Issuu on Google+

BOSTOCK HOUSE

HANDBOOK


BOSTOCK HOUSE

HANDBOOK


Geelong Grammar School Bostock House Darryl Moorfoot Head of Bostock House 139 Noble Street, Newtown Victoria, Australia 3220 T +61 3 5221 7760 F +61 3 5221 7602 E bostock@ggs.vic.edu.au

www.ggs.vic.edu.au

CRICOS 00143G


CONTENTS 01

OUR PHILOSOPHY Our Purpose 6 Our School 9 A Proud Heritage 11 Positive Education 13 Our Community 15 Learning to Flourish 17 Friends of Bostock House 19

02

PREP TO YEAR 4 Life at Bostock House 23 Absence 23 Assembly 23 After School Activities 23 Before and After School Care 23 Booklist23 Buddy Programme 23 Buses24 Camps and Excursions 24 Camps 24 Excursions 24 Chapel24 Other Information 25 Community Service 25 Easter and Christmas 25 First Aid 25 Medication25 Lost Property 25 Parking25 School Accounts 25 School Crossing 26 Special Days 26 Timetable26 Toys26 1

Transition 26 ELC - Prep and New Students 26 Year 4 - Middle School 26 Parent Communication 27 Bostock Bulletin 27 Student Diary 27 Information Evenings 27 Parent Enquiries 27 Reports27 Sport 28 Swimming Programme 28 Whole School Athletics Carnival 28 Sports Uniform 28 Sunsmart Policy 28 Student Code of Conduct 31 Uniform 32

03

EARLY LEARNING CENTRE Learning Through Play 35 Collegiality and Organisation 35 The Environment 35 Collaboration 36 The Programme and Process of Growth and Development 37 Arrivals and Departures 38 Behaviour Management Policy 41 Childcare Rebate 41 Communication41 Complaints41 Clothing42 Enrolment Procedures and Admission Requirements42 Food 43 Health 44 What to Bring 46

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


04

07

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

INTERDISCIPLINARY BASED LEARNING

Early Learning Centre 49 Prep - Year 4 50

05

PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING Physical Learning53 Health53 Perceptual Motor Programme (PMP) 53 Physical Education 54 Sport 55 Outdoor Education 55 Personal and Social Learning 56 Positive Education 56 Religious and Values Education 57

Design, Creativity and Technology75 Information and Communications Technology75 Thinking 76 Reasoning, Processing and Inquiry 76 Creativity76 Reflection, Evaluation and Metacognition 76

08

OTHER INFORMATION Assessment and Reporting Learning Support The Journey

79 80 81

06

DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING The Arts 61 Art61 Drama62 Music63 English 64 Literacy64 LOTE 68 Humanities 69 Library69 Mathematics70 Science72

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

2


OUR PHILOSOPHY

01


The philosophy that underpins the School’s understanding of Exceptional Education is manifest in our purpose, spirit, focus, character and beliefs


OUR PURPOSE is to inspire our students and community to flourish and make a positive difference through our unique and transformational education adventures


OUR FOCUS is learning to flourish

OUR SPIRIT

- our rigorous a

- Positive E - our excep - partnerships betw

is making a positive difference

- in

OUR CHARACTER is to be authentic, courageous, dedicated, forgiving, inquiring, loving, optimistic, passionate, resilient and trusting


OUR CHALLENGE is to demonstrate that Positive Education enhances student wellbeing and to lead in establishing wellbeing as an essential component of a thriving educational system

WE BELIEVE

academic programmes create wonder, curiosity and a desire to learn -boarding and co-education provide valuable life skills Education enhances wellbeing and enables individuals to flourish ptional staff bring character and richness to the life of the School ween our parents, staff and students provide the best learning outcomes - in nurturing strong relationships fostering spirituality and celebrating our Anglican tradition - in serving others and building social responsibility - in growing our heritage through innovation


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

OUR SCHOOL Bostock House caters for girls and boys of 3 to 4 years of age in our Early Learning Centre (ELC), and from Prep to Year 4 in our Primary School. Bostock House is very much a child-sized school. Our campus is small – and small class sizes enable staff and students to form close relationships and for every child to receive specialised care. The comprehensive curriculum provides an excellent foundation for all areas of learning and offers each child the opportunity to discover and develop areas of strength as well as providing the fundamental numeracy and literacy skills. Specialist subjects – Music, Art, Drama, Physical Education, Japanese and Library – support our foundation work with numeracy and literacy. Our Early Learning Centre offers a full day programme, underpinned by the teaching of the world-renowned Reggio Emilia philosophy. When you visit the Bostock House office you will meet Anette Arkinstall or Tracey Brown, who are able to assist with a wide range of matters, from book orders to after school programmes. Messages can be left with Anette and Tracey for children and class teachers. Children may also phone their parents from the office when required. If your child is absent from school you should contact the office to notify teaching staff. If you are unable to collect your child promptly at the end of the school day, please ring Anette or Tracey so arrangements can be made for after school care. Our community is a small and caring one. Please do not hesitate to ask for help or clarification of any matters. Our Head of Campus, Daryl Moorfoot, always has his door open to children, parents and staff. Please feel welcome to call in.

9

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

A PROUD HERITAGE The Geelong Church of England Grammar Preparatory School was established in Aberdeen Street, Newtown, in 1924. It was renamed Bostock House in 1933 by then Headmaster of Geelong Grammar School, Dr (later Sir) James Darling, in honour of Thomas E Bostock (1863-1922), who was Mayor of Geelong from 1905 to 1908, founded the Barwon Heads Golf Club in 1907, and joined the Geelong Grammar School Council in 1909, playing a vital role in the School’s relocation to its present site on the edge of Corio Bay in 1914. Likewise, the original Bostock House outgrew its Aberdeen Street location and moved to farming land beyond Highton on the slopes of the Barrabool Hills in 1962, where it shared a site with The Hermitage (Geelong Church of England Girls Grammar School) and Marcus Oldham Farm Management College.

11

It amalgamated with The Hermitage in 1976 and became known as Geelong Grammar School, Highton. Another restructure of the School in 1997 saw the development of a Middle School at Corio for Years 5 to 8, with the Junior School relocated to its current location, a Heritage listed building at 139 Noble Street, and renamed Bostock House. The Edwardian style building was erected in 1916 as a residence for Edward G Gurr, a distinguished local identity and the then Mayor of Geelong. It was sold to William R Redpath of Redpath’s Woollen Mill in the 1920s. It was purchased by two sisters, Edith and Helen Wood, in 1953. The Wood sisters felt the beautiful gardens would provide a peaceful learning environment for children and established St Andrew’s Private School on the site. St Andrew’s was a primary school for up to 120 children from 1954 until 1994. The property was purchased by Geelong Grammar School in 1997 and became Bostock House.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

POSITIVE EDUCATION Geelong Grammar School reinforced its reputation as a pioneer of modern education through the introduction of its revolutionary Positive Education programme in 2009. The School developed Positive Education from the science of Positive Psychology in collaboration with Professor Martin Seligman and his team from the University of Pennsylvania. Positive Education focuses on cultivating positive emotions and character traits, encouraging students to find purpose and lead engaged and meaningful lives. Implicit teaching of Positive Education occurs at each year level, at every campus and across all aspects of school life. Studies over the past 20 years suggest that these explicit Positive Psychology programmes lead students to have increased levels of creativity, better critical thinking skills and increased levels of positive emotion. Positive Education improves wellbeing while equipping students with the skills to manage failure and to build from those life experiences found to be challenging – teaching confidence, resilience and optimism. Under the umbrella of ‘wellbeing’ Bostock House students learn about other significant life skills and concepts, including mindful meditation, the connection between emotional and physical wellbeing, nutrition and fitness. “Geelong Grammar School is the pioneer in the world in taking steps to introduce this type of learning through all aspects of an educational curriculum,” Professor Seligman said. “In doing so, I believe that Geelong Grammar students who go through the programme will be less likely to suffer from depression – which is increasing in epidemic proportions in many western countries, including Australia – and will lead more positive and fulfilling lives.”

13

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

LEARNING TO FLOURISH We want our children to work and live in an environment in which they know that people care about them and respect them. We want them to feel confident that they will be supported, encouraged and prepared to take risks with their learning. We want them to feel a genuine sense of belonging and to develop a positive mindset in all areas of their lives. Positive Education teaches us that all of these things are important for one’s overall physical and mental health and development.

Children who feel that they belong and are valued are happier and more relaxed. They are also more socially aware, have greater emotional intelligence and are more successful learners. Mental health research has shown that children who have a sense of belonging are less likely to suffer mental health problems and are better learners. At Bostock House we endeavour to give our children genuine opportunities to discover and develop their strengths and talents. By incorporating and utilising their strengths in everyday life we believe that they will perform better, enjoy greater life satisfaction, have higher energy levels and feel happier. In short, they will flourish. Daryl Moorfoot Head of Bostock House

15

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

OUR COMMUNITY Our Bostock House school community is built around the Three Rs. Relationships, relationships and relationships. Positive relationships between teachers and children, children and children, teachers and parents, and among staff, form the basis of our Bostock House culture. The culture of a school is the primary characteristic that supports student development and academic learning. At Bostock House we endeavour to create a community in which each individual feels happy, safe, valued and a sense of belonging. We do this by encouraging the values of learning, trust, respect, inclusiveness and a sense of fun. We believe that the Bostock community is an open, friendly and non-judgemental one. Our physical environment makes for a very warm and homely feel; the Heritage listed house at the heart of the campus provides a base for all students and the planning of the play areas means that the children are never far away from the security of their classrooms and teachers.

17

Bostock House is a relatively small campus and this helps us create a close community. In fact people often liken Bostock House to a rural school in town. All of our paths cross each and every day at Bostock House and the constant interaction means that we really do know one another. Daryl Moorfoot Head of Bostock House

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

FRIENDS OF BOSTOCK HOUSE Parents are partners in their child’s education and we are fortunate to enjoy exceptional support from our parent body. The interaction between parents, staff and children before and after school is a delight to behold. We welcome the involvement of family and extended family members at a broad range of special occasions, such as our Easter Service and Christmas Pageant. Our parent support group, the Friends of Bostock House, is an integral part of our community. The committee meets on a monthly basis during the school year, supporting our campus in a variety of ways, through social events, special events and fundraising.

19

Annual events organised by the Friends of Bostock House include a Cocktail Party to welcome the beginning of the school year and our annual Bostock Fair, which is held at our Corio campus in Term 1. These events provide wonderful opportunities for our community to come together in a relaxed, friendly atmosphere, and for parents to meet other parents and staff.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


PREP TO YEAR 4

02


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

LIFE AT BOSTOCK HOUSE ABSENCE If your child is ill or away for the day, please telephone the office to notify the school. Office hours are 8.30am to 4.30pm. ASSEMBLY Assembly is held each Monday afternoon in the Multi-Purpose Room and provides the opportunity for the whole school to meet in order to: - Share important news - Share what we have been doing in our classrooms - Present people with awards or congratulations for things they have done - Celebrate special days (e.g. excursions, Asian studies, etc) - Hear plans for imminent events - Hear performances from other students Parents are most welcome to attend these assemblies. AFTER SCHOOL ACTIVITIES Children are encouraged to participate in after school sports activities, which are held on Tuesday afternoons throughout the school year. Additional after school activities will also be conducted intermittently during the year. Parents will be notified of details via our Campus Newsletter, the Bostock Bulletin. Before and After School Care This service is provided from 8.00am to 8.30am and after school from 3.30 until 6.00pm. Regular bookings can be made at the office. Occasional use is possible and parents should notify the office by 1.30pm on the days when it is required. Children are provided with afternoon tea and activities. Older children can use the time to complete homework if they wish. BOOKLIST Each year parents are issued with a booklist. Please make sure that your child has all of the requirements on the list. BUDDY PROGRAMME Buddy programmes are a wonderful opportunity for children of different ages to mix together and learn from each other. At Bostock House, our buddy programme includes all students from ELC to Year 4 and children are involved in a range of shared activities. By incorporating buddies into our school, we make a positive step towards ensuring a safe and happy playground.

23

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

BUSES Please contact the office at Bostock House for information regarding bus travel to and from Bostock House.

CAMPS AND EXCURSIONS CAMPS Each year level has a special activity that is part of our Outdoor Education and Camps programmes. Children in Prep and Year 1 take part in planned after school activities at school, which includes preparation of the evening meal before going home at 5.30pm or 6.00pm for Prep children. Year 1 children stay to watch a film before being collected by their parents at 8.00pm, or possibly sleeping over. Year 2 children have a more challenging experience with an overnight stay. They leave Bostock House in the morning and spend a day bushwalking in the Geelong area. They are accommodated at our Corio Campus and the following day enjoy an excursion to the beach. Year 3 and 4 children participate in a three-day camp. They take part in many challenging activities, including bushwalking, rope courses, canoeing, and environmental activities. EXCURSIONS Excursions throughout the year are an important part of the school programme and may be undertaken on a class basis, as part of a larger group, or on a whole school basis. As they are considered an integral part of the programme, parents do not incur any extra cost. Excursions may include trips to the Zoo, Planetarium, Scienceworks, rockpools at Barwon Heads, Corio Campus for tree planting, Chapel, Geelong city, or traffic school. Notification may come directly from the class teacher, along with information regarding appropriate clothing and lunch requirements, or via the Bostock Bulletin if it is a whole school excursion. CHAPEL Chapel is held each fortnight at nearby All Saints Anglican Church, Newtown. Our Chaplain from the Corio Campus welcomes the children and leads us through the service. Each class is responsible for preparing a service two or three times a year. The Chaplain then explores the main teachings. The children take a great deal of pride in their presentation and it affords them valuable opportunities to speak in front of their peers. In addition, the format of the services allows them to become familiar with the customs of the Anglican Church, and to take part in some valuable reflection time. Understanding and appreciation of other faiths is promoted both in our studies and in the services. Services are held on alternate Wednesdays and parents and friends are most welcome to attend.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

24


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

Once a term we journey out to Corio to have a service in the School Chapel (also called All Saints) and this is a wonderful opportunity for parents to join us and see the Corio Campus.

OTHER INFORMATION COMMUNITY SERVICE The School supports a variety of causes throughout the year, including the Royal Children’s Hospital Good Friday Appeal, Canteen and Geelong Foodbank A variety of ways of fundraising or collecting goods is employed and though the activities (e.g. dress-up days) are based around fun, the children are made aware of the real purpose of the exercise through volunteer speakers or short videos where appropriate. EASTER AND CHRISTMAS Special services are held to celebrate these events. All children take part and parents and friends are warmly invited to attend to help celebrate these occasions The Christmas Pageant is a delightful experience with Year 4 children traditionally presenting the main part of the Easter service. FIRST AID Bostock House has a well-equipped First Aid Room. All staff have formal training in first aid management. Parents receive written notification of any treatment their child has received. MEDICATION Staff will administer medication, if requested by parents. Parents must complete a Medication Consent Form which is available from the office. LOST PROPERTY The Lost Property basket is located inside at the backdoor of the House. Parents and children are welcome to look for items at any time. PARKING Parking is very closely monitored in Noble Street. Please be aware of all parking signs and bus zones. SCHOOL ACCOUNTS All school fee account enquiries please contact: Accounts Department Geelong Grammar School 50 Biddlecombe Avenue CORIO VIC 3214 t +61 3 5273 9253 25

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


SPECIAL DAYS Throughout the year there may be a number of Special Days including Japanese Day and Book Character Day. On these occasions any food or activities provided are included in the programme. TIMETABLE A copy of your child’s timetable will be in the front of the school diary. TOYS Children are not permitted to bring toys to school. VISITING PERFORMERS Each year a number of performers visit to give performances in dance, music and drama. As the performances are generally selected to complement the programme, there is no extra charge to parents.

TRANSITION ELC – Prep and New Students An orientation programme is conducted during Term 4 for children moving from the Early Learning Centre to Prep and includes new students commencing in Prep. During this period there will also be an information evening for all Prep parents. Dates will be notified at the commencement of Term 4. New students commencing in Years 1 to 4 will also be notified of a planned orientation day and are encouraged to attend. Year 4 – Middle School Students moving from Bostock House to Middle School, Corio, are also involved in a comprehensive orientation programme. They visit the Corio Campus at least three times during Term 4. They meet the Head of Middle School and the Heads of the two Day Houses – Otway and Highton. They also have the opportunity to participate in numerous activities involving class work and sport. The Head of Middle School visits Bostock House to talk to parents during Term 3. Middle School tours are available for parents and students.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

26

SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

SCHOOL CROSSING A crossing supervisor is employed by the City of Greater Geelong to ensure parents and children can cross Noble Street safely.


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

PARENT COMMUNICATION Bostock Bulletin Each week, a newsletter called the Bostock Bulletin is sent home with the eldest child of each Bostock House family and is emailed to parents at the email address provided for school correspondence. The Bulletin contains news of school and class activities, details of future events and other dates for your diary so that you know what is happening at school. It may also contain an article from the Head of Campus or another staff member on a curriculum matter or innovation that is taking place at the school. Parents are encouraged to look for the Bulletin as it may contain important details that you or your children need to know. Student Diary Every child is issued with a school diary. This is the primary way for you as a parent to communicate with the school via the class teacher. Each day, any notices from the school or the class teacher will be inserted into the diary and any homework entered for you to see and sign off. This is also the method by which you can inform the class teacher of anything that concerns your child. This may be a change of arrangement for after school, a dentist or doctor’s appointment or a family event which may affect your child in the next few days. Information Evenings During the course of the year parents may be invited to attend information evenings conducted at the school such as Literacy Evenings and Year Level Information Evenings. Parent Enquiries All enquiries regarding students should be directed to the Bostock House office, tel: 03 5221 7760 Reports At the end of Semester 1 and 2 (Terms 2 and 4) comprehensive written reports are prepared for each student. Parents receive an email from the school advising that reports are available to view online via the School Community Portal. During term, parent teacher interviews provide feedback on children’s progress at home and at school. Parents are welcome to make an appointment with the class teacher at any time during the year. Formal interviews are offered mid-term of Term 1 and at the beginning of Term 3.

27

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


SWIMMING PROGRAMME Early in Term 1 an intensive swimming programme is run for all children from Year 2 to 4. The children are graded according to ability and great emphasis is placed upon stroke development, water safety and building endurance. Parents are encouraged to come and see the progress–often remarkable–that their children have made over the two-week period. Prep and Year one children take part in a swimming programme during Term 4. WHOLE SCHOOL ATHLETICS CARNIVAL On Sunday 16 September the wider Geelong Grammar School community (Bostock House, Toorak Campus, Timbertop and Corio) comes together at our Corio Campus for the School’s annual cross-campus Athletics Carnival. Bostock House joins Toorak Campus for a series of sporting events for children from Prep to Year 4 on the Perry Oval (in front of the Chapel), while students from Toorak Campus (Year 5 and 6), Middle School, Timbertop and Senior School compete in track and field events on the Main Oval. The day begins with a whole school Chapel service, while Timbertop students arrive on Saturday to camp in tents on Biddlecombe Oval. The junior sporting events (Prep to Year 4) conclude by noon and families are welcomed to stay for a picnic lunch and watch the senior athletics. Sports Uniform Sports uniform is to be worn to school on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For uniform details see pages 32 - 33.

SUNSMART POLICY Our Sunsmart Policy has been developed to ensure that all students and staff attending this school are protected from skin damage caused by harmful ultraviolet rays of the sun. Bostock House has a number of strategies in place to ensure that your child’s skin is protected from sun damage whilst at school, and also to ensure that he/she becomes aware of safe practices for out of school hours now and in the future. The wearing of suitable clothing is the first priority and to this end children are required to wear the school hat for outside play in Terms 1 and 4. The hat is required for physical education classes as well as for recess and lunchtime play. Children without a hat will have to remain in shaded areas. Outside shade is provided over some of the fixed play equipment to provide extra protection, and also over areas that are used for eating at lunchtimes. Assemblies are conducted indoors. Positive role modelling is provided by teachers who also wear hats when outside for activities or playground duty. Curriculum components in health also educate children in the need for sun protection. Sunscreen is provided in all classrooms for the children’s use, however it is advisable to apply sunscreen routinely in the morning before your child arrives at school.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

28

SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

SPORT


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT Geelong Grammar School, Bostock House aims to create a harmonious and safe school environment that caters for the needs of all students. Students will be encouraged to take responsibility for their actions and develop self-discipline. The Code of Conduct is based on an agreed set of individual rights and their related responsibilities. In order to try and ensure the students understand their rights and responsibilities, the school teaches the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities both inside and outside the classroom. All students have the right to: • • • • •

Be treated with courtesy, kindness and respect Feel free and confident to express feelings and opinions Work and play in a safe and happy school environment without interference Feel secure in a supportive and caring community Have the expectation that school rules are fair and respect the rights of all members of the school community • Be valued as an individual, free from discrimination regarding race, gender, cultural, physical or intellectual diversity • Learn in a supportive and non-threatening atmosphere In order to enjoy these rights students need to recognise the following responsibilities: • • • • • • • • •

31

Treat other with courtesy, kindness and respect Listen to others with respect Play a role in maintaining a safe and caring environment Contribute to the development of school values and support school rules Accepting responsibility for their own actions Value others, for their individual differences Work to achieve personal best whilst allowing others to do the same Value and care for other people’s possessions Value and care for the school equipment and buildings

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


UNIFORM SHOP The Geelong Grammar School Uniform Shop is situated on the second level of the Handbury Centre for Wellbeing at our Corio Campus and sells all GGS academic and sports uniform, both new and second hand. The GGS Uniform Shop operates as a service to parents to help combat rising costs. Those purchasing clothes from the Shop may pay by cash/cheque, credit card or by debit against their school account. Second hand items of good quality and approved brands will be accepted by the shop on a consignment basis, and if sold, the proceeds will be credited to the student’s account. The School retains a fee of 25%. From this fee the operating costs are deducted and the balance is donated to various areas of the School. A form is available at the Shop for students to complete and include with second hand items submitted for sale. Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 8.30am – 4.30pm Other times by arrangement, tel: 03 5273 9329. When shopping for a student new to the School please allow 45 minutes to one hour to get a complete outfit. Note: All articles of clothing should be named before children wear them to school. Children are not permitted to wear non-uniform items of clothing: jewellery, coloured scarves, coloured hair ribbons or nail polish. ACADEMIC UNIFORM GIRLS Blazer (GGS) Dress (Summer) Kilt (Winter) Jumper Shirts Socks (Summer) Socks (Winter) Tights (Winter) Shoes Tie Hat

Grey/blue trim GGS grey/blue GGS grey/blue Grey/blue stripe GGS blue short sleeve or long sleeve White mid calf Grey/blue stripe (knee high optional) Black (optional) Black lace up (polishable) Blue/grey stripe (optional) GGS blue wide brimmed with crest

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

32

SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

UNIFORM


↓ SECTION 02 — PREP TO YEAR 4

ACADEMIC UNIFORM BOYS Blazer (GGS) Jumper Shirts Trousers Shorts Socks Shoes Tie Hat

Grey/blue trim Grey/blue stripe GGS blue short sleeve or long sleeve Grey poly wool Grey poly wool (optional) Grey/blue stripe, knee high worn with shorts or trousers Black lace up (polishable) Blue/grey stripe (optional) GGS blue wide brimmed with crest

Summer uniform is to be worn Term 1 and Term 4. Hats are compulsory in Term 1 and Term 4 with both academic and sports uniform. Winter uniform is to be worn Term 2 and Term 3. SPORTS UNIFORM GIRLS AND BOYS Microfibre Sport Jacket GGS blue (optional) Microfibre or Fleecy Track Pant GGS blue Rugby Polo (long sleeve) GGS blue with gold and white stripe (optional) Vest Black with GGS crest Shorts Black House Polo (short sleeve) GGS blue with gold collar Socks White sport with gold and blue trim Shoes Sport with non-marking sole mainly white Bathers Speedo one piece (GGS type not required) Sport Bag GGS blue Children are to come to school in Sports Uniform on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Available Extras GGS Pencil case, GGS Backpack, Library Bag (GGS blue)

33

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

03


↓ SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

LEARNING THROUGH PLAY We recognise that children come to us with a wide repertoire of interests, skills and talents. Many opportunities are provided for every child to practise and extend skills across all areas of development – intellectual, physical, language, social and emotional. These are fostered in a child-centred, play-oriented setting that has been very carefully planned for our community of children. Opportunities for learning and play are provided for individual investigations and small and large group cooperative learning. Play is the child’s way of learning – exploration, challenge, enjoyment, experimentation, enquiry, negotiation, observation and fun is therefore the basis of the learning environment.

COLLEGIALITY AND ORGANISATION Staff Geelong Grammar School has a commitment to employ well-qualified and experienced staff. This ensures the provision of highly personalised attention, care and a comprehensive programme that provides an excellent foundation for all areas of learning. Geelong Grammar School also has a commitment to provide adult to child ratios much higher than those required by State regulations. This arrangement ensures the quality of communication and relationships, the highest quality of work and above all the most effective activation of the children’s resources and potentialities. Collegiality The co-presence of staff in the room extends to specialist teachers in Music, Physical Education, Library and Japanese. This collaborative way of working is an intentional and integral part of the educational environment at Bostock House. The Day The ELC is open from 8.00am - 6.00pm Monday to Friday. Before School Care is available from 8.00am - 8.45am in the ELC and After School Care from 3.30pm - 6.00pm in the Art room. The ELC educational programme runs from 8.45am - 3.15pm. Parents can use Before and After School Care on a regular or occasional basis. Please contact the school office for further details. Annual Calendar The ELC follows the Geelong Grammar School Term Calendar – being four terms a year. A number of days before school commences and after school closes are used for teacher professional development, organisation and preparation. THE ENVIRONMENT The ELC is situated on one floor and can be viewed in a single sweep of the eyes from the entrance area. The foyer is an important welcoming area of the ELC and presents 35

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


The indoor area is divided into specific spaces used for different activities where children can work in small or large groups, with or without adults. These spaces are also within easy reach of other spaces giving children the freedom to move between activities easily. The furnishings are child-friendly and are enriched by pieces, objects and play structures designed, provided and sometimes constructed by children, parents or staff. The design is simple, functional and welcoming to reflect the users of the space and not to overwhelm. The ELC pays special attention to the environment and makes careful choices of furnishings and objects, creating its own functional and inviting aesthetic personality. The environment reflects the users of the space who plan, develop and change the environment in a collaborative way, responding to the learning and interests of the ELC community. The environment also encourages and supports challenging inquiry and learning. COLLABORATION Participation has its own implicit aims and values to: • establish and develop bonds of growth • encourage dialogue and knowledge building • reinforce the children’s feelings of trust and security • create a solid and supportive relationship with teachers • share information about your child • share in the life and education of your child Parents are encouraged to spend time at the ELC during their child’s day sharing particular experiences or engaging in an activity. Parents also attend special information and social evenings, some with their children and some specifically for parents only. ELC staff are committed to working with every family to ensure trust, open communication and consistency in approach. Parents are therefore encouraged to ask questions about the programme, their child’s interests and development or any concerns or queries and to share information about their child. Families are an integral part of our ELC and Bostock community and are each unique. Each has needs and desires, interests and beliefs. These are celebrated and respected, giving value to each child and each family. Mutual trust and respect allows open and frequent communication to support children. Other participants enhance the programme with crafts and skills. The Friends of Bostock House is a parent support group with representatives from each year level at Bostock House, including ELC. The committee meets on a monthly basis during the school year, supporting our campus in a variety of ways, through social events, special events and fundraising.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

36

SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

information, daily journals and project books as well as photographs, drawings and documented conversations of the children.


↓ SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

THE PROGRAMME AND PROCESS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT FOCUS ON PROCESS Our educational programme is characterised by a number of important elements. Attention is given to the children’s learning paths and processes, to the way in which children organise their thoughts and actions as they work towards achieving an objective. This ‘journey’ shows us the extent of the children’s repertoire and provides information about how the mind of the child moves and how strategies change along the way. By focusing on the process we are able to observe and interpret children’s skills, understandings, strengths and areas that need further development. The children and staff can also reflect, evaluate and revisit experiences and processes – thus extending the learning. This is a unique experience that looks at the process rather than the product, developing skills that are the foundation for all future learning. DOCUMENTATION Our ELC provides many varied activities that challenge the children’s efforts and skills, and stimulate their interest. Work is documented to make the experiences tangible and is shared with parents and children, visitors to the ELC and the whole school community in a variety of ways. SMALL GROUP WORK This is a way of working that is much-loved by children. It offers rich communicative and relational potential and is a catalyst for skills of negotiation and conflict resolution. It co-ordinates actions, discoveries, feedback, enables points of view to be exchanged and language and symbols to be made. Working in groups broadens the mind and stimulates transformations of thought. It is both work and play. CREATIVITY Experience tells us that the creativity of children, facilitated by their great flexibility of thought and eagerness to explore, emerges from multiple experiences and from the reassurance of freedom to air and explore these. Creativity emerges when the children are able to bring together, in practice, the formation of knowledge and self-expression.

37

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


The Daily Attendance Record Book, located inside the entrance of the Early Learning Centre, must be signed on arrival and departure. Please print the name of the person you have authorised on your child’s enrolment form to collect your child, in the column provided. In accordance with DEECD Regulations and for your child’s protection, she/he is not to leave ELC without this authorisation. If you are unable to collect your child, it is preferable that written notice be given. In the event of an emergency, please contact the School Office on tel: +61 3 5221 7760 or ELC tel: +61 3 5221 6744 Please come inside upon arrival, as staff would like to greet you and your child. Again, when collecting your child we like to farewell both the child and the parent/caregiver. These times are important – it gives the teacher the opportunity to discuss the child’s day, and parents the opportunity to ask questions or pass on relevant information. Please be punctual bringing and collecting your child. In the event that a child is not collected by 3.45pm he/she will be entered into the After School Care programme. The following actions will then be taken: • Parents and/or emergency contacts will be contacted as per the daily attendance record book and individual child’s file, to clarify collection details.These contacts will continue to be telephoned at ten minute intervals until a response is gained. Charges for After School Care (ASC) will apply until the child is collected, as per Bostock House ASC fee schedule. Upon arrival, parents will be required to sign the after school care book and the charges will be added onto the child’s school account. • If a child is not collected by 6.00pm, parent and emergency contacts will again be telephoned. Late care charges will then apply post 6.00pm as per school Fee Schedule. If the ELC hasn’t had any contact from parents/guardian by 7.00pm (School Office tel: +61 3 5221 7760 or ELC tel: +61 3 5221 6744) the ASC staff will contact: a) Head of Campus b) Police for assistance in locating parents c) Police to arrange the child to be dropped off at the Police Station A notice will be displayed on the ELC door notifying the location and phone number for the child. (DHS Children’s Services Regulations 32: Removal of a child in emergency applies in this situation).

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

38

SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES


↓ SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT POLICY Certain guidelines need to be applied in the Early Learning Centre for the safety and wellbeing of all children. No child will be exposed to any form of corporal punishment, embarrassment or intimidation. We believe positive guidance, positive education and restorative justice techniques are more appropriate and beneficial to children. If there is any behaviour that is of concern, parents and staff will discuss this openly in order to help the child. A full policy is available upon request. CHILDCARE REBATE Parents can claim a rebate for any registered care at Bostock House ELC. Please contact your CentreLink office for more information. Childcare Rebate receipts are available upon request from our Accounts Department to present with the required forms at CentreLink. COMMUNICATION Communication between home and ELC is an essential part of our programme. Feedback regarding children’s progress is shared daily with parents and parents are encouraged to follow up any concerns or queries. A time can be arranged to either speak to the Director at the Centre or to visit the family at home. Individual portfolios are an integral part of the ELC programme and communication with families. Throughout the year information is added – samples of each child’s work, photographs, conversations, observations by staff and copies of projects in which each child has participated. Notices and newsletters (Bostock Bulletin, ELC Newsletter) are sent home with the children regularly. Additionally, other important information and reminders are displayed on the parent noticeboard in the ELC foyer. The Head of Bostock House is also available for discussion and/or meetings with parents. Additional information regarding early childhood services and programmes can be obtained from: Officer of the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development: Children’s Services Officer P.O. Box 2086 Geelong Victoria 3220 Tel: +61 3 5225 1000 Fax: +61 3 5215 5499

41

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Bostock House will notify the Secretary of Department of Education and Early Childhood Development within 48 hours of the feedback, complaint or concern being made if it alleges that health, safety or wellbeing of any child at the Early Learning Centre may have been compromised, or there may have been a contravention of the Children’s Services Act (1996) or Children’s Services Regulations (1998). CLOTHING Every effort is made to protect children’s clothing at ELC. Smocks are provided for painting, clay, and other similar activities. However, as it is difficult to stay clean at all times, please dress your child in comfortable clothes that allow for physical activity and messy play. Long dresses are dangerous and are strongly discouraged. To encourage independence, it is important that children wear clothes that they can manage, particularly when they need to go to the toilet. It is expected that all children are toilet trained before starting. Sensible footwear is also very important. Thongs, Crocs and flip flops are not recommended as they make physical activity difficult and dangerous. Velcro fastenings are desirable so that children can manage shoes independently. In line with the School’s Sunsmart policy, hats are to be worn during Terms 1 and 4. A Geelong Grammar School hat is available for purchase; alternatively, please ensure your child has a hat with a wide brim or in a Legionnaire-style. Backless dresses and strappy tops are strongly discouraged as these garments do not protect children from painful sun damage. Sunscreen must be applied before coming to the ELC. Each child needs to bring his/her own named sunscreen/insect repellent – roll on. This is to be kept in your child’s locker in Terms 1 and 4. Children will be supervised and encouraged to reapply their own protection during the day. ENROLMENT PROCEDURES AND ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Prospective parents are most welcome to visit, observe and discuss with us our programme. Application forms are available from the school office; these must be completed and returned along with the application fee and child’s birth certificate in order to activate the enrolment process. (As per the Enrolment Policy) Our ELC provides an educational programme and care for children aged 3 - 5 years. Parents may choose either one or two years at the Early Learning Centre, depending on when they wish their child to commence school. We recommend parents discuss the child’s needs with the Head of Bostock House or the Director of the ELC.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

42

SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

COMPLAINTS Bostock House ELC will deal with and respond to any feedback, complaint or concern as soon as practicable after the feedback, complaint or concern is made, and as discreetly as possible in the individual circumstances. A full policy is available upon request.


↓ SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

FOOD SNACK AND LUNCH In keeping with the ELC Healthy Food Policy and in the interest of general health, development and dental hygiene, we encourage children to eat healthy nutritious foods. We ask parents not to include nuts and nut based foods such as NUTELLA and PEANUT BUTTER in their child’s snack and lunch pack, to mininise the risk to children with allergies. Commercial packaged foods such as chocolate/muesli bars, Twisties, chips, Dunkaroos, sweet drinks, chocolate biscuits, health bars and roll ups are best enjoyed at home as a treat. These foods are not encouraged as snack or lunch foods at the ELC and contain high levels of sugar, fat and salt. Good nutritional habits are essential to maintain sound development, health and wellbeing and for prevention of disease and future illness. Snack and lunch foods may be selected from the following: sandwiches, rolls, raw vegetable fingers, yoghurt, pure fruit products, dips, cheese, crackers, plain/fruit scones, salads, dried fruit and fresh fruit. Choose sandwich fillings such as: - cream cheese, celery and sultanas - tuna and pineapple - egg and shredded lettuce - avocado and shredded chicken Avoid fillings such as: - Strazburg/Devon/salami meats - Nutella - peanut butter - honey - jam - 100 & 1000’s - chocolate sprinkles Food in segmented lunch boxes avoids the need for plastic wrap. Paper towel or waxed lunch wrap is preferable if wrapping is desired. DRINKS Water is always available at the ELC and children are strongly encouraged to drink frequently. Children may bring water-filled drink bottles. Boxed fruit drinks, cordial and flavoured milk are best kept for home use and are not recommended due to high sugar content. Please name all food containers, spoons, drink containers and ice-packs. Ice-packs during the warmer weather keep the food fresh. A separate snack container for snacks, rather

43

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Invite your child to help select and prepare food for these occasions and encourage independent and self-help skills. Ensure that your child has a nutritious breakfast before starting the day – every day. COOKING From time to time we do prepare, cook and taste foods with the children, so it is important for staff to be aware of children with any food intolerance/allergies/religious or cultural factors. These important factors need to be considered for the safety and respect of children. BIRTHDAYS Birthdays are celebrated and enjoyed at the ELC and parents are welcome to stay and enjoy the celebration with their child at snack time. Small patty cakes/muffins/decorated biscuits are easier for the children to manage rather than providing a large cake to be sliced. Please consult with staff about suitable birthday treats as some children may have a food intolerance/allergies. Birthday invitations may be handed directly to parents, posted or left in children’s lockers. Staff are not responsible for distribution and we all need to be sensitive to the feelings of those not invited when invitations are handed out in front of the children.

HEALTH HEALTH AND ATTENDANCE All parents need to complete the health/medical section on the enrolment form. This is to comply with Department of Education and Early Childhood Development – Children’s Services requirements and to keep ELC staff informed of your child’s needs. Please call the ELC or the Bostock House office between 8.00am - 9.00am or leave a message if your child is to be absent. There may be some aspects of your child’s health that should be discussed with the Director. Diagnosed disorders or illness; the taking of medication; allergies; behavioural/ medical concerns or recurring problems need to be discussed and documented. This information is kept confidential and it is invaluable to staff when planning for your child’s programme. Further plans for your child’s and family’s support are available.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

44

SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

than a large amount of lunch included in one container, is preferable.Your child will be encouraged to take excess food home including food that your child does not like to eat. This will help you and your child decide on another choice. To assist your child in managing his/her lunch, a practice picnic lunch before beginning at the ELC will help your child get used to opening containers; deciding which foods to eat first; managing ‘sloppy’ foods and remembering to remain seated whilst eating and drinking.


↓ SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

The Early Learning Centre is not the place for a sick child. If your child seems overtired, has a temperature or is unwell in the night or morning, then she/he is best kept at home. The effect of a day at ELC could be exhausting for a sick child and prolong recovery. Please keep in mind that your child is not the best judge as to whether she/he should be at home or at ELC. It is unfair to the child, as well as other children in the group, if she/he returns before a full recovery. If your child becomes ill while at ELC, every endeavour will be made to contact you to collect your child as soon as possible. In the event that parents cannot be contacted, the person authorised to collect your child from ELC will then be contacted. If your child contracts an infectious disease, please inform the Centre. We are required to follow Department of Education and Early Childhood Development regulations with regard to periods of absence. All parents will be notified of any occurrence of an infectious disease or head lice within the school. In the event of an accident when a child needs emergency medical attention, an ambulance will be called and parents contacted as soon as possible. A child may not attend the ELC unless the child’s parent/guardian has authorised for emergency/medical care and for two people to be nominated to give permission for the above care in the event that we are unable to contact parents. Medication Staff will administer medication if requested by parents. Parents must complete the Medication Consent Form on the day. This consent form is for current medication in its original container with original label including your child’s name, dosage and instructions. Staff will detail administration of the medication for parents to countersign as acknowledgement that the medication has been given as requested. Rest Time Rest time is provided during the afternoon programme to balance the active sessions offered during the day. During this time children are encouraged to rest and relax with soothing music and stories to provide a focus. Younger children may wish to bring a small soft toy to keep with their sleep-bag for rest time. Children are not expected to sleep but many look forward to the opportunity for a short nap. This is a good habit and life skill reflecting mindfulness and enhancing wellbeing. Geelong Grammar School practises Positive Education and rest time is one of the opportunities to develop and practise these skills. Each child will need a sleep-bag. These must be clearly named on the outside of the velcro tab. Lyne Hadfield is happy to sew your child’s sleep-bag. Please contact her on tel: 03 5274 1972 or 0409 593 832 to discuss your needs. You have a copy of the sleep-bag pattern and requirements for you to sew the bag if you wish. 45

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Each child is provided with a regulation mattress. Please speak with ELC staff if you have any concerns.

WHAT TO BRING Sunhat (Wide brim or Legionnaire style). You may wish to leave hat at the ELC. Spare Set Of Clothes All children need to have at least one set of spare clothes, which can be left in their locker in case of accidents, messy play, or change in weather conditions. Please name all items of clothing and footwear. Lunch Please see notes under Food at the Early Learning Centre. School Bag Back Pack (named) Note: Please name all belongings. A copy of the Bostock House ELC Policy and Procedures document is available in the ELC foyer.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

46

SECTION 03 — EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

Alternatively, peruse this option at www.teenyme.com.au.


CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

04


↓ SECTION 04 — CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

EARLY LEARNING CENTRE Our Early Learning Centre offers a carefully planned full day programme that stimulates the children’s enquiry and investigation into the environment and world that surrounds them. Creativity, enthusiasm for learning and a sense of fun and enjoyment is evident in the ELC. Our multi-aged grouping of children aged from three to five years ensures a very supportive and secure environment in which the individually planned programme is stimulating, challenging and encouraging of the children’s skill development. Our philosophy, which has been influenced by staff visits to Reggio Emilia in Italy, underpins a specialist programme that is continually evolving. Bostock House ELC recognises what research has identified to be true, namely the importance of staff and early experiences for children’s short-term cognitive, social, emotional, physical and language development, as well as their long-term success in school and later life. Our Centre also encompasses a spirit of peace, dignity, tolerance, freedom, equality and solidarity as stated in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Young children learn best through first-hand experience and play. The concepts of care and education are inseparable. Play is the medium through which children experiment, explore and investigate their environment. The conclusions and outcomes from these investigations are the children’s learning. It has been noted in research that the earlier a child’s needs are identified and appropriate support provided, the more positive the outcomes for children, families and the community. Learning is hands-on, interactive, interest-based, play-centred and investigative, and develops the inquiring mind. Children are encouraged to explore and engage, to observe and wonder, to challenge and question their world. Our curriculum encompasses all learning areas and focuses on the current interests of the children. Programme plans are designed around the emergent interests and needs of each child and the class as a whole. These are displayed to inform parents and visitors. Investigations are undertaken with small groups of children as they indicate curiosity and interest. These investigations are then documented in various ways for families and friends to share. The curriculum is planned and implemented with the aim of fostering competence in the children and developing the whole child. The programme provides open-ended, hands-on experiences that allow children to progress and develop at their own pace. This is a playbased approach, promoting independent and inquiry-based learning, within a community context. The curriculum is also designed around the developmental areas of emotional, social, cognitive, language and physical skills, embracing Positive Education for positive outcomes.

49

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Prep – Year 4 Curriculum content and delivery is especially important in the early years of education. Each child is unique and is different in development, maturation, personality and ability. We recognise children’s differences and strive to develop in them a love of learning, positive self-esteem and the social skills essential to effective and rewarding participation in a community. Much thought goes into providing an appropriate, interesting, challenging and imaginative curriculum. Underpinning this is a concern for truth, honesty and respect for others, as well as personal qualities such as perseverance and initiative. At Bostock House we establish a firm foundation of knowledge, skills, attitudes and processes necessary for further learning. There is a particular emphasis on literacy and numeracy, as well as introducing key concepts in other learning areas. We aim to build on what children already know and develop skills for life-long learning; promote children’s self-esteem, confidence and independence; promote imaginative and creative processes and develop aesthetic awareness; demonstrate that learning is stimulating and exciting; and provide all children with the knowledge, skills and behaviours to: • • • • • • •

Develop an understanding of their strengths and potential Learn with and from peers, which includes seeking and responding appropriately to feedback Increasingly manage their own learning and growth by monitoring their own learning and setting their own goals Develop skills of goal setting and time and resource management Develop resilience and dispositions which support learning Recognise and enact the learning principles within and beyond the school Develop a sense of morality and ethics within a Christian framework

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

50

SECTION 04 — CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Learning is a never-ending process and our ELC builds on the foundations of a lifelong love of learning. We believe that the quality of the learning and care received by the children at Bostock House ELC is fundamental to their success in later years. By the end of the year, the individually based programme and the children’s participation within the ELC community has ensured that they have gained skills and confidence, and established foundations to assist them for life.


↓ SECTION 04 — CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

This new approach to learning seeks to identify and recognise skills that are essential for success in all facets of life, whether academic, business or social. Personal and social skills (ability to work with others) and interdisiplinary skills (thinking creatively, designing and presenting) are clearly integral to learning in all the disciplines.

THREE INTER-RELATED STRANDS

51

Physical, Personal and Social Learning

Discipline-Based Learning

Interdisciplinary Learning

incorporating Health and Physical Education, Personal/ Interpersonal and Religious and Values Education

incorporating the Arts, English and Languages Other Than English (LOTE), the Humanities, Mathematics and Science

incorporating Design, Creativity and Technology, Information and Communication Technology and Thinking Skills

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

05


↓ SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

PHYSICAL LEARNING HEALTH The aim of teaching Health Education is to develop and nurture resilience, which is the ability to thrive, persevere and maintain a positive attitude and a healthy body. The health programme at Bostock House offers essential knowledge, integrates it and makes connections to real life. Students learn individually how to develop and maintain their own physical wellness and personal development through active involvement. All students are involved in learning experiences that affect the way they think, feel and act in regard to their well-being and that of others. They learn to make choices, problem solve and think critically to promote a better quality of life for all, and make life more satisfying, productive and rewarding. Students are involved in educational programmes in Nutrition – Eat Smart for Heart, Pedestrian and Road Safety, Water Safety, Sun-smart Behaviour, Protective Behaviour, Fitness, Human Development, The Body, Me, My Family and the Community, Personal Hygiene, and programmes run through the Life Education Van. Visiting professionals, performers and excursions complement programmes conducted in the classroom, allowing children to relate knowledge to real life situations. PERCEPTUAL MOTOR PROGRAMME (PMP) PMP is a movement programme for children in the Early Learning Centre to Prep. The programme aims to teach children the Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) through carefully sequenced activities. It is seen as a part of the total physical experience for children and includes floor sessions, games, language development and fine motor sessions. The FMS include: kicking, catching, striking, jumping, bouncing, hopping, skipping, balancing, crawling, bowling and climbing. This programme is preventative rather than curative, teaching the skills correctly from the start and working in a variety of ways to overcome early difficulties so that the child develops the skills to move competently into major games and activities. Children work through a sequence of experiences to develop FMS along with memory training, confidence, problem-solving and language skills.

53

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


During the early years at Bostock House, children are given the opportunity to learn the essential motor skills upon which later learning is dependent. Skills such as throwing, catching, kicking, running, dodging, leaping, jumping, ball bouncing and striking form the building blocks that underpin the learning of more complicated sport and movement skills. Without fundamental skill competence, children are less likely to learn related sport and movement skills. Students participate in two lessons of Physical Education per week. In these lessons specific fundamental skills are introduced and practised using a variety of teaching styles and equipment. Specific components of these skills are taught through individual practice and as they are mastered, children are taught how to apply them and the movement concepts associated with performing them. ELC Children engage in a variety of activities that enhance their gross motor skills, body awareness and control of movement. They also learn about co-operation and participation, as well as positive values and beliefs about physical activity. The children attend specialist PE sessions every week, which also incorporate aspects of the Perceptual Motor Programme. Prep – Year 2 Students at this level undertake a wide variety of physical activities, on their own and with their peers. They learn to move freely in their environment with and without equipment and follow instructions. They practise movements such as running, hopping, jumping, rolling and climbing, and explore the basic fundamental motor skills such as catching, throwing, kicking and striking using simple equipment. Students learn the components of each skill and when they are mastered learn to link them together in one fluent motion to perform a basic movement sequence. These skills are continually developed and incorporated into simple games that require hand/eye or foot/eye coordination. All students are involved in an intensive swimming programme that focuses on skill development and water safety. Years 3 – 4 Students continue to develop movement and fundamental motor skills and begin to use a wider variety of equipment in lessons to develop manipulative skills. They have the opportunity to apply motor skills that demonstrate control of movement patterns in a consistent manner over a range of activities and game situations. Group activities are a core component of the programme and allow children to develop cooperative skills and develop confidence in game situations. Children develop an understanding of rules and the need to adhere to them when playing games. All students are involved in an intensive swimming programme that focuses on skill development and water safety. BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

54

SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The role of Physical Education and Sport in the school curriculum is to help students develop the competencies and values necessary for incorporating regular physical activity into their lives. Through involvement in a structured and sequential physical education programme students can achieve physical and personal benefits.


↓ SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

SPORT At Bostock House, students are given the opportunity to participate in sports, which are modified sports for young children. The programme has been adapted so that it is suitable for children and is safe to play, yet still challenging. Playing sports with appropriately modified equipment and rules enables children to be involved without risk of injury or humiliation. Modified sports enable children to more quickly develop the skills required to play adult sports. No matter how strong or well developed a child, every participant is encouraged to join in and have fun. Modified sport does not do away with competition. Rather, it promotes activities designed to meet the competitive capabilities of the maturing child. Modified sport emphasises fun and enjoyment for children in competitive situations. As their skills improve, children also learn to cope with the stresses of competition. Some of the examples of modified sport which children at Bostock House are involved in include Little Athletics, Auskick (Australian Rules Football), Tee Ball (softball), Kanga Cricket, Minkey (hockey), GoalKick (soccer), Netta (Netball), Oz Ball (basketball), Gym Fun and Mini Volley Ball. OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Outdoor Education Programme provides an opportunity to use the features or characteristics of a particular location to introduce the children to new experiences and to extend those begun in the school environment. The Outdoor Education Programme aims to encourage children to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Be active participants in a wide variety of hands on experiences Develop positive social attitudes and self-confidence Develop a wide range of enquiry skills Develop wider environmental awareness

Prep – Year 1 One late evening at school: The children enjoy a BBQ dinner, a movie and a visit to Adventure Park for fun and games. Year 2 Two-day excursion with sleepover at Corio Campus: The children visit the You Yangs and the beach and enjoy group activities at the Corio Campus. Years 3 – 4 Three-day camp with a wide range of outdoor activities. Camps are at a beach and bush venue. The children take part in a wide range of activities including bushwalking, canoeing, rope initiative courses and environmental activities.

55

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Learners are most successful when they are mindful of themselves as learners and thinkers within a learning community. At Bostock House we seek to provide students with the knowledge, skills and behaviours to be successful learners both at school and throughout their lives. Children need to develop the knowledge and skills to manage their own learning; to understand what it means to learn; who they are as learners; how to go about planning, monitoring and revising; how to reflect upon their learning and that of others; and to determine their own levels of understanding. At Bostock House we support students to initiate, maintain and manage positive social relationships with a range of people in a range of contexts. Students learn about and practise the social conventions that underpin relationships and learn how to act in socially responsible ways. It is through the development of positive social relationships that individuals become linked to society, develop a sense of belonging and learn to live and work with others. We aim to provide children with a range of learning experiences that will: • • • • • •

Develop in students the capacity to work cooperatively as part of a team; Encourage them to present their own ideas and listen to those of others, approach topics from different viewpoints, and understand their specific role and responsibilities in relation to those of others and the overall team goal; Develop their skills and strategies to manage and resolve conflict in a sensible, fair and effective manner; Encourage students to support each other by sharing ideas and materials, offering assistance, giving appropriate feedback and acknowledging individual differences; Support the students to exhibit appropriate behaviour for maintaining friendships; Enable students to recognise and accept that there are consequences for their actions.

POSITIVE EDUCATION Geelong Grammar School’s decision to introduce Positive Psychology in association with our innovative Wellbeing Centre is a move to develop a more positive outlook and environment where all students and staff can flourish, where inspiration is enhanced, and where benefits, indicated by substantial world-wide research, can be achieved. The term Positive Education has been adopted by Geelong Grammar School to describe all facets of its educational initiatives associated with the wellbeing/development of the young placed in its care. Research indicates that the benefits from Positive Education promote engagement, increases learning and improves academic performance. Positive Education also promotes: • • •

Individual and corporate (community) management of health and wellbeing Hope and optimism Creativity, healthy personality development and perspective in life

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

56

SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL LEARNING


↓ SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

• •

Personal and community growth, higher levels of empathy, engagement and greater acceptance of others Problem solving and a sense of enquiry

Primarily, Positive Education improves wellbeing while equipping all with the skills to manage failure, to understand the reasons for failure and to build from life experiences found to be challenging. Through explicit and implicit curriculum development, students will engage in activities that promote the principles of ‘authentic happiness’, the development and use of one’s ‘character strengths’ and the learning of skills to enhance one’s level of ‘resiliency’. Under the umbrella of ‘wellbeing’ students will also learn about other significant life skills and concepts including: mindful meditation, the connection between emotional and physical wellbeing, nutrition and fitness for life and a balanced approach to life in general. Geelong Grammar School has always had a reputation for developing the individual and equipping them to go into the world with confidence, a sense of purpose and a preparedness to make a meaningful contribution in whatever career they decide to engage in. The move by Geelong Grammar School to endorse Positive Education within the education context is based upon a confidence and a hope that we can further develop in students an even more positive and enabling approach to life.  We are also endeavouring to ensure that Geelong Grammar School remains a “positive institution” and one where young people and staff can live and work together with an enabling and quality outlook, based upon hope and a sense of meaningful contribution.  A community based upon kindness to others, respect, forgiveness and goodness. Positive Education is vital to our country’s future, and our own wellbeing.

RELIGIOUS AND VALUES EDUCATION The essential focus of Religious and Values Education (RAVE) is to provide the students with Christian attitudes and values that will allow them to lead full and just lives. The content of Religious and Values Education is integrated into the curriculum so it includes affective, social, spiritual and emotional dimensions. Through a range of stories, discussions and activities the students explore various ideas related to the Anglican faith. Students partake in chapel services fortnightly, led by one of our School chaplains. The key areas of study include:• • •

57

The Bible, Christian Faith, Anglican Tradition Values and Ethics Religions other than Christianity

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Prep – Year 2 At this level, the children focus primarily on themselves, friends and family. Through stories, discussion and activities, students grow in their awareness of self, of others, of the world and of the faith community. They are given the opportunity to pray in both formal and informal settings and participate in chapel services regularly. Classes organise and present the services throughout the year. Years 3 – 4 At this level, the children begin to explore social justice in the local community and in the world. They become more aware of the message of scripture as the basis for living a Christian way of life. They are given opportunities through reflecting on their life, to learn to make appropriate decisions, establish positive patterns of behaviour and respond to moral dilemmas. Students also participate in chapel services and present the service on several occasions throughout the year.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

58

SECTION 05 — PHYSICAL, PERSONAL & SOCIAL LEARNING

ELC Christian values and concepts such as love, honesty, friendship and sharing are incorporated into all aspects of our daily life. These are also explored through discussions relevant to real-life experiences and children are encouraged to articulate their thoughts and feelings and to respect others. Cultural celebrations significant to the children are explored throughout the year. Each term, the ELC children have the opportunity to join the school children in attending church services at All Saints Church.


DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

06


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

THE ARTS The Arts are a fundamental means of expression and communication in all societies. At Bostock House, dance, drama, music and visual arts are offered to all students as part of the curriculum. Students learn ways of experiencing, developing, presenting and understanding ideas, emotions, values and cultural beliefs. They learn to take risks, be imaginative and develop self-confidence Learning activities in the early years provide students with essential understandings and skills to form a foundation for further development in the arts. Students are engaged in both performing and visual arts and experience a broad range of art forms and activities. The focus of the Arts is for students to explore ideas and feelings relevant to them and their understanding of the world. At this stage, imagination and observation skills are combined to plan and create works. Many materials, mediums and spaces are employed for different purposes. Creativity flourishes in an environment where children are open to new experiences and are encouraged to be resourceful and independent. Staff assist children in reaching their full potential by providing materials, equipment, ideas and experiences, and by stimulating and appreciating the creative imaginations of the children. ART The Art programme at Bostock House is based on the understanding that all children have the ability to create something that is, to them, unique and original. Activities in the early years are designed to provide students with the development of skills to allow learning, appreciation and, above all, the enjoyment of expression through Art. Students experience as wide a range as possible of materials and mediums to encourage and facilitate the expression of their individuality. There are eight areas around which these experiences are developed: - Drawing - Painting - Printing - Collage

- Construction - Clay modelling - Threads - Textiles

ELC Art is a valued, daily component of the ELC programme. Dedicated areas inside and outside enable and encourage children to design, explore, create, manipulate, build, experiment, construct and translate their ideas. Art works may be individual or group-based and are celebrated and exhibited in a meaningful way. A variety of activities may be set up for children to work with specific mediums and tools, practising skills and ensuring a range of experiences are offered.

61

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Children experiment with line, texture, colour, pattern and shape. They learn to manipulate a variety of media and tools required for different art forms such as construction, clay modelling, collage, painting and puppet making. They explore art principles such as pattern, repetition and symmetry. They are introduced to a range of art forms and become aware of differences and similarities. Years 3 – 4 In these years children further develop their artistic skills in the areas of drawing, painting, construction, clay modelling and textiles. They experiment with art concepts such as movement and proportion, and basic perspective. There is some emphasis on art appreciation – students are exposed to a variety of artworks to foster a broader appreciation of how people have, over the years, represented their own environments. DRAMA Drama encourages the natural instincts of children to play. Their imaginative thinking is enriched and stimulated through shared activities. They participate in a range of games that develop the skills of negotiation and co-operation, and learn to develop ideas of their own. Children use play as a way of getting to know themselves and of coming to grips with the realities of the world. Through drama they can explore their feelings, lessen their fears, and come to understand the problems of others. ELC As dramatic and fantasy play and pretending feature highly at this stage of development, the children have access to a range of props and materials to utilise in their imaginative play. These may be individual, small group, or shared with others. Dramatisation of favourite stories occurs throughout the year. The children also perform regularly in non-threatening environments – at assemblies, special parent events and the end of year concert. Prep – Year 2 Students participate in dramatic action based on students’ sense of play and familiar experiences. They explore the basic elements of drama, developing an awareness of themselves in space and an ability to control their movements. They are encouraged to be imaginative and flexible in their work and be prepared to take risks. Co-operation and decision-making are encouraged through imaginative play, movement experiences, role-play and mime. Communication between students is an important element of all drama lessons as they share their ideas and observations with their peers. Years 3 – 4 Students participate in a range of dramatic activities that draw on fantasy and reality as well as exploring feelings and issues. They may work as individuals or in groups continuing to develop the use of voice, movement, role-play, improvisation and gesture. They are

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

62

SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

Prep – Year 2


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

encouraged to contribute ideas and participate in decision-making. They develop the skill of working and planning with others to present their ideas and are encouraged to be supportive in their appraisal of others’ work. Communication between students continues to be an important element of all drama lessons as they share their ideas and observations with their peers. MUSIC At Bostock House, we believe it is vital to teach our children to experience music, to appreciate its joys and participate in its creation. Learning to love music and sharing in its wonders begins with the young child. When we learn to listen and appreciate each other, to sing, dance and interact together, we are laying the foundation of joyful musical nurturing, thus helping our children reach their musical potential. The Music Programme at Bostock House is primarily based on the philosophies and pedagogy of Zoltan Kodaly. The main aims of the programme include the development of music literacy (the ability to read and write music) and the fostering of positive attitudes towards involvement in music. Children learn a common repertoire of poems and songs, mostly accompanied by games. The tunes are stored in memory and later retrieved for the learning of particular concepts. Song materials are carefully chosen to form the basis of a sequential programme of conceptual development. Musical learning evolves from a variety of experiences including singing games and dances, singing songs in unison, rounds, canons and in parts, as well as listening and moving to music. All these are the foundation from which musical concepts are drawn and through which musical skills are practised. The approach is developmental and based on teaching, learning and understanding music through the experience of singing. All children participate in three music lessons per week. ELC Music is an important component of our daily programme. Experiences are planned to encourage children to create, listen, compose, sing, dance and share music. In addition to these experiences, the children also attend a specialist music session every week that incorporates the Kodaly Method and Kindermusik programmes. Prep – Year 2 At this level, children develop their music appreciation and the ability to express themselves through creating, singing, playing, movement and listening. Students learn a repertoire of songs and rhymes that enable them to gain an understanding of beat, rhythmic and melodic elements. As musical elements are introduced and practised students learn how to represent them using notation and hand signs. They are encouraged to express themselves, and specific skills are nurtured including vocal and aural development, internalising rhythm and reading and writing skills.

63

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Children continue to develop an understanding of rhythmic and melodic elements of music and apply these when reading, writing and performing music. They are encouraged to use their knowledge to write music to perform to a range of audiences. Aural and vocal skills are extended and children begin to develop skills in two-part singing. Theoretical concepts of music are explored and children gain an appreciation of the instruments of the orchestra. CLASSROOM INSTRUMENTAL PROGRAMME All students in Years 3 and 4 take part in instrumental tuition as part of the classroom music programme. They gain a general appreciation of the violin and cello, and learn to prepare and perform a selection of simple songs as well as working together in a group. INSTRUMENTAL PROGRAMME Students can undertake instruction in a variety of instruments. Specialist instrumental teachers take these lessons, which are an optional extra, usually for 30 minutes per week. All children are encouraged to maintain a regular practice schedule and have the opportunity to perform to a variety of audiences. PERFORMANCE Many opportunities for performance arise during the year: weekly assemblies, concerts each term and the Christmas concerts at the end of the year are regular events. Small groups may perform for local organisations such as nursing homes.

ENGLISH LITERACY Learning about language is important for the personal and social development of every child at Bostock House. Our children must develop the necessary skills to understand and control the English language so that they develop the confidence and competence to meet the demands of the future. The primary purpose of the study of English from ELC to Year 4 is to establish good foundation skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. As in other subject areas, learning is modelled by the teacher, shared with peers and leads to independence. The early childhood years (birth to eight years) are most important for literacy development. Teachers use a balance and combination of teaching styles that include teacher-directed and child-centred work. Individual children’s learning needs are met through the use of various programmes that cater for each learning style. We recognise that children learn through visual, auditory and kinesthetic experiences. Our literacy programme caters for these three facets of learning, as children learn the 70 most commonly used phonograms of the English language. Children are also taught spelling through word lists that may include frequently used words, word families, sound blends and thematic words. The Magic 100 and BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

64

SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

Years 3 – 4


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

200 Word Programmes encourage the skill of automaticity where children read and write frequently used words. ELC Children are immersed in literature through stories, poetry, songs, games, activities, roleplay and more. The ability to process and understand language is encouraged as children engage in meaningful learning experiences through speaking and listening. The joy of reading and storytelling is celebrated daily and play experiences that foster pre-literacy skills build confidence for future learning. Children are encouraged to explore manipulative skills and pre-writing activities to build motor strength. Prep Speaking and Listening Formal and informal discussions and conversations are used to develop speaking and listening skills. Reading Learning to read involves the child being a code breaker, text participant, text user and text analyst. The children begin the year working on the Jolly Phonics Spelling Programme and learning the phonograms on which the English language is based and apply them when decoding words. The child’s reading development is enhanced through exposure to sounds, frequently used words and opportunities to share various text types. With an understanding of the use of the title, illustrations and knowledge of text type they begin to predict meaning. Writing Through constant exposure to modelled print and the development of sound knowledge, children are able to write using various text types. Children will write personal recounts and simple texts about familiar topics. Years 1 – 2 Children’s speaking and listening skills are further developed through a range of formal and informal situations. Reading Children use semantic, syntactic and graphophonic cues to construct meaning from a variety of text types. Take-home books of an appropriate level and interest and a variety of genre, including fiction and non-fiction are borrowed each day, and teachers strongly emphasise the need for wider reading at home with parents. Writing Through constant exposure to modelled print and development of sound knowledge, children are able to write using various text types. They learn to plan, compose, edit and publish texts to convey ideas and information. The conventions of grammar are taught. Years 3 – 4 Speaking and listening skills continue to be developed in these years. It involves the development and demonstration of knowledge about the appropriate oral language for particular audiences and occasions.

67

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Writing By the end of Year 4 our children should write independently, using correct grammar and spelling. They are taught the process of writing from planning to publishing, and taught to write specific text types.

LOTE Japanese Students start to understand and use Japanese in structured situations and activities related to their local environment: self, family, home, classroom and community. They demonstrate comprehension by responding to instructions or by using key words or short phrases. As far as possible, students are immersed in hearing the language, whose meaning is made clear by gestures, dramatisation, singing, doing activities, and viewing tapes. Students also begin to indentify some common elements in the language that differ from, or are similar to, English or other languages they may be familiar with. ELC Specialist Japanese sessions are held weekly and the focus on learning in the ELC is through aural, oral and cultural understanding. The children engage in games, songs and a range of concrete experiences largely conducted in Japanese. Prep – Year 2 Students interact with Japanese in the classroom context, responding to what they hear, see and touch directly. At this level students develop initial literacy skills in English – in Japanese the main focus is on oral interaction, while surrounded by visual stimuli. The focus is on listening and doing, with students interacting with talk in Japanese, playing with sound, repeating single words and simple phrases related to visual stimuli and actions, singing songs, miming and responding to exposure to the language in context. They are made aware that the Japanese script is different to their script and that the Japanese language is used for communication. Years 3 – 4 In Years 3 and 4 the emphasis is still on oral interaction through games, songs and stories. Children develop initial literacy in Japanese and begin to develop specific reading and writing skills. They can recognise familiar words in print provided that there is a prompt. Students also begin to make observations about Japanese culture based on pictures, videos and discussions. Books, traditional toys and objects of art are also used. Year 3 and 4 students operate in the Japanese language in relation to their own experiences. They are able to give a short speech about themselves in Japanese. They can understand basic structures such as commands and questions. They are aware that there are 3 forms of Japanese script and they can distinguish between them. Emphasis is

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

68

SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

Reading By the end of Year 4 our aim is to have children reading fluently, with expression, meaning and understanding. A variety of text types are explored and children are encouraged to read widely for pleasure.


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

on making children aware of the different grammatical structures of other languages and comparing them to English.

HUMANITIES Humanities in Prep to Year 4 involves the study of human societies, people and their cultures in past and present. The Humanities develop in students the key ideas and concepts that enable them to understand the way in which people and societies have organised their world. Overall, students are introduced to basic concepts related to history, geography and economics under a general ‘humanities’ umbrella. Prep Students draw on their own experience to help them understand the world around them. Students begin to learn about the cultures and histories that have contributed to Australian society. They investigate the geography of their local area. Through participating in activities designed to save energy, save water and recycle, they develop their awareness of enviromental issues. Years 1 – 2 Students further develop concepts of time, change and continuity through a study of changes in the local community over time. They recognise the globe as a model representation of Earth and can locate Australia and other places. They investigate the geography of their local area. They are introduced to the concept of resources and their management. Years 3 – 4 Students apply the concepts of time, continuity and change through a study of the history and traditions of Australians. They examine stories, artefacts and other evidence from the past and present to learn about Australian society and its origins. Students investigate human and physical characteristics of Australia and consider features that have changed over time. They learn about settlement patterns, major land uses, communication networks and the location and variety of national parks in Australia. Students begin to visualise and describe locations and directions using simple grids and compass points. They learn to use an atlas and a globe to locate and name the states and territories of Australia. Students learn to distinguish between basic needs and wants, saving and spending and goods and services. They examine and compare different types of work and specific jobs.

69

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


ELC A weekly visit to our library enables the children to borrow stories and books as well as become familiar with the processes involved in utilising a library as an educational, information-rich resource centre. Prep – Year 2 The literature programme at this level endeavours to lay the foundations of our literacy heritage through the enjoyment of fairy stories and folk tales, as well as contemporary favourites. Picture storybooks are enormously important in the early years as they enable children to experience emotions, to develop empathy with others and to develop resilience in dealing with their own emotions. In addition, picture books enable the possibility of discussion and debate, the development of values and formulation of a moral position. Picture storybooks are identified as a literary form and the children are encouraged to verbalise the sequence of events and recognise the main characters. They are also introduced to the different sections of the library and how they are organised. Children are encouraged to select and borrow from the library each week. Years 3 – 4 Children are encouraged to borrow books of an appropriate reading level and are supported in their choice each week. It is important that reading remains enjoyable and not a chore. Short chapter books are often borrowed by class teachers to supplement the ‘take-home’ reading programme. A balance of picture storybooks, chapter books and non-fiction books is encouraged. At this level children are encouraged to verbalise the themes in fiction books and can discuss the sequence of events. They can identify the main character and make predictions about what might happen. Research tasks familiarise the children with library search mechanisms and the children become familiar with the cataloguing system in the non-fiction collection.

MATHEMATICS In the early years of schooling it is vital that students are given the opportunity to develop their grounding in mathematical skills and understandings through a range of nonthreatening learning experiences. At Bostock House, the Mathematics programme aims to provide the students with interactive, investigative and progressive learning experiences, thus enabling all children the opportunity to develop their understandings in a supportive environment. BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

70

SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

LIBRARY The library provides resources for children and teachers across the curriculum. Resources for integrated topics are collected for each class and are available for research in the classroom. In addition, each class visits the library once a week as part of the literature programme. This provides an appreciation of different types of books, the work of selected authors, and develops early research skills.


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

The curriculum is sequential from Prep to Year 4 and is divided into five strands. These are:• Number • Space • Measurement, Chance and Data

• Working mathematically • Structure (Years 3 and 4)

The children experience Modelled, Shared, Guided and Independent teaching approaches as they move from requiring much support to requiring little or no teacher support. The children are provided with suitable concrete materials, which they use to learn and extend new concepts. ELC Numeracy is an interactive and enjoyable experience in the ELC, building on a familiarity with numbers. Children engage in mathematical processes through their play and in ways that are relevant and of interest to them. Within their everyday activities the children are exploring, experimenting and consolidating concepts associated with numbers and simple number patterns, solving problems, estimating, reasoning, counting, analysing, sorting, grouping, ordering, categorising, hypothesising and predicting. Mathematical concepts are also explored through games, songs, stories and rhymes. Prep – Year 2 Space Students identify, describe, classify, manipulate, draw and make shapes and objects with reference to their parts. They learn to distinguish between 2D and 3D shapes, find symmetry in shapes and congruent shapes. They learn to follow and use directional language to draw and read informal maps and use simple grids. Number Students read, write, make and rename numbers to 3 digits showing an understanding of place value. They use skip counting using whole numbers to 100 and can identify, continue and devise whole number patterns. Students use a number of strategies to recall addition and subtraction facts to 20 and use informal written methods based on place value to solve addition and subtraction problems up to two digits. Students verbally express the process of multiplication and division in practical situations and represent these in concrete forms. Measurement, Chance and Data Students select and use informal units to measure and compare the attributes of everyday objects. They use estimation, comparing and reflection when measuring volume, mass, capacity, length and time. Students use calendars and clocks and develop a sequential understanding of the nature of time. They begin to distinguish between possible and impossible, likely and not-likely events. Students represent data using one to one correspondence between data and its representation, and record and interpret information in simple block, column and pictograph format. Working Mathematically Students explore the significance of mathematical ideas in daily life. They learn to communicate and discuss mathematical ideas in everyday and symbolic language and to explore mathematical problems that arise in everyday life. Students pose and solve problems, model and investigate.

71

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


↓

Space Students recognise and describe the orientation of lines and angles. They use conventional language to describe and compare the attributes of 2D and 3D shapes. They are able to draw, make and manipulate shapes, match nets and link spatial features of objects with their functions. Students are able to draw, visualise, follow and give descriptions of locations and paths using directional language. Number Students demonstrate a sound understanding of place value of numbers up to 5 digits when counting, ordering, comparing, estimating and recording, and begin to use common fractions and decimals. They identify, recognise and extend number patterns to solve problems involving the four operations. Students apply their knowledge to solve word and money problems. They continue to practise their automatic recall of multiplication facts and mental strategies for solving equations. Measurement, Chance and Data Students use formal units to measure, order and compare the length, angle, area, volume, capacity and mass attributes of familiar objects and shapes. They make sensible estimates and choose appropriate units when measuring. Students use analogue clocks to tell the time and interpret timetables and calendars. Students use informal language to classify outcomes in terms of their likelihood. They collect, sort and analyse data and work with various graphical methods of recording. They interpret information presented in graphical form from tables and simple graphs. Working Mathematically Students extend their use of known mathematical skills across each of the strands, and increase their ability to use strategies for inquiry to solve everyday mathematical problems. They learn to generate and investigate their own questions and check the reasonableness of their answers. They use brackets when solving simple sequence of operations. They formulate and test conjectures to investigate number; computations; number patterns; measurement and shapes. Students use calculators and computer software to support their mathemactical development. Students construct number collections using counting of composite sets of units. They recognise the importance and meaning of the = sign. They use commutative and associate properties of numbers. They use the distributive property for multiplication. Students clarify and describe angles, polygons and solids according to their properties. Students identify variables and solve missing addend problems.

SCIENCE At Bostock House, we believe that scientific knowledge must be seen as more than the retention of scientific facts. Emphasis should be placed upon knowledge of a more general or universal character, the basic concepts which permeate our investigations and appreciation of scientific knowledge. Our science programme recognises that thinking is a process which can be learned, and opportunities are constantly provided to encourage students to perform such thinking tasks as concept development, interpreting, inferring and generalising. These skills then lead to the risk-taking tasks of prediction and the formulation of hypothesis.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

72

SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

Years 3 – 4


↓ SECTION 06 — DISCIPLINE BASED LEARNING

ELC Children informally investigate the world around them through play, exploration and experimentation integrated into the general programme. Prep Students make use of all their senses to begin making accurate observations to describe their environment. They learn to differentiate between living and non-living things and sort objects according to basic criteria such as shape, size, colour and weight. They practise identifying and describing similarities and differences and are introduced to basic scientific procedures such as collecting, recording, displaying data and making generalisations. There is also emphasis on safety considerations in science lessons. Children are introduced to basic scientific language. Years 1 – 2 Students observe phenomena such as life-cycles, food chains and phases of the moon. They make a series of observations over time and collect data about things like the weather to identify patterns and predictions. Students learn to suggest possible solutions to problems and to suggest forms of observation and measurement that are appropriate for the investigation being undertaken. They are encouraged to ask questions that may lead to an appropriate solution of a given problem. They begin to recognise simple patterns in their findings and in data and to generate conclusions. Students extend their scientific vocabulary and knowledge of scientific method. Years 3 – 4 Students begin to design and conduct experiments in the areas of biological, chemical, earth, environmental, physical and space sciences. They begin to make greater use of the scientific method learning to design a fair test, take variables into account, record accurately and to draw conclusions based on evidence. They begin to use scientific language rather than personal language in science lessons and activities. Students continue to investigate and record changes they observe on a daily basis. They learn to recognise systems and sub-systems, and that systems are made up of interacting parts that work together to produce change. They classify a variety of materials and realise that some materials are more difficult to classify. They investigate how humans affect the survival of living things and the health and welfare of the natural environment. Students relate scientific ideas to their own experiences, interests and concerns. Students continue to develop their scientific vocabulary and understanding of the scientific method.

73

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


INTERDISCIPLINARY BASED LEARNING

07


↓ SECTION 07 — INTERDISCIPLINARY BASED LEARNING

DESIGN, CREATIVITY AND TECHNOLOGY This involves students in the purposeful application of knowledge and experience to create outcomes that meet human needs. Through a process of investigating, designing, producing and evaluating students explore, apply and develop materials, information and systems. Effective technology programmes encourage students to be productive, innovative and enterprising. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY The focus here is on the task to be accomplished rather than on the technology they are using to do the work. Through the selection and application of appropriate equipment, techniques and procedures, children create information products that are meaningful for themselves and their audience. They effectively demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the concepts, issues, relationships and processes that are the subject of the task. Computer software used at Bostock House falls into two categories: • Programs used for drill practice, which allow the student to recall information that they have been taught and answer questions. This software is invaluable in allowing students to consolidate their understanding of concepts in many areas of the curriculum. • Programs designed to develop the students’ research skills. These programs are openended and offer students an exciting visual approach to developing and organising their ideas, understanding concepts and expressing and sharing their thoughts. This software helps students to develop an array of cognitive skills (labelling, matching, sorting, categorising, describing, comparing, brainstorming and concept mapping) applicable right across the curriculum. Students learn to expand upon their ideas and in the process, develop their written communication skills. ELC Students in the ELC develop familiarity with the computer and practise manipulating the mouse to operate age-appropriate programs. Teachers use the digital camera to photograph and record projects and learning. Prep – Year 4 Students now have the opportunity to present their research in many different ways. Techonology allows staff to record special events and presentations for future use. A range of technological implements are used as teaching and learning resources in classrooms. As students progress through year levels their opportunity to use resources increases and they are encouraged to improve their ability to use technology to enhance their learning.

75

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Our world and the world of the future demands that all students are supported to become effective and skillful thinkers. Thinking validates existing knowledge and enables individuals to create new knowledge and to build ideas and make connections between them. It entails reasoning and inquiry, together with processing and evaluating information. It enables the exploration of perceptions and possibilities. It also involves the capacity to plan, monitor and evaluate your own thinking, and refine and transform ideas and beliefs. An explicit focus on thinking and the teaching of thinking skills aims to develop students’ thinking to a qualitatively higher level. Students need to be supported to move beyond the lower-order processes required for creative problem solving, decision making and conceptualising. In addition, they need to develop the capacity for metacognition – the capacity to reflect on and manage their own thinking. This happens when the School and classroom culture values and promotes thinking, and if students are provided with sufficient time to think, reflect and engage in sustained discussion, deliberation and inquiry. Students need challenging tasks that stimulate, encourage and support skillful and effective thinking. Thinking has three dimensions: REASONING, PROCESSING AND INQUIRY This dimension encompasses the knowledge, skills and behaviours required to enable students to inquire into the world around them, and to use critical thinking to analyse and evaluate information they encounter. Students learn to question and assemble information and develop opinions based on informed judgements. They also develop the capacity to transform information into coherent knowledge structures. CREATIVITY The capacity to think creatively is a central component of being able to problem solve and be innovative. In this dimension students learn to seek innovative alternatives and apply their imagination to the generation of possibilities. They learn to take risks with their thinking and make new connections. REFLECTION, EVALUATION AND METACOGNITION Learning is enhanced when individuals develop the capacity to reflect on, and refine their existing ideas and beliefs. In this dimension students learn to reflect on what they know and develop awareness that there is more to know. They learn to question the perspectives of themselves and others. They evaluate the validity of their own and others’ ideas. They also develop their metacognitive skills in planning, monitoring and evaluating their own thinking processes and strategies.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

76

SECTION 07 — INTERDISCIPLINARY BASED LEARNING

THINKING


OTHER INFORMATION

08


↓ SECTION 08 — OTHER INFORMATION

ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING Children in their early years grow and change rapidly, particularly in their social and emotional development. At Bostock House, we understand developmental stages, individual characteristics and the influence of culture of our students. Teachers make decisions about instruction based on the attributes and interests of each group of children. Our recording and assessment procedures aim to give the maximum on-going indication of a child’s progress. Assessing children’s learning occurs every day as teachers observe children and collect samples of their work. A comprehensive approach to assessment enables teachers to make informed decisions about curriculum, plan instruction, and monitor and share children’s progress with families. By assessing children’s abilities teachers can focus on all aspects of a child’s development and the classroom programme responds to the children’s needs, interests and abilities. In addition, a teacher’s purpose for assessing is to establish a firm foundation of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values necessary for further learning. Children are closely monitored by classroom and specialist teachers. By compiling a collection of work samples throughout the year, teachers identify the strengths and weaknesses of each child’s learning. These work samples assist teachers in delivering individual programmes, and may consist of anecdotal records; annotated work; running records; digital photos; checklists and writing samples. Other strategies used to assess children are individual conferencing, group times and whole school appearances, such as assembly and chapel. Standardised testing occurs at intervals throughout the year to monitor students’ progress and provide normed statistics from year to year. These results are kept at the school to build a profile of academic ability. Diagnostic tests may be initiated if concerns arise with particular children. Teachers take the time to learn about each child’s family, establish a structure for ongoing communication and involve families in the assessment process. Communication with parents is encouraged through informal conversations before and after school, the diary, parent/teacher interviews during Term 1 and 3 and student reports at the conclusion of Terms 2 and 4. During the year, children’s work is on display in the school, sent home via bulletins and class newsletters, and available prior to the parent/teacher interview. This communication with parents provides comprehensive information about their children’s progress. We understand that when families are involved, children’s achievements at school are enhanced, teachers obtain critically important support and our school becomes a better place for learning.

79

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL


ELC Our Early Learning Centre acknowledges the individual differences of children, recognising that each child is unique and all children exhibit a wide range of abilities, interests and learning styles. Where support is required for individual children and in consultation with the child’s family, appropriate services are sourced. These support services may include the Department of Human Services, Gateways Support Services or SCOPE Victoria. Prep – Year 4 Students who attend learning support lessons also need to be supported in the classroom. This involves identification of students in need of support, diagnosis of the point of difficulty in the learning experience or development, and the establishment of a class teaching programme. Where necessary an integration aide works with individual children in the classroom to support individual learning plans. The Learning Support Teacher in consultation with the class teacher provides a programme that assists the specific child. This may involve a child being withdrawn from the classroom (individually or in a small group) for short periods of time to target specific areas or the Learning Support Teacher providing assistance in the classroom.

BOSTOCK HOUSE HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

80

SECTION 08 — OTHER INFORMATION

LEARNING SUPPORT


Spread across five specialist campuses, Geelong Grammar School offers a unique educational journey to meet the diverse needs of our students. We believe that learning is life’s greatest adventure and every single step matters.

MIDDLE SCHOOL (YRS 5-8) CORIO Embedded in our 245-hectare site on the edge of Corio Bay, Middle School is a unique learning and living environment that allows students on the edge of adolescence to grow and flourish.

BOSTOCK HOUSE (ELC-YR 4) GEELONG Our heritage-listed campus located in the leafy Geelong suburb of Newtown, Bostock House provides the perfect environment for our students to explore, learn and play.


SENIOR SCHOOL (YRS 10-12) CORIO Australia’s largest co-educational boarding school campus, our Senior School offers the choice of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma for entry into tertiary study.

TIMBERTOP (YR 9) MANSFIELD Our remote Year 9 campus located in the foothills of the Victorian Alps, Timbertop provides students with a transformational year of challenge and adventure.

TOORAK CAMPUS (ELC-YR 6) TOORAK A modern campus in the heart of Melbourne’s inner east, our Toorak Campus provides a positive environment where learning is celebrated and children are encouraged to reach their potential.


www.ggs.vic.edu.au


2014 Bostock House Handbook