CHRISTMAS EDITION

Nathan unleashes his inner Scrooge in light of the crazy holiday season.

BY NATHAN ZUNIGA

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!” What’s better than being wrapped in a cozy blanket, sitting by a warm fire and sipping on a nice cup of hot chocolate? I don’t know what’s better, but I can tell you what’s worse: when that scalding hot chocolate burns your tongue, causing you to accidentally throw your blanket into the fireplace, which ends up burning your house down. Okay, that may be a little exaggerated, but honestly, that kind of explains how I feel about Christmas. If you really think about it, Christmas is definitely not the most wonderful time of the year. Most people are just too busy shopping for presents at the last minute and pretending to know all the words to each overplayed Christmas song to realize how ridiculous Christmas can be. We all know these things frustrate us, but no one is brave enough to speak up, until now. First, let’s talk about the holiday weather. We all have this idea of a perfect, white Christmas. I don’t know about you, but I don’t see any white here in Boerne. There are two types of Christmas in Texas, the 85-degree Christmas and the icy Christmas. The closest thing that Texas gets to snow is ice. What’s worse than slippery roads and icicles hanging over your head? Actually, probably snow. Snow is really overrated. Everyone has this fantasy of running out into the snow and having an awesome snowball fight on Christmas morning, when in reality it’s just going to be cold, wet and depressing. And do you really think your poor excuse for a snowman is going to compare to the perfect snowmen you see in movies? Sorry to burst your bubble, but you already know that thing is going to be no taller than your leg and is either going to be run over by a truck or crumble into a sad lump of snow. But, you know what, let’s celebrate. It’s Christmas! After a long, agonizing, suspenseful night of staring at your ceiling, you wake up and run downstairs. You’re so excited to rip open the presents that you have waited almost a month for, but you fail to realize that your parents stayed up all night wrapping them for you. So, you have to wait an additional two hours because you woke up at 8:00, and your parents just went to sleep

two hours ago. But it’s all fine, 10:00 rolls around and you rip open your presents. Now, parents, this is also a great time to test your children, because if they don’t like what they got, you can just lock them out of the house while you relax for a change. I mean seriously, Christmas must be really stressful for parents, with all the last-minute gift shopping and holiday traveling. Let’s just get rid of it all together, along with eggnog. Don’t act like you think it tastes good, we can all agree that it tastes like someone spit their bubble gum into some spoiled milk. So, let’s stop pretending that we like it and move on with our lives. Okay, I feel like I have been dumping all over Christmas. Surprisingly enough, I don’t think Christmas is bad at all, I love the holiday season. So, let’s just forget about everything I have said here, and focus on the true meaning of Christmas… Oh wait, I forgot that was ruined too. What used to be the celebration of the birth of Christ suddenly turned into a fat, old, creepy man with a bag full of “presents” that flies around on a sketchy sleigh who breaks into your home to leave behind his “presents” for your children. Someone needs to shoot down his sleigh with a rifle. Can we just skip Christmas and move on to Easter? Nope, that was ruined with a creepy bunny that somehow lays eggs. Valentine’s Day? No, that was also ruined, but this time it’s a creepy, flying baby with a weapon.

“YOU KNOW WHAT? I TAKE BACK WHAT I SAID, CHRISTMAS NEEDS TO CHILL.”

53


PRESS

Need some inspiration while you’re working on homework? Press Play on one of the Geneva Quarterly’s homework playlists, compiled by one staffer and one teacher.

CHRISTMAS SHAKIN’ STEVENS MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE PAUL MCARTNEY WONDERFUL CHRISTMASTIME BRENDA LEE ROCKIN’ AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE BOBBY HELMS JINGLE BELL ROCK ELLA FITZGERALD SLEIGH RIDE BRETT ELDRIDGE SILENT NIGHT MARGARET WHITING BABY IT’S COLD OUTSIDE PETER J WILHOUSKY CAROL OF THE BELLS MORE THAN EVER BEDHEAD NAT KING COLE THE CHRISTMAS SONG BREAK MY HEART LA SERA WHAM! LAST CHRISTMAS WHY DID EVER WE MEET THE PROMISE RING MICHAEL BUBLE BLUE CHRISTMAS PUMPKIN EYES SILVER SCOOTER BING CROSBY IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK A LOT LIKE CHRISTMAS PALISADE MINERAL ANDY WILLIAMS IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR RIP RINGO DEATHSTARR DEAN MARTIN SILVER BELLS COUPLESKATE JOE CHRISTMAS FOLLOW THE LEADER SLOAN BIG DIPPER BUILT TO SPILL COME IN ALONE MY BLOODY VALENTINE WILD THING THE TROGGS I NEVER LOVED YOU ANYWAYS CHAIRS IN THE ARNO THE CRYSTAL LAKE GRANDADDY FEEL THE PAIN DINOSAUR JR. SUR LA PISTE DE DANSE LAURE BRIARD ROCK THIS TOWN STRAY CATS Follow @GenevaQuarterly SHADY MESS DURALUXE on Spotify to listen to more GSB TAKE IT AS IT COMES VIVIAN GIRLS playlists and keep up with song additions. THE VEIL OF ISIS THE SWORD

PLAY

MICHAEL BUBLE WHITE

BY TEACHER MR. PAUL JOHNSON

BY STAFFER LAUREN JARVIS

54 OUT OF THE BOX


SEATBELTS SAVE TYE’S

GRAPHIC BY RUTH WACKER PHOTO BY LUKE BOWER

SPONSORED BY THE STEVE TYE’S DRIVING SCHOOL 55


CINEMA SEASON BY KENNY KIDD GRAPHIC BY RUTH WACKER

56


It’s funny how the simple term “Christmas Spirit” plants such an intricate abundance of strong, complicated, almost indescribable feelings and thoughts in your head. You can’t really describe the feeling the holiday season gives you in words; only give examples of what gives you that feeling. A comforting, entrancing fire. A hot drink in brisk, cold weather. That weird sense of longing and almost-satisfaction in your stomach. The closest a word comes to describing it is nostalgia. Not a bitter, mopey, pining-for-the-past nostalgia, but an incomparable sense of warm satisfaction and reflection that makes this season truly the best time of the year. So I’m going to try something a little different. It’s easy to just do a “Top Five Movies About Christmas”, or “Five Movies To Watch In Theaters Over Christmas Break”, but that doesn’t really do the magical feeling justice. So I think the proper thing to do would be to recommend five movies that capture the beautiful, optimistic enthusiasm felt around Christmas, regardless of whether or not Christmas is even present. These movies amplify that feeling of childlike excitement and almost supernatural positivity, not Elf for the 138th time. So here we go! is rated R. If you’re ok with reading and occasional, moderately inappropriate content, and you are 17 or older, you will be treated to a movie that embodies the selfless idealism and kindhearted warmth of Christmas perfectly.

MOVIES TO LIFT YOUR SPIRIT FORREST GUMP FOR THE CHRISTMAS SEASON

Obviously. This movie about maybe the most big-hearted, idealistic, lovable and giving character in movie history; that makes you feel like you’re drinking sweet hot chocolate the entire time, that makes you laugh and cry and feel like you can do anything in the world after watching it, may as well be a Christmas movie. It’s a movie filled with wonder and cheer and hope, and there’s no better time for it than during Christmas Break

AMÉLIE

“Amélie” has nothing whatsoever to do with Christmas. But it is just about the happiest, most kindhearted and smile-inducing movie I’ve ever seen. It makes you want to adopt a dozen homeless dogs and feed them ice cream near a warm fire while singing carols and giving all your money to charity. It’s got the spirit of Christmas more than just about any Christmas movie I’ve ever seen. TWO DISCLAIMERS! It is in French with subtitles and it

LA LA LAND

Ok, so I’m taking a bit of a risk here, considering this hasn’t been released yet, but I figured I ought to include at least one movie playing in theaters, right? “La La Land” is a musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as dreamers/lovers, and although that normally would be cause to cringe and gag, the trailers for this movie have been so gorgeous, filled with life and enthusiasm, and have had such wonderful music that they’ve put me in the mood for Christmas early. It looks delightful, and director

Damien Chazelle (“Whiplash,” not a Christmas movie at all), has proven himself to be one of the biggest talents out there today. So I’m willing to bet that this wonderful, corny, romantic musical will be the best movie to watch in theaters over the break for the Christmas spirit.

GROUNDHOG DAY

Yes it’s the wrong holiday, but I think it is genuinely impossible to feel less than amazing after watching this story of a man stuck repeating the same day over and over again, and learning valuable lessons. Is it corny? Oh yeah, undeniably. But it feels genuine, and warm, and optimistic about people, life, love, and everything. It’s much more than just a silly comedy; it’s an important movie about the beauty and satisfaction of being less self-centered and more caring. It’s perfect for Christmas.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

Oh alright, this is an actual Christmas movie that does deserve to be watched over Christmas. “It’s A Wonderful Life” really is the quintessential Christmas movie. I don’t think any movie ever has matched its level of cheerful, infectious optimism, endless warmth, and sense of compassion. “It’s A Wonderful Life” honestly captures the spirit of Christmas. 57


SOLVING SANTA’S SECRETS IS SANTA CLAUS REALLY COMING TO TOWN?

BY NATHAN YOUNG

Geneva students share their devastating stories about the moment they solved Santa’s secret.

PHOTO BY IAN COMUZZIE

KENNY KIDD:

One year I got a bike for Christmas and the present said “from Santa.” Later in the day my dad was talking about how he got a really good deal on the bike, and the dots kind of connected.

BEN CARRWAY:

It was a hot August afternoon in Florida. I asked my dad how many years Santa had been alive. I was just trying to learn something new. That conversation ended in heartbreak and betrayal.

KENSI PARKER:

I was arguing with my friends, saying that Santa was real, and I kept on getting teased for it. When I came home crying, I asked my mom and she said, “He’s not real, your friends were right.”

RUTH WACKER:

I was about seven when my whole family was in our van and my sister, Grace, offhandedly mentioned something about parents being Santa. Surprised, I questioned her and she said, “Don’t you know that Santa isn’t real?” And, being two years older, I had to hide my disappointment and pretend that ‘of course I knew Santa wasn’t real.’ Grace still doesn’t know that she ruined it for me.

JOSEPH HOHNE:

When I was two, my brother and sister ruined it for me. They just told me that the gifts were from my parents. It was tragic.

CORLEY PETRIE:

When I was about seven or eight, I was making cookies for Santa on Christmas Eve, and my brother Campbell said, “What are you doing? Santa is not real you dumbo.” My mom tried to say he was wrong, but inside…I knew.

“I SAW THEIR FEET AND I KNEW”

LUKE MIXON:

On Christmas Eve I really wanted to find out if Santa was real so I slept under our Christmas tree. When my parents brought my presents out, I saw their feet and I knew. Then I crawled out from under the tree and went to bed. 58


IF THERE WAS A..

WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF IT SNOWED IN TEXAS?

BY ANSON EGGERSS GRAPHIC BY ANSON EGGERSS

Y

our family wakes up on a regular morning. You look out the window and suddenly realize that the driveway is…WHITE? Your first instinct is to bundle up in the warmest clothes you can find and venture out into the endless frost. “What is this peculiar substance? It feels so…soft!” your sibling declares. “I didn’t know snow was actually real,” your mom says. “This is possible in Texas?” you exclaim as you observe the phenomenon. You begin to experiment with the substance. “Hey! Maybe we can make a…a sort of man out of it! A snowman! That’s what we’ll call it,” says your dad. As much as snow would fill all of our hearts with joy, there is pretty much no chance for snowfall this year in Boerne according to the Almanacs. Typical. But it’s still amusing to imagine what it truly would be like

if a snow day occurred right here in Boerne, Texas. In other states, snow is regular and can even become a nuisance to some. It’s different here. Just the thought of school being canceled, drinking hot chocolate, and having snowball fights makes most Geneva students eager for the elements. Everyone seems to have their own form of entertainment when it comes to this. As junior Lauren Jarvis puts it: “I like putting the snow into a bowl and then pouring syrup on it. We eat it like ice cream.” Classic Laura Ingalls Wilder. “If there was snow, I would dig a cave in it, cuddle up inside, and drink coffee,” said senior Arianna Flores with enthusiasm. “Even though I hate the cold.” “I’d go for a run and then make a snowman,” said freshman Arthur Flores. The variety of amusement is limitless. But let’s face it - snow in South Texas? There’s snow way. 59


WHAT’S YOUR TYPE?

“16 PERSONALITIES” QUIZ CAPTURES THE COLORFUL RHETORIC SCHOOL COMMUNITY. BY ARIANNA FLORES

The “16 Personalities” online quiz took the world by storm this part year. A mash-up of Jung’s theory of psychological types and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®, the 16 Personalities quiz categorizes people into one of 16 personality types. These types are centered around their “Big Five” personality traits, Mind, Energy, Nature, Tactics and Identity. Each personality type has a four-letter name, like INFP or ESTJ, derived from four of these two-sided traits. Introverted/Extroverted explains how people interact with their surroundings (Mind). Observant/Intuitive defines how people view the world and process information

(Energy). Thinking/Feeling determines how individuals make decisions and deal with emotions (Nature). Judging/ Prospecting reflects how people go about work, planning, and making decions (Tactics). In addition, Assertive/ Turbulent measures people’s confidence (Identity), and this trait is tacked onto the end of the personality type (omitted below). A sample of Rhetoric school students and teachers across grades took the “16 Personality” quiz to determine their personality types, and the results were diverse. Take the quiz for yourself and find in-depth explanations for each personality type at www.16personalities.com.

A NALYS TS

DI P L O M AT S

ENTJ: “Bold, imaginative and strong-willed

ENFJ: “Charismatic and inspiring leaders,

Whoopi Goldberg Steve Jobs

Anson Eggerss Sutton Houser

leaders, always finding a way – or making one.”

able to mesmerize their listeners.”

ENTP: “Smart and curious thinkers who

ENFP: “Enthusiastic, creative and sociable free

William Cone Katherine Anderson

Mr. Royal Brown Scott Standerfer

cannot resist an intellectual challenge.”

spirits, who can always find a reason to smile.”

INTJ: “Imaginative and strategic

INFJ: “Quiet and mystical, yet very

Mr. Dirk Russell Shelby Miller

Coggin Galbreath Mr. Steven Tye

thinkers, with a plan for everything.”

inspiring and tireless idealists.”

INTP: “Innovative inventors with an

INFP: “Poetic, kind and altruistic people,

Ashton Rodgers Bill Gates

Mr. Paul Johnson Kira Drawe

unquenchable thirst for knowledge.”

SENTIN ELS

ESTJ: “Excellent administrators, unsurpassed at managing things – or people.”

Noah Nilsson Frank Sinatra

ESFJ: “Extraordinarily caring, social and popular people, always eager to help.”

Dr. Rodney Lloyd Sammy Ledoux

always eager to help a good cause.”

E XP L O R E R S ESTP: “Smart, energetic and very perceptive people, who truly enjoy living on the edge.”

Grant Williams Scott Janse

ESFP: “Spontaneous, energetic and enthusiastic people – life is never boring around them.”

Gabi Griffey Serena Williams

ISTJ: “Practical and fact-minded individuals,

ISTP: “Bold and practical experimenters,

Dr. John Rosheger Emme Owens

Michael Jordan Tom Cruise

whose reliability cannot be doubted.”

masters of all kinds of tools.”

ISFJ: “Very dedicated and warm protectors,

ISFP: “Flexible and charming artists, always

Mr. Rob Shelton Ms. Chelsie Jacobson

Audrey Ryden Ross Kirchner

always ready to defend their loved ones.”

60 OUT OF THE BOX

ready to explore and experience something new.”


— THEPINKINGTON: PINKINGTON PRESS — “WE’RE ALL NUTS HERE”

P&P PEANUTS: SPREAD TOO THIN? The purchase of the state-of-the-art Legume Loom 2000, which was meant to increase P&P production exponentially, may not have had the effect the Pinkington Bros. had hoped for. Reports leaked from the P&P financial office this week suggest that, while production may be on the rise, sales are not. Despite vice-chair Norma Diggs’ assurances that chunky peanut butter was simply “going out of vogue,” reports indicate that smooth sales are also down by no less than 57%. If this trend continues, there’s no telling how long the factory will last. “These numbers suggest the unthinkable,” says special correspondent Mindy Phipps. “Pinkington is peanuts. Without the factory, there is no town.” The factory museum, opened last month as “The Peanut Gallery,” may be a source of extra revenue for the company, but it seems unlikely that the museum alone will be able to turn things around for P&P. An unnamed official

at the mayor’s office put it this way: “If people aren’t buying the peanut butter, why do we expect that they’ll pay money to come and look at it instead?” Overall, this seems like an accurate assessment. “Should we be worried?” asks concerned Macy Foster, teller at Pinkington Bank. “This museum is looking less and less like a fun idea, and more and more like a last-ditch effort to save a company that’s going under.” P&P declined to comment on the financial reports, but is currently under pressure from Mayor Munchum to release all relevant documents to the public. “In a town where 99.764% of the population makes its living in some sector of the peanut industry, people deserve to know,” the mayor said in his speech last Wednesday. “I urge the good people of Pinkington not to panic. We must carry on with our lives and hope for the best. I believe, however, that we have reached a stage in the game where we would do well to prepare for the worst.” 61


“NUTTERS”DOCUMENTARY RELEASED TO CRITICAL ACLAIM Two years ago, when an alternative news channel van broke down outside city limits, cameraman Mr. Henry Linder was fascinated with this town—so much so that he decided to stay awhile and film a short documentary on Pinkington and its citizens. Most people remember the expectations of fame and boosted tourism revenue that accompanied Mr. Linder’s project—feelings which could not but die down over nearly two years with no news of further developments. But now, at long last, Mr. Linder’s film (facetiously titled “The Nutters”) has been released across the nation, and the reception has been overwhelming positive. “I was fascinated by the town,” says Linder in the introduction to his film. “The people … the way they think … they way they live … It’s like another planet.” The New York times called the documentary an “unprecedented, entirely original foray into the strange genre of experimental film … (Linder’s) work

challenges our conceptions of the bizarre, the frightening, and the captivatingly surreal.” Pinkington citizens featured in the film were so natural on camera that leading critics seem to be under the mistaken (but extremely flattering) impression that they are in fact professional actors: “The performances from the supporting cast,” said one reviewer, “are as utterly convincing as they are outlandish and improbable … Linder’s imaginings of an isolated Ohio town and its inhabitants are as vivid and engaging as they are freakish and impossible … The acting is superb from start to finish. Here is a wealth of undiscovered performers prime for long careers of offbeat character acting. The film plays almost like a genuine documentary—but of course, it can’t be.” In other words, Pinkington on camera seems too good to be true. We can only hope a flood of tourists will be coming through to see for themselves.

PRINCESS PINKINGTON DETHRONED Carmelita Fairfax, the recently-coronated “Pinkington Princess,” was disqualified last night from the Miss Ohioan Farmer Pageant in Columbus for “shocking and offensive conduct” on the runway. Pageant footage shows Miss Fairfax deliberately tripping the representative from Cleveland, ripping out her hair extensions, and ordering that a judge be beheaded when she tried to intervene. At least six officials were bitten by the eight-year-old girl over the course of the evening, and the pageant director sustained several second-degree burns when Carmelita pushed him into a chocolate fountain. This fiasco raises the question of how Carmelita advanced to the state level competition in the first place. The answer may lie with her mother, Lucille Bunting-Fairfax. Anonymous reports, just now beginning to surface, speak of bribery and intimidation being used against local judges and officials. “Fairfax Farming Inc. offered me $2,000 to give Carmelita a perfect score,” 62 OUT OF THE BOX

said one Pinkington judge who wished to remain unnamed. “When I refused, Mrs. Bunting-Fairfax threatened to come after my family.” Lucille Bunting-Fairfax declined to comment, but police are currently investigating what may turn out to be years of vicious tactics unscrupulously employed on her daughter’s behalf. “I was never really a spy from Jiff,” says Ms. Collie, now homeless, former teacher at Pinkington Elementary. “That rumor only started after I gave a gave Carmelita Fairfax a B- on her kindergarten report card. Nine-year-old Benjamin Bugle has a similar story: “Ever since I told on Carmelita because she cut off my hair and bit me, her mom told everybody I have cooties, and now I don’t have any friends.” Is Lucille Bunting-Fairfax responsible for her daughter’s reign of terror? Keep an eye on the Pink Press headlines for updates.


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: GOOD IDEA, MARTHA! CONSPIRACY THEORIES WITH PHYLLIS HEY! I’m Martha, and now that it’s I’m going to be tackling a frightening topic this week: thermostats. The recent information that has come out about our thermostats—namely, that corporations can hack into them and gain full audiovisual access to our private lives—is nothing short of alarming. I happen to know that Skippy is hacking into Pinkington thermostats, getting closer and closer everyday to the factory itself. For all of P&P’s problems, they’ll be really and truly finished when Skippy can steal their secrets from the inside; but as of yet, the factory refuses to see reason. Join the fight. We need to raise awareness to save this town. Disable your own thermostats, and stop by Shelling Street Pharmacy to sign my petition to shut off all heating and air to Pinkington until the threat is past.

November there’s a chill in the air! With thermostats being forcibly removed left and right, you’ll probably find yourself in want of a blanket to snuggle up with around the house—But we all know how difficult it is to hold a blanket wrapped around you while performing basic household tasks like cooking, cleaning, and spreading peanut butter. That’s why I had the idea for a blanket with sleeves, so it stays on snug but leaves your arms free for whatever you need them for! They could come in all sizes and colors. My favorite color is yellow. What’s yours? Do you have a great idea you’ve been wanting to share with the world? Let me know at www.goodideamartha.com!

CLASSIFIEDS:

From Mimi Lemons: WANTED: One (1) wedding, including one (1) groom (see my previous advertisements for qualifications), one (1) certificate of marriage, two (2) witnesses, and one (1) minister who is also a ventriloquist and can say “I do” in a feminine voice. I will provide one (1) bride, in the person of my daughter Karen. Don’t worry about the rings, I’ve had them ready for ages.

From Phyllis Phigg: WANTED: A generator-powered heating unit and a great quantity of blankets.

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THE TALON

CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER W

CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER W

EXCLUSIVE STORY: CLAUS ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE!

“Great bouncing icebergs!” So said S. Claus of the North Pole upon discovering a non-conformity in a potential sled-pulling deer. He intimated that should things not change, the deer in question would be disqualified from future consideration. Lawyers for Rudolph Donnerson, the above mentioned reindeer, have threatened a lawsuit: “We are shocked at such intolerance towards our client who happens to have nasally luminescent qualities.” Claus’ problems seem to be only beginning as representatives from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) have started picketing outside the gates of his North Pole complex: “Not only does he make them work all night, who knows what he feeds them to get them to fly.” Claus, who goes by the name of Santa, was unavailable for comment.

64 OUT OF THE BOX


TER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE

FEAT. VINTAGE TALON CONTENT

HISTORY BY MR.THEOF ROB “THE SHELTON TALON”

TER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE ACCUSED OF INTOLERANCE//YOU BETTER WATCH OUT//OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY//CLAUSE Many people in our over-sensitive culture find the phrase “Merry Christmas” offensive. Therefore, we at The Talon suggest that instead of tiptoeing and using deflated slogans like “Happy Holidays,” we should use even more potent greetings so that they find “Merry Christmas” benign. Here are a few of our suggestions:

OMNIPOTENT BABY DAY HAPPY BIRTH OF GOD-INCARNATE DAY JOYOUS ‘WORD BECAME FLESH’ SEASON MERRY THANKSGIVING FOR GOD CONDESCENDING TO BECOME ONE OF US CHEERFUL DAY OF CELEBRATION FOR GOD TAKING STEPS TO SAVE US FROM OURSELVES AND HELL EXULTANT SEASON OF THE CHRIST OF HISTORY BLOWING HISTORY APART JESUS MAKING A SHAMBLES OF COMPARATIVE RELIGION GREETINGS

WARNING!

YOU BETTER WATCH OUT. YOU BETTER NOT CRY. YOU BETTER NOT POUT. WE’RE TELLING YOU WHY. We have received reliable reports from sources north of Boerne that there is a malevolent force headed this way. Among other disturbing accounts, these sources claim that “he’s making a list, checking it twice; he’s gonna find out who’s naughty or nice!” It is unclear as to why the list is being made or what he intends to do with this information on our citizens’ moral behavior. Should we receive more news concerning this public peril, we will pass it on immediately. In the meantime, know that it has been rumored that he even sees you when you’re sleeping and he knows when you’re awake! He knows if you’ve been bad or good. So be good, for goodness’ sake!

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WE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS

ALL PHOTOS BY IAN COMUZZIE AND JACQUELINE KNOX

GENEVA QUARTERLY STAFF

66 OUT OF THE BOX

AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR!


ACCORDING TO SANTA’S LIST COMING STRAIGHT FROM THE NORTH POLE,

BEST STAFF AWARD GOES TO: EXECUTIVES PHOTOGRAPHY CHIEF EDITOR OF MANAGEMENT: JESSICA WHEELER CHIEF EDITOR OF CONTENT: ARIANNA FLORES CHIEF EDITOR OF DESIGN: SKYLAR TIPPETTS CHIEF EDITOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN COMUZZIE

LUKE BOWER KATELYN DAVIS BRADEN HALL JACQUELINE KNOX

PHOTOSHOP EDITOR: RUTH WACKER INDESIGN EDITOR: CARRISSA GEORGELOS EDITORIAL EDITOR: EMME OWENS

ANSON EGGERSS ANNA RIEDLINGER SARA BETH STOLLE

EDITORS INDESIGN

AISLING AYERS LAUREN JARVIS CAROL METZGER CHARLOTTE WALKER

INDESIGN CREDITS:

AISLING AYERS 10-13, 27-28, 54, KATELYN DAVIS 58-59, ARIANNA FLORES 10-13, 60, CARISSA GEORGELOS 40-43, 61-63, LAUREN JARVIS 24-25, 53, JACQUELINE KNOX 8-9, 14-15, 29-31, CAROL METZGER 50-52, 56-57, EMME OWENS 16-17, SKYLAR TIPPETTS 1-7, 20-21, 22-23, 26, 32-33, 48-49, 64-65, 67-68 RUTH WACKER 18-19, 55, CHARLOTTE WALKER 36-37, JESSICA WHEELER 38-39, 44-45, 46-47, 66 NATHAN YOUNG 34-35, SARA BETH STOLLE 44-45

PHOTOSHOP EDITORIAL

JAYNE GOODMAN MATTHEW SCHRODER NATHAN YOUNG NATHAN ZUNIGA DANIEL GROVER (MARKETING)

ADVISOR BECKY RYDEN

COLOPHON: All verbal and visual content is solicited and selected by the Quarterly Staff of the Geneva School of Boerne. Approval is garnered from advisor and headmaster. All bylined writers are held accountable for their work. MAGAZINE SPECIFICATIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS: Created in InDesign and printed by SchoolPrinting.com. Font families: Rama Gothic Standard Condensed Semi-Bold, Roboto Slab, Roboto Bold


VOL. 4 ISS. 2

68

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Geneva quarterly issue 2, 2016  

The Rhetoric School publication for the Geneva School of Boerne.

Geneva quarterly issue 2, 2016  

The Rhetoric School publication for the Geneva School of Boerne.