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• WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2016 • VOLUME 83 • NO. 33 • 2 SECTIONS

New library director feels right at home

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Time to vote Lively presidential primary April 5, ballot has contests for both parties; last of local candidate profiles inside STORIES PAGE 4

Alleged man behind bomb threat appears in Polk court Quick investigation led to charges, which may go to the federal level PAGE 3

Osceola woman named to UW Board of Regents Lisa Erickson is a student at the University of Wisconsin - River Falls PAGE 2

For the sixth and last time, Seth-David Maack of rural Luck has made his Easter journey, carrying a large wooden cross. Maack uses his venture to raise money for good causes, and this year raised over $2,100, all of it going to the Polk County Mental Health program. The journey he took this year went from Luck Lutheran Church to Bone Lake Lutheran Church, down Hwy. 48, a distance of over five miles. He is seen here on Hwy. 48 carrying the handmade log cross early on Sunday, March 27, arriving in time for the Bone Lake Lutheran Easter service. Maack’s health problems mean this is likely his last cross-carrying venture, but the efforts continue to inspire many, as he was treated to a volley of waves, horn honks and “thumbs-ups” as he dragged the large cross on his Christian journey. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Decades-old child sex assault charges emerge Man faces allegations from the mid-’90s, of same victims PAGE 7

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FIRST READ STATEWIDE - As Tuesday, April 5, draws nearer, candidates for president are flocking to Wisconsin to garner support from voters in the spring primary. Democrats Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton and Republicans Ted Criz, Donald Trump and John Kasich, who remains in the race hoping to map a course to a contested GOP convention, are making appearances mostly in the southern part of the state. Trump supporters and protesters faced off at a Trump rally Tuesday eveing, March 29, in Janesville. Trump took a swipe at Walker for his policies and other things. “You know, he comes in his motorcycle jacket and a big Harley - I love Harleys, right? But the motorcycle guys like Trump,” he said. “They really like Trump. And he doesn’t look like a motorcycle guy to me, I’m sorry.” - with information from Wisconsin Public Radio ••• MADISON - A new study shows electricity rates in Wisconsin are the highest among eight Midwestern states, but residents might not be paying as much as those in neighboring states because they use far less power on average. An analysis by the state Public Service Commission found that 2015 marked the first year that Wisconsin’s rates for residential, commercial and industrial electric customers ranked higher than Michigan and six other Midwestern states. But the analysis also found that monthly residential electric bills in Wisconsin last year were nearly $8 less than the average of all eight Midwestern states. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports that Wisconsin residents are paying less on average because they use 19 percent less electricity each month compared to the Midwest average. - Associated Press | WPR News

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PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

Lisa Erickson named to UW Board of Regents MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker announced on Friday, March 25, the appointment of University of Wisconsin-River Falls student Lisa Erickson to the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents. Erickson will replace Regent Nic Harsy as the nontraditional student on the board whose term ends in May. Erickson is in the Honors Program at UW-River Falls and is pursuing a degree in journalism with a food science minor. She previously owned a private, gourmet catering company called Wild Chow Catering and has also been a blog and television cooking segment host in Osceola. As a mother of four, Erickson writes a food column in the Osceola Sun newspaper and works as a counselor at the Tri-County Life Care Center. “It is wonderful that a student from our campus has been selected to serve in this role,” said Chancellor Dean Van Galen. “It is a tremendous opportunity and responsibility for Lisa, and an honor for which UW-River Falls is very proud.” One of 18 members on the board of regents, Erickson will help establish the policies and rules that govern the UW System, which is made up of 26 campuses and the statewide UW-Extension. The board also plans how best to meet

Lisa Erickson future state needs for collegiate education, sets admission standards, and approves university budgets. “I have been quite impressed with Lisa’s initiative and drive. When I saw the notice for a nontraditional student position opening on the UW System Board of Regents, I immediately thought of Lisa and encouraged her to apply. Obviously, Governor Walker saw that same thing!” said Associate Dean of

the College of Arts and Sciences Tricia Davis. “I am very excited for Lisa and this amazing opportunity and experience that she will have representing UW System students on the board.” The other two new citizen members appointed Friday by the governor are Tracey Klein and Bryan Steil. In his press release, Walker stated, “We look forward to the leadership of Tracey, Bryan, and Lisa and thank them for their willingness to serve in this capacity.” Sixteen of the 18 members of the board of regents are appointed by the Governor, and all serve without pay. Fourteen of the regents are citizens who serve staggered seven-year terms and two UW System students are appointed for two-year terms. One of the two student members must be a nontraditional student, at least 24 years of age and who represents the views of non-traditional students, such as those who are employed or who are parents. The three new appointees are considered regent-designates until a final Senate confirmation. Their appointments are expected to be effective May 1. For more information, email beth. schommer@uwrf.edu.

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OFFICES Frederic • 715-327-4236 P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) Fax - 715-327-4117 (news copy) Fax - 715-327-4870 (ad copy) Siren • 715-349-2560 24154 State Road 35, Siren, WI 54872 (M-W, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. T-F 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) Fax - 715-349-7442

The Burnett County Sheriff's Department is attempting to identify the individuals or vehicle shown in these photos. Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff's department at 715-349-2121. - Photos from Burnett County Sheriff's Dept.

Clayton woman dies in two-vehicle accident POLK COUNTY - A two-vehicle collision Friday morning, March 25, near Clear Lake, claimed the life of Sarah E. Maloney, 65, of Clear Lake. The accident occurred at 10:45 a.m. on CTH P at 60th Avenue. According to a DOT news release Maloney’s vehicle, a 1990 Ford Fiesta, was eastbound on 60th and a 2007 Jeep Liberty driven by Billy K. Hacker, 66, Menomonie, Wis., was northbound on P. Maloney apparently failed to stop at stop sign at P and was struck in the passenger door by Hacker, causing fatal injuries to Maloney. Hacker sustained injuries and was taken to Amery Regional Medical Center for treatment. Polk County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the scene. It is the fourth traffic-related fatality in Polk County this year. - Gary King with information from DOT

A 1990 Ford Fiesta, driven by Sarah E. Maloney, Clear Lake, and a 2007 Jeep Liberty driven by Billy K. Hacker, Menomonie, were involved in an accident Friday morning, March 25 in Polk County that resulted in the death of Maloney. - Photos from Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

St. Croix Falls • 715-483-9008 Box 338, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 (M-W, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. T-F 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) Fax - 715-483-1420

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MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Alleged man behind bomb threat appears in court Quick investigation led to charges, which may go to the federal level Greg Marsten | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The man allegedly behind a bomb threat last week that was directed at Polk County government facilities and employees made an initial court appearance on Monday, March 28, before Judge Jeffery Anderson, who set his bond and commented on the seriousness of the offense. David A. Strenke, 27, Luck, is facing two felony charges from the threats, which occurred on Tuesday, March 22, David Strenke and led to a largescale county building evacuation. Initial details of the bomb threat were somewhat guarded last week, due to the suspect being on the lam. Once the suspect was in custody, Polk County prosecutors filed a criminal complaint late last week, and the Leader reviewed the documents at length, and also followed Strenke’s subsequent initial court appearance on Monday. With the complaint review, research and multiple interviews, the Leader was able to piece together background on the suspect, incident and more, even as the Polk County Sheriff’s Department continues their investigation into the matter.

Background on the threat According to the criminal complaint, an unidentified male called 911 at 1:38 p.m. on Tuesday, March 22, stating he needed the Balsam Lake Police Department, claiming he had planted bombs. “I placed an explosives device in every government office, Probation and the (Polk County) Jail,” the caller stated, demanding the release of a man who is currently in custody at the jail. “If you don’t release (the jailed man) I’ll detonate.” The Leader will not identify that jailed man’s identity, nor the names of others who may have been involved in tracking the suspect down, due to their lack of involvement in the bomb threat. While the initial threats were somewhat vague, they were taken seriously enough that Polk County authorities evacuated the bulk of two county-owned buildings, while also searching for the perpetrator and any possible explosive devices in question. Several county employees noted that

the initial response by authorities included an intense search of both the Polk County Justice Center and the Polk County Government Center, especially in places open to the public. Due to the nature of the threat, investigators moved quickly to find the perpetrator, trying to track the caller with cell phone information, but they were stymied fairly quickly, as the phone used in the threat was a so-called “pay as you go” or “burner” phone, listed with Verizon Wireless, who had no information on the user. Authorities made an emergency request with the phone carrier for all recent records on the number, including recent message and call logs, as well as cell tower locations for those calls, determining that the call originated in the Town of Johnstown in Polk County, northeast of Balsam Lake.

Questions for the referenced man in jail PCSD investigators also questioned the jailed man the unidentified caller had requested be released, and he seemed to have no real idea who the caller might be, nor why the caller sought his release. However, recent call records did tie the man behind the bomb threat to several local individuals, and the jailed man did give some possible connections. Authorities now believe the threats were not made to release the man for positive reasons, but possibly to get the man out of jail for the caller to harm him. The jailed man in question is from Minnesota and has been in custody for several months on several pending felony drug charges, with a jury trial tentatively set for this June, but his connection to the caller is still unclear. While the jailed man’s recollection did not pan out, and in fact did lead to one “dead end,” as a Taylors Falls resident was initially questioned, but had a solid alibi, and police quickly realized he was not the caller. But the complaint does show a timeline of quick and thorough investigative work, using what little information they had, explaining how they were able to apply recent calls from the phone to an extended “circle of acquaintances” of the earlier calls, and by that same evening, they were able to find a woman who was able to identify the caller’s voice as that of David A. Strenke, who had relatives in rural Luck. The phone owner is confirmed Using information from one of the people in that “circle of acquaintances,” police obtained a search warrant and went to that home, where they found his rela-

tives, but not Strenke. The relatives said they had not seen him in over a week, but they did confirm the phone number in question was indeed his. Ironically, Strenke had recently left a “sticky note” on a relative’s refrigerator, stating “David’s back up (phone number),” which was the same cell number. A warrant was issued for Strenke a short time later, and he apparently turned himself into authorities late in the afternoon on Thursday, March 24, although the circumstances of that surrender are unclear. Strenke is now charged with a felony charge of making a bomb threat, as well as another felony charge of attempted escape - party to a crime, in reference to trying to have the aforementioned prisoner released. If convicted on both counts, Strenke faces up to six and-a-half-years in prison, with up to/or including a $15,000 fine.

The suspect appears in court Strenke made an initial appearance in circuit court on Monday, March 28, before Judge Anderson, who was one of those that had been evacuated the previous Tuesday. “This was a serious offense,” Anderson stated flatly to Strenke with a sigh. “It caused us to have this building and another building shut down.” Strenke made several incoherent comments before Anderson cut him off and noted how the local charges may be just the beginning, how they may go to another level, due to the fact that government employees and offices were threatened. “The FBI has been contacted, and it may lead to federal charges,” Anderson added. Strenke is being represented by a public defender, and while there was little testimony at the initial hearing, some of the case facts were revealed, as the judge mentioned that police may seek a voice analyst for review of the 911 tape, as well as how they are apparently looking over his cell phone for additional evidence, under a search warrant. “Considering the world we live in,” Anderson. “I’m setting bond at $10,000 cash.” His next court appearance is slated for an April 6 preliminary hearing, where the state is expected to lay out some of the same details revealed in the criminal complaint, and any subsequent evidentiary findings to convince the judge to bind him over for trial. Strenke remains in custody at press time.

comment by press time, FBI officials are apparently considering their own pursuit of charges in the case, triggered by the fact that some of those affected were federal employees, which gives the US Attorney’s Office possible cause for pursuing even more serious charges under the umbrella of so-called “domestic terrorism,” which includes potential threats against federal buildings, employees or transportation systems, such as aircraft or trains. While the Leader could find no set penalty or sentencing recommendations for such a conviction, typical penalties can reportedly vary between five and 10 years of federal prison time, with up to $50,000 in fines, plus potential restitution for costs of the local and federal investigation, as well as any subsequent reimbursement for things like lost man-hours or business. “It (the case) has been kicked over to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, through the FBI, and I believe they are considering that possibility (of charges),” PCSD Capt. Steve Smith confirmed, adding that if the U.S. Attorney’s Office does pursue such charges, local allegations would likely take a second chair to any federal prosecution. “We are still doing some investigative work,” Capt. Smith added.

His history Public court records indicate Strenke does have a notable local criminal history, including what was originally a 13-count indictment in 2005 on burglary and theft in Polk County that originally included seven felony charges. That case was reduced down to one felony burglary conviction in a 2008 plea agreement, for which Strenke was sentenced to a year in jail, with work release privileges. Strenke was also convicted of possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia in 2007, which led to a simple fine. He was also charged with misdemeanor resisting arrest in 2009, resulting in a 30day jail sentence. Strenke also faced misdemeanor battery - domestic abuse, bail jumping and disorderly conduct charges in 2011, which resulted in a deferred judgment of conviction and one year of probation. While the background on a certain incident or confrontation was unclear, he was convicted of resisting arrest in Barron County in 2014, which resulted in a him paying a fine. He also has several various traffic citations over the years, most recently just a few weeks ago in Centuria, for driving on a suspended license.

Federal charges possible While they could not be reached for

Woman flees courtroom to escape jail She missed previous sentencing hearing, but now faces potentially stiffer sentence Greg Marsten | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE – A Hudson woman who missed her sentencing hearing last week on a felony drug possession charge did make a court appearance several days later, but when the judge chastised her nonappearance, with no real excuse, he said she would be going to jail, which led her to leave the courtroom and not come back. Camrie Brooks, 22, Hudson, was originally charged with a felony charge of intent to distribute methamphetamine a year ago, which meant she faced up to 40 years in prison, as well as a $100,000 fine or both. According to the criminal complaint filed by the Polk County District Attorney’s Office, the charges came about after she was arrested in a high-scale drug investigation that focused on her then boyfriend and another man, who were under surveillance by a variety of state and federal authorities for allegedly dealing

meth. After being followed from an apparent drug buy, the trio were stopped in their car just south of Balsam Lake on March 30, 2015, and police found over 13 ounces of Camrie Brooks meth, drug paraphernalia, a large amount of cash, digital scales and a loaded 9-mm handgun, as well as a .22 caliber pistol in the trunk. The driver implicated Brooks as being part of a plan to distribute the meth, but she denied knowing about much of the allegations, and later those high-level charges against Brooks were amended down to her being charged with felony possession of meth, as well as a lesser charge of drug paraphernalia possession - as party to a crime. Those lesser charges in the plea deal meant she still faced up to 3.5 years in prison with a $10,000 fine or both, as the possession - PTAC charge was dismissed. She pleaded guilty to felony meth possession on Jan. 27, and was set to be

“I can’t run away, I’m wearing high heels!” - Camrie Brooks, who ran away sentenced by Judge Jeffery Anderson on Thursday, March 24, which she missed. Brooks had until last Monday, March 28, to appear and not have a warrant issued for her arrest. She did appear in Anderson’s court on Monday, but her lawyer was not available at the time. The judge was not pleased with Brooks’ previous nonappearance and lack of calling to explain, and as she broke down and told him that she had car problems and couldn’t get to Balsam Lake, he told her her she would be going to jail while the issue was sorted out. Brooks broke down again, then said she had to inform her friends that would not be needing a ride. He initially refused to let her leave the courtroom gallery. “The last time I let someone do that (leave the court to inform someone of her pending incarceration) she ran out the exit and out across the highway, nearly getting hit by a car,” Anderson said. “So no, you cannot leave.”

Ne ws tip? C ontac t us at ne ws@l e ad erne wsro om.c om

Brooks continued her pleas, claiming she couldn’t flee, because of her style of dress and footwear. “I can’t run away, I’m wearing high heels!” Brooks said over her tears. In spite of his initial reservations, Anderson let her leave the courtroom to inform her friends of her new situation. As a jailer was called to book her on the missed appearance, Brooks left and did not come back. The jailer could not find her and she was gone from the campus property, which left the judge and prosecutor to immediately issue a “body-only” warrant for her recapture. Brooks now faces additional charges when found, on top of her original, yetto-be-imposed plea bargain sentence for meth possession, which may now be voided with her fleeing. At press time, Brooks had yet to be found, and a nationwide warrant has been issued for her arrest.


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

State Supreme Court contest on Tuesday ballot

Statewide election only judicial race

Gregg Westigard | Staff writer BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES – Voters will choose between Rebecca Bradley and Joanne Kloppenburg in the contest for justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court next Tuesday, April 5. That race and the presidential primary are the only contested elections on all the Burnett and Polk counties ballots. The two are running for the seat for-

Still no candidates for St. Croix Falls School Board, Siren Village Board Gregg Westigard | Staff writer BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES – There are still no candidates for two of the three area contests with blank spots on the ballots next Tuesday, April 5. St. Croix Falls School District is short a candidate for one of the open seats and the village of Siren needs another candidate for its village board. A candidate did come forward for

Ballot has contests for both parties Gregg Westigard | Staff writer WASHBURN/BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES – The eyes of the nation will be on Wisconsin next Tuesday, April 5, when the state holds a presidential primary. There are active races for the

merly held by Patrick Crooks. Crooks had announced that he would not run for another term on the court where he had served since 1996. He died last fall while still serving and Gov. Scott Walker appointed Bradley to fill the vacant seat. Bradley was already a candidate for the position and is now running as the incumbent. Information on the two candidates can be found on the website of the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance. Go to wistax.org and look for the link In their Own Words on the home page. There is also a link to this information of the Leader website.

Other judicial contests There are five other judicial contests this April and in all cases the candidates are running unopposed. In the only areawide contest, Thomas Hruz is seeking a full term on the Court of Appeals for District 3. He was appointed to the position in 2014. Five area municipalities have municipal courts and four of those courts elect their judges this April. Three of those judges are running unopposed for re-election. They are Brian Sears for the Webster court, David Danielson for the St. Croix Falls court, and Dennis Zemke for the

The write-in watch

a blank spot on the Luck School Board ballot. The St. Croix Falls School Board has two seats open this year. Incumbent Steven Bont is seeking re-election while Sheri Norgard is not running again. No one filed for that second position during the December filing period, and no candidate has entered the contest during the following three months. Two candidates were nominated for three open seats in January at the Siren Village Caucus. Incumbents David G. Doty Sr. and Rudolf Mothes are back on the ballot. Phyllis Kopecky is not seeking another term, and no new candidate came

forward at the caucus or during the following months. Any late write-in registrations learned of will be posted on the Leader website between now and April 5. Luck School District did get a registered write-in candidate for its open ballot spot. Former Superintendent Rick Palmer is running for the spot to replace the retiring LeRoy Buck. Kurt Stonesifer is on the ballot for the second seat. There is actually another write-in candidate this year. Sam Owens is running for the Milltown Village Council in a contest where three incumbents, Larry Kuske, Les Sloper and Joe Castellano,

court that serves Turtle Lake. Chelsea Whitley is running for the municipal court bench that serves the city of Amery and the village and town of Clear Lake. She would replace Jerome Wittstock who is retiring after serving many years. The fifth area municipal court serves the villages of Osceola and Dresser. Priscilla Dorn Cutler was re-elected to that position in 2015. Municipal judges are elected to four-year terms.

were renominated at the caucus. All write-in votes are counted, but election laws say that write-in candidates should register as soon as they decide to seek an office. Registering as a write-in lets the public know that someone is interested in a position and would accept an office if elected. It also lets the election clerks know what names to watch for while counting ballots. Registering is done by filing a campaign registration statement, GAB-1, with the clerk of the election for the office being sought.

Lively presidential primary April 5 nomination in both the Republican and Democratic parties and all the front-runners will be on the ballots. But those ballots will include many more choices, three names on the Democratic side and the names of 12 Republicans. Ted Cruz, John Kasich and Donald Trump are on the Republican ballot along with Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Carly Fiorina, Jim Gilmore, Mike Huck-

abee, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio and Rick Santorum. Martin O’Malley joins Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on the Democratic side. In addition, voters can select an uninstructed delegation for each party. The 15 names on the ballot were selected in January by the leaders of each party in the state following the Wisconsin Ballot Access Rules of the Government Accountability Board. That leadership

group includes the chairs of each state party, a female and male national committee person, and the party leaders in the state Senate and Assembly, five people for each party. They determine “which people are generally … recognized by the news media … as candidates.” The 15 were still active candidates, in their opinions, on Jan. 5.

Four running for Grantsburg Village Board Gregg Westigard | Staff writer GRANTSBURG – Four candidates were nominated at the caucus in January for the three open trustee spots on the Grantsburg village board. Gregory Peer was first elected in 2012 and is completing his second term. Rayna Surdey was first elected in 2014. Scott DeRocker was appointed to fill a vacancy in August 2014 and is running for his first full term. John Dickinsen is on the ballot for the first time. The candidates were asked two questions, what is your vision for the village and what do you see as major village issues for the next two years and what are your thoughts on those issues. They were also asked to submit a brief profile. Greg Peer My name is Greg Peer and I am seeking a third term on the Grantsburg Village Board as a trustee. I have lived in Grantsburg most of my life, graduated from high school here and have been very active in Grantsburg community events. I currently serve on the board of directors of the Grantsburg Rotary Club, Grace Church and Whitetails Unlimited. For the past 13 years I have owned and managed Shady Knoll Home, an assisted living facility for the elderly and developmentally disabled clients. My hobbies include fishing, hunting, singing and viewing wildlife. The village long-range comprehensive plan, combined with the Grantsburg Revitalization Organization has given our Grantsburg community some fantastic ideas of what we can be as we move forward. Grantsburg has Memory Lake in the center of our community and we will develop and utilize it to attract tourists and wildlife. Modern technology has changed the way people communicate, shop, work and access information. It will be my goal in the next two years, as your elected trustee to have the Village of Grantsburg update and utilize these technology resources to become accessible, interactive, and available for our residents. I would

APRIL 5 ELECTION PROFILES

Grantsburg Village Board review, modify and codify all the existing village ordinances and make them online available. I will also strive to enforce these ordinances to make our village a cleaner, safer and more desirable place to live. Grantsburg is a truly blessed community and our village has a dedicated and professional group of leaders serving our population. I would be honored with God’s grace to continue serving with them as your village trustee.

Scott DeRocker I have lived within the city limits of Grantsburg for about 28 years, in the village for the last six years . I have two sons that have attended Grantsburg Schools, my oldest graduated in 2009 and my youngest will graduate this May. I feel our small town is a wonderful place to raise a family and would like to participate in continuing Grantsburg’s success. I have with the help of others put together a snowshoeing trail system on the village property down by Memory Lake Campground, for families to come and have fun in the winter. We have held two snowshoeing events with the last collecting donations for the Grantsburg eighthgrade trip to Washington, D.C. I have with the help of others organized and held two motorcycle runs for cancer. I am a member of our American Legion and have participated in fundraisers through it. My family and friends have helped and hosted the tractor show on Main Street for Big Gust Days for 10-plus years. I have hosted and participated over the years in the tractor run for cancer. I did help with watercross many years before and while my son was in the hockey program. I am a Wisconsin Conservation Congress delegate and alternate chairman for County Deer Advisory Council, I care a lot about our natural resources. I am hoping you give me the oppor-

The four candidates for the Grantsburg Village Board (L to R) are Greg Peer, Rayna Surdey, John Dickinsen and Scott DeRocker. - Photo by Gregg Westigard tunity to continue serving on the village board, striving to do what is best for Grantsburg and its residents.

John Dickinsen We have an incredible community and I am running to ensure Grantsburg continues to be a wonderful place for families to live, work, play and raise their children. The only way to do this is making wise and fiscally responsible decisions. We need to create a balance to maximize the draws, such as our natural beauty, businesses and amenities (pool, library, etc.) that we have for new families to move here in order to keep Grantsburg strong. Grantsburg is wonderful because of the people living here and I will listen to those amazing people to maximize the potential of our great village and continue our heritage of hard work, faith and family values. There are always issues that small towns face. In Grantsburg, I believe the most important area is to ensure we are fiscally responsible so we can continue being the great place we have to live, work and play. I believe we need to make wise decisions regarding the village property along the river. At this stage, there

are many possibilities and we need to research and ensure the decision that is made will balance the needs of our community members and businesses. While we cannot take forever making these decisions, we need to take our time to make the right decision. I am honored to be running for the position of village trustee to represent and serve the residents of Grantsburg that I have lived beside for the last six years. I work at the School District of Grantsburg where I am a fifth-grade teacher and coach. I love living in town with my wife, Alycia, and two children, Charlotte and Wade. We consider ourselves lucky to live where others come to vacation. Our hobbies include hunting, fishing, sports and anything that gets us into the great outdoors. With warmer weather, you will find our family out walking and running through town.

Rayna Surdey No information was received from Rayna Surdey by press time. We will post her responses on the Leader website if we receive them prior to the election.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Four candidates seek three vacant seats Greg Marsten | Staff writer DRESSER – Four candidates are vying for three seats on the Dresser Village Board. Three of those seeking seats are incumbents: Cathy Frandsen, Darron Nelson and Elina Kuusisto. Also running for a trustee seat is challenger Jeff Gutzmer. Cathy Frandsen (Incumbent) Why are you running for office? “I was appointed to the village board in July 2015 after a board member resigned. I have learned much about the village and its operations during this short time. I want to continue to serve my community and help improve it for the future. As a parent, I feel I can represent the interests of families in the village of Dresser.” What issues do you feel are most important at this time for the village? “A big issue in Dresser is the aging infrastructure and the funding necessary to improve it. We need to find affordable ways to address it and improve it without making it a burden on our budget and taxpayers. Dresser also has an aging village office and lack of space in the village library. My long-term goal is to see a new combined space to address both of these issues. Lastly, I feel it is important for Dresser to be a family-oriented community where adults will want to live and raise their children. Our youth are the future of our village.” What kind of experience do you have in public service? “Despite never having held an elected office before, I grew up in 4-H and spent many hours doing volunteer work in my community. I attended both 4-H State Congress in Madison and Citizenship Washington Focus in Washington, D.C., programs designed to teach youth how to be strong civic leaders. Service to others is something that is very important to me.” Any work or school information, background or other things you think voters should know about you? “I graduated from Osceola High School. My husband, Darin, and I bought our house in 2004. We have two (young) daughters. I have a degree in business administration focusing on finance. I am a remote employee of Jack Henry and

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Dresser Village Board Associates, an S&P 400 company, where I provide technical support to small and midsize banks across the United States and the Caribbean. I am the secretary in my church women’s group and am a member of the Dresser Village Library book club. I am also a founding board member and the treasurer for the Northern Stock Horse Organization. I enjoy spending time with my family and am interested in photography.” Any other comments you would like to share? “I am thankful for the opportunity that I have had to serve the village of Dresser and I am looking forward to the possibility of further service going forward.”

Darron Nelson (Incumbent) Nelson has been a village trustee since 2010, and is seeking his fourth term. He did not respond to our questionnaire by press time, but has said in the past that he wants to continue to serve the village residents as best as he can, and considers road maintenance a prime board issue and responsibility, as well as air and water quality. Nelson is a sales associate at a local auto dealership, and is married with three children. Elina Kuusisto (Incumbent) Why are you running for office again? “I first ran for the position of village trustee because I knew there was a need and I knew that I had the head and the heart for it. Two years later, I look forward to continuing to serve my community with my increased knowledge and experience. I made Dresser my home eight years ago because I resonated with its spirit and charm and I’m proud to be a leader here.” What issues do you feel are most important at this time for the village? “It is of the utmost importance to me to approach each issue individually with Dresser’s best current and future interest in mind. It will be important to balance

Cathy Frandsen

Darron Nelson

residential and commercial growth with environmental health in coming years.” What kind of experience do you have in public service? “I’ve held leadership positions in community and charitable organizations since childhood and I’ve been a village trustee since 2014.” Any work or school information, background or other things you think voters should know about you? “I’ve lived in Dresser for over eight years. I’m an animal and nature lover with experience in leadership organizations. I studied natural resource science at the University of Minnesota and have worked in the public sector in Minnesota for 15 years ... and you may recognize me from my part-time job at “The Little Store” here in Dresser.”

Jeff Gutzmer (Challenger) Why are you running for office? “I decide to run for office to get involved with the community I live in,” Gutzmer has said previously. “The rich history of Dresser needs to be brought back to attention and growth is needed to sustain our individuality.” What issues do you feel are most important at this time for the village? “The biggest issues we face, like every other community, is revenue,” said previously. “We need to fill our empty buildings, our empty homes and fill our vacant lots. Dresser has wonderful, successful businesses, but we can do better by attracting more commerce, which will bolster and improve upon what we currently have. This will also lead to keeping property taxes and other utilities under

Elina Kuusisto

Jeff Gutzmer

control.” Gutzmer has stated that he wants to “improve what we have and utilize ... the resources that are available. “Dresser, like many other cities and villages, is a bedroom community. We need local jobs, local opportunity and a solid foundation to pass on to the next generations. I want to give the government back to the residents. Everyone needs to be invested in their community and they need the opportunity to speak and be heard.” What kind of experience do you have in public service? Gutzmer has not served in public office prior, but did run for president of the Dresser Village Board in 2015. Any work or school information, background or other things you think voters should know about you? “I was born in Dresser and grew up here until age 10. I moved back to Dresser in 2009 with my three daughters, to the same (now developed) field I played in with my cousins, after living in St. Croix Falls and serving on the fire department and St. Croix Valley EMS for about 18 years. My mother’s family is from Dresser and her childhood home is still occupied by family,” he said. Gutzmer has served in a variety of positions with the Minnesota Department of Corrections for 25 years, working as a corrections officer, safety officer, safety administrator and currently as a lieutenant and watch commander. “I have specialized training in incident management, investigations and emergency response, working closely with Homeland Security and FEMA,” he stated.

Only one contested race in Burnett County

A farmer is challenging the county’s most experienced supervisor in Tuesday’s election

E. Royal Emerson | Staff writer BURNETT COUNTY - Burnett County Supervisory District 17 is located at the extreme southeastern section of the county and comprises the Towns of Dewey and Roosevelt. CTH H runs through the heart of the district and is also a central theme of the campaign of Duane Johnson, a farmer who is challenging the county’s most experienced supervisor, Phil Lindeman. “I’m running for Burnett County District 17 supervisor because I feel the folks in the district have not been heard of for a while. All you have to do is drive up and down CTH H. It’s as rough as a corncob,” Johnson said. Johnson is a 1981 graduate from Shell Lake High School. He earned an associate degree in agricultural finance from the University of Minnesota - Crookston. After working for a spell in the Minnesota state Senate, he returned to his family

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Supervisory District 17 farm. Johnson is a third-generation farmer who farms 550 acres on CTH H. He raises beef cattle and cash crops. For the past 15 years, Johnson has served as Farm Services Agency representative on the Burnett County Land and Water Conservation Committee. He also serves as a supervisor for the Dewey Town Board. In his spare time, he likes to hunt, fish and snowmobile. He also volunteers at the Cumberland Hospital. Johnson feels that deteriorating infrastructure and providing elderly services are the most pressing concerns. “We must apply common sense to these problems and try to get the most bang for our buck,” Johnson said. “I plan to accomplish this using a farmer’s point of view.” “I’m not afraid to say what I think, or to ruffle a few feathers. I want to provide the residents of District 17 with a strong voice in Burnett County matters,” Johnson said. “Our current county board member has served on the board for more than 20 years. It’s time for a little fresh blood.”

Duane Johnson Phil Lindeman Lindeman is the longest-serving supervisor on the county board, having represented District 17 for the past 22 years. Lindeman was born and raised in Burnett County. Prior to serving on the county board, Lindeman was an agricultural and shop instructor at Shell Lake High School for 24 years. He and his wife also operate Lindy’s Berries, a successful strawberry and raspberry farm in operation since 1978. Lindeman feels there are five priority issues for Burnett County: Maintaining a strong agricultural base; land-use-planning concerns including shoreland issues; providing critical services for elderly residents and fixing county roads while keeping the tax rate affordable; business and

tourism development; and effective law enforcement. “We have a large agricultural base in Burnett County,” Lindeman said. “And while it has consolidated into larger operations, it is still an important base for our county.” Lindeman understands that improving infrastructure is critical to business, agriculture and tourism. CTH H is scheduled for a major resurfacing next year. Lindeman has also taken the lead in securing a recreational sheriff’s deputy for the county’s ATV trails and lakes, not just for law enforcement, but also to serve as a sort of ambassador to the many lake association and ATV and snowmobile clubs. Lindeman serves on the influential health and community services and land use and information committees. He is also the county representative on the Indianhead Community Action Agency and Impact Seven. “I feel like I’m pridefully the best qualified candidate,” Lindeman said. “I’ve had the opportunity to serve on most of the committees. I have tried to serve the district well, and I hope I can continue to serve on the county board.”

New rights for victims under Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Law

STEVENS POINT – Attorney General Brad Schimel released the following statement on Thursday, March 24, in response to Gov. Walker signing Assembly Bill 808, the Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Law. “Crime victims should never be afraid to come forward and under the Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Bill signed into law today by Gov. Walker, another barrier to reporting has been broken down for victims of sexual assault. “Instead of worrying about receiving

an underage drinking citation, a sexual assault victim can focus on deciding whether or not to report to law enforcement and seek medical help. “This is a commonsense change to our law that has received the support of law enforcement, campus administrators and nonprofit organizations. Rep. Joan Ballweg and Sen. Jerry Petrowski deserve our praise for leading on the Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Bill this session.” The Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty

Law prevents law enforcement from issuing a citation to an underage victim of sexual assault when he or she seeks the assistance of emergency medical personnel. This law also applies to a person who is present with the crime victim at the time of or immediately following the alleged assault. Schimel has been fighting for crime victims since the start of his prosecutorial career 26 years ago. He was recognized by the Wisconsin Association of Victim

and Witness Professionals as Wisconsin Professional of the Year for his work on behalf of survivors of sexual assault. Currently, Schimel leads Wisconsin’s Sexual Assault Response Team, which recently finished creating a rape kit test protocol and is now coordinating campus sexual-assault efforts in conjunction with a multidisciplinary team of law enforcement, education, victim witness, and legal professionals. – from the office of the state attorney general


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

SCF School Board faces a write-in dilemma

Dr. Steve Bont seeks re-election, but other vacant seat means write-ins are encouraged

Greg Marsten | Staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A unique situation has emerged in the April 5 election to fill two seats with three-year terms on the St. Croix Falls Board of Education. While incumbent board member Dr. Steven Bont is seeking a return to his seat, the now-vacant board seat previously held by Sheri Norgard is essentially unclaimed, as she announced her noncandidacy months ago, but no one else has emerged to fill that vacancy. “If we can’t find someone to run, things must be moving too smoothly,” Bont joked at the most recent meeting. While Bont may have been joking, that “smooth sailing” may very well be part of the lack-of-a-candidate problem, with no

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St. Croix Falls School Board current controversies or large-scale problems to garner opposition, that vacant seat means that the veritable “write-in” spot seen on every ballot in local elections may be more important than ever in St. Croix Falls. At the most recent board of education meeting, district Administrator Mark Burandt said that in spite of efforts by the school district to encourage and field a candidate for the vacancy, none officially emerged. While several people took out write-in candidacy papers, none were ever returned for the district to promote anyone as an “official” write-in. Burandt said that with no official candidates, the person who garners the most write-in votes in the coming election would be asked if they want to fill the vacant term, but if that person does not accept that honor/position, the board is

under no obligation to accept the person who has the second-highest number of votes. “(The top write-in candidate) could be someone with, say, eight votes, but a person with seven votes, (the board) Dr. Steve Bont wouldn’t have to accept them,” Burandt stated hypothetically, if that top vote-getter refuses the appointment. Without an accepting write-in, the way to fill the vacancy is potentially quite complicated, as current board policy involves a lengthy procedure that is currently under review, and may be addressed at the next board meeting. “The state says we must have a policy in place by July, but it may be coming forward earlier than that,” Burandt stated. “Without a candidate (in this election) we

may have to deal with our prior policy.” Burandt said that their current policy “does allow for a little bit of latitude,” but does set basic time lines, with 60 days to advertise for the vacancy, with an application to the superintendent, then board interviews and subsequent approval or rejection vote. But if nobody applies for that seat vacancy, the district does have a fairly complicated procedure to fill the spot, which essentially involves an ongoing process of repeating the previous advertisement and application procedure, until a candidate is found, interviewed, voted on and selected. That procedure would be avoided if the top write-in candidate accepts the position. Regardless, Bont is the only official candidate on the ballot for a board vacancy, and has said he is excited to keep his seat and continue his service to the district.

Luck principal a Herb Kohl Leadership Award finalist

LUCK — The Herb Kohl Foundation, which has been awarding scholarships to students and teachers since 1990, has now established a program to recognize principals, Luck Elementary School Principal Ann Goldbach was nominated by Luck Superintendent Chris Schultz. While she was not selected as one of the 16 principals to receive the Leadership Award this year, Goldbach was named a finalist. The Leadership Award recognizes principals for setting high standards for instruction, achievement and character, and for creating a climate to best serve students, families, staff and the community. Schultz, in his nomination letter, said that he has worked with hundreds of supervisors in his 27 years as an educator. “No other administrator in my experience has demonstrated such consistent

Luck Elementary School Principal Ann Goldbach. — Photo by Mary Stirrat

integrity, passion, sincerity, knowledge and professionalism as does Ann Goldbach,” he wrote. He provided examples of how Goldbach is always caring for the students, reading to them in classrooms, supervising after-school events and announcing each birthday. “Ann knows that our mission is student learning and our means is teachers teaching,” Schultz wrote. “To make this happen, she makes sure teachers know they are valued and allowed to grow in a thoughtful, compassionate, consistent work environment.” She spends time in the classroom, providing positive feedback and putting improvement plans in place when needed. “I have never observed such consistent and sincere inclusion of teachers in the planning and implementation of success in a school,” said Schultz.

As director for curriculum and instruction, he said, Goldbach organizes staff development every month. She is actively engaged in data analysis that led to a new literacy program, a new math curriculum and targeted intervention. She stays on top of data collection, organization and reporting. “Ann has led the drive to develop growing educators, effective programs and more successful students,” Schultz concluded his nomination. “She is persistent, organized, supportive, honest, efficient, knowledgeable, engaged and, most of all, intentional. “Ann Goldbach is the finest principal I have known.” Schultz read his nomination to the school board at its Monday, March 28, meeting, where Goldbach’s retirement resignation was accepted. — Mary Stirrat with information from Chris Schultz

Tenth Polk property auction starts next week

Wooded lot on old Hwy. 8 is choice property

Gregg Westigard | Staff writer POLK COUNTY – Look north from Hwy. 8 as you cross the Balsam Branch and you see an old concrete bridge. That bridge is a remnant of old Hwy. 8 before the road was relocated years ago. Does anyone know when the route was changed or have stories of that old route? One of the properties included in the next Polk County property auction is on that old highway, now a private drive with very ancient blacktop. That property is probably the best of the seven parcels coming up for sale in this round of Polk County property auctions. There are two other lots that are probably buildable, one small piece that could be reached with hiking boots, and three that are the result of errors in titles or tax payments. One of those may well be pulled from the auction before it starts. The 10th Polk County auction of tax-forfeit property starts Monday, April 4, and ends Monday, April 18. Details on the properties can be found on the Polk County website. Bidding on these auctions is live online at wisconsinpurchase. com. The old Hwy. 8 parcel is 6.3 acres of woods on the private road that turns off of new Hwy. 8 just west of the Hwy. 46 north intersection. The property itself is on the north side of the road just before the driveway for 1435G. There is an unmarked easement to the land. Look for a group of four fire-number signs along Hwy. 8 and a sign saying Private Drive, 10 MPH. That would be driving fast on this old pavement. A second parcel is on Paulsen Lake Lane north of Paulsen Lake Drive in the Town of Alden. The 0.83 acre of planted pines is north of 334 and opposite 337C Paulsen Lake Lane. The property drops off sharply from the road and looks like

A wooded lot in the next Polk County property auction is near this old Hwy. 8 bridge on the Balsam Branch. A visit to the site is a trip into travels past. – Photo by Gregg Westigard lowland. The third probably usable lot is at 1627 CTH K/60th Avenue in Garfield. There are 4.14 acres of rolling old field and remnants of an old basement. The property is just east of the intersection of CTH K and Hwy. 65. Then there is a curious little plot of hillside in the city of St. Croix Falls near the Dairy Queen. The parcel of land is 142 feet by 150 feet somewhere on the steep hillside behind 304 and 308 S. Adams St.

The property that accesses the plot is an undeveloped section of Illinois Street. During a site visit, residents on the adjacent property looked up the hill and puzzled at where the plot might be and why it exists. Two other properties might be lessons in property owner beware. The owner of a home in southern Alden wondered why he was given notice of a coming land sale. When he saw the map, he realized that the land being auctioned was his land, a

0.65-acre part of what he thought he had purchased. He said that explains why it took him 10 months to complete the purchase of his property and why there seemed to be a discrepancy in the amount of land he owns. In this case, the property owner will need to bid to finally make his property complete. The other property has a different story of paying attention to detail. Leonard Ayde wondered why he was getting notices about the 1.65 acres of land where he stores the vehicles for his business, L&C Autoworks. He told the Leader that the company holding his mortgage apparently did not make the property-tax payments that they were holding in escrow. That property may be removed from the auction list. This is probably a good thing because the fenced-in storage yard is protected by a watchdog, which might make site visits interesting. The last piece is a property-survey correction, a 0.29-acre sliver of property at the south end of a lot in Eureka. The only way the county can correct errors like this is by auction, even though there is an assessed value of only $600, lost property tax of $11 a year and probably only one buyer. Polk County is regularly auctioning off these tax-forfeited properties to clear the county’s records and get land back on the tax rolls. The proceeds from the auctions go into the county’s general fund.

Spring election approaches

O

n Tuesday, April 5, Wisconsin citizens will vote in their party’s presidential primary and choose municipal and local school officials. In some parts of the state, they will also elect circuit court judges. Additionally, voters will elect a Supreme Court justice to serve for the next 10 years. Justice Rebecca Bradley is being challenged by Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg. In Wisconsin, Supreme Court justices are elected to 10-year terms in nonpartisan elections. Including Wisconsin, elections are nonpartisan in 15 states, although in Michigan and Ohio,

candidates are nominated by parties. Seven states hold partisan elections. The Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance is a nonpartisan, nonprofit research organization dedicated to good government through citizen education since 1932.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

Big changes at Luck Elementary

Standards-based report cards, Spanish to be added for elementary students

Mary Stirrat | Staff writer LUCK — Luck Elementary School Principal Ann Goldbach informed the board last fall that she will be retiring at the end of this school year, and on Monday evening, March 28, her retirement resignation was officially accepted by the school board. Goldbach has been with the district for seven school years, since 2009. A total of 38 applications for the position had been received as of late last week, 24 of which included all the needed information. School administration and board member Kurt Stonesifer are reviewing the applications, and three to five individuals will be selected for initial interviews. Elementary Spanish Spanish language instruction will most likely be part of next year’s school day for students in kindergarten through sixth grade at Luck, making Luck Schools the only district in the area to offer Spanish for those grade levels. Goldbach presented the idea at the March 28 meeting of the school board, saying that an online interactive Spanish program could be added without taxing the students and teachers. Younger students can more easily learn foreign languages, she said, and the course the staff is considering is self-grading and “very developmental.” It teaches through literature, selecting individual words to explore, and includes a great deal of information and photos about the culture. Elementary teachers participated in a webinar last week about a program that might be a good fit, said Goldbach. “You don’t have to be an expert in Spanish to do this,” she said. “The kids would find it interesting.” She added that students learn languages much easier at a younger age. Studies show that students who learn a second language can then more easily learn additional languages. Goldbach said she chose Spanish because students can continue to pursue it

Luck School Board President Jake Jensen. — Photos by Mary Stirrat in middle school and high school. Parents would have access to the online program as well, to learn with and help their children. Not only do many universities require a foreign language at the high school level, said district Superintendent Chris Schultz, but also individuals who are multilingual have “a competitive edge in the workplace, particularly in our expanding global economy.” Board member Kurt Stonesifer added that the Hispanic population in the United States is the largest minority. Goldbach was directed to continue to explore and bring pricing information to the next board meeting.

Report cards Giving parents, students and teachers a better view of student progress is behind a change in how report cards will look for all elementary students. Starting next year, all students in kindergarten through sixth grade will receive a standards-based report card rather than the current point-based system. Students in kindergarten through second grade have been receiving the standards-based

report card for the past three years, but it will be new for third through sixth grade. “You are looking at grading standards as opposed to grading a subject,” explained Goldbach. “It gives parents a much better idea of what their kids are doing.” Rather than receiving a letter grade or pass/fail indication in a subject, such as math, each subject will be broken down into the standards that are being taught that year. In first grade, for example, there are 12 standards under the subject of math. These include writing numbers up to 120, telling and writing time and partitioning shapes into halves and quarters. Each standard will receive a numerical score that indicates whether the student is performing at an exemplary level, is proficient, developing or emerging. An explanation of each of these terms is included. Social and behavioral skills are scored using the same rubric, said kindergarten teacher Lori Denny, who added that she hasn’t had any questions from parents in the three years the kindergarten has been using standards-based report cards. “It helps parents understand what we’re teaching,” she said. Board member Todd Roehm said that he appreciated the standards-based report cards his children received in kindergarten through second grade more than what they are bringing home now. Goldbach said she would bring the new report cards to the board once they are finished being developed.

Trimesters With little discussion, the board approved Goldbach’s proposal that the elementary school go to a trimester schedule, eliminating the current schedule of four quarters. Goldbach said she and her staff have been exploring the change, and her elementary team is recommending that it be implemented. The trimester system in elementary schools is becoming more and more common, she said. “Developmentally, with younger kids,” Goldbach said, “having trimesters gives them a longer period of time to show

Luck Elementary School Principal Ann Goldbach will be retiring at the end of the school year. progress.” The change will have no impact on holiday schedules or on the middle and high school schedules, she said. A letter will be sent home to parents to explain the change.

Elementary staffing With thanks and appreciation, the school board accepted four letters of retirement resignations from elementary school staff. Resignations came from kindergarten teacher Laurie Paulson, two-plus years volunteering; first-grade teacher Sherri Schaffer, 13 years; fifth-grade teacher Ron Steen, 27 years; and Goldbach, nine years. With recent changes in the rules governing small class sizes, and with smaller numbers for the incoming kindergarten class, the district will only need to hire a replacement fifth-grade teacher. There will be two sections for each grade, kindergarten through sixth, said Goldbach.

Decades-old child sex assault charges emerge

Man faces allegations from the mid-90s, of the same victims

Greg Marsten | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE - A 64-year-old Polk County man who has served over a decade in prison on sexual assault of a child charges, is facing another 40 years in prison on related charges brought forth by the original victims, who have since recalled further molestation. Terry Lee Bruss, 64, Balsam Lake, was charged on March 10 by Polk County prosecutors with two felony counts of sexual assault of a child, from incidents that are alleged to have occurred in Feb. 1993, when Bruss lived in Lewis. He made an initial appearance in court on Monday, March 28, where Judge Jeffery Anderson set a $100,000 signature bond, and set a preliminary hearing for April 7, where the state will lay out some of the evidence they have against Bruss, for the judge to consider binding him over for trial. Bruss has a lengthy and sordid history of sexual assault, and was first convicted on identical charges in a 1995 plea agreement that dismissed five felony charges of first-degree sexual assault of a child, and one misdemeanor charge of exposing himself. Bruss pleaded guilty to two identical felony charges of sexual assault of a child, and was placed on probation for ten years, but had to serve a year in county jail. A short time after his release from the Polk County Jail, Bruss was charged with a variety of parole and bond violations, as well as nearly identical sexual assault charges once again - of the same two victims, even - in early 1997. He made his case to a jury in late 1997, who found him guilty of three felony charges, sending him to prison for at least a decade. His original potential sentence came

into play after his subsequent arrests and a probation violation, revoking a portion of his originally deferred sentences. Bruss had been caught having contact with at least one of the original pre-teen victims, in Terry Lee Bruss direct violation of his original court orders. Court documents revealed that a witness had reported that he was having direct contact with one of the victims, drinking beer and riding bikes together. As a deputy came to his home, he literally caught Bruss with his pants open and shirt off, in the act of starting to molest one of the same victims, once again. That led to the subsequent convictions and extensive jail time, with Bruss being released in 2014. However, two of the victims later recalled even more alleged molestation by Bruss from 1994, when the victims were five and eight years old. Those recollections included allegations that Bruss had perfumed a variety of sexual acts on the victims, including scenarios Bruss would create where the children would be forced to perform sexual acts on him and each other In a chilling account by one victim, she recalled pretending to be asleep as Bruss approached her in her bed, hoping he would leave her alone. This reportedly led him to molest the other victim instead, and she recalls hearing the other girl “scream and make noises” as Bruss molested her. The criminal complaint suggests that the molestation incidents occurred at least ten times, and likely more often. Bruss originally denied the recalled allegations in a 2014 interview with po-

lice, but he later admitted it “might have happened, after all.” He was apparently under the influence of alcohol at the time, and said he had little recollection of what may have actually occurred. Some of his admissions led to the two latest felony charges, specifically noting the shower touching, as well as the other victim being molested on his couch. “These charges are from 1993, 1994,” Polk County District Attorney Dan Steffen told the judge at the March 28 initial hearing. “We need to go back to the original (state) statutes.” Due to the dates of the alleged offenses, Bruss faces 20 years in prison on each charge, if convicted, which is much less than the current sentencing guidelines, which are much more strict. “If it were today, he might be facing 40, maybe 50 years on each count,” Steffen told the Leader. “We’ve got to do some research on what those (potential sentences) might be.” Bruss is currently on probation, and has agreed to face the latest charges, which led to the signature bonds on the allegations. He was also ordered to have absolutely no contact or be anywhere near the two victims, who are now adults. He cannot even enter Burnett County under his bond. J u d g e Anderson set a Thursday, April 7 date for his preliminary hearing, where prosecutors will lay out the evidence for the judge to determine if there is enough to

bind him over for trial. Bruss has a lengthy history of charges, and not just sexual assault, as he was convicted of welfare fraud in 1994 for receiving over $1,600 in state benefits, while not revealing that he was working at the time. Deeper research on Bruss’ criminal history started with another troubling account, prior to all of his subsequent child sexual molestation charges, where court records show Bruss’ first criminal conviction involved an incident where he beat up a man’s poodle with a stick, while the dog was tied up. A witness recalled hearing the dog “scream and yelp” as he beat it to death, later taking the animal away in a car trunk, never to be seen again. He later admitted to killing the dog, and was forced to pay a total of $175 in fines, which included $115 in restitution to the owner for loss of the animal. That dog-beating incident was likely what first put the eyes of the law on Bruss. Look to the Leader for details on his latest sexual assault case, as it progresses to completion.

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

C O N V E R S A T I O N S

Since 1933

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Candidate responds, clarifies I would like to respond to some statements published in last week’s profiles of candidates running for the Polk County Board of Supervisors. “She (Kathryn Kienholz) says that her opponent (Chris Nelson) would not be good for the county.” My response: I believe I would be great for the county because I bring exactly what Kienholz wants, a balance of good development to expand our economy and conservation tactics to keep our lakes and river ways clean. I have been implementing proper mitigation for

all lakeshore projects for the past 16 years and will continue to push the environmental preservation along with economic growth. “He (Chris Nelson) wants to work to get a WITC facility in the county.” My response: I want to make clear that I want to bring a WITC facility to Polk County but not on the additional dime of the residents. In 2013, we paid WITC $4,975,000 in taxes to help them expand their campuses in other counties. In 2015, we paid WITC $1,525,900 to do the same thing. It is time that our tax dollars stop going to other counties to further their expansions and keep our tax dollars in house to promote ours. With the amount of money we send out to educational facilities, we

deserve to have one more local and accessible for our students. “He (Chris Nelson) wants to talk to Rep. Adam Jarchow and Sen. Sheila Harsdorf and tell them, ‘You must fight for us.’ Nelson says he wants to use leverage by working with them and asking them, ‘How can you help us?’” My response: I believe Jarchow and Harsdorf are both fighting for us already and are doing an outstanding job. I support both of them and want to continue working together to tackle future issues. Chris Nelson Town of Milltown

POLITICAL LETTERS Letters to the editor regarding political races should be limited to 400 words (longer letters may be published at the discretion of the editor), should contain no personal attacks and if endorsing a candidate should state an issue or issues as to why the writer favors that candidate. The same applies when being critical of a candidate - it must be based on issues. Letter writers should provide sources for their claims. We reserve the right to limit publication to one letter per person or group per month. We may not publish some letters if we feel an organized campaign is attempting to flood the opinion pages with letters for a particular candidate and likewise, we will not publish letters that make serious charges against a candidate, especially close to election day, when there is a limited opportunity for us to fact check the claims or for the candidate to respond. Since the Leader is published once a week, some letters may be published on our website and not in our printed edition, in an attempt to allow for timely response. We urge writers to keep the discussion civil. Any letter deemed as a personal attack or nasty in general won’t be published. - Editor

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

The process evolves ... or does it? This year’s spring election will

either see a record number of us going to the polls next Tuesday ... or just the opposite. If the incredibly entertaining and sometimes irritating and insulting presidential race gets more people involved, then there is something to take away from the mess. In researching historical information last week for a story on JFK’s brief visit to Northwest Wisconsin during the 1960 primary election - perhaps the last successful presidential candidate to travel our back roads - it was interesting to see a vintage front page of a Virginia newspaper which included the following headlines: “Hubert Calls Jack Little Boy” and “Stop Kennedy Movement is Shrugged Off.” There was name-calling and movements to stop candidates in 1960 and it can be assumed in other presidential races over the years. How soon we hope to forget. Kennedy has been described by historians as a candidate who went “over the heads of the backroom bosses” and played directly to his popularity with voters, characterizing himself as the underdog, and avoiding debates with the fast- and smooth-talking Hubert Humphrey. He didn’t have to beg for money, as his father bankrolled much of

the campaign to the point of suspicion and allegations of vote buying in Virginia and Chicago. There was dodging of rumors and accusations of questionable behavior. History has not been kind to Kennedy’s reputation and it’s likely he would have not survived as a candidate today. Or perhaps he would have thrived. It’s unfair to compare candidates from now and nearly 60 years ago but there’s plenty of similarities in the overall process ... if anyone cares. 2016 offers its own brand of drama. Gov. Scott Walker and Congressman Paul Ryan are on a speculative list of potential candidates for the GOP ticket. That’s how sketchy this political year has become. It should be particularly interesting to see how voters in our area not only turn out but how they vote. How many local Tea Party followers are anxious to cast a bal-

lot for Ted Cruz and how many in general will back Donald Trump? We need to implement our own exit poll. Hopefully not overlooked are the local contests for county board, school board, village board and state Supreme Court. We’ve attempted to educate our readers as to where the contested races are and where the candidates stand. Our website contains a link to information on the state Supreme Court candidates as well as a list of local contested races as outlined in earlier print issues. This week we follow up with local candidate profiles. And there are no letters to the editor pertaining to Tuesday’s election aside from one letter - in accordance with our policy stating our letters section in this - the final issue prior to the election - is reserved for candidates themselves wishing to clarify or respond to information previously published here about their stances on issues. Our website (leadernewsroom. com) will be the forum between now and Tuesday for any candidate wishing to respond or clarify their views. Take time to take part in the process on Tuesday. And gratitude goes out to those local candidates who, with little noise, are taking on an important role and serving their communities by simply running. - Gary King

The Inter-County Leader was established in 1933 by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association. Read about the cooperative’s history at iccpaonline.com

WHERE TO WRITE President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 PH: 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin 1 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5653 FAX: 202-25-6942 Rep. Adam Jarchow (28th District) Room 19 North, State Capitol. P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Jarchow@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Romaine Quinn (75th District) Room 7 West, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison, WI 53708 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.Quinn@legis.wisconsin.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323 Sen. Janet Bewley (25th District) Room 126 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 608-266-3510 sen.Bewley@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

The Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper

JOE HELLER

Informing more than 16,000 readers each week in print and online • leadernewsroom.com


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Let’s get started!

Jeff Peterson has my support

In February’s Letter to the Editor, a suggestion was made that those of us who were concerned about coming in contact with ticks should become informed. Knowing what can happen, should you be bitten by a tick and subsequently contract Lyme disease, is crucial information. The ticks are already out, and in great number. We need to be ready and know what to do to protect ourselves. Our public libraries have a number of books on the subject. All of them really make for quite an interesting read. For those of you who did follow up and take the time to learn more, you now have a better understanding of what could happen to you. Should you not seek help in a timely fashion, the outcome can affect you in ways you never thought possible. On Thursday evening, April 28, at 7 p.m., our area’s Lyme Education and Support Group will be holding their first meeting of the year. We meet at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church at 217 Deronda Ave. (CTH F) in Amery. In an effort to help and support people who wish to know more about Lyme disease, or for those who are presently affected, and for those of us who have had it at least one time or know of someone who has, our group came together several years ago to form this 501(c)3 organization. Our mission is as stated above. Please circle April 28 on your calendar. We look forward to meeting you. With your presence Thursday evening you will be helping us to begin another season of reaching out to people in our communities. Should you have any questions, you may call Paula at 715-268-2035, Bonnie at 715-268-9557, or myself at 715-268-2856. Thank you!

According to a long-running Gallup study, most U.S. citizens trust their local government more than they do their state or federal government. Since 2001, local government “has consistently garnered more trust from Americans than state government,” Gallup reports. In fact, that number hovers right around 72 percent. Of course, state and local governments each have their roles, but lately, state government seems intent on shouldering its way into local territory, usurping and eroding local control, even micromanaging local decisions. There is a laundry list of examples such as restricting a community’s ability to limit its use of plastic bags. Seriously? Worse, the state now restricts a county’s ability to regulate its own shoreland and mounted an attempt to limit a school district’s ability to recoup lost funding through referenda. The water privatization bill lifts the requirement that any sale of a municipal water system to a private corporation must first be approved by public referendum. If a county wants to enact a moratorium on development until a plan can be put in place, the state says no. What’s going on here? Our current Assembly representative, Adam Jarchow, supported most of these bills and either authored or co-authored many of them. Why? Who is he representing? Are there large numbers of his constituents demanding that they have no say in the sale of their municipal water supply or that they really, really want to use plastic bags over cloth bags? I doubt it. If you’re interested in seeing a complete list of these bills, along with voting records, check out VoteSpotter.com, then ask yourself how these votes benefit you. Are they stepping on local control? Our current assemblyman doesn’t seem to recognize nor respect that the majority of his constituents prefer that the state recognize the integrity of their local officials to regulate local concerns. In fact, our assemblyman has become one of the

Ann Krisik, Amery

primary drivers of the state steamroller. I believe Jarchow has had his chance and that it is time to support someone who will truly represent the wishes and best interests of the majority of their constituents. Jeff Peterson has my support. I am part of the growing grassroots campaign that supports Peterson. I have known and worked with Peterson for many years. He’s served on many boards and respects local control. I believe Peterson has the integrity and the courage to be an outstanding assemblyman. Dennis Fawver Luck

Hats off I had the pleasure and honor of attending the large group contest for the Siren Middle School and Siren High School choirs and bands on Tuesday, March 22. All four groups scored firsts from each of three judges. I happened to listen to the two bands perform and I feel the firstplace rankings were spot on. The music department at Siren Schools is impressive. Choir director Terese Muus and band director Bryn Anderson are credits to their professions. They inspire students to engage in vocal and instrumental music and to continue their involvement throughout their school careers. One judge made comment on the large size of the middle school band, considering the small size of the school overall. The high school band’s results marked the second time in many years that they scored firsts on more challenging Class A pieces. Wow! When you also consider all the extra work that these two educators put into the high school’s musical that had just finished up two days before, it becomes very evident that they deserve our awe as well as our appreciation. Hats off to the Siren music department! April Close Siren

Victim amnesty bill If you haven’t heard, there’s an epidemic of sexual violence sweeping college campuses across the nation, and Wisconsin’s institutions of higher learning are not immune. It is incredibly saddening to know that many of you reading this are friends with somebody who has been a victim of sexual assault, or have yourself been a victim. In recognizing that perpetrators of sexual assault regularly use alcohol as a weapon to weaken the defenses of their victims, the Wisconsin State Legislature and the Wisconsin Department of Justice sponsored the Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Bill. It is now Wisconsin law that when an underage person falls victim to sexual assault or assists a friend who has been assaulted, he or she will not be cited for underage drinking or face school discipline when coming forward to law enforcement or campus authorities. Victims of sex crimes have a tough decision to make when deciding whether or not to involve law enforcement and seek help from the criminal justice system when they have been assaulted. Fear of consequences for underage drinking should never come in the way of a victim seeking help and being treated by medical professionals after a horrific crime like sexual assault. We want to encourage victims to come forward so law enforcement and medical professionals can gather necessary evidence in the search for the truth and prevent perpetrators from assaulting additional victims. We believe the Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty Bill is one of many steps that will empower victims and help put an end to sexual assault on campus. For more specifics of Sexual Assault Victim Amnesty, please visit doj.state.wi.us/ ocvs/campus-sexual-assault.

Attorney General Brad Schimel State Rep. Ballweg, State Sen. Petrowski Madison

SHOWDOWN AT JANESVILLE Protesters argue with Trump supporters outside his event in Janesville on Tuesday, March 29. The crowds that gathered outside the Janesville Conference Center, backing up traffic for several hours, seem to have largely been peaceful. There was, however, one notable exception that was caught on camera: Video and photos of the incident show an anti-Trump protester apparently trying to punch another person before getting pepper-sprayed in response. - Photo by AP/Nam Y. HuhThere | WPR News

Rural woes

S

tate Rep. Kathy Bernier, R-Lake Hallie, is annoyed when local officials start comparing Wisconsin and Minnesota, but those comparisons often reflect discontent in rural areas. Earlier this year Bernier walked out of a meeting between local school officials and legislators from western Wisconsin. “Fundamentally, Minnesota is beating us. Our school formula is broken,” an Eau Claire educator said. “It is not helpful to compare Minnesota and Wisconsin,” Bernier replied. Later Bernier would tell constituents that Wisconsin spends $11,071 educating each elementary and secondary school student, while Minnesota spends just $17 per student more. But those are statewide figures, not a reflection of the financial problems facing rural districts that often have declining enrollments, others note. State Sen. Kathleen Vinehout, D-Alma, said the rural districts are often faced

State Capitol Newsletter Matt Pommer with winning approval for property tax increases or slashing spending. The Alma district, she said, recently approved a major tax increase to help pay for a new school furnace. The Prescott School District is facing a $1.5 million cut because a referendum failed. “People all across this state have voted to raise property taxes,” she said. Vinehout noted that Tony Evers, state superintendent of public instruction, has repeatedly proposed school-aid changes to reflect declining enrollments and poverty. Evers’ proposals have failed in the state

Capitol, she noted. Gov. Scott Walker’s popularity has dramatically sagged in western and northern Wisconsin, according to numbers from the Marquette University Law School poll. The governor has spent substantial time in that region in the wake of those numbers. He has held invitation-only meetings to ask what the state should be doing. Now he promises to put more money into public education in the biennial budget he will send to the Legislature next year. But there are other educational pressures facing the Wisconsin budget. Tax revenues have not met expectations and the voucher program which sends taxpayer money to private schools continues to expand. Wisconsin also provides a large income-tax break for families who send children to private elementary or high schools. The governor has been encouraging public school districts to offer programs that will push young people to consider

vocational education rather than college. A new law allows public schools to employ people with relevant experiences to lead the vocational instruction rather than teacher training. Other spending cutbacks are hurting rural Wisconsin. The $250 million slash in taxpayer money for the University of Wisconsin System has led to reducing the number of Extension agents in some sparsely populated counties. Spending issues are everywhere in Wisconsin. Minnesota and Wisconsin populations are about the same, but Wisconsin has twice as many people in prison. Wisconsin leads the nation in the percentage of its young black males in prison. The state spending rolls on. The content in this column does not reflect the views or opinions of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association or its member newspapers.


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

Afternoon high school aligns with Frederic for more collaboration Mary Stirrat | Staff writer LUCK — Adjustments to the afternoon schedules at Frederic and Luck high schools mean that the two districts will be sharing some of their class offerings next year, giving students a broader range of opportunities. At its regular meeting held Monday, March 28, the Luck School Board approved extending the last three classes of the day by two minutes each, adding a total of six minutes to the school day. This will enable Luck and Frederic to share classes over the interactive television system, allowing students at each school to participate together from their home school. “The benefits outweigh the possible conflicts?” board President Jake Jensen asked high school Principal Brad Werner, who worked with Frederic’s principal to iron out the details. Werner said he believed it would be a worthwhile change. It will save students the drive time to Frederic, he said, and no additional teachers will be needed. In order to collaborate and share ITV classes with Frederic, he said, the change is necessary. Teachers from both Frederic and Luck will be teaching the classes. “There are a lot of good things that can come from it,” he said. The board also approved changes in the middle school schedule, reducing the number of class periods from nine to seven. This allows core subjects such as math and English language arts to be extended to one full hour, which is what the teachers were requesting. The middle school will also see an additional six minutes per day. This will add a total of 17 hours to the teaching schedule for the year. Grants So far this year the school has been awarded $58,000 in grants, with another $43,000 to $50,000 in grant applications “still on the table,” said Superintendent Chris Schultz. Grants secured include $10,000 for technology, $15,000 for food-service equipment, $25,000 for teacher mentoring and $3,100 for new band instruments. Among those that are in the works is a $25,000 application to Monsanto for the math and science department, possibly to be used for Lego Robotics. Staff members including food service director Ione Barron, band teacher Jennifer Gilhoi and science teacher Dean Roush have all played a role in submitting grant applications for a variety of purposes. A lot of people are taking opportunities to see if they can bring some extra money in,” said Schultz. “It’s a lot of work.” Values and ideals Wednesday, March 23, the school hosted a kickoff lunch to begin the process of developing a school mission statement and district goals. Sixty people, including school staff and community

School day adjusted at Luck

Aaron Arjes, technology director at Luck Schools, presented his report at the Monday, March 28, meeting of the school board. members, participated. Participants were divided into groups of six to come up with words that they would like to see as descriptors for the school, which will be used to form “pillars” that will support the vision and mission of the district. “These would be our core values that drive our decisions,” said Schultz. “They have to be what we use as our reference point when we make decision.” These pillars, he said, will be what produce successful students, staff and community members. “Who do we need to become?” he asked as a way of explaining the point of the pillars. A total of 30 different words were selected, of which integrity and respect were the most common, closely followed by enthusiasm. Tied for the next most common were achievement, dedication,

The Monday, March 28, meeting of the Luck School Board of Education was the last for board member and clerk LeRoy Buck, who chose not to seek re-election. Buck has been on the board since April 2006 and has been board clerk for all those years.

Kindergarten teacher Lori Pfaff, left, and fifth-grade teacher Jody Waterman explained how the new Cardinal Caravan program works. Students are nominated for recognition and are surprised by a visit from school staff bearing gifts. — Photos by Mary Stirrat excellence, pride, motivation and perseverance/persistence. A committee will be established to narrow the list down and begin formulating a mission statement. The committee, which will meet Monday, April 11, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., will consist of the five board members, about five community members, five staff members and three school administrators.

Other business • Elementary principal and curriculum coordinator Ann Goldbach reported that new curriculum for psychology, anatomy and physiology, and advanced placement physics have been chosen for review. The district is also looking at a new elementary science curriculum, she said, and is right now exploring ScienceFusion by Houghton Mifflin. • Teachers Lori Pfaff and Jody Waterman gave a presentation on Cardinal Caravan, a new program at Luck Schools that recognizes students who have a positive impact on the school and the community through their behavior and attitude inside and outside the classroom. Last week’s Leader included photos of Nate Skow, Hunter Memmer, Parker Steen and Ray Dueholm, the first four students who were “crashed by the Cardinal Caravan.” School staff, in cooperation with the parents, surprised the students by visiting

LUCK SCHOOL DISTRICT PRESCHOOL DEVELOPMENTAL SCREENING SCHEDULED FOR MONDAY, APRIL 18

Frederic Elementary “Mite-Y-Vikes”

PRESCHOOL ROUNDUP!

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The Luck School District will be conducting a developmental screening for children ages birth to five years old, with the primary emphasis on threeand four-year-olds, on the morning of Monday, April 18. The areas of screening will include: fine motor development, gross motor development, and speech and language concepts. Vision and hearing screenings will be conducted by a nurse from the Polk County Public Health Department. A representative from Birth to 3 services will also be assisting with the screening. If you have concerns about your child’s development in any of these areas, please call the Luck Elementary School Office at 472-2153, extension 108, by Wednesday, April 13. Appointments will be scheduled beginning at 8:30 a.m. with each screening 643547 32-34L 22-24a lasting about 45 minutes.

their homes and presenting them with a variety of prizes. The prizes were donated by local businesses, individuals and organizations. • Discussion continued regarding holding two days of summer school immediately prior to the start of the 201617 school year. Summer school would possibly be Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 30-31, with the school year starting Thursday, Sept. 1. This has the potential of additional state funding, which would impact property taxes and possibly ensure better attendance for the first two days of the school year. • Technology director Aaron Arjes presented the technology department report, saying he was very pleased the district went with Chromebooks for its one-toone technology. He suggested that, starting next year when the Chromebooks had three years of use, graduating seniors be allowed to have them or purchase them for a nominal fee. Arjes also discussed options for a visitor-management system to track information on visitors to the school, upgrading some of the computers with solid-state hard drives and upgrading the elementary computer lab.

OPEN HOUSE & REGISTRATION

Children turning 4 on or before September 1 will be eligible to enroll in Frederic’s 4K program for the 2016/2017 school year! Please call the elementary office to register your child and schedule a time to visit our classroom and meet the teacher! 715-327-4221

Open House Events Fri., April 22, 9 a.m. - 11 a.m., 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Wed., April 27, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. 643848 22-27a 33-38L Wed., May 4, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Three unchallenged seats, but two candidates seeking one common council seat Greg Marsten | Staff writer ST. CROX FALLS – City of St. Croix Falls Mayor Brian Blesi is unchallenged in his attempt to return for a two-year term, as is municipal court Judge David Danielson, who is unchallenged for a return to the bench for another four-year term. Incumbent Jerry Berger is also unchallenged in his seeking a return for a twoyear term on the common council seat in Wards 1 and 4, District No. 1. But the District No. 2, Wards 2 and 3 common council seat is the city’s one true race. That council seat is currently occupied by Jeff Huenink, who is not seeking a return. Two candidates are vying for the vacant seat, Al Kruger and Arnie Carlson. As the only real race, theirs are the only candidate profiles. Al Kruger Why are you seeking public office? “I get a blank look too many times when I answer the question: ‘Where are you from,’ until I add: ‘across the river from ... Falls.’ I see St. Croix Falls as a good city that could be even better. It should be more than Wisconsin’s best-kept secret. Soliciting thoughts about the role of the common council, a business owner said, ‘Be sure the potholes are filled and the eyesores removed.’ Our dedicated librarian added, ‘Have a big picture for our town.’ A third offered, ‘Talk to the residents before and after decisions are made. Help us understand council decisions.’” Krueger also gave some background on how he was first truly introduced to the city: “In 2006, I was invited to study the city and offer the city council a newcomer’s view of strengths and opportunities. While interviewing many citizens, I learned that most shared my view of St. Croix Falls’ three main attributes: art, ecology and natural beauty. There are creative people in our city who are currently advancing plans to preserve and strengthen the resources of our area. As a council member, I would welcome the chance to support these efforts. I believe I have the time, energy and experience to help fulfill the council’s role by working for what is best for the people.” What do you feel are the most important issues facing the city at this time? “Choosing a new administrator is probably the most important task before the council. Beyond that, to make well-informed budget decisions. With our limited resources, we need to find the balance

SCF has one city race APRIL 5 ELECTION PROFILES

St. Croix Falls City Council as we move forward, preserve and protect the quality of life while investing in the future at the same time.” What kind of experience do you have in public service? “Local community and political involvement has been my lifelong interest. Living in Grand Rapids, Minn., I helped start a program called ‘Circles of Support,’ moving a number of families out of poverty. That program continues to flourish,” he said. “My links with St. Croix Falls grew as I participated in the community/school venture, Reading Friends of Elementary Saints. Ten years taught me about our exceptional public school system. Fixing up homes with Habitat for Humanity got me closer to the people in need. Helping to found a new fellowship led to an understanding of the depth of commitment and compassion locally. The simple task of driving for Interfaith Caregivers introduced me to wonderful people who simply needed a bit of help now and again. I also had a short stint on the local (St. Croix Falls) Plan Commission.” A little background about yourself, including your family: “In 2006 I married Marilyn Brissett, an active (city) resident of 45 years, after we had both lost our spouses. Between us, we have four adult children. My education includes undergraduate and graduate degrees in government and political advocacy. I’ve used that mainly in helping good candidates with their elections,” Kruger stated. He also noted that he owned a retail clothing store for 12 years, while at the same time, and for most of his business life, he was self-employed in the textile industry. “I (was) directing products from concept to sales. That involved selecting, hiring, managing the work of many professionals toward completion of a business objective. I see great parallels in moving our city forward.”

Arnie Carlson Why are you seeking public office? Carlson has previously served on the St. Croix Falls Common Council, after being appointed by former mayor Bradley Foss, to fill a vacancy. He then ran again and served two more terms before not seeking a return. “I took a couple of years off (of the council),” Carlson said. “I wanted to give someone else a chance! And also give my mind a bit of a rest.”

Al Kruger

Arnie Carlson

As for why he is seeking a seat again, he said he has “found a few things stirring” and that he thinks he would like to address some of the issues the city is facing, such as the vacant lot beside the Civic Auditorium, as well as how to best address the high volume of land in the city not on the tax rolls. “I’d really like to pay more attention to the downtown,” Carlson said. “I know it won’t ever be like it was in the past, but I don’t think anyone has a real clear answer on how to really make it (prosper) again.” He also said that while he understands the need for conservation, he is concerned that the city has placed too much burden on city residents, due to in part to the high volume of non-taxable land. “Conservation is one thing, but common sense needs to enter the picture,” Carlson said in closing. What do you feel are the most important issues facing the city at this time? Carlson echoed his comments on the previous answer, but added that he has an opinion that is sometimes outside the scope of some council members and the mayor. “We’ve got a pretty good group of people on the council currently, and I think the mayor is doing a pretty good job, but we don’t always see eye-to-eye, which is to be expected,” Carlson said. He pointed to the vacant lot beside the Civic Auditorium as a void the city must fill, to get the property back on the tax rolls, as well as finding ways to encourage more business downtown, again to expand the tax rolls and build up the downtown. He also said that while he thinks the city could use a person to fill the void left by the departure of city Administrator Joel Peck, he is not convinced they need to have a full-time person. “I think we do need someone to fill those (administrative) duties, but maybe it could be either a manager or a parttime person, such as a subcontractor. The last two administrators weren’t always loaded down with work, and I think the duties have changed,” he added. Carlson said that with the completion of the city’s wastewater treatment plant,

he thinks it is necessary for someone to try to rein in the powers of some agencies and outside parties, trying to impose their plans on the city, regardless of the cost. “Early on, in a (WWTP) conversation with the Army Corps of Engineers, I had to tell them they need to realize they are talking about spending our money,” Carlson said, noting the much higher price tag the Corps had originally proposed. “Once they got off that ‘Taj Mahal’ thinking (on the WWTP) I think the end result is very good, actually.” What kind of experience do you have in public service? As mentioned earlier, Carlson has served several terms as a common council member several years ago, and he has been a longtime member of the St. Croix Falls Plan Commission, which he finds “extremely interesting.” “I find it very exciting, at times. I think the variety of projects keeps it very interesting, and I need that! I really like that variety, and always have,” Carlson said. He has also served on the city’s tourism commission, and pointed to his past experience as a common council member on top of his history as an engineer as important to how he handles some of the negotiations and projects the city faces. “I have some real experience dealing with people who you could say were ‘pretty high up on the ladder,’ so I’m pretty thick-skinned,” Carlson said. A little background about yourself, including your family: Carlson grew up just outside town, and currently is the third generation of his family living in the home he and his wife, Charlee, bought back in 2001. “My grandfather owned the Dombrock Brickyard property (east of the city). When he retired, he bought the property where I am in now,” he said, adding that his parents also bought that property from their parents, as did he and his wife. Carlson graduated from St. Croix Falls High School, and later attend the University of Wisconsin, where he was trained as an engineer. He worked most of his adult life in engineering maintenance management for a variety of large firms, from General Motors to Caterpillar, and also dealt with a wide variety of issues in that industry. But he pointed to his long local history as a reason to vote for him, and how he cares deeply about the city, its residents and its history, which he has watched unfold for decades, and wants to see grow even stronger. “Being the third generation on this ground feels pretty good!” Carlson stated in closing.

Most Wisconsin taxpayers saw income tax cuts in recent years

After recent legislative changes, WISTAX Report re-examines the state income tax

MADISON – Most, but not all, filers have experienced a state income-tax cut since 2008, according to a new tax-season report prepared by the Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance, a nonpartisan research organization now celebrating its 85th year. “Over the past seven years, Wisconsin’s income tax has undergone several waves of major change, and we thought a multiyear, cumulative look was overdue,” explained WISTAX President Todd A. Berry. During 2008-14, married filers with incomes between $20,000 and $200,000 experienced tax cuts ranging from 3.9 percent to 32.1 percent. Taxes fell the most, 32.1 percent, for those with incomes between $20,000 and $50,000. Their average bill dropped from $688 in 2008 to $467 in 2014. Taxes also fell for filers with incomes between $50,000 and $100,000. The average decline was 7.6 percent, from $3,167 to $2,926. However, not all income taxpayers had tax reductions. Due to a new top tax

bracket created in 2009, taxes for filers with incomes over $500,000 rose an average of 5.7 percent from $74,107 in 2008 to $78,345 in 2014. Those with incomes under $20,000 also saw an increase from 2008 to 2014. However, as a group, these filers pay no income tax; in fact, due to refundable tax credits, the state writes them a check. Although the governor and Legislature added a new top tax bracket in the 200911 state budget, the focus since has been on cuts. In 2013, all rates were reduced and the five brackets were reduced to four. The top rate was trimmed from 7.75 percent to 7.65 percent, although that was higher than at any time since 1986. The bottom rate has been dropped more, in two steps from 4.6 percent in 2012 to 4.0 percent in 2014. Despite recent income-tax reductions, Wisconsin remains a relatively high income-tax state. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, income taxes claimed 3 percent of personal income in 2013, seventh highest among the states and above the national average, 2.3 percent. Per capita, Wisconsin collected $1,262 in income taxes in 2013, 11th most in the country. While the Badger State last year had 3 million filers reporting $157.8 billion of adjusted gross income and paying $6.6

billion in income taxes, who files, who reports income and who actually pays the tax varies significantly with income. Two-thirds of filers had Wisconsin adjusted gross income of less than $50,000. This group of filers claimed 23 percent of income, but they paid only 9.4 percent of taxes. The vast middle, filers with incomes between $50,000 and $200,000, reported a majority of both income, 52.2 percent, and taxes paid, 56.7 percent, but only comprised 31 percent of filers. Those with incomes over $200,000 comprised a small fraction, 2.5 percent of taxpayers. However, they reported a quarter of income and paid more than a third of state income taxes. More than 90 percent of net taxes were paid by the third of filers with incomes over $50,000. Due to various deductions and credits, the average income-tax rate people pay is lower than the rate specified in law. Average rates are fairly low for those with low incomes, but, reflecting a “progressive” tax, they rise rapidly with income. Filers with incomes below $50,000 paid an average effective rate of 1.7 percent; however, most of that was paid by filers with income between $20,000 and $50,000. The average rate for filers with less than $20,000 in income was negative, minus 1.5 percent. The average effective rate

rose to 4.5 percent for filers with $50,000 to $200,000 in income, and reached 5.7 percent for filers with incomes above that range. With piecemeal legislative changes to the state income tax, the WISTAX report notes that the process for calculating income taxes has become more complex over the years. In the last four years, the number of pages of instruction for the state’s long form, Form 1, has grown from 33 in 2011 to 58 in 2015. Another issue that remains a problem with Wisconsin law is equity. The income tax continues to have a “marriage penalty,” and retired residents pay significantly less in taxes than younger residents, even those with like incomes. WISTAX also noted the ongoing discussion about whether Wisconsin’s tax structure needs updating and rebalancing to minimize any adverse economic consequences income taxes might have. For more information, a free copy of The Wisconsin Taxpayer report, “One Hundred Years and Counting: Wisconsin’s Income Tax: History, Process and Filers,” is available by calling 608-2419789, emailing wistax@wistax.org, visiting wistax.org or writing WISTAX at 401 N. Lawn Ave., Madison, WI 53704-5033. – from WISTAX

Got a news tip? Opinion? Event? Send your information to news@leadernewsroom.com


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

Siren Board of Education swamped

Becky Strabel | Staff writer SIREN - The Siren Board of Education meeting held on Monday, March 28, centered around the football field being in a swamp and many other action items. “We can’t play football here.” “There are safety concerns.” “The field may be beyond repairing.” These were just some of the comments made by school board administrator Dr. Kevin Shetler and others. Not yet done is an assessment to determine needs and how the insurance company will handle the athletic field area. The field has been in its current location for at least 30 years with track updates made as recent as the 2001 tornado, but stumps and other organic material continue to decay and create sinkholes in the field. Games have stopped during play for repair in past years. Track meets scheduled for this spring will be looked at regarding the track’s condition. “We need to determine things sooner than later,” commented Duane Emery, board member, “so fundraising can be done.” “The plan to have the National Guard help is not coming to term. There is an approximate two-year wait list for their services. I do have an engineer

that may do the work pro bono,” stated board member Mark Pettis. Ryan Karsten, school athletic director, will be asked to bring some plans and current assessments to the board. The DNR might have a say in the project due to the proximity to standing water and wetlands.

Summer school Summer school will be held June 13 through July 1 for incoming kindergarten through grade 12 students. The middle and high school levels will be for credit recovery while four teachers will teach combined classes in the elementary. There will not be transportation provided this year for summer school. After hearing the results of a survey compiled during spring parent/teacher conferences, board president Peggy Moore said, “With a high number of responses saying that the lack of transportation was the main reason for not planning to participate, we will need to re-evaluate the budget and busing for the program.” However breakfast and lunch are provided. Other business Other items discussed included spring parent/teacher conferences that were

held in one evening with a free family meal. Usually, the meetings are held over two days, but the staff wanted to try something different to see how it was accepted. Both a community resource fair and the library club Scholastic Book fair occurred the same evening too. Shetler gave a shout-out to instrumental music instructor Bryn Anderson for receiving a Herb Kohl Fellowship Award. The school’s music department will receive $3,000 as well as $3000 for herself. “This award is quite an honor,” commented Shetler. A property detachment meeting is planned with Webster school to address some school district lines east of Siren near Hwy. 70. “We don’t want to redraw school lines, but there are a couple of properties that need to be addressed,” stated Moore. The 2016-17 school calendar was approved with classes starting September 1, 2016 Many events are planned for the district including the middle school and high school athletic banquet on Thursday, March 31; 4K and kindergarten screening on Friday, April 1; state testing will take place Monday, April 11 through Thursday, April 21. Family literature night is Tuesday, April 19; 8th-grade transition

night on Tuesday. May 3; and the Native American Awareness Powwow on Friday, May 13. Following closed session the board approved a $1,500 one-time addition to the Communities United in Education budget, hiring Rachael Trittlewitz as a paraprofessional and Kristen Kosloski as head volleyball coach. Teaching contracts were offered to long-term subs Elisa Ailts as the elementary school guidance counselor and Anastasia Thull as a high school English teacher. The following committees are scheduled to meet on Monday, April 11: personnel and negotiations at 6 p.m, followed by policy, planning and curriculum at 7 p.m.. On Monday, April 18, the budget and finance committee will meet jointly with the building and grounds committee starting at 5:30 p.m. A walkthrough of the building and grounds will take place. Also, the regular monthly school board meeting will be held on Monday, April 25, at 6 p.m.

Beekeepers meet in Siren

Northland Beekeepers club recently met for first time in 2016. The club meets to promote beekeeping every fourth Monday of the month. – Photo by Wayne Anderson SIREN – This year’s overwinter bees produced sounds of happiness, disappointment and hope to carry on at the Northland Beekeepers club in their first meeting of the year Monday night, March 28. With the coming of spring, the news from local hives reported more than half of the club members experienced heavy colony losses, even after a fairly mild winter. One club member said one of his hives just “vanished” in January. Bees vacating a hive in the dead of winter is a troubling sign. But even with apiary mysteries, club members new and old are gearing up for another round for this honey season. The

bees are already bringing in pussy willow pollen. And new package bees and equipment are on order, with local retailers getting into the business. The Burnett Dairy Cooperative in Alpha is selling only bee supplies. But Blain’s Farm & Fleet in Rice Lake is selling actual bees and the supplies. This year a 3-pound package of bees with a queen was $129.99. Longtime beekeeper and club member Paul Ekblad, 87, said when he started beekeeping during the Truman administration in 1946, a package of bees was $5. The worries over deadly varroa mites and colony collapse disorder, which are known to devastate bee colonies, were

raised. And thus the debate of using chemical treatment versus organic practices to combat these adversaries was debated. The federal government is also concerned over the loss of bees. “Honeybee pollination alone adds more than $15 billion in value to agricultural crops each year in the United States,” said President Obama in an executive memorandum. “Scientists believe that bee losses are likely caused by a combination of stressors including poor bee nutrition, loss of forage lands, parasites, pathogens, lack of genetic diversity and exposure to pesticides,” the memorandum stated. A federal Pollinator Health Task Force

has been developed to determine the loss of bees. The honeybee is nature’s greatest pollinator and friend to agriculture. The Northland Beekeepers meet every fourth Monday of the month at the Burnett County Government Center in Siren at 7 p.m. There is no cost and all are welcome. For more information, contact Vicki and Gary Schaaf at 715-866-5122. The Polk Burnett Beekeepers Association meets every third Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Polk County Justice Center in Balsam Lake. – from Wayne Anderson

LUMBER JACK’S OPENS IN MILLTOWN

Lumber Jack’s chefs (L to R): Dave, Jason and Joe with bartender Samantha. The menu offers everything from fine dining to comfort foods and basic burger choices. An all-you-can-eat salad bar is available every day, with tacos added Monday through Wednesday and Friday night will feature an all-you-can-eat cod fish fry.

After nine months of renovations, Lumber Jack’s Saloon and Pizzeria opened Monday, March 28, on Milltown’s Main Street in the former Mill Inn building. A summer grand opening is being planned. Lumber Jack’s is open for breakfast at 7 a.m. every morning, and closes every night at 2 a.m. — Photos by Mary Stirrat


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SPRING SPORTS FREDERIC • GRANTSBURG • LUCK • ST. CROIX FALLS • SIREN • UNITY • WEBSTER BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Frederic/Luck tops Saints in season opener Frederic/Luck 15, SCF 8 Marty Seeger|Staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Frederic/ Luck softball team took advantage of a slim Saints roster on Thursday, March 24, in both of the West Lakeland teams first games of the season. St. Croix Falls was without a handful of starters due either to injury for spring break according to coach Clayton Hanson, and Frederic/Luck took full advantage, banging out 21 hits and scoring 15 runs. After Frederic/Luck got a run on a Saints error in the first inning, St. Croix Falls responded with a bases loaded tworun double to left field by Adrienne Stoffel. The Saints 2-1 lead was short-lived however, as Frederic/Luck scored five runs on four hits, starting with a single by Kyla Melin, and an RBI single by Tasian Arjes. Kalyn Miller legged out an infield single and two runs scored on passed balls. Isabelle Jensen also smacked an RBI single in the inning before Saints pitcher Katie Kopp stopped the bleeding with a strikeout, but not before Frederic/Luck had taken a 6-2 lead. From that point on, the Saints couldn’t recover despite scoring two runs in the bottom of the second. Frederic/Luck continued to hit the ball well, scoring another five runs in the top of the third. Frederic/Luck also had a handful of solid defensive plays in the win. Frederic/Luck used two pitchers in the win including Sophie Fredericks who went six innings while allowing 12 hits, seven earned runs with four walks and six strikeouts. Arjes pitched one inning with one run, no hits and two strikeouts. Saints pitcher Katie Kopp finished with

Brooklyn Petersen of the Frederic/Luck softball team flops into second base as a Saints infielder Madi Snyder attempts to catch a wide throw from the outfield on Thursday, March 24, in St. Croix Falls. – Photos by Marty Seeger unless otherwise noted seven strikeouts and three walks. Top hitters for Frederic/Luck included Arjes, Melin, Miller and Emily Amundson each with three hits. Fredericks went

Frederic/Luck players collide while going after a pop-fly hit by the Saints, and still managed to get the out. – Photo by Becky Amundson

4 for 5 at the plate, and Amundson and Jensen both drove in three runs along with Addie Musial.

The weather was cool on Thursday, March 24, in St. Croix Falls, but playable as Frederic/ Luck and St. Croix Falls were successful in completing their first games of the season.

Extra Points

••• LEADER LAND – The UW-Superior Yellowjackets women’s softball team finished the month of March with a 10-4 record. Yellowjackets senior starting infielder and Unity native Brittany Thomfohrda has the team’s fourth-highest batting average at .328. She has started all 18 games this season and has 20 hits with four doubles and three triples. Former Grantsburg standout and Yellowjackets sophomore pitcher Macy Hanson has a 1-2 record this season and has pitched the second-most innings on the team with 28. She currently has a 2.00 ERA, striking out 40 batters so far with one save. She has started four times this season. – uwsyellowjackets.com ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete playing collegiate sports in 2016 who hasn’t been mentioned, or could be mentioned again, send us an email or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 11 p.m. on Tuesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! SPORTS NEWS OR SCORES TO REPORT? • PHONE: 715-327-4236 • FAX: 715-327-4117 • EMAIL: mseeger@leadernewsroom.com

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Frederic, Siren athletes compete at state youth wrestling tournament MADISON – Athletes from Frederic and Siren competed at the Wisconsin Wrestling Federation Kids Folkstyle State Championships on Friday and Saturday, March 25-26, at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison. Before making it to state, Nolan Johnson of Frederic took second at the regional tournament, and finished second at state in the 80-pound bracket for his age. It was his third trip to state. Johnson is the son of Larry and Jennifer Johnson. Taedon Nichols of Siren also competed at state. He is the son of Jake and Karen Nichols. He took first at regionals in the 70-pound bracket for his age, and fifth overall at the state tournament. This was Nichols fifth time competing at state. – Marty Seeger with submitted information

Nolan Johnson of Frederic and another athlete get set to wrestle at the state tournament.

Taedon Nichols of Siren, with the black headgear, reaches for the leg of an opponent at state.

Nolan Johnson, left, of Frederic and Taedon Nichols of Siren, pose at the Wisconsin youth state wrestling tournament at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison.

Saints youth wrestlers qualify for state

LFGS wrestlers earn all-conference

The St. Croix Falls youth wrestling program is sending several wrestlers to the state tournament. Pictured back row (L to R): Caleb Bents, Bennett Bergmann, Luke Thaemert, Tanner Gaffey and Kyle Zehm. Front: Brett Sladke, Kellen Kelly, Brady Belisle, Eli Prokop and Mia Teeselink. Not pictured, Lily Andersen. – Photo submitted From the Luck/Frederic/Grantsburg/Siren Coop Wrestling program, seniors Cole Britton and Parker Steen were selected to the West Lakeland All-Conference team. – Photo submitted

Webster track competes at Superior Marty Seeger|Staff writer SUPERIOR – The Webster track and field team competed at the Little Jacket Invitational on Thursday, March 24, with several positive outcomes and performances from athletes. Overall the performances were a good starting point as the season slowly gets under way. “I think it is safe to say the coaching staff was pleased with the performances. I know they exceeded my expectations. Some of them really set the bar high,” said coach Roy Ward. Depth will be an issue for the Tigers this season according to Ward, who also said they treated the invite more like a practice than an actual meet. “Each athlete now has a baseline performance and has a couple weeks to get ready for our first outdoor meet in Spooner,” Ward said. First-place finishers at the meet included Skyler Winkler in the 55-meter dash, and Kaitlyn Moser in the shot put, with 33 feet, 8 inches at the indoor meet held at UW-Superior. Sadie Koelz had a record-breaking day in the pole vault, clearing 9 feet, 3 inches. In the boys events, Andrew Ruiz finished very strong in the 1,600-meter run with 5:00.33, and the 4x800-meter relay team took first with a time of 9:23.11,

The Webster track team completed their first meet of the season on Thursday, March 24, at Superior. – Photo submitted which included Ruiz, Darrick Nelson, Mason Schaaf and Joey Formanek. The

4x400-meter relay team also finished first with 3:51.12, which includes Ruiz, For-

manek, Dustin Kern and Jamison Matrious.


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Special Olympics basketball teams headed to state

Two out of three Polk County basketball teams who competed at the University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point recently, qualified to compete at state. The Cougars lost both games played in Stevens Point, ending their season with fourth-place ribbons. The Lakers and Rockets both won their games in Stevens Point, qualifying them to advance to state competition in Oshkosh on Saturday and Sunday, April 9-10. Pictured at left are the Lakers (L to R): Steven Kicker, Osceola; Russell Anderson, Clayton; Randy Anderson, Amery; Chris Richter, Frederic; and Charlie Casarez, New Richmond. – Photos submitted

The Polk County Rockets basketball team qualified for state. They include (L to R): Coach Dave Neidermire, Tim Eggers, Frederic; Liz Wrensch, Clayton; Jarvis Warwas, Frederic; Jason Neidermire, East Farmington; Cole Johnson, Clayton; Ben Olson, Frederic; and Jordin Anderson, Clayton. Not pictured, coach Pat Meier.

ClubRed U14, U16 volleyball teams share first-place success at March Mania tournament

On Sunday, March 20, the ClubRed U14 Elite volleyball team finished first out of 20 teams in the Gold Bracket at the March Mania Tournament held in the Wisconsin Dells. Pictured back row (L to R): Coach Carrie Olson, Sophie Reed, Melanie Doll, Ellie Duncan, Olivia Ohnstad and coach Jen Olson. Front: Sydney Bents, Brenna Olson, Sidney Hoverman, Carley Nelson, Lily Hacker and Addi Anderson. – Photo submitted

In the photo above, the U14 ClubRed volleyball team is pictured along with the ClubRed U16 team, which also took first place at the March Mania Tournament in Wisconsin Dells. Pictured back row (L to R): Coach Carrie Olson, Taylor Howe, Addie McCurdy, Sam Bents, Ciara DeLozier, Rebecca Morrison, Joanna Ingram, Sidney Hoverman and coach Jen Nelson. Middle: Ashton Anderson, Jada Wyman, Brenna Olson, Melanie Doll, Carly Nelson and Sophie Reed. Front: Olivia Ohnstad, Ellie Duncan, Addi Anderson and Sydney Bents. Not pictured, Lily Hacker.


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Free-throw contest winners from Council 6370 FREDERIC – The Frederic Parish Council 6370 Knights of Columbus congratulate the winners from area schools who competed in the free-throw contests over the winter and early spring. Schools include Luck, Frederic, Grantsburg and Siren.

Winners from the Luck area include back row (L to R): Connor Svoboda, 10; Gavyn Ellefson, 11; and Wyatt Jensen, 12. Front: Makenna Eley, 10; and Taeven Callahan, 11. – Photos submitted

Winners from the Grantsburg area include back row (L to R): Carson Knutson, 12; and Reed Arnold, 12. Front: Aiden Erickson, 9; and Silas Prusinski, 10. Not pictured: Blake Ulmaniec, 11; and Bruce Lindeau, 13.

LEFT: Pictured from Frederic in the back row include Carter Wondra, 9; Jameson Wink, 10; and Knights of Columbus member Charley Altstatt. Front: Mariah Lemieux, 11; Vivian Jorgenson, 10; and Hailey Ridgeway, 9.

Knights of Columbus member John Donlin stands next to Grantsburg girls winners of the freethrow contest. Pictured back row (L to R): Donlin, McKayla Blume, 12; Ellie Duncan, 13; and Alexis Troff, 14. Front: Megan Schafer, 9; Carley Cross, 10; and Hanne Johnson, 11.

Another group of free-throw winners from Frederic include (L to R): Logan Lillehauge, 14; Karlie Alexander, 12; Justin Blechinger, 12; and Knights of Columbus member Charley Altstatt.

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL Lakeland-West Standings Team Conf. Cameron 0-0 Grantsburg 0-0 Luck/Frederic 0-0 Shell Lake 0-0 Siren 0-0 St. Croix Falls 0-0 Turtle Lake/Clayton 0-0 Unity 0-0 Webster 0-0

SOFTBALL Overall 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Upcoming Thursday, March 31 4:30 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Amery Friday, April 1 5 p.m. Webster vs. New Lisbon at Woodside Sports Complex Unity at St. Croix Central Saturday, April 2 2 p.m. Webster vs. Shell Lake at Woodside Sports Complex Tuesday, April 5 5 p.m. Unity at Clear Lake

TRACK & FIELD

Lakeland-West Standings Team Conf. Cameron 0-0 Frederic/Luck 1-0 Grantsburg 0-0 Shell Lake 0-0 St. Croix Falls 0-1 Turtle Lake/Clayton 0-0 Unity 0-0 Webster/Siren 0-0

Overall 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-0

Scores Thursday, March 24 Frederic/Luck 15, St. Croix Falls 8 Upcoming Friday, April 1 5 p.m. Spooner at Webster Rush City, Minn. at Frederic Monday, April 4 5 p.m. Unity at Amery Tuesday, April 5 5 p.m. Northwestern at Grantsburg

Upcoming Friday, April 1 TBD Unity at Northwestern Tuesday, April 5 4 p.m. Spooner Invitational (Frederic/Luck, Grantsburg, Webster)

Siren winners, pictured back row (L to R): Russell Cook, 13; and Nathan Kosloski, 14. Front: Josie Hagert, 12; Hannah Lemieux, 13; and Ellen Lindquist, 14. Not pictured, Brady Kosloski, 12.


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West Lakeland All-Conference basketball teams

The West Lakeland All-Conference girls basketball team includes back row (L to R): Taylor Alseth, Frederic; Emily Amundson, Frederic; Ann Chenal, Frederic; Cassidy Lee, Grantsburg; Addie McCurdy, St. Croix Falls; and Kaitlyn Moser, Webster. Front: Raelin Sorensen, Unity; Gabrielle Foeller, Unity; Ashlee Rightman, Siren; Caitlyn Daniels, Siren; and Laurel Kannenberg, Siren. Inset photo: Emma Pedersen, Luck.

The West Lakeland All-Conference boys basketball team includes back row (L to R): Taylor Hawkins, Luck; Noah Mortel, Luck; Tate Fohrenkamm, Webster; and Alex Johnson, St. Croix Falls. Middle: Neil Oustigoff, Siren; Aaron Ruud, Siren; Erik Peterson, Unity; Logan Bader, Unity; and Nathan Heimstead, Unity. Front: John Chenal, Grantsburg; Jordan Knutson, Grantsburg; Jaeger Staeven, Grantsburg; and Roman Poirier, Frederic. – Photos submitted

AREA BOWLING RESULTS Hacker’s Lanes Monday Afternoon Retired Standings: Vultures 31, Bears 27, Swans 27, Eagles 24, Hummingbirds 23, Mallards 22, Badgers 22, Night Hawks 17 Men’s games: Jim Merritt 214, Dennis Bohn 197, Lloyd Swanson 185. Men’s series: Dave Bannie 545, Lloyd Swanson 541, Dale Johnson 488. Women’s games: Marge Traun 174, Mary Young 169, Barbara Austad 168. Women’s series: Marge Traun 488, Nancy Anderson 459, Pat Bresina 442. Team games: Swans 642, Vultures 624, Bears 621. Team series: Vultures 1795, Eagles 1791, Bears 1783. Tuesday Classic Standings: Maurer Power 107.5, Yellow Lake Lodge 106.5, House of Wood 88.5, S&G 78.5, Pioneer Bar 52. Individual games: Curtis Renfroe 242, Don Swenson 234, David Hall 229. Individual series: Curtis Renfroe 631, Dale Frandsen 624, Dale Gregory & Don Swenson 600. Team games: S&G 647, House of Wood 641, Yellow Lake Lodge 606. Team series: House of Wood 1754, Maurer Power 1740, S&G 1664. Games 50 pins or more above avg.: Curtis Renfroe 242 (+58), David Hall 229 (+57), Don Swenson 234 (+55). Splits converted: 3-10: Curtis Renfroe, Tony Wilson, Bill Hacker. 2-5-7: Bill Hacker. 2-7: Bruce Norstrem (2x). 2-7-8: Bruce Norstrem. Wednesday Night Early Standings: Pioneer Bar 33, Hansen Farms 32, Cifaldi Motors 28, Skol Bar 27, Cummings Lumber 24, Stotz & Co. 24, Luck Laundry 23, Bye 1. Individual games: Gene Wynn Jr. (HF) 258, Gene Wynn Sr. (HF) 235, Jeremy Anderson (SB) 234. Individual series: Gene Wynn Jr. (HF) 651, Gene Wynn Sr. (HF) 618, Dale Frand-

sen (SC) 592. Team games: Skol Bar 948, Cifaldi Motors 923, Hansen Farms 919. Team series: Skol Bar 2699, Hansen Farms 2616, Luck Laundry 2500. Thursday Early Standings: Fab Four 38, LakeLand Communications 33, Grindell Law Offices 29.5, Red Iron Studios 27, American Family Siren 25.5, Backwoods Beer & Bait 23.5, Hell Raisers 17, Wikstrom Construction 14.5. Individual games: Curtis Renfroe (LC) 243, Bruce Wikstrom (WC) 219, Don McKinney (FF) 215. Individual series: Curtis Renfroe (LC) 602, Dave Grindell (GLO) 571, Don McKinney (FF) 567. Team games: LakeLand Communications 581, Fab Four 567, Red Iron Studios 541. Team series: Fab Four 1627, LakeLand Communications 1569, Grindell Law Offices 1532. Consecutive strikes (5 or more): Bruce Wikstrom 219 (5x), Curtis Renfroe 243 (7x). Games 50 or more above avg.: Curtis Renfroe 243 (+58), Bruce Wikstrom 219 (+59). Splits converted: 2-4-8-10: Dennis Lieder (AFS). 2-4-5-10: Bruce Wikstrom (WC). 3-10: Karen Carlson (BBB), Kanan Hackett. 4-5: Jeff Janetto (WC). Friday Night Standings: Frederic Design & Promotion 47, The Leader 43, Junque Art 38, Pin Heads 26. Individual games: Jen Ellefson 208, Karen Carlson 195, Dorothy Barfknecht 187. Individual series: Jen Ellefson 494, Sheila Hansen 490, Karen Carlson 480. Team games: Frederic Design & Promotion 806, Pin Heads 791, The Leader 784. Team series: Frederic Design & Promotion 2317, The Leader 2313, Pin Heads 2269. Splits converted: 3-6-7-10: Dorothy Barfknecht. 3-10: Tammy Lindberg.

McKenzie Lanes Monday Night Ladies Standings: Edina Divas 85.5, Sam’s Carpentry 78.5, Jensen Sundquist Insurance 78, McKenzie Lanes 68, Gutterbugs 50.5, Wolf Creek Log Furniture 47.5. Individual games: Kathy McKenzie 198, Toni Sloper 193, Patty Walker 192. Individual series: Kathy McKenzie 579, Helen Leggitt 515, Cindy Castellano 506. Team games (Handicap): McKenzie Lanes 837. Team series (Handicap): McKenzie Lanes 2473. Tuesday Night Men’s Standings: Hack’s Pub 51.5, GA Screenprinting 48.5, The Cobbler Shop 47.5, Steve’s Appliance Plus 45, The Dugout 44, Logoton PC 36.5, Edina Realty 27, Bye 0. Individual games: Craig Willert 267, Rick Katzmark 259, Darren McKenzie 258. Individual series: Darren McKenzie 730, Kevin Ek 702, Craig Willert 667. Team games (Handicap): Hack’s Pub 1286. Team series (Handicap): Hack’s Pub 3581.

Tuesday Women’s Standings: Main Street Cafe 133, Gutter Dusters 129, Tomlinson Insurance 127.5, Split Happens 125, Jeff’s Small Engine 116.5, Kassel Tap 113, Hauge Dental 107, Custom Outfitter 100. Individual games: Jan Kruse 197, Linda Goulet & Lisa King 186. Individual series: Shirley Wiswell 526, Jan Kruse 525, Patti Katzmark 500. Team games (Handicap): Gutter Dusters 863, Hauge Dental 849, Jeff’s Small Engine 845. Team series (Handicap): Main Street Cafe 2390, Hauge Dental 2384, Jeff’s Small engine & Gutter Dusters 2380. Wednesday Night Men’s Standings: Tiger Express 23, McKenzie Lanes 23, Jeff’s Small Engine 23, Captain’s Bar & Grill 20, Hanjo Farms 20, Fox Ridge Farm 13, 5 J’s Sports Bar 11, Dalles Electric 11. Individual games: Jason Steffen 279, Derek Swenson 259, Carl Hetfeld 258. Individual series: Jason Steffen 717, Craig Willert 701, Jim Alt 689. Team games (Handicap): McKenzie Lanes 1179, Tiger Express 1121. Team series (Handicap): Tiger Express 3186, McKenzie Lanes 3172. Thursday Night Ladies Standings: Soul Sisters 82.5, Hauge Dental 75, JJ’s 71.5, Hack’s Pub 70, Central Bank 70, Eagle Valley Bank 60.5, TL Enterprise 60, Cutting Edge Pro 54.5. Individual games: Debbie Korsan 204, Annette Norlander 199, Louise Cole 198. Individual series: Dawn High 556, Annette Norlander 525, Lonnie Stowell & Debbie Korsan 514. Team games (Handicap): Eagle Valley Bank 801, Hack’s Pub 794, Central Bank 762. Team series (Handicap): Hack’s Pub 2278, Soul Sisters 2227, JJ’s 2194.

Black & Orange Monday Night Standings: Bruce’s Auto 36-8, Yellow River Saloon 24-20, Larry’s LP 15-29, Back & Orange 13-31. Individual games: Neil Huppert (YRS) 228, Matt Strese (L) 225, Josh Johnson (L) 224. Individual series: Josh Johnson (L) 640, Neil Huppert (YRS) 607, Lloyd Katusky (B&O) 571. Team games: Black & Orange 1046, Larry’s LP 1034, Bruce’s Auto 1011. Team series: Larry’s LP 3024, Yellow River Saloon 2945, Black & Orange 2944. Games 50 or more above avg.: Matt Strese 225 (+82), Aaron Landin 203 (+52). Splits Converted: 6-7: Tim Vasatka. Tuesday Tippers Standings: The Shop, A&H Country Market, Gob’s Gals, West Point Lodge. Individual games: Laura Main (TS) 186, Cindy Hesik (GG) 167, Vivian Marx (GG) 158. Individual series: Vivian Marx (GG) 464, Laura Main (TS) 448, Cindy Hesik (GG) 435. Team games: The Shop 575, A&H Country Market 553, Gob’s Gals 531. Team series: Gob’s Gals 1568, The Shop 1558, A&H Country Market 1527. Games 50 or more above avg.: Laura Main. TNT Standings: Northwoods Lumber 38-10, Larry’s LP 29-19, Flower Power 27-21, Vacant 2-46. Individual games: Jennifer Kern (L) 194, Sue Eytcheson (FP) 181, Cheryl Scallon (NL) 172. Individual series: Jennifer Kern (L) 578, Sue Eytcheson (FP) 472, Cheryl Scallon (NL) 458. Team games: Larry’s LP 854, Northwoods Lumber 827, Flower Power 810. Team series: Larry’s LP 2527, Flower Power 2412, Northwoods Lumber 2367.


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

I N T E R- C O U N T Y LE ADE R

OUTDOORS ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

DNR Spring Hearings/Conservation Congress annual county meetings April 11 Polk County annual fish and wildlife public meeting April 11 STATEWIDE – Wisconsin residents will be able to nominate and elect local representatives to the Wisconsin Conservation Congress and express support or nonsupport for a range of advisory questions on conservation and natural resources management issues at the congress’ spring meetings held in every county of the state on Monday, April 11, starting at 7 p.m. The county meeting is held jointly with the Department of Natural Resources Spring Hearings. For those unfamiliar with the Wisconsin Conservation Congress, it is a statutorily established advisory group to the state Natural Resources Board on all natural resource issues. “In Polk County, the joint DNR and Conservation Congress annual county meeting will be held at the Unity High School, auditorium, 1908 State Hwy. 46, in Balsam Lake, 54810,” said Wally Trudeau, chair of the Polk County delegation. The Burnett County meeting will take place at

the Burnett County Government Center, Room 165, 7410 CTH K, Siren, 54872. At the meetings, citizens will have the opportunity to comment and register their support or nonsupport for congress proposals that could someday become the rules that regulate fishing, hunting, trapping and other outdoor recreation activities in Wisconsin. They may also submit resolutions addressing conservation needs or concerns they observe. “Citizens have the opportunity to weigh in on natural resources issues that may affect them. The congress asks these questions to gauge the public’s support, or lack thereof, on any given issue,” said Trudeau. Results of the public’s input on these proposals will be presented to the Natural Resources Board in May 2016. If there is support for a proposal, the advisory question could become a DNR rule change proposal in following years. This year the Conservation Congress will seek public input on 33 advisory questions on a range of topics, some of which include: • A proposal to eliminate the “artificial only” restriction from regular season trout regulations; • A proposal to create a Senior Citizen

Conservation Patron License; • A proposal to disallow permanent waterfowl blinds on public lands; • A proposal to ban lead fishing tackle and ban lead shot on DNR managed lands; • A proposal to increase hunting, fishing and trapping license fees; • A proposal for registration of nonmotorized watercraft. “Conservation Congress advisory questions generally originate from citizens’ ideas,” said Rob Bohmann, chairman of the Wisconsin Conservation Congress. “If resolutions presented at the county level meetings are supported, the resolution is advanced to one of the congress’ advisory committees and the congress executive council for consideration. “Each year, there are over 200 resolutions submitted locally. Not all pass, but the ones that do have the potential to become a rule, policy or legislative change in the subsequent years,” Bohmann said. “It is a true grassroots process that empowers the citizens of this state to shape natural resources policy.” Anyone submitting resolutions must submit two copies of their resolution typed or neatly printed on 8-1/2 by 11inch white paper. Resolution writing

instructions and a template for writing a resolution are available online at dnr. wi.gov/About/WCC/springhearing. html. In addition to the congress advisory questions, the county meeting is also reserved for the election of delegates to the Wisconsin Conservation Congress. To vote for congress delegates, one must be 18 years old and provide identification along with proof of residency in the county. “There will be two seats up for election in Polk County in 2016,” stated Trudeau. “Any citizen of the county who is a Wisconsin resident and is at least 18 years of age may be nominated to the congress for a two- or three-year term. Nominees must be willing to volunteer their time and represent their local citizens on natural resource issues.” For more information, contact Trudeau at 715-268- 2304. – submitted

Trumpeter swan numbers soar from zero to 4,700 in a generation 2015 estimates six times higher than last aerial survey MADISON - The number of trumpeter swans in Wisconsin has zoomed from zero to nearly 4,700 a generation after the Department of Natural Resources and partners launched recovery efforts, national surveys results show. Population estimates from aerial surveys of interior North America peg Wisconsin’s number of adult and “sub-adult” trumpeter swans at 4,695 birds in 2015, more than six times as many as the 672 estimated during the last survey five years ago, and up from 24 in 1990. “Working with many partners, Wisconsin DNR over the past quarter century has used the tax check off and other funding sources to restore a healthy and growing population of trumpeter swans that is part of a regional resurgence,” says Sumner Matteson, an avian ecologist for the DNR Natural Heritage Conservation program and the biologist who collected the first egg from Alaska in 1989 that launched the Wisconsin recovery program. “It’s gratifying for all the partners involved that we’ve had this success.” Matteson said that if it had not been for the support and interest of the public in restoring species through the tax check off, private donations and federal grants, the recovery of trumpeter swans in Wisconsin would not have happened. “This has been a model of success between the public and private sector to restore part of our heritage once lost,” he says. “It’s also a good example of persistence and patience, which is especially important with the restoration of endangered birds.” Market hunting and demand for the feathers of trumpeter swans brought these birds, one of North America’s largest, to near elimination from Wisconsin and other upper Midwest states by the

Wisconsin’s trumpeter swan recovery program has been a great success and numbers of the beautiful bird continue to grow. Trumpeter swans, like the ones pictured above, have become a common sight across the state, including Polk County, where these birds were spotted. – Leader file photo by Marty Seeger 1880s. Wisconsin put the species on the state’s endangered species list in the 1980s, which made it illegal to kill, transport, possess, process or sell them, and launched a recovery effort that collected eggs from the wilds of Alaska, hatched them at the Milwaukee Zoo, and reared the young in the wild using decoys, and in captivity, before releasing them. Scores of organizations, businesses and private individuals worked to carry out the recovery effort with state wildlife managers, technicians, research scientists, University of Wisconsin-Madison wildlife ecologists and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service staff. Two of the private partners, Mary and Terry Kohler of Sheboygan, were honored in 2012 by the state Natural Resources Board for their role in helping transport the eggs used in the recovery program from Alaska, and for their financial help. The Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin helped secure much needed

funding, while the Endangered Resources Fund and the bird’s protected status under the endangered species law both significantly aided outreach efforts and helped to fund Wisconsin’s monitoring efforts. Trumpeter swans reached the recovery goal early – more than doubling the 20 breeding pairs hoped for by 2000 – and Wisconsin removed it from the endangered species list in 2009. Trumpeter swans remain protected under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty, which celebrates its centennial this year. Annual DNR surveys to monitor trumpeter swan nests and to band new hatchlings ended in 2012. The national aerial survey, conducted once every five years, is now the main way Wisconsin keeps tabs on trumpeters. This survey counts all the white trumpeter swans seen along transect routes, not just the number of adults actively sitting on nests, so the numbers are much higher in the aerial surveys than the nesting surveys.

The 2015 North American survey was conducted in Wisconsin in mid-May by DNR biologists, research scientists and pilots who flew along established routes to count ducks and other waterfowl, with special additional routes established to focus only on adult and “subadult” swans. Subadults or nonbreeding swans are white like the adults. Other states’ recovery efforts have been working as well, particularly in Minnesota, which launched the first Midwestern efforts, and where the 2015 surveys estimated 17,021 birds. Together, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan (3,021 birds) comprise most of the 27,000 birds in what is known as the Interior Trumpeter Swan Population, which is comprised largely of restoration flocks. For management purposes, there are considered to be two other trumpeter swan populations: the Pacific Coast Population and the Rocky Mountain Population. – from dnr.wi.gov


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 19

Follow the Leader.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SOCIAL WORKER

Full-time position available with Burnett County in N.W. Wisconsin. www.burnettcounty.com for further details or 715-349-2181. Application deadline: Until position is filled. EOE. 643778 22-23a,b,c 33-34L

NOTICE TOWN OF LORAIN CEMETERY COMMITTEE MEETING

A Public Hearing Will Be Held On Sat., April 9, 1 p.m. At The Lorain Town Hall For The Purpose To Address The Issue Of The Comprehensive Land Use County Plan To Take Effect Sept. 15, 2016.

Agenda: Call meeting to order, motion to approve the agenda, information and discussion on pros and cons of county zoning, possible advisory vote from the electors for the board, motion to adjourn. Town of Lorain Commission: Steven Larson, Chair 643667 33L 23a WNAXLP Susan E. Huges, Clerk

- SENIOR LIVING IMMEDIATE OPENING THE FRANDSEN APARTMENTS

Brand-new, 1-BR unit

850

$

/mo.

All utilities included except phone & electric. Lawn care/snow removal included.

South First Street, Luck, WI

Call Kyle At 715-566-3432

641948 27Ltfc 17a,dtfc

Located one block off Main St. Close to library, clinic & shopping.

LICENSED OR EXPERIENCED CHAIRSIDE DENTAL ASSISTANT Please send resume to email: mccormackdentistry@gmail.com

Steven McCormack, DDS St. Croix Falls

715-483-3570

Bella Salon and Day Spa Attn.: Jenna, P.O. Box 317, Luck, WI 54853 715-472-4222

CAREER OPPORTUNITY PART-TIME DIETARY AIDE

EOE

HELP WANTED Summer Is Just Around The Corner!

Burnett Dairy Cooperative is currently hiring part-time Cheese Store Clerks and Bistro workers. The right people for these positions are prompt, efficient, courteous and above all have excellent customer service skills. Job duties include, but are not limited to: Cashiering, stocking shelves and coolers, maintaining a clean and sanitary work area and helping customers with their transactions. To be qualified for either position, a person must be comfortable using a computer, be able to collect money and make change, be comfortable working with food products and demonstrate excellent customer service skills. This job requires constant standing, infrequent lifting of up to 50 pounds and the ability to work as part of a team in a fast-paced, pleasant work environment. Similar clerk experience preferred. Schedule: Part-time days, evenings and weekends with shifts ranging in the timeframe of 7:45 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. These positions offer competitive wages, 401(k) and profit sharing.

Please apply in person at Burnett Dairy Office, 11631 State Road 70, Grantsburg, WI 54840. Applications are also available at www.burnettdairy.com/employment

643928 33-34L 23-24a,d

Criminal background check required. 643091 20-22ap 31-33Lp

FOR RENT Downtown Centuria. Nice backyard with fire pit. $ per month Available Now Water, sewer & garbage included. Background check. First month’s rent & damage deposit.

525

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

GRANT WRITER SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT Job Description: The School District of Siren has opened up a search for a Grant Writer at approximately 10 hours/week for the 2016-2017 school year. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply immediately. Qualifications:

Candidates should possess the following skills/ abilities: • Grant writing experience • One who can compile data and conduct proper research • One who possess strong technological skills • Someone who is a self-starter • One who can collaborate and coordinate with other team members

Requirements:

Someone who has served within an educational environment.

How to Apply:

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest and credentials to: Dr. Kevin Shetler, District Administrator School District of Siren 24022 4th Ave 643639 Siren, WI 54872 32-33L 22-23a

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Grantsburg School District March 17, 2016

HELP WANTED

The�City of St. Croix Falls�is seeking qualified individuals to fulfill an Equipment & Water Operator position that reports to the Public Works Coordinator.�The position performs repair and maintenance related to City streets, public works, water and sanitary sewer utilities.�Applicants must possess a valid Wisconsin Class B Commercial driver’s license (CDL) and must obtain Class A Commercial driver’s license with Tanker endorsement within a year. Ideal candidates should possess strong communication skills, knowledge of the methods, materials, equipment and tools used in the repair and maintenance of streets, sanitary and storm sewers, ditches, sidewalks and trees. A working knowledge of water and sewer utility functions and underground utility construction is desired.�Strong mechanical and electrical aptitude and snowplowing experience required.�Must possess the physical ability to sustain long workdays and be able to function effectively in the outdoors in cold, hot or inclement weather.�The position is classified as emergency personnel and must have the ability to respond to emergencies after hours or on weekends. Additional requirements include high school diploma or GED and experience in a municipal public works department or public works construction experience in the position of equipment operator or laborer. Wastewater Certification preferred and/or experience working with wastewater treatment and must obtain Wastewater Basic Certification within one year of hire. Within two years of hire, must obtain the Municipal Water Supply Operator Certifications, including groundwater and distribution, and any other certifications required by the City in the future. Firefighter training strongly weighs in applicant’s favor. Wage range $23.69 - $25.52. Please submit employment application to the City Administrator at 710 S. Highway 35, St. Croix Falls, WI, 54024.�Employment application can be found online at www.cityofstcroixfalls.com or at St. Croix Falls City Hall.�The City is an equal opportunity employer. Applications due to the City Administrator by�Friday, April 15, at noon CST. Position 643999 33L open until filled.

Please call 715-866-8177 or email campoffice@herzlcamp.org for an application.

643273 21-22a,d 32-33L

United Pioneer Home 715-472-2164

Now accepting applications for full-/part-time staff for maintenance & cleaning positions starting in April/May.

612-280-7581

Hours: 3 - 8 p.m. 5 - 6 days a pay period. Works every other weekend and rotating holidays. Training is provided. Apply Mon. - Fr. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

623 S. 2nd Street., Luck, WI 54853

FOR SUMMER CAMP

2-BR + 4-Season Porch Apartment

643797 22a,c,d 33L

NOTICE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF LORAIN, POLK COUNTY

Please send or stop in with your resume:

643663 32-33L 22-23a,d,e

Sat., April 9, At 10:30 a.m. At The Town Hall

Agenda: Call to order, roll call, review of the previous year activities, possible advisory items for the town board. Motion to adjourn. Susan E. Hughes, Clerk

643815 22-23a,d 33-34L

Bella Salon and Day Spa is seeking a Cosmetologist to join our staff. Positions available at both our Grantsburg and Luck locations.

HELP WANTED

Job Title High School Special Education Teacher Job Description Full-time Special Education Teacher for the 2016-2017 school year. Applicants with certification in Special Education are strongly encouraged to apply. 100% FTE. Qualifications Appropriate Wisconsin DPI Certification in Cross Categorical LD, CD OR EBD Special Education or the ability to obtain one of the above licenses. Requirements Special Education Cross Categorical experience preferred. High school teaching experience preferred. Applicants are required to work effectively with the high school special education team to design and implement high-quality educational programming for our students. Excellent interpersonal communication skills and the ability to work in conjunction with building administration and classroom teachers to provide innovative behavior management approaches are necessary. Knowledge of IEP writing and management, referral process, functional behavior assessments, co-teaching instruction based on the needs of the student as outlined in the IEP, and successful cross categorical programs is required. Applicants should possess the skills necessary to communicate effectively and collaborate with parents, county service workers and multiple service providers in order to build educational partnerships. Applicants need to be prepared to deal with all aspects of the personal, social and academic needs of high school students. Interested applicants should be willing to take part in school and student improvement initiatives. How to Apply Applicants are encouraged to apply by using the Wisconsin Education Career Access Network (WECAN) site at https:// services.education.wisc.edu/wecan/teachers/login/form2.cfm. You may also send a letter of application, resume, credentials (3 current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license to the address below. This posting will be open until filled. Contact: Josh Watt, Principal Grantsburg High School 480 East James Avenue Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2531

644062 33L

The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap. 643573 32-33L


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

news@leadernewsroom.com

RESOLUTION 10-16

AMENDMENTS TO THE TELECOMMUNICATION TOWERS, ANTENNAS AND RELATED FACILITIES ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted said ordinance by Resolution 29-13; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendment concerns substantial revisions to the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, enacted August 20, 2013, to bring said ordinance into compliance with Wisconsin Statute Section 66.0404; and WHEREAS, the lands affected by the proposed amendment are any lands within the unincorporated areas of Polk County; and WHEREAS, the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee held a public hearing on March 2, 2016, to amend the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance; and WHEREAS, a copy of the existing Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, proposed Amended Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, and map of the property affected by the amendment are attached to and incorporated herein. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain that the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance is amended in the attached Amended Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance. Adopted this 15th day of March, 2016, by the Polk County Board of Supervisors. 643922 33L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF PENDING APPLICATION FOR PROPOSED RIPRAP Barbara Richardson, P.O. Box 768, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024, has applied to the Department of Natural Resources for a permit to install riprap on the banks of Deer Lake. The project is located in the SW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 29, Township 34 North, Range 17 West, Town of Balsam Lake, Polk County. The Department will review the proposal provided by the applicant and any information from public comments and a public informational hearing, if requested. The Department will determine whether the proposal complies with ss. 1.11 and 30.12(3m), Stats., and ch. NR 150, Wis. Adm. Code, and ensure that the required mitigation meets the standards in s. 281.36(3r), Stats. if the project impacts wetlands. The Department has made a tentative determination that it will issue the permit or contract for the proposed activity. If you would like to know more about this project or would like to see the application and plans, please visit the Department’s permit tracking website at https://permits.dnr.wi.gov/water/ SitePages/Permit%20Search.aspx and search for. Reasonable accommodation, including the provision of informational material in an alternative format, will be provided for qualified individuals with disabilities upon request. An person may submit comments and/or request a public informational hearing by emailing Dan.Harrington@wisconsin.gov or writing to Dan Harrington, 810 West Maple Street, Spooner, WI 54801, by U.S. mail. If you are submitting general comments on the proposal, they must be emailed or postmarked within 30 days after the date this notice is published on the Department’s website. If you are requesting a public informational hearing, the request must be emailed or postmarked within 20 days after the date this notice is published on the Department’s website. A request for hearing must include the docket number or applicant name and specify the issues that the party desires to be addressed at the informational hearing. If no hearing is requested, the Department may issue its decision without a hearing. If a public informational hearing is held, comments must be postmarked no later than 10 days following the date on which the hearing is completed. The final decision may be appealed as indicated in the decision document. Docket Number: IP-NO-2016-49-00876 WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES For the Secretary 644027 33Lp WNAXLP Dan Harrington Water Management Specialist Date: 3/23/2016

(Mar. 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff vs. CHER M. BRADT, et al. Defendants Case No. 15 CV 0300 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 27, 2015, in the amount of $107,471.38, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the premises described below at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: April 12, 2016. at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens, encumbrances, and payment of applicable transfer taxes by purchaser. PLACE: In the Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis., 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot 4, Block 6, Original Plat of Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wis. ADDRESS: 506 River Street, Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO: 165-00025-000. Dated this 8th day of March, 2016. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff Mark R. Cummisford State Bar #1034906 7071 South 13th Street Suite #100 Oak Creek, WI 53154 414-761-1700 Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC, is the creditors’ attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 643181 WNAXLP

The next meeting of the BOARD OF DIRECTORS of the FREDERIC RURAL FIRE ASSOC. will be TUES. APR. 12, 6 p.m. at Fire Hall

NOTICE

TOWN OF LAKETOWN BURNING BAN

No burning allowed until after 6 p.m. from April 1 until June 1, 2016.

WNAXLP

Got a news tip? Opinion? Event? Send your information to

(Mar. 23, 30, Apr. 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY GSMPS MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-RP2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005RP2, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCESSOR-IN-INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE c/o CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES F. HOOBER and UNKNOWN SPOUSE of James F. Hoober Defendants. Case No. 15-CV-363 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $10,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 14, 2016, in the amount of $132,504.69, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 19, 2016, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW 1/4 of SE 1/4) Section Twenty-two (22), Township Thirty-four (34) North, Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest corner of said SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 thence East along the South line of said SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4, 302.0 feet to the point of begInning; thence continuing East, along said South line 458.0 feet; thence North, parallel with the West line of said SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4, 951.0 feet; thence West, parallel with said South line 458.0 feet; thence South parallel with said West line, 951.0 feet to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2041 140th Avenue, Town of St. Croix Falls. TAX KEY NO.: 044-00543-0000. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. 643506 WNAXLP

The Siren Sanitary District will hold their monthly Board Meeting on Thursday, April 14, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District Meeting, the Town of Siren will hold their monthly Board Meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. The agenda will be posted. If you wish to be on the agenda, please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk, 715-349-5119 644087 33-34L WNAXLP

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

644063 33-35L

Purchase a subscription and make your money go farther along with the covenience of having the news delivered to you.

(Mar. 30) NOTICE IN REPLEVIN STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Case Code 31003 Case No. 16-SC-148 To: PEDRO CRUZ JR. You are hereby notified that a summons and complaint has been issued to recover possession of the following described goods and chattels, to wit: 2007 CHEVROLET EQUINOX; VIN#2CNDL63F176053363 of which I, the plaintiff, am entitled to the possession, and which you have unjustly taken and unlawfully detain from me. NOW, THEREFORE, unless you shall File an Answer in the Circuit Court of Polk County, located in the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, State of Wisconsin, on April 18, 2016, at 1:30 p.m. before the calendar judge or any other judge of said court to whom the said action may be assigned for trial, judgment will be rendered against you for the delivery of said property to the plaintiff and for damages for the detention thereof and for costs. Dated at Milwaukee, WI, this 25th day of March, 2016. SANTANDER CONSUMER USA, INC. SUCCESSOR TO FIFTH THIRD BANK Plaintiff By: Jerome C. Johnson, Attorney State Bar# 1016307 839 N. Jefferson St., #200 Milwaukee, WI 53202 Tele.: 414-271-5400 PO No.: 1886.71 643960 WNAXLP

NOTICE - SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETINGS

643403 32-34L

NOTICES

ORDINANCE 05-16

POLK COUNTY TEMPORARY SPEED LIMIT ORDINANCE (WIS. STAT. S. 349.11(10)) TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, the Polk County Highway Department performs work on the Polk County system and the state highway system within the geographical boundaries of Polk County; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 349.11(10), the Highway Commissioner or his/her designee is authorized to, for the safety of the highway construction and maintenance workers, pedestrians and highway users, cause to be posted temporary speed limit less than the speed limit imposed regularly in their jurisdiction when a county highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, when performing maintenance on the state trunk highway system under s. 84.07, or in those instances with respect to highways not under its jurisdiction that are being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired by the local authority; and WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Polk County Public Safety and Highway Committee, it is in the interest of the County to enact an Ordinance that adopts and allows for the posting of temporary speed limits consistent with Wisconsin Statute Section 349.11(10). NOW, THEREFORE, the Polk County Board of Supervisors enacts the Polk County Temporary Speed Limit Ordinance and ordains as follows: 1. If a highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, temporary speed limits may be imposed as set forth in Wisconsin Statute s. 349.11(10). 2. The Polk County Highway Commissioner and in his/her absence, his/her Highway Superintendent or Foreman is authorized, at his/her discretion to impose mandatory temporary speed limits under the continuing authority of this section and without need of further action by the County Board. 3. Temporary speed limits shall be in accord with this section and shall be imposed by the posting of either portable or fixed temporary regulatory speed limit signs of the same face size and design as permanent regulatory speed limit signs, type R2-1, as described in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices as adopted by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. 4. Signs may be posted on any highway under the jurisdiction of this authority (and any state trunk highway upon which this County performs maintenance under §84.07, Wis. Stats.) when such highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, but only in the immediate area of such work and of those persons engaged in performing such work. 5. Any temporary speed limit imposed in an area where construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair is being performed on the shoulders or what is normally the traveled portion of the roadway, or where the highway construction or maintenance workers performing such work as necessary on the shoulders or what is normally the traveled portion of the roadway, shall be 45 mph or 10 mph less than the speed limit normally in effect for that portion of highway, whichever is the lower temporary speed limit (i.e. temporarily 35 mph in a normally 45-mph zone or temporarily 45 mph in a normally 65-mph zone). 6. No temporary speed limit shall be imposed when construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair work is being performed inside the highway right of way but not on the shoulders or the traveled portion of highway. 7. Any speed limits imposed under the authority of this section are temporary, and the signs imposing such limits shall be removed, covered or otherwise obscured when the highway construction or maintenance workers performing construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repairs and their equipment are not present on the shoulders or traveled portion of the highway. 8. The area in which any temporary speed limit imposed shall be terminated by posting a regulatory speed limit sign informing the public of the specific speed limit outside of the area where construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair work is being performed. 9. Nothing herein shall prohibit the Polk County Highway Commissioner or his/her designee from posting advisory speed limit signs, of the type W13-1 as described in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, in areas of highway construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repairs suggesting such speed as he or she deems appropriate to promote the safety of highway construction and maintenance workers, pedestrians and highway users and that such advisory signs may also be posted in conjunction with the temporary mandatory speed limit signs, as described and authorized above. Adopted this 15th day of March, 2016, by the Polk County Board of Supervisors. 643918 33L WNAXLP


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

Polk County deaths

NOTICES (Mar. 23, 30, Apr. 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BRUCE GUSTAFSON Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 16 PR 21 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth September 20, 1960, and date of death February 12, 2016, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 322 State Road 65, Amery, WI 54001. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is June 30,30, 2016. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar March 14, 2016 Maxfield E. Neuhaus Rodli, Beskar, Neuhaus, Murray & Pletcher, S.C. 219 North Main Street P.O. Box 138 River Falls, WI 54022 715-425-7281 643533 Bar No.: 1031885 WNAXLP

POLK COUNTY HIGHWAY COMMISSION IS NOW ACCEPTING REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE FOLLOWING, DUE ON APRIL 12, 2016, AT 3 P.M. • Asphalt & Pulverizing/Milling • Line Painting • Road Oil • Gravel • Crack Sealing Materials • Rock • Culverts • Erosion Control Materials Any or all of the above may be used on the CTH C3 Local Road Improvement Project. Contracted services on county construction projects over $100,000 are subject to prevailing wage laws. Polk County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to accept the bid most advantageous to Polk County.

BIDS WILL BE OPENED PUBLICLY ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2016, AT 9:30 A.M., AT THE POLK COUNTY HIGHWAY OFFICE. For additional information, please write or call: Polk County Highway Commission, P.O. Box 248 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 643594 32-33L 715-485-8700

LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACES

At the election to be held on April 5, 2016, in Polk County, Wisconsin, the following polling place locations will be used for the municipalities indicated. Polling places will open at 7 a.m. and will close at 8 p.m. Voters must be registered before they may vote. You may already be registered. If you have any questions concerning your polling place, or registering, contact the municipal clerk prior to the election. All polling places are accessible to elderly and disabled voters. City of St. Croix Falls Voting at: City Hall (Located at 710 Hwy. 35 South, intersection of U.S. Hwy. 8 & Hwy. 35 S.) Bonita Leggitt, Clerk - 715-483-3929, ext. 11 Town of Alden Voting at: Alden Town Hall (Located 1 mile east of Hwy. 65 on Cty. Rd. C & CC) Judy Demulling, Clerk - 715-248-7859 Town of Apple River Voting at: Apple River Town Hall 612 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Fritz Coulter, Deputy Clerk - 715-268-4896 Town of Balsam Lake Voting at: Balsam Lake Town Hall & Shop (Located at 1494 150th Ave., intersection of 150th Ave. & 150th St.) Brian Masters, Clerk - 715-554-2091 Town of Bone Lake Voting at: Bone Lake Lutheran Church (1/2 mile S. of Hwy. 48, corner of Cty. Rd. I & 255th Ave.) Darrell Frandsen, Clerk - 715-472-8212 Town of Clam Falls Voting at: Clam Falls Town Hall (County Road I to 320th Avenue, east to 80th Street, then south 1/4 mile - hall on east side of street) Jane Schmidt, Clerk - 715-653-2368 Town of Eureka Voting at: Eureka Town Hall 2395 210th Ave. Deb Dibble, Clerk - 715-483-9899 Town of Farmington Voting at: Farmington Town Hall (Located 1/4 mile west of Hwy. 35 on 30th Ave.) Debbie Swanson, Clerk - 715-294-2370 Town of Garfield Voting at: Garfield Town Hall (Next to Fire Hall, in Wanderoos) Sue Knutson, Clerk - 715-268-4857 Town of Georgetown Voting at: Town Hall (Located corner of Cty. Rds. H & I) Kristine Lindgren, Clerk - 715-857-5788 Town of Laketown Voting at: Cushing Community Center (Located at 2410 241st St., Cushing School) Patsy Gustafson, Clerk - 715-648-5569

Town of Lorain Voting at: Lorain Town Hall (Located at the intersection of 20th St. & 345th Ave., next to fire hall) Susan Hughes, Clerk - 715-653-2629 Town of Luck Voting at: Luck Town Hall (Located at St. Rd. 48, next to Luck Medical Clinic) Lloyd Nelson, Clerk - 715-472-2037 Town of McKinley Voting at: McKinley Town Hall (Located at Corner of Hwy. 48 and 15th St.) Anna Weaver, Clerk - 715-822-5909 Town of Milltown Voting at: Milltown Fire Hall (Located at 127 Eider St., on Hwy. 35 north of Milltown) Virgil Hansen, Clerk - 715-825-2494 Town of Osceola Voting at: Town Hall (516 East Ave. N, Dresser) Lorraine Rugroden, Clerk/Treas. - 715-755-3060 Town of St. Croix Falls Voting at: St. Croix Falls Town Hall (Intersection of U.S. Hwy. 8 and 200th St.) Janet Krueger, Clerk - 715-483-1851 Town of Sterling Voting at: Cushing Community Center (From Hwy. 87 turn by Holiday (Cty. Rd. N), go straight onto 241st St.) Julie Peterson, Clerk - 715-488-2735 Town of West Sweden Voting at: West Sweden Town Hall (Located in Frederic, off Hwy. 48 W., on (N.) 3rd Ave.) Phyllis Wilder, Clerk - 715-327-8951 Village of Dresser Voting at: Municipal Office (Located on the corner of Main St. and Central Ave., 2 blocks off of State Rd. 35) Jodi A. Gilbert, Clerk - 715-755-2940 Village of Frederic Voting at: Frederic Village Hall (107 Hope Road West , 1/2 block west of Hwy. 35) Janice Schott, Clerk - 715-327-4294 Village of Luck Voting at: Luck Village Hall (401 South Main St.) Lori Pardun, Clerk - 715-472-2221

NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL BOARD OF CANVASSERS

At the close of voting on Election Day, pursuant to the provisions of Wis. Stat. § 19.84, the Election Inspectors will convene as a joint meeting of the Local Board of Canvassers and the Municipal Board of Canvassers for the purpose of conducting the local and municipal canvasses to Wis. Stat. §§7.51 and 7.53(1). This meeting will be open to 643861 33L 23a,d WNAXLP the public pursuant to Wis. Stat. §§ 19.81-89.

Mark S. Johnson, 59, Bismarck, N.D., died March 17, 2016. Thomas R. Knops, 74, Clayton, died March 19, 2016. Leona H. Wilkie, 76, Webster,

died March 19, 2016. Dorothy L. Baker, 93, St. Croix Falls, died March 20, 2016. Joy J. DeNucci, 86, Frederic, died March 20, 2016.

Polk County marriages (Mar. 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In The Matter Of The Name Change Of: Freyja Anne van der Paardt By: (Petitioner) Freyja Anne van der Paardt Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 16 CV 79 NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: Freyja Anne van der Paardt To: Freyja Anne Quin Birth Certificate: Freyja Anne van der Paardt IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Polk County, State of Wisconsin: Molly E. GaleWyrick, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810, May 16, 2016, 12:45 p.m. BY THE COURT: Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge 643262 March 11, 2106 WNAXLP

John L. Brown and Christine A. Darsow, issued March 24, 2016.

Jordan D. Wilcox and Krista L. Zahn, issued March 24, 2106.

TREE SEEDLINGS AVAILABLE Ed Peterson, Chairman of the Burnett County Natural Resources Committee, announces that the annual tree, shrub and wildflower sale is now in progress. These plants are available for Spring, 2016. Plants purchased may be used for any purpose and there is no minimum order. The species available include: TREES: Colorado Blue Spruce, Red Pine, White Pine, \White Spruce. SHRUBS: American Highbush Cranberry, American Plum, Juneberry, Ninebark Trees are offered in bundles of 25; shrubs in bundles of 5. All of the plants are bare-root stock and average 9” – 12” tall. Wildflowers are available in 4 different collections of plants or 2 different selections of seed mix. Pick up date will be the end of April 2016 for the trees and shrubs, and the beginning of June for the wildflower collections and seed. Since orders are taken on a first-come, first-served basis, we would like to encourage you to order early to be sure to reserve the species and amounts that you are interested in. Remaining stock is sure to go fast!! Anyone interested in ordering product may contact the Burnett County Land and Water Conservation Department, County Gov-ernment Center, 7410 County Road K, #109, Siren, WI, 54872 or call 715-349-2186. The brochure and order form can also be printed from our website: www.burnettcounty.com and then navigate to the Land & Water Conservation page. 644066 33L

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE AND SPRING ELECTION APRIL 5, 2016

LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACES

The Presidential Preference Vote and Spring Election will be held on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, in the State of Wisconsin, County of Burnett. This notice of location and hours of polling places is published on behalf of the municipalities. Following is a list of polling place locations for Burnett County municipalities: Town of Anderson Town Hall 13808 Anderson Rd. Town of Blaine Town Hall (Northland Comm Ctr.) 1232 E. School Rd. Town of Daniels Town Hall 9697 Daniels 70 Rd. Town of Dewey Town Hall 24433 Town Hall Rd. Town of Grantsburg Town Hall 23211 State Rd. 48/87 Town of Jackson Town Hall 4599 County Rd. A Town of LaFollette Town Hall 24184 Malone Rd. Town of Lincoln Town Hall 9110 Perida Rd. Town of Meenon Town Hall 7396 Kruger Rd. Town of Oakland Town Hall 27826 Lone Pine Rd. Town of Roosevelt (Timberland Luth. Church) 20805 Cty. Rd. H Town of Rusk Town Hall 25195 County Rd. H Town of Sand Lake Town Hall 5364 County Rd. X Town of Scott Town Hall 28390 County Rd. H Town of Siren Town Hall 7240 S. Long Lake Rd. Town of Swiss Town Hall 7551 Main Street Town of Trade Lake Town Hall 11811 Town Hall Rd. Town of Union Town Hall 9015 County Rd. F Town of Webb Lake Town Hall 31000 Namekagon Trail Town of West Marshland Town Hall 12259 County Rd. F Town of Wood River Town Hall 11610 State Rd. 70 Village of Grantsburg Village Hall 316 S. Brad St. Village of Siren Village Hall 24049 First Ave. N. Village of Webster Community Center 7421 Main St. W. The polling places will open at 7 a.m. and will close at 8 p.m. If you have questions contact the municipal clerk. All of the polling places are accessible to elderly and disabled voters. Town of Anderson Town of LaFollette Town of Sand Lake Jessica Johnson, Clerk Linda Terrian, Clerk Peggy Tolbert, Clerk 410 E. Park Ave. 23928 Malone Rd. P.O. Box 165 Luck, WI 54853 Siren, WI 54872 Webster, WI 54893 715-472-4753 715-349-2531 715-222-9375 Town of Blaine Town of Lincoln Town of Scott Stephanie Askin, Clerk Wanda Washkuhn, Clerk Karen Wiggins, Clerk 33249 Little McGraw Lk. Rd. 25603 Icehouse Bridge Rd. 28390 County Rd. H Danbury, WI 54830 P.O. Box 296 Spooner, WI 54801 715-244-3179 Webster, WI 54893 Office 715-635-2308 715-866-4201 Town of Daniels Town of Siren Liz Simonsen, Clerk Town of Meenon Mary Hunter, Clerk 9697 Daniels 70 Suzanna M. Eytcheson, 23340 Soderberg Rd. P.O. Box 190 Clerk Siren, WI 54872 Siren, WI 54872 25863 E. Bass Lk. Dr. 715-349-5119 715-349-2291 Webster, WI 54893 Town of Swiss 715-866-4893 Town of Dewey Judy Dykstra, Clerk Pamela Brown, Clerk Town of Oakland 7551 Main St. 1148 Swiss Chalet Rd. Deanna Krause, Clerk P.O. Box 157 Shell Lake, WI 54871 7426 W. Main St. Danbury, WI 54830 715-468-7111 P.O. Box 675 Office: 715-656-3030 Webster, WI 54893 Town of Grantsburg Town of Trade Lake 715-866-8213 Romey Nelson, ClerkDeborah Christian, Treasurer Town of Roosevelt Clerk 118 E. Madison Avenue Patricia Hayden, Clerk 13361 St. Rd. 48 P.O. Box 642 2997 County Road EE Grantsburg, WI 54840 Grantsburg, WI 54840 Shell Lake, WI 54871 715-488-2600 715-463-5600 715-468-2468 Town of Union Town of Jackson Town of Rusk Mary Eifler, Deputy Clerk Lorraine Radke, Clerk Bonnie Harder, Clerk 8639 County Rd. U 4742 County Rd. A 26985 E. Benoit Lake Rd. Danbury, WI 54830 Webster, WI 54893 Spooner, WI 54801 715-866-4547 715-866-8412 715-635-4723

concerning your polling place,

Town of Webb Lake Gail Keup, Clerk 2363 Escape Drive Webb Lake, WI 54830 715-259-3439 Town of West Marshland Kerri Harter, Clerk P.O. Box 612 Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2461 Town of Wood River Raylene Swanson, Clerk 24788 Rylander Rd. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-689-2318 Village of Grantsburg Jennifer Zeiler, Clerk 316 S. Brad St. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2405 Village of Siren Ann Peterson, Clerk/Treas. 24049 First Ave. P.O. Box 23 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-2273 Village of Webster Patrice Bjorklund, Clerk/Treas. 7505 Main St. W. P.O. Box 25 Webster, WI 54893 715-866-4211 643742 33L WNAXLP


PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

NOTICES RESOLUTION 09-16

NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION April 5, 2016 TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Election for the Town of St. Croix Falls will be held on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, at the Town Hall located at 1305 200th Street. Sample ballot is below. For absentee requests contact the Town Clerk at 715-483-1851. Poll is open from 7:00 am. to 8:00 p.m.

AMENDMENTS TO THE POLK COUNTY SHORELAND PROTECTION ZONING ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors amended said ordinance by Resolution 12-10; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendment concerns substantial revisions to the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance, enacted April 1, 2010, to bring said ordinance into compliance with Wisconsin Statute Section 59.692, as amended by 2015 Wisconsin Act 55, and Wisconsin Administrative Code, s. NR. 115.05; and WHEREAS, the lands affected by the proposed amendment are any lands within Polk County that are within 1,000 feet of the ordinary high-water mark of any pond, lake or flowage and any lands within Polk County that are within 300 feet from the ordinary high-water mark of any river or stream or the landward side of the flood plain as provided by Wisconsin Statute Section 59.692(1)(b); and WHEREAS, the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee held a public hearing on February 17, 2016, to amend the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, A copy of the existing Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance, proposed Amended Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance and map of the property affected by the amendment are attached to and incorporated herein. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain that the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance is amended in the attached Amended Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance. Adopted this 15th day of March, 2016, by the Polk County Board of Supervisors. 643920 33L WNAXLP

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NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION April 5, 2016 TOWN OF EUREKA

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Election for the Town of Eureka will be held on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, at the Town Hall located at 2395 210th Avenue. Sample ballot is below. For absentee requests contact the Town Clerk at 715-483-9899. Poll is open from 7:00 am. to 8:00 p.m.

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PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER VILLAGE HALL 7505 MAIN STREET WEST WEBSTER, WI 54893 APRIL 13, 2016 - 6:00 P.M.

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The Village of Webster is holding a Public Hearing regarding the Village’s Community Development Block Grant for Public Facilities (CDBG-PF) grant program. This project involved upgrades to lift stations and sanitary sewer upgrades. The public is invited to review the program performance and to express citizen views. The agenda for the public hearing is as follows: 1. Review of program performance. 2. Citizens views on the program. 3. Other CDBG issues. The Village will also hold a public hearing regarding its proposed application for Community Development Block Grant– Public Facilities (CDBG-PF). The public is invited to attend to learn about the CDBG program, to help identify additional community development needs, and to comment on the activities proposed to be included in the CDBG application. The agenda for the public hearing is as follows: 1. Identification of total potential funds 2. Eligible CDBG activities 3. Presentation of identified community development needs 4. Identification of any community development needs by public 5. Presentation of activities proposed for CDBG application, including potential residential displacement 6. Citizen input regarding proposed and other CDBG activities. Residents of the Village of Webster are encouraged to attend, especially residents with low to moderate incomes. The meeting room is handicapped accessible. Persons needing additional accommodations should contact Patty Bjorklund, Village Clerk at 715-866-4211. 643746 33L WNAXLP

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NOTICE OF HEARING

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, April 12, 2016, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view sites and reconvene at 1 p.m. at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. At that time, the applicant will inform the Board of their request. (The applicant must appear at 1 p.m. when the Board reconvenes at the Government Center.) SCOTT McLEOD requests a special exception to Article 8D4 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to have a retail sporting goods business. Property affected is: 521 State Hwy. 48, SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4, Sec. 30/T36N/R15W, Town of McKinley, Clam River, Parcel #038-00707-0000. CRAIG & SHEILA HAASNOOT request a variance to Article 11C, Table 1 & 11E3 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to be less than 25’ from rear lot line and less than 63’ from centerline of a town road with dwelling addition/deck. Property affected is: 956 Wisconsin Ln., Part of the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4, Sec. 21/T33N/R16W, Town of Lincoln, pond, Parcel #032-00601-0000. JIM & APRIL WALLACE request a variance to Article 11C, Table 1 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance for accessory building addition less than 25’ from the side property line. Property affected is: Lot 3, CSM #2813, part of the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, Sec. 18/T35N/R18W, Town of Eureka, Twin Lake, Parcel #020-00435-0001. MICHAEL & KIMBERLY SACHI request a variance to Article 5C & 11E4 and a special exception to 15B1 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to exceed the 25’ height limit for an accessory building -- located less than 35’ from centerline of a private road; and grade on slopes of 20% or greater. Property affected is: Lot 1, CSM #6600, Vol. 30 Pg. 54, Sec 23+26/T33N/R17W, Town of Garfield, Lake Wapogasset, Parcel #024-00494-0100. 643627 32-33L WNAXLP


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

NOTICES REQUEST FOR BIDS CONCRETE SIDEWALK REMOVAL & REPLACEMENT SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT The School District of Siren is now taking bids for the removal and replacement of approximately 1,020 square feet of concrete sidewalk. To obtain further specifications and view job site, please contact the Director of Buildings & Grounds @ 715-349-7392, ext. 403 to make an appointment. All bids must be submitted no later than 4 p.m. on April 15, 2016, in a sealed envelope marked CONCRETE SIDEWALK BID. All mailed bids should be sent to Don Fleischhacker, Director of Buildings & Grounds, School District of Siren, 24022 4th Avenue, Siren, WI. The Siren Board of Education retains the right to reject any and all proposal bids. 644015 33-34L 23-24a

INVITATION TO BID CHIP SEALING PROJECTS TOWN OF JACKSON

The Town of Jackson is seeking sealed bids for chip seal resurfacing of approximately 7.7 miles total, widths vary from 18 to 21 feet. Roads to be sealed are Mallard Lake Road, Leef Road, Shore Road, Loon Creek Trail, Chalet Road and Fox Road. Type of aggregate for chip seal to be determined by contractor at time of inspection. Aggregate to be applied evenly and rolled into emulsified asphalt, with excess rock to be broomed from coated surface. Required crack sealing to be performed by others prior to application of chip seal coating. Contractor to verify road width and length. Resurfacing work is to be coordinated with town representatives and must be completed by September 1, 2016. Bids are due and will be opened on April 11, 2016, 7 p.m. at the Jackson Town Hall during monthly town meeting. Valid certificate of insurance must be presented with bids. The Town of Jackson reserves the right to reject any and all bids or portion thereof. For more information, contact Roger Larson, 715-866-7529 or 715-566-0559. 643416 32-33L WNAXLP Sealed bids should be sent to Town of Jackson, 4599 County Road A, Webster, WI 54893. Attn.: Chip Seal Bid.

TOWN OF TRADE LAKE BIDS FOR NEW SIDING, SOFFIT, FASCIA AND REPLACEMENT WINDOWS The Town of Trade Lake is accepting bids to side, replace soffit and fascia and new replacement windows on the Town Hall. We will accept bids for either steel or LP Smart Side siding, aluminum soffit and fascia and replacement windows comparable to Marvin Integrity. We are also accepting bids for the wall insulating and also new doors. Please bid these separately from the siding bid. Please mail bids to clerk’s office by April 21, 2016. These bids will be opened at the April 21, 2016, Monthly Board Meeting at the Town Hall. Please address questions to: Clerk, 715-488-2600; Supervisor Jeff Lade, 715-488-2758. Email: tradelakewi@gmail. Clerk’s Address: Town of Trade Lake, 13361 State Road 48, Grantsburg, WI 54840. Deborah L. Christian, Clerk 643485 21-22a 32-33L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION AND PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE AND SAMPLE BALLOTS OFFICE OF THE POLK CLERK TO THE VOTERS OF POLK: Notice is hereby given of a spring election and a Presidential Preference Vote to be held in Polk County on April 5, 2016, at which the officers named below shall be chosen. The names of the candidates for each office to be voted for, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office, each in its proper column, together with the questions submitted to a vote for a referendum, if any, in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO VOTERS Upon entering the polling place, a voter shall state his or her name and address, show an acceptable form of photo identification and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. If a voter is not registered to vote, a voter may register to vote at the polling place serving his or her residence, if the voter presents proof of residence in a form specified by law. Where ballots are distributed to voters, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the voter shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot, except that a voter who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the voter’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the voter of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular choice. AT THE SPRING ELECTION Where Paper Ballots are Used The voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the voter shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to “no” if opposed to the question. Where Optical Scan Voting is Used The voter shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the voter shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided, and fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the write-in line. On referendum questions, the voter shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to “no” if opposed to the question. Where Touch Screen Voting is Used The voter shall touch the screen at the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the voter shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the voter shall touch the screen at “yes” if in favor of the questions or the voter shall touch the screen at “no” if opposed to the question. AT THE PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE Where Paper Ballots are Used Within the party of his or her choice, the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice or shall, in the alternative, make a mark (X) in the square next to the words “Uninstructed Delegation,” or write in the name of a person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. Where Optical Scan Voting is Used Within the party of his or her choice, the voter shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice or shall, in the alternative, fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the

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words “Uninstructed Delegation,” or write in the name of a person of his or her choice for a candidate in the space provided for a write-in vote and fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to the write-in line. Where Touch Screen Voting is Used Within the party of his or here choice, the voter shall touch the screen at the name of the candidate of his or here choice or shall, in the alternative, touch the screen at the words “Uninstructed Delegation,” or type in the name of a person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. A voter may cast only one vote in the presidential preference primary. The vote shall not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the voter in marking his or here ballot may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. If a voter spoils a paper or optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one voter. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the voter shall return it to the election official who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. The voter may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast. After Voting the Ballot After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors’ initials on the outside do show. After casting his or her vote, the voter shall leave the booth, deposit his or her folded ballot in the proper ballot box or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit and deposit any unvoted ballot in the discard box. The voter shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the voter shall insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve. Where a central count system is used, the voter shall insert the ballot in the security sleeve so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the voter shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and discard the sleeve or deliver it to an inspector for deposit. The voter shall leave the polling place promptly. After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the voter shall leave the polling place promptly. A voter may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the voter declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the voter’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the voter. The following is a sample of the official ballot:

Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

NOTICES NOTICE OF FREDERIC SCHOOL BOARD SPRING ELECTION April 5, 2016

REQUEST FOR BIDS LINE PAINTING PROJECT & SEALING OF OUR WEST & SOUTH PARKING LOTS FOR DISTRICT OF SIREN

Notice is hereby given to the qualified electors of the School District of Frederic that on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, a primary election for two school board members will be held. Chuck Holicky, Clerk March 28, 2016

This project will involve the line painting of our West and South parking lots, and the blacktop sealing of our West and South parking lots. To view the project sites, and make an appointment, please contact the Director of Building and Grounds, Don Fleischhacker, at 715-349-7392 ext. 403. All bids must be received by April 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. sealed and marked parking lot bids. Mail bids to: Siren School District, Attn: Don Fleischhacker, 24022 4th Avenue North, Siren WI. The Siren Board of Education retains the right to reject any and all proposal bids. 644017 33-34L 23-24a

ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUOTES Village of Luck

Notice is hereby given that sealed quotes for the following projects will be received by the Village of Luck Director of Public Works until 4:00 p.m., April 6, 2016, at the Luck Municipal Building, P.O. Box 315, 401 Main St., Luck, WI 54853. Projects include: Project 1 - Miscellaneous Chip Sealing and Crack Filling Projects. Copies of the specifications, instructions to bidders, forms of proposals and other contract documents are on file at the Municipal Building and may be obtained without charge. Contractors should contact the Director of Public Work regarding any questions about the specifications or location of work. The Village of Luck reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informalities in the bids received and to accept any bid which it deems most favorable. 643625 WNAXLP 32-22L

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(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF SPENCER JARED JOHNSON By (Petitioner) Spencer Jared Johnson Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 16CV102 NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: Spencer Jared Johnson To: Spencer Jared Steek Birth Certificate: Spencer Jared Johnson IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Polk County, State of Wisconsin, Judge Jeffery Anderson, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810, April 22, 2016, 2:00 p.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disbility to participate in the court process, please call 715-4859299 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: Jeffery Anderson Circuit Court Judge 644028 March 24, 2016 WNAXLP

NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION AND PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE AND SAMPLE BALLOTS OFFICE OF THE BURNETT COUNTY CLERK: TO THE VOTERS OF BURNETT COUNTY: Notice is hereby given of a spring election and a Presidential Preference Vote to be held in Burnett County on April 5, 2016, at which the officers named below shall be chosen. The names of the candidates for each office to be voted for, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office, each in its proper column, together with the questions submitted to a vote, for a referendum, if any, in the sample ballot below. INFORMATION TO VOTERS Upon entering the polling place, a voter shall state his or her name and address, show an acceptable form of photo identification and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. If a voter is not registered to vote, a voter may register to vote at the polling place serving his or her residence, if the voter presents proof of residence in a form specified by law. Where ballots are distributed to voters, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the voter shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot, except that a voter who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the voter’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the voter of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice. AT THE SPRING ELECTION Where Paper Ballots are Used The voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the voter shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to “yes” if in favor of the question, or the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to “no” if opposed to the question. Where Touch Screen Voting is Used The voter shall touch the screen at the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the voter shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the voter shall touch the screen at “yes” if in favor of the questions, or the voter shall touch the screen at “no” if opposed to the question. AT THE PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE Where Paper Ballots are Used Within the party of his or her choice, the voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice or shall, in the alternative, make a mark (X) in the square next to the words “Uninstructed delegation,” or write in the name of a person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. Where Touch Screen Voting is Used Within the party of his or her choice, the voter shall touch the screen at the name of the candidate of his or her choice or shall, in the alternative, touch the screen at the words “Uninstructed Delegation,” or type in the name of a person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote. A voter may cast only one vote in the presidential preference primary. The vote shall not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes’ time shall be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the voter in marking his or her ballot may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked. If a voter spoils a paper ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one voter. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the voter shall return it to the election official who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. The voter may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast. After Voting the Ballot The sample ballot for County Board Supervisor is an example for District One only. Below are the remaining After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not show, but so the supervisory districts along with the candidate names for that race. printed endorsements and inspectors’ initials on the outside do show. After casting his or her vote, the District 1 - Brent Blomberg District 9 - Chuck Anderson District 16 - Gary Lundberg voter shall leave the booth, deposit his or her folded ballot in the proper ballot box or deliver the ballot to District 2 - Dale C. Dresel District 10 - Ed Peterson District 17 - Philip J. Lindeman an inspector for deposit, and deposit the any unvoted ballot in the discard box. The voter shall leave the District 3 - Gene McLain District 11 - Norman Bickford Duane I. Johnson polling place promptly. District 4 - Jeremy Gronski District 12 - Christopher Sybers District 18 - Don Taylor After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the voter shall leave the polling place promptly. District 19 - Craig Conroy District 13 - Bert E. Lund Jr. District 5 - Dorothy H. Richard A voter may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the voter declares to the presiding District 20 - Gerald G. Pardun District 14 - Emmett Byrne District 6 - Donald Chell official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing, or understanding English, or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the District 21 - Clifford Larry Main District 15 - Richard I. Anderson District 7 - Gene E. Olson voter’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which District 8 - Chuck Awe represents the voter. The following is a sample of the official ballots: (continued on next page 643956 33L WNAXLP


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

(continued from previous page)

NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION AND PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE AND SAMPLE BALLOTS The following sample ballot screen shot is an example of a ballot which would be voted on the SVRS Handicapped Accessible Voting Machine available for use at all polling locations.

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Wanda Hinrichs, Burnett County Clerk County Government Center, Room 150 7410 County Road K #105, Siren, WI 54872 715-349-2173


8

PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

First claimed a co-worker spilled a drink on her Greg Marsten | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE - A 29-year-old local woman is facing her second driving while intoxicated charge, at least, after a Polk County Sheriff’s Deputy caught her driving over 100 mph on the evening of Thursday, March 24, south of Osceola. According to the probable cause report filed by the PCSD, a deputy was stopped

103-mph DUI for Osceola woman

Tameka Shaleen

on County Road X and Hwy. 35 that evening when he observed a vehicle traveling almost twice the speed limit, and he clocked the car at 103-mph. He initiated a pursuit, which lasted for several miles before the driver

slowed down but kept going. Once the driver stopped, the deputy approached the car and the female driver rolled the window down slightly, and the deputy noticed the smell of intoxicants. The driver was identified as Tameka Shaleen, 29, Osceola, and while she did not think she was speeding, she also initially denied drinking, stating that a co-worker had spilled a drink on her clothing, which was why she smelled like alcohol. However, she failed all the field sobri-

OBITUARIES

NOTICES

Anton Marius (Pete) Peterson Jr.

NOTICE OF ELECTION - SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT Notice is hereby given of a spring election to be held in Burnett County, on the fifth day of April, Two-Thousand and Sixteen, at which the officers named below, shall be chosen. The names of the candidates for each office to be voted for, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office, each in is proper column, together with the questions submitted to a vote, for a referendum, if any, in the sample ballot below.

644118 33L WNAXLP

TYPE B NOTICE FOR SPRING ELECTION NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION AND SAMPLE BALLOT APRIL 5, 2016 OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Notice is hereby given of a spring election to be held in Polk County on April 5, 2016, at which the candidates named below shall be chosen for the Unity Board of Education. The term of office for a school board member is three years. The candidates have been certified to or have filed for candidacy in the school office and the sample ballot is provided below.

644044 33L WNAXLP

ety test and later admitted to drinking whisky that night. She registered a blood alcohol concentration of .17-percent, over twice the legal limit. Shaleen has a prior DUI conviction from last May, and she may face additional traffic charges in the future, due to the excessive speed, according to Sheriff Peter Johnson. Shaleen appeared before Judge Jeffery Anderson on Monday, March 28, where he set an $1,000 bond and a May 23 hearing.

(Mar. 23, 30, Apr. 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC as servicer for The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A., as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage AssetBacked Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-RP4 Plaintiff vs CAROL A. JENSEN, et al. Defendant(s) Case No: 14 CV 407 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 7, 2015, in the amount of $153,353.57, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 19, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the sale is fatally defective. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: All that part of Government Lot 1, Section 134-19, lying North and East of a line described as follows: Commencing at a point on the North line of said LOT 1, 330 Feet East of the Northwest Corner thereof, thence Southeasterly to a point on the East line of said Lot, 850 Feet South of the Northeast Corner thereof; also, the North 850 Feet of Government Lot 1, Section 6-34-18, Polk County, Wisconsin, except parcel described in Volume 627 Records, Page 962, Document No. 517794, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1708 South River Road, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 044-01043-0000 & 044-00131-0000. Dated this 1st day of March, 2016. /s/Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Jordan C. Staleos J. Peterman Legal Group Ltd. State Bar No. 1085629 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 643516 262-790-5719 WNAXLP

Anton Marius (Pete) Peterson, Jr., 89, of Webster, Wis., passed away, peacefully, Sunday, March 20, 2016, at the Frederic Nursing Home. Anton was born Nov. 27, 1926, in Deerfield, Ill., the first born son of Anton Sr. and Selma (Schmechel) Petersen. He attended Bluff Lake School until eighth grade. He helped on the family farm until joining the Navy on the 5th day of April, 1944, and proudly served his country until his honorable discharge on the 4th day of September, 1953. He was employed at the MG Astleford Company in Savage, Minn. Pete loved his job hauling heavy equipment on his big rig, retiring in 1986. When he could, he spent his free time tending his huge vegetable garden and lawn at their home until his admittance to the Frederic Nursing Home in July 2014. He was preceded in death by his parents, Anton and Selma Petersen; mother- and father-in-law, Mae and Frank Panek; brothers, Dewey, Venzel and Denver Petersen; sisterand brother-in-law, Mary and Joe Garcia; as well as a sister- and brother-in-law, Gladys and Ray Barber, and brother-in-law, Frank Panek, Jr. Anton is survived by his wife Joann Peterson, Webster; son, Jerald Peterson, Hudson, Wis.; son- and daughter-in-law, Dennis and Patricia Peterson, WB Township, Minn.’ and daughter and son-in-law, Lori and Marvin Johnson, Eau Claire. He is also survived by four granddaughters, Teresa (Gary) Eskuri, Andover, Minn., Melissa (Ceferino) Nazal, Portland, Ore., Nicole Johnson, Blaine, MN, Aimee Jo Johnson, Hudson, Wis. Five great-grandchildren, Kaitlin and Jacob Eskuri, Cameron, Amelia and Lauren Nazal. He is also survived by brothers, Albert (Evelyn) Peterson, Marvin (Eudora) Petersen, Wilkie (Rita) Petersen, Calvin Petersen, Chlorn (Karen) Petersen, Dorsey (Andrea) Petersen; sisters and brothers-in-law Effie Petersen, Rita (Bob) Hughes, Roger (Janice) Panek and numerous nieces and nephews. Per Anton’s request, no services will be held. Cards of condolence may be sent to Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, Wis. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery (N4063 Veterans Way Spooner, WI 54801). A burial will be held at a later date at the Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Spooner, Wis. Arrangements were entrusted to Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home Webster.

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MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

“The Grapes of Wrath” comes to life onstage as part of The Big Read ST. CROIX FALLS - As part of The Big Read in the St. Croix Valley, an ensemble cast from St. Croix Festival Theatre will be performing “The Grapes of Wrath,” based on the novel by John Steinbeck adapted by Frank Galati at Franklin Square Black Box in St. Croix Falls. The play follows the story of the Joad family as they are forced from their family farm in Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl and migrate to California in search of work, sustenance and a means of survival. “There is an immense amount of emotion in John Steinbeck’s novel, and Frank Galati has captured the epic journey and beautiful prose in an effective, inspiring adaptation for the stage,” says Jaclyn Johnson, director of the play. “Festival Theatre, as I have come to know it, prides itself on its approach to storytelling through theater, utilizing strong production elements, fantastic talent and creative artistry.” The play, “The Grapes of Wrath,” was adapted by Galati in 1988 and debuted at Steppenwolf Theatre Company of Chicago that same year. In 1990, it was performed at The Cort Theater on Broadway and went on to win the Tony Award for Best Play. The “The Grapes of Wrath” will open Saturday, April 9, at 7:30 p.m. at Franklin Square Black Box, 125 N. Washington St., St. Croix Falls, with performances continuing until Sunday, April 24. Tickets can be purchased online at festivaltheatre.org or by contacting the box office at 715-483-3387. Festival Theatre would like to recognize the Unity area FFA alumni as the supporting sponsors of “The Grapes of Wrath.” For opening night, a free trolley ride with live fiddle music will take theatergoers from Stillwater, Minn., to St. Croix Falls. The trolley will leave ArtReach St. Croix, 224 N. 4th St., Stillwater, at 6:15 p.m. with stops in Marine and Scandia. The ride is free but seating is limited and advance registration is required by calling ArtReach at 651-439-1465. Visit ValleyReads.org for dates and times of The Big Read events hosted throughout the St. Croix Valley. – from Festival Theatre

Jaclyn Johnson returns to Festival Theatre to direct “The Grapes of Wrath.” - Photos submitted

LOCAL ARTIST TO SHOW NEW WORKS

Taylors Falls oil painting artist Barbara Young will introduce 28 new original works completed this past winter. The show is Sunday, April 3, between 2 and 4 p.m., at The Bistro on the St. Croix, 115 N. Washington Ave. in St. Croix Falls. Complimentary hors d’ oeuvres and wine will be served. The show theme is “Pick a Bouquet.” The varied flower paintings are shown in a wide selection of vases and arrangements with picture sizes ranging from 5 x 7 inches up to 22 x 28 inches. They are framed. Enjoy an early spring afternoon with friends. The remaining paintings will hang at the Bistro following the April 3 opening during the restaurant’s regular hours. - Photo submitted

VOTE APRIL 5

Patricia Schmidt

Full-Color Brochures with Fold 50......................$58 200..................$95 Save 100....................$79 20% 250..................$117 150....................$87 500..................$156 Price includes 80# gloss or matte paper and folding. Customer to supply electronic file. Custom design service is available for an additional fee. Larger quantities available upon request.

County Board Supervisor - District 2

Offer good through April 1, 2016

Experience Counts! Paid for by Patricia Schmidt

643528 32-33Lp

Village of Luck and the Towns of Luck, Bone Lake & Georgetown (west of CTHs I & H)

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION 303 Wisconsin Ave. N Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-4236

24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2560

107 N. Washington St. St. Croix Falls, Wis. Phone 715-483-9008

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis. Phone 715-468-2314 642528 19-22a-e 30-33r,L


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 30, 2016

15th-annual Spring Art Tour set for Upper St. Croix Valley

“Gossip,” by local artist Jan Killian, is an example of art that will be on display during the 15th-annual Spring Art Tour in May. - Photos submitted

Julie Adams created this painting titled “Happy Hour.”

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Ellis Avenue, Siren, WI 54872

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the studios. For those making a weekend of it, the Polk County Information Center can also assist travelers with ideas for lodging. Call 800-222-7655. Several of the studios have guest artists such as Red Iron Studio in Frederic with forged iron, metal art and sculpture, furniture, pottery and jewelry. There will be special exhibits of Earth Arts member artists. Visit with artists at the St. Croix Art Barn in Osceola, Festival Theatre in St. Croix Falls, Frederic Arts in Frederic, Burnett Area Arts Group in Siren, artZ Gallery and, new this year, The Hungry Turtle Institute, both in Amery, and also The Community Gallery at Amery Medical Center.

Participating artists

James Shoop - shoopsculpturaldesign.com Jimmy Springett - jimspringett.com Barb Tanner Bonnie Urfer - bonnieurfer.net Jim Van Hoven - periodwindsors.com James Williams - jim@digitalarts.com Joy Zasadny - HYPERLINK “http://www. stcroixchiro.com/”stcroixchiro.com

Julie Adams - riversidestudioart.com Carol Adleman - cadleman@lakeland.ws Teresa Ball - etsy.com/shop/craftybpaperie Chris Brylski - CJSI@frontiernet.net Mark Buley - markbuley.com Vivian Byl Randee Carroll - randeecaras@gmail.com Julie Crabtree - juliecrabtreeart.com Dorie Cronin - clay-spinners.com Cindy Cutter - spiritgardener.com Cynthia DeMar - Studio11CreativeArts.com David DeMattia - sleepingdragonstudios. com Earl Duckett - ducknest1@gmail.com Patricia Duncan - patriciaduncanart.com Ann Fawver - threesisterstudio.com LaRae Fjellman - transcendingart.com Kristina Fjellman - kristinafjellman.com Wendy Frank - wendyfrankdesigns.com Nancy Buley and Judy Alverson - gypsymoonbodycare.com Sister Kristine Haugen - hermitagearts.com Bonnie Hagen - bluesprucestudio.com Brian Hall - oakleafbuildingwi.com Joyce Halvorson - jlhalvor58@gmail.com Susan Heaven - susan@heavenbechtold. com Win Herberg - poetrypottery.com Linda Iwaszko - liwaszko@gmail.com Margaret Johansen - johansmr@lakeland.ws Colleen Kwong - spirit-of-creation.com Keppers Pottery - kepperspottery.com Jan Killian - woolyfrogarts.com Randy Lee and Lisa Larson - ImagesByLee. com Meg Luhrs and Leif Bjornson - leifandmeg@ gmail.com Jack and Karen Marchese - marchesedesignstudios.squarespace.com Kristan Martin Ardis Miller - ardiscarolmiller@hotmail. com Pitchfork Brewing - pitchforkbrewing.com John Reed - 715-491-4314 Gregg Rochester - greggrochesterart.homestead Jon Michael Route - jonmichaelroute.com Michael Route - redironstudios.com

RIGHT: Artwork by Jon Route of Frederic. BELOW: “Stillness” by Randy Lee.

($1,500 average bonus over the past 4 years)

Contact and/or send resume to Mark Foote 715-349-5591 • mfoote@northstatesind.com TAKE PRIDE IN MANUFACTURING LOCAL PRODUCTS IN A WORLD-RENOWNED MARKET. WE HOPE TO MAKE YOU A PART OF OUR TEAM! North States Industries is an Equal Opportunity Employer

NORTHWEST WISCONSIN - The members of Earth Arts will be opening their studios, galleries and “tour oases” for their 2016 Spring Art Tour to be held on Saturday and Sunday, May 7 and 8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Art lovers can take a self-guided tour through the Upper St. Croix Valley, visiting 26 tour stops with more than 51 artists at artist studios and tour oases. This is a once-a-year opportunity to visit with the artists and take home some beautiful art for home or office. The Earth Arts Spring Art Tour is held annually on the first weekend of May and features unique, handmade artwork, artist demonstrations and conversations. Visitors will enjoy sculpture, watercolor, oil, acrylic and alcohol ink painting, pastel, photography, scratchboard, pottery, garden art, furniture, fiber art and stitchery, jewelry, clothing, mixed media, iron and metal art, collage and assemblage, feather art, soaps and body products. Earth Arts offers a brochure that includes the studio locations and artist’s information with corresponding numbers on the map. Brochures/maps are available at artZ Gallery, Café Wren and the Polk County Information Center. Along the tour itself, large “Art tour” signs, in red letters, will direct visitors to

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Earth Arts Earth Arts organization brings together artists and growers for the purposes of mutual support, networking, organizing and promoting special events. Earth Arts is an open forum and welcomes all interested parties working in all artistic media as well as producers from nurseries, orchards and farms in the area. For more information about Earth Arts, its members and the Spring Art Tour visit earthartswi.org. - submitted

Galleries/arts organizations artZ Gallery - artzgallery.org Burnett Area Arts Group - burnettcounty. com Frederic Arts Center - fredericarts.org St. Croix Festival Theatre - festivaltheatre. org West Denmark Dane School - westdenmark. org St. Croix Art Barn - stcroixartbarn.org Festival Theatre - festivaltheatre.org Hungry Turtle Institute - hungryturtle.net Amery Medical Center Community Gallery - amerymedicalcenter.org

Tour Oasis: Café Wren - cafewren.com Chateau St. Croix Winery - chateaustcroix. com Ellie’s Ice Cream & Coffee - elliesicecream. com The Watershed Café - thewatershedcafe. com Farm Table - Ameryfarmtable.com


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2016 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B 1

Currents Northern

Stories from the NW Wisconsin community

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outh Africa is a study in contrasts, the last country on the African continent to abandon white rule in a majority black nation, but only after an unrelenting worldwide campaign to end apartheid. When F.W. De Klerk, the Afrikaner president of South Africa, surrendered to the inevitable in 1994, he ended what was arguably the longest colonial rule of any country on Earth. Beginning with the Portuguese, explorer Bartolomeu Dias first sailed around the Cape of Good Hope at the most southwesterly point of the continent in 1488, a string of colonial powers held sway over the native Africans who far outnumbered them for nearly 400 years. Our South African sojourn begins in Cape Town, just 50 miles north of the Cape of Good Hope. Cape Town is a confluence of many things, old and new, black and white, rich and poor. It takes some sacrifice to get here; to immerse yourself in this place of dreams requires the willingness to fly nonstop for over 14 hours from the eastern coast of the United States, sleeping fitfully through the night in the upright position, but our first glimpse of Table Mountain looming over the city convinces us that it was all worth it. Cape Town is the southernmost city on the African continent, an exciting, world-bending destination, a land of magnificent scenery still coming to grips with its post-apartheid identity. A magnificent city by the sea, bisected by mountains, it is in many ways the most progressive place in the country, a veritable rainbow nation that the New York Times rated the No. 1 “place to go” in the world in 2014. Just offshore from Cape Town we visit Robben Island, the infamous prison whose most famous inmate was Nelson Mandela, who spent 18 of his 27 years behind bars on this island. When he was finally released from prison on Feb. 11, 1990, Mandela went straight to City Hall in the center of Cape Town and delivered a stirring

Looking down from Table Mountain. speech to over 50,000 people from the balcony there. This site, like many others across the country, has been memorialized in tribute to the great man known here by his clan name, “Madiba.” Traveling south from the city for a couple of hours, we come to the convergence of two great oceans, the Atlantic and the Indian, warm meets cold, Africa meets Asia, an unparalleled weather maker where you can experience all four seasons in one day. They say the Atlantic Ocean at the bottom of Africa is influenced more by Antarctica than Africa, and you’re not tempted to take a swim after dipping a toe in it. Just around the Cape of Good Hope, the coastline bends northward again into False Bay where we come upon a colony of penguins who seem strangely out of place in Africa. Like so many things here, they are hard to take your eyes off of as we follow the wooden walkway that winds through literally hundreds of the flightless birds in all stages of life. Back in Cape Town, we make one last stop in the township of Langa, just east of the city proper. The townships are vestiges of the

City Hall in Cape Town - Mandela delivered his first speech straight out of prison from the balcony in the center to 50,000 people. - Photos by Steve Pearson

See A world away, page 2 The warthog.

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apartheid system which was formally instituted in 1950. At that time, black South Africans were forcibly removed from the city centers and relocated in prescribed locations outside the city limits. These areas quickly became shanty towns full of squalor and suffering. Blacks were required to carry “pass books” at all times and could only enter the city for work and were required to leave at the end of the day. Soweto, short for Southwest Township, outside of Johannesburg, became the best known of the townships. Home to Nelson and Winnie Mandela, it became the de facto headquarters of the anti-apartheid movement. Today, the Langa Quarter Project and others like it across the country have sought to rejuvenate the townships and even make them cultural tourism destinations. Soweto is the bustling home to close to a million people where Mandela’s home is now a museum. In Langa, we are toured around by a knowledgeable guide who knows both the local and national history of the townships. Our tour includes a visit to a small tin tworoom shack that is home to a mother and her two children, 150 square feet of living space at best. The next day, we’re winging our way to Johannesburg, a city of 4 million, where we catch a bus that takes us six hours north to Kruger Wildlife Reserve, the largest national park in South Africa. Our safari takes us to one small corner of this huge place, and our skilled guide, communicating with other guides in the area as he drives our open-air safari vehicle, quickly finds a pride of lions and then, later, we make a rare cheetah sighting. There are antelopes of various types and sizes, giraffes and elephants that stroll slowly across the road, seemingly oblivious to our vehicle. It is otherworldly, this land on the other side of the globe from our home. The birds are multicolored and their calls are like nothing we’ve heard at home. Even the starlings have an exotic flair with their brilliant aqua-blue plumage. Every sighting, large and small, brings a thrill, especially the big cats, but I have to confess to a soft spot for the lowly warthog that looks like an assemblage of spare parts as it kneels on its forelegs to nibble on the undergrowth. After three days in the bush, we return to Johannesburg to tour the cultural and historic spots in this large city that is a mishmash of huge houses behind high fences and garbage-strewn areas that extend for blocks


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A world away/from page 1 in the city center. The crime rate here is high, we’re told, and our guide cautions against walking outside at night. After a drive through the city, we head to Soweto where we see the modest home Mandela returned to after his long incarceration. Next, a stop at the Hector Pieterson Museum, named for the first student killed in a 1976 protest against the teaching of Afrikaans, the language of the oppressor, in the schools there. The iconic photo of Pieterson’s limp body being carried by another youth while his sister runs alongside was seen worldwide and upped the ante in the struggle to end apartheid. Our afternoon is spent at the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg, a place where one could easily devote a couple of days. Hundreds of people from all over the world jam the corridors and open galleries. It is a place of sorrow and joy; story boards, video and thousands of photographs from the period keep us enthralled until our guide insists we have to leave some two hours later. The next morning, we pack for Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. Our time in South Africa has come to an end, and it did not disappoint. You can roughly divide the history of this country into three eras, pre-European, colonialization and post-apartheid. In the great sea of time, the period since Mandela’s release followed by his rapid ascendance to the presidency is just a drop of water. South Africa, like the U.S., still has a long road ahead to become an economically just, color-blind society, but it is a fascinating place to visit both culturally and geographically. As with other places we’ve visited in Africa, we were made to feel totally welcome by the native people and I have a feeling it won’t be our last time on South African soil.

Photos by Steve Pearson

On the boat to Robben Island, Cape Town and Table Mountain in the background.

African Penguins at Boulders Beach.

The Malay district in Cape Town.

Mandela’s cell on Robben Island.

Cape Town and Table Mountain from the sea.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Chinese pharmacies

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ell, we have survived our first winter, I hope. After all, it is almost April. Before we moved to Northwest Wisconsin, our friends warned us about the miserable winters with blizzards, which would bring 10 to 15 feet of snow. Thanks to El Nino, that never happened. Every day, we are counting our blessings: We are closer to our son’s family in the Twin Cities. We got to see our granddaughter much more often, watching her grow by the minute. We have met many new friends from the book club, our church and from meeting our neighbors (especially Irene and Robin across the lake). Also, from my writing classes, my barbershop (The Indianhead Chorus), and all my friends from the cooking classes. We got to watch the beautiful sunrise at the front porch and the sunset from our back porch every day, while listening to the rustling leaves and hearing different birds serenading each other. I started to give cooking lessons and share my passion with others. We’ve discovered authentic Chinese restaurants and Oriental stores in the Twin Cities (well, there are none on this side of the border). We discovered this dim sum house in Bloomington which is quite authentic, and the discovery of different Oriental grocery stores was an extra bonus. Much to my surprise, one of the stores has a whole wall full of drawers from floor to ceiling, with a long glass counter in the front displaying colorful boxes of manufactured medicine. All of a sudden, the memories of my childhood in Hong Kong started to resurface. What stood in front of me was an old-fashioned pharmacy that I haven’t seen for ages and never in my wildest dreams would I have expected to see one here. I must have been 8 or 10 years old then. In my old neighborhood, there was this herbal medicine store on the street corner. The first time I visited was when my mother sent me there to get some medicine for my brother who was not feeling well. When I entered the store, first thing I noticed was these

Wok & roll Peter H. Kwong drawers – they literally filled the whole back wall from top to bottom and side to side. The drawers were the size of large shoe boxes, each labeled with an index card with Chinese writing. I recognized the words but had no idea what they were. There was an elderly gentleman at the counter who asked me what I needed. So I repeated my mother’s instructions: “My brother has a fever with an occasional cough. He doesn’t have an appetite and doesn’t sleep well at night.” He paused and pondered for a minute, and then with separate bowls, he started opening the drawers, one at a time, and filled each one with the contents. A few times, he had to climb the ladder in order to get to the higher drawers. Then he gathered all the bowls, and from each bowl he picked out the contents gently and weighed them carefully with his scale, which consisted of a long bamboo with markings, a dish hanging on at one end, and a movable weight at the other. Just by the way the scale was tilting, he knew he had the right amount of herb medicine (very scientific indeed). That went on with each ingredient. Then he gently put them all in a large piece of wax paper, and fold them neatly into a small package. Then he told me the cost, followed by the instructions. And just to be sure, he wrote them down on the package just in case. And lo and behold, my brother would feel better after a few days! Herbal medicine dates back 4,000 years in Chinese history. There was this fictional character Shen Nong who was supposed to have tasted many different herbs and plants and discovered which were beneficial or harmful to our bodies. Then, it was during the Ming Dynasty (1368 – 1644 A.D.) that a gentleman named Li Shizhen, who after spending 27 years of testing and collecting data, finally wrote a book on all the

characters of the herbs, plants, flowers and roots that he researched. There were more than 1,800 of them. The most famous root drugs known in the U.S. are the ginsengs, which are grown and harvested plentifully in northern Wisconsin. Other medical plants such as daylilies, chrysanthemums, honeysuckle and peonies, to name a few, are known more for their botanic beauty than their medicinal values. My personal experience with herbal medicines was not the most pleasant, as most were bitter, pungent and hard to swallow. My mother had to bribe me with nuggets of candied fruit pieces before I would empty the bowl. But somehow, whatever I had that made me feel terrible, I felt better after a couple of bowls of “bitter tea.” I admire those “herbal pharmacists,” who could memorize the characteristics of hundreds and thousands of these herbs, and also be able to cure one’s illness by combining and mixing different herbs together. While the Western doctors would use a stethoscope to

detect how one is breathing, or how one’s heart is beating, the Eastern doctors could detect all that by putting his finger on your pulse. In old days, when men and women were never to have physical contact, the doctors would attach a piece of string to the beating pulse, through a shaded curtain, and could diagnose whatever symptoms the patient behind the curtain had. While we take different kinds of vitamins to keep us healthy here in the Western world, the Chinese drink herbal teas which are supposed to clean your system. Maybe it is time for me to have a bowl of “bitter tea” now?

Peter Kwong will be teaching a cooking class at Unity High School beginning April 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. For further information please contact Deb Paulsen at Unity School District at 715-825-2101, ext. 1560, or email depaulsen@unityk12.wi.us.

Glenna Farms celebrates sugaring season with sweet giveaway AMERY – In the spirit of sugaring season, Glenna Farms will be hosting a photo contest Saturday and Sunday, April 2-3, during their annual MapleFest. Using the hashtag MapleFest2016, MapleFest guests are invited to post photos of their adventures at Glenna Farms to Instagram or Twitter. On Monday, April 4, a photo posted that incorporates the hashtag and was taken at Glenna Farms during Maple-

Wilma in Oaxaca Wilma Gray

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ast summer, my friend Dawn said I would love the culture and weather in southern Mexico during the winter. You can imagine how excited I was in January to be invited to join Dawn and her husband, Manuel, in Oaxaca. They had an extra bedroom available. I didn’t waste one minute in accepting. My excitement mounts and I get a Spanish language book to familiarize myself with some Wilma Gray basics. My friend Lois helps me daily, but it is hopeless - my attempts at the language only result in her laughter. It’s close to departure time and Dawn sends me some instructions, just in case. “Be sure to bring warm PJs. We will pick you up. If something happens and you have to come to us, take a taxi and say ‘Abajo de la iglesia de San Felipe por el arroyo.’ It is the second door after you pass the bridge.” The morning of my departure has dawned; it is 28 degrees, drizzling and

Fest will be selected, and the winner will receive free pure maple syrup for a year. MapleFest, which takes place April 2-3 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., allows guests to engage in the process of making maple syrup while enjoying free pancakes with pure maple syrup. A self-paced tour takes guests step-by-step through the process and ends with a live demonstration of the evaporator boiling the water from the sap

Writers’

Carousel car windows are iced. As I am waiting for my 11 a.m. airport shuttle to arrive in Baldwin, I tell everyone about my trip. I’m definitely feeling like a very lucky woman today. As time slips by and past the noon hour, I start to get on edge. We call the shuttle and are told that the noon shuttle from Eau Claire has already passed Baldwin. I am frantic. Is it all going down the tubes? On the phone, the shuttle people suggest I drive my own car to the airport or call a taxi. Is this a joke? There is no taxi in Baldwin and it looks icy out there. My flight leaves at 1:55 p.m., I tell the motel manager I would be willing to pay anyone $50 to drive me to the airport. Jennelle, his daughter, agrees to take me. It is 12:45 p.m. and this is definitely my last chance. I give her $60, partly because I only have 20-dollar bills in my wallet and partly to thank her for trying to save my butt. She wishes me luck and I’m in the airport with no idea if I am on time or not. Now I only have to get my two

to make pure maple syrup. Additionally, guests can go back in time with a demonstration of cooking sap the old-fashioned way, which is in a kettle over flames. “This event allows families the rare opportunity to visit a working maple syrup farm during the production season,” said Rick Glenna, owner. “With the new photo contest, it allows us the unique experience of seeing the farm through our customers’ boarding passes, one for Houston and one for Oaxaca. I am nervous, looking at the computers where you get the passes, looking longingly at the ticket counter employees. I decide to see if they will do it for me when I tell them I am already late for my flight. Beautiful! Now it’s through Security and I have to use the bathroom. I hurry to my gate and see they are loading passengers. Whew! Be still my heart. Oaxaca! Quickly made to feel at home, I am shown the bathroom. In Mexico you may not put any paper in the toilet - it all goes in a wastebasket, but I am really here and ready to experience everything. My friends love the place and are eager to share their enthusiasm. It doesn’t take long to see the warmth and heart of the people. We explore the ruins of Mitla, a pyramid the Spanish tore apart and replaced the stones into a cathedral. We go downtown to see the chocolate factory and sample some. We drive to the capital of Mescal and sample some. We go to Monte Alban, the immense mountaintop ruins of a large pre-Columbian archaeological site. We drive into the mountains to see the birthplace of past President Benito Juarez. Even today, in Mexico, people revere him and assert that he was the last good president Mexico has had. We go to see El Arbol del Tule; it has the stoutest trunk of any

eyes. I’m looking forward to seeing what people take their photos of and providing one lucky winner a supply of nature’s finest sweetener for an entire year.” For more information regarding the photo contest rules and the MapleFest event, visit glennafarms.com/coupons. – from Glenna Farms

tree in the world, a diameter of 46 feet. Food? Do I try anything new, you ask? How about grasshoppers served on a bed of lettuce? (Dawn advises me not to eat the lettuce.) How about corn smut? I have wanted to try this for a long time but haven’t had the opportunity. Opportunity knocks! I enjoy completely the food of Oaxaca, the climate, the culture, the artistic verve of its people. About the writer: Wilma Gray was adopted and then raised as a farm girl in Iowa and Wisconsin. As a child she had an inventive spirit which lent itself to theatrics. This was early tamped down and lost. She joined Carolyn Wedin’s writing class in 2010 to see if the early storytelling spirit still lived. Now 74, Wilma finds it’s a second childhood, second chance. Today she lives in Luck. Writers’ Carousel, a revolving menagerie of pieces for your enjoyment, is created by participants in Carolyn Wedin’s Write Right Now, WITC Community Education classes in Frederic and Luck.


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estival Theatre welcomes featured artists Zach Lee and TJ Charlson. Lee brings life and mystery to Tom Joad, and Charlson plays the Rev. Casey in “The Grapes of Wrath,” opening Saturday, April 9, at the Franklin Square Black Box. Jaclyn June Johnson returns to Festival for this large-cast show, sponsored by ArtReach and the Unity area FFA alumni. Lee grew up in Glenburn, N.D. He has come quite a long way from his first stage appearance as Santa in “Santa’s Rockin’ Reindeer” in fourth grade. Lee has a master’s in theater arts from the University of North Dakota and has performed as Orin Scrivello D.D.S in “Little Shop of Horrors,” Sir Lancelot in “Spamalot,” Pozzo in “Waiting for Godot” and Lenny in “Rumors.” Working with Festival Theatre is his first step in moving closer to the Twin Cities. After graduating last year, Lee worked as a caregiver for his 1-year-old nephew, who was born prematurely. Luckily, his nephew is doing well, and Lee could join Festival to play Tom Joad in “The Grapes of Wrath.” Lee is looking forward to bringing the

Festival

Featured Artists classic story to life in St. Croix Falls. “At first glance, it seems like a dated piece of work, but there are many parallels between this tragic story and what is going on in our world today,” Lee says. “If we cannot learn from Zach Lee history, we are doomed to repeat it.” Returning to the Festival Stage, Charlson will be playing the traveling preacher, the Rev. Casey, in “The Grapes of Wrath.” Born in Oklahoma, where

the Joad family begins their journey, Charlson is no stranger to extended road trips. TJ Charlson This last year, Charlson and his family took a six-month journey in a travel trailer, exploring the country before settling in Amery. Charlson moved around a bit as a child in a military family, but mostly grew up in North Carolina. His earliest performances were dancing. His friend’s mother owned a studio, and they were always looking for guys to help for recitals. He attended Appalachian State University and later

transferred to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in acting and received recognition as most significant contribution to the acting/ directing program. He went on to receive a Master of Fine Arts in directing from Western Illinois University. Charlson performed as Bob Cratchit and ensemble characters for Festival Theatre’s production of “A Christmas Carol” this past winter. Other memorable credits include Alan in “Equus,” Crow in “Tooth of Crime,” Charlie in “On Golden Pond,” Lysander in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Charlie in “The Foreigner” and the Rev. Moore in “Footloose.” Charlson also has a knack for fight choreography, and has worked on “Les Miserables,” “West Side Story,” twice, and “I Hate Hamlet.” Charlson continues his work in theater at Festival and directing at the Amery Middle School. He’s looking forward to working with this talented cast to bring this marvelous story to life.

Grantsburg High School presents “Our Town” GRANTSBURG - The drama department of Grantsburg High School will be presenting the Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Our Town” Friday through Sunday, April 1-3, in the high school auditorium. The play is “an enduring work of American drama” that emphasizes the beauty in the ordinary aspects of life in a small town at the turn of the century. The playwright, Thornton Wilder, was

born in Madison and won the Pulitzer Prize for “Our Town” in 1938. Over 40 students, along with director Linda Benge and several adult volunteers, have been working hard to bring this classic to the stage. “The play is a script that many people study in school,” said Benge, “and it is challenging to work on something that has been performed by so many fa-

mous actors. But I think that there are many parallels between the small town of Grover’s Corners and the small town of Grantsburg. Maybe that gives these student actors a special insight into the story. The values are very similar. Maybe there is something special about living in a small town that helps us all enjoy the ordinary.” It is estimated that this play has been

performed somewhere in the world at least once every night since it was published. It is an American classic. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and the Sunday matinee will be at 3 p.m. with tickets available at the door. – submitted

Flood hits the Forts

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ow, I thought, even though my pal the Old Recluse has a subtle sense of humor, the news he left me with was a bit of a stunner. He’s pretty good at mimicking old movie comic Stan Laurel by pulling a straight face on all occasions, serious or not. But when he told me, “A flood has hit the Forts!” I fell for it, for a few seconds anyway. I mean the place, although near a river, sits on relatively high ground, surrounded by sandy soils. But ya never know, right? Sure enough, it turns out the “flood” he gravely informed me about was true, umm, at least in one sense. But he was using the term in reference to a human, not a deluge of water. Oh well, even old Woodswhimsy here can be taken in, once in a few decades anyway. Maybe I need a little “wordswhimsy” savvy to accompany the woodsy tag, eh? Donna Flood is the new administrative assistant/gift shop manager at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. Her route to the position involved some interesting twists and turns, so methinks it might be worthwhile to introduce her, as visitors will soon find her welcoming presence at the historic site’s interpretive center. One of her key roles will involve orienting everyone to the place, whether they be eager schoolkids or bedraggled tourists on the prowl for a fun/educational time as they explore the history on offer at Forts Folle Avoine. She’s rarin’ to go, given that she’s experienced a few real-life adventuring of her own. Donna only recently arrived at the Forts via her latest residence in Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska, where she lived with hubby Chuck Matoush. Nestled in the remote Brooks mountain range, the town of around 300 is home to the Nanamiut tribe of Inuit Eskimos. Chuck is actually still there, finishing out a term of teaching in the local school, where Donna also was a substitute teacher’s aide. Their relocation to Danbury completes a natural full circuit for Chuck, as he’s spent summers here since age

Folle Avoine

Chronicles

Donna Flood, shown here with husband Chuck Matoush, is the new administrative assistant/ gift shop manager at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. Both will also be lending their talents to a variety of the activities at the park. - Photo submitted

Woodswhimsy the gnome 10. His experiences range from forestry, including stints as a smoke jumper, to ventures into China and several other intriguing stops packed in along the way. Donna’s background is equally adventurous. Recently she mused a bit on her life thus far, “I’ve hiked glaciers in Iceland, tried my hand at various hobbies like pottery, which I still love, climbed in Rocky Mountain National Park, took in lots of concerts and shows and explored all over the place with my camera, even publishing and selling a few of my favorite pics. Oh, and that’s besides taking up the violin and writing some romantic fiction.” It’s as if she’s even surprised herself when she sums it all up by saying, “Go figure!” So now she’s chosen to venture “back in time,” as it were, via her new posting at Fort Folle Avoine Historical Park, where she hopes to contribute to a site she finds totally fascinating. Asked about her reflections on the Folle Avoine story, Donna recalled that she “first visited here last year and was impressed by the expertise of the guides hosting the tours of the fur trade/Indian area. The whole fur trade looked like something I wanted to learn more about.” She has a natural feel for historical places, recalling her time in New England where she’d experienced sites like the recreated 1627 Pilgrim village of Plimoth Plantation and the early 1830s-era Old Sturbridge Village. Growing to love romping around through that history, she was concerned there just wouldn’t be much of that sort of historical oomph around here. Now she’s finding out, especially in regard to fur trade history, that such is hardly the case. Wistfully, she reflects on “my

surprise at finding the fur trade, and how well researched and documented it was. I really hadn’t thought much about it, as it’s a peripheral part of New England history with its colonial/

intends to lend a hand with site activities. “Given that he started his career in forestry,” Donna muses, “he’s expressed interest in hosting visitors to the site’s log-

Revolutionary War focus.” But the fur trade not only includes that era, it precedes it, she’s learning, and was carried on for almost 300 years wherever the frontier lines were, such as in the original 1802-05 years of the original Forts Folle Avoine. Plus, she quickly adds, “There’s way more than that ... even neat tidbits of local history, like how the Duncan yo-yo toy empire was once based in Luck. So there’s lots of hidden history, too.” Explaining her own special intrigues, Donna explains, “I’ve spent much of my life interested from the viewpoint of ‘how did they live?’ What was different for household life? I’ve done a lot of re-creation of various perspectives of the Middle Ages, for instance, and was delighted to find that the fur trade era is well-represented in that regard. I figured I’d get involved with it in one way or another, sooner or later.” And indeed she will, as Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park attracts many “living history re-enactors” to several of its events. And, cycling back to hubby Chuck, once he settles back here in May he

ging museum and, hopefully, this will include other parts of interpretation needed at the site, too.” Hmm ... given both of their backgrounds, sounds like some intriguing stories are to be had from both Donna and Chuck. And stories, and storytelling, are what the best history is all about. Donna is currently at work Wednesdays through Fridays at the site’s interpretive center. The site’s seasonal school tours get under way in midApril, so she’s focusing on plans to revamp the gift shop’s look and merchandise lines. Of course each Wednesday the research library opens for visitors; then on Memorial Day weekend the weekly round of tours will be available once again. More info is always available by tootling 715-866-8890 or checking out theforts.org website. Signed, Woodswhimsy ... an independent writer not affiliated with Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park

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MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Do you remember? Compiled by Sue Renno

50 years ago “The most paralyzing blizzard of the winter” caused the March 23 edition of the Leader to be printed a day late.–A hole 25 to 30 feet deep was discovered in/ under the parking lot behind Hagberg’s Store in Frederic. Robert Hall was leaving work when he found his car to be stuck, with one tire mired in a soft spot in the blacktop. Ashley Hughes and his son Ashley Jr. happened by and helped to lift the car, when the blacktop crumbled and gave way, with the men able to avoid falling in. Shorty Aubert and his crew were called in to fill in the hole, an old well or dry well.–The Frederic Legion Auxiliary served supper for the Paul G. Johnson Legion Post 249 members on the occasion of the American Legion’s 47th birthday. Brian Teske shared slides and commentary from his tour of duty in Vietnam. The Honey Bees girls quartet, Kathy Amundson, Ann Pedersen, Andrea Pedersen and Susan Berg, sang several numbers, and four charter members of the post were in attendence, Henry Bille, Willard West, Emil Walquist and Earl Duncan.–The Auditorium Theatre in St. Croix Falls was playing “Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines,” starring Stuart Whitman, Sara Miles and James Fox. The Frederic Theatre would show “Lord Jim,” with Peter O’Toole, then MGM’s “The Big Parade of Comedy.”–An open house was planned in Cushing on April 3 in honor of the 55th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Hans Hanson. The Frederic Roller Mill, for many years the largest building in Frederic. - Special photos

40 years ago The village of Frederic has a remarkable and com-

pelling history. This is the first of a series of articles in which I hope to rewrite the early years of this history. It seems an audacious proposition to say that I intend to “rewrite history,” but hear my real meaning. There are actually six distinct ways in which I plan to “rewrite” Frederic’s history. 1. We are fortunate to have a series of extraordinary documents, generated at several anniversary dates over the years, telling the history of Frederic. I will be using information in these existing documents to simply restate the history, perhaps in a more cohesive or approachable manner. In this way I am rewriting as in “writing again,” the village’s history. 2. As part of my research into Frederic’s history, I have scanned many of these documents and converted them to searchable text. The digitized version of these documents are available at the Frederic Public Library so that anyone can search for any name or place, or any word for that matter, and find all its occurrences in the various documents. In this meaning of rewriting Frederic’s history, I am rewriting these historical documents in a modern, digitized and searchable format, making them accessible to anyone. 3. The power of the Internet is now available to unearth information that was practically inaccessible in the past. I have found and will share new information relevant to Frederic’s history from my Internet searches. By combining information from these new sources with the record that already exists, I will be expanding and thus rewriting our history. 4. All history is complicated by the very nature of life itself. Frederic’s history is no exception. Many of the buildings in town have been used for multiple purposes; many have been owned by several individuals; some have been moved; many of our buildings and homes have names based on owners who have long since moved on; and of course some have disappeared. It’s no surprise that our story has errors. When I find compelling evidence of errors in the earlier telling of our history, I will offer corrections to help future historians. 5. I have collected numerous photos and maps related to Frederic’s history. I put them into a book, “Frederic in Photos, the Early Years,” with one copy for the Frederic Historical Society and one for the Frederic Library. I am delighted to announce that a second

Rewriting Frederic history Don McClure edition is available. It has 80 percent more photo pages than the original and many more maps for a total of over 360 pages of photos and maps. It’s available on disc at the Frederic Public Library for anyone to view or copy. In this way, the photographic history of Frederic can be accessible to many and can be better preserved for future historians. Since the photos are electronic, they can be enlarged easily to view more detail. A few other significant photos are shown below. The original depot is the first building in Frederic proper, the railroad station that was assembled at the end of the line. It arrived before Frederic’s first lots were sold in late 1901. Another photo shows what was the largest building in Frederic for many years, the Frederic Roller Mill. In 1966 it was moved from its original location on Wisconsin Avenue just north of what is now Hope Road to just south of Oak Street and just east of the railroad, now the Gandy Dancer Trail. It was removed recently, making space for the new Frederic Clinic of the St. Croix Regional Medical Center which opened in 2015. The tallest structure in town was and is the water tower at the north end of town, installed in 1913. 6. The photographic record itself tells us about parts of Frederic’s history that have never found their way into the print documents noted in sections one and two above. These print documents have been the most tangible basis of our history up to now. Thus I will also be rewriting Frederic’s history by sharing fresh insights based in part or solely on photos in the book mentioned in No. 5 above. I have recently started a Facebook group called Frederic Wisconsin, Early Years. All the photos described in paragraph 5 can be found there, compressed, and many of the digitized text documents are there too. More items are coming from this author, and new materials are being added by others.

Leonard Leifgren, president of Farmers State Bank, Frederic, announced the opening of a bank branch in Danbury, March 16. Kerry Brendel was appointed branch manager, with Irene Helin also hired to serve there.–Gary Schauls, a Frederic graduate and Vietnam vet, began work as the new accountant for the Frederic hospital.–In “one of the wildest regional championship games seen in years, the Frederic Vikings thoroughly manhandled” the Grantsburg Pirates, 8768.–Alex Martin, Frederic, was photographed with the box he created using wood salvaged from the Carlson Hardware store during a remodeling project and other wood milled by his own grandfather, Israel Bjorkman, salvaged from a remodel of the Eddie Blom residence. He carved sea-themed pictures on the top and sides and used a propane torch to darken the carvings.–Delane Hoefs and the Rev. Craig Jorgenson were married on Nov. 15, 1975, at Wood River Tabernacle.–Navy Seaman Recruit Keith Engdahl, from St. Croix Falls, graduated from recruit training at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.–The Reflections was a gospel music group comprised of young people from Viola Lake Missionary and Alliance Church. They planned to make a record at a recording studio in Minneapolis. Two of their members, Dan Adler and Larry Mansfield, planned to hold a Frisbee marathon at the Webster school gymnasium, admission 5 cents and sponsors desired, with a goal of breaking the 30-hour marathon record, and using the proceeds to help pay for the recording.

20 years ago Swimmer Lindsey Highstrom, 14, Cedarburg, granddaughter of Virgil Highstrom and Darlene Groves, Siren, and Leonard and Bridget Renz, Luck, qualified for Olympic tryouts at Purdue University, and cross-country skier Seth Behrends, 15, Drummund, grandson of Reg and Mary Behrends, Siren, qualified to compete in the Junior Olympic competition in Rumford, Maine.–Lauritz Jensen, Luck, was awarded a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star at a ceremony held on his wife, Grayce’s, birthday, 50 years after the incidents in WWII that earned him those medals and others.–Kim Murphy was the new director for the Luck Housing Authority.–Lisa Brendel, a sophomore from Frederic and daughter of Kerry and Cindy Brendel, took second place in the state Legion Oratorical Contest, after winning first place at the local, county, district and regional levels.–The case against a former Siren School District administrator was settled, with some charges dismissed and a finding of guilty to two charges of embezzlement. He was ordered to pay $6,000 restitution to the school district plus $1,500 to the AODA program.–Natural gas is odorless, so an odorizer is added to aid in detecting leaks. In Grantsburg, a faulty valve leaked odorizer onto the floor at the natural gas pumping station on Hwy. 70, causing a law enforcement officer to declare, “The whole town stinks.” The smell lasted about four days, and had many people feeling nauseous and/or fearing there was a real gas leak.

Brought to you by:

The original depot, the first building in Frederic proper. The freight (near) end of the building was later extended to its current size.

A cooperative-owned newspaper


PAGE 6 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

TOWN TALK • COUNTRY CHATTER Hello friends, The best news of the week is that Mistletoe, our senior long-term resident cat, has finally been adopted. She went to a wonderful home in Danbury where she will live with her new friend, another senior cat. Fingers crossed that they get along well and become the best of friends. Other adoptions include dogs Queenie and Serena. As those three adopted pets went out the door, five strays came in to take their places in the form of three cats and two dogs. Millie, a gray tiger-striped cat, was found at the rest stop by Elbow Lake Road. Lionel, a 5-year-old brown and black tabby, was rescued on Crosstown Road by Grantsburg. Cadbury, a 5-month-old black kitten, was picked Sherlock up on CTH

Shelter

YAPpenings

Humane Society of Burnett County H in the Town of Dewey. Dog Harvey, a large tan and white fellow, was found on Kessler Road in the Town of Scott, while Chloe, a lovely German shepherd, was found by Grantsburg. Chloe’s owner came for her the next day but the remaining dog and three cats have gone unclaimed. Our featured cat is a 4-month-old orange kitten we call Calvin. The first time that I laid eyes on Calvin was in the shelter office; it was his turn to help the office staff and he took his job very seriously. Since it was lunchtime and DQ Blizzards were on the menu, Calvin was doing his best at getting upclose and personal with both Emily and Paige as they were trying to enjoy their treats. Cat Peaches and Cream got inspired by the little mischief maker and the girls soon had two felines vying for some ice cream. I took pity on the girls and distracted Calvin with a toy mouse on a stick which he went after with a vengeance. Occasionally Peaches and

Frederic Senior Center Our spring remains very nice with a little rain. It’s just cold enough at night and warm enough in the daytime for the maple sap to run. The winners for Spades were Darwin Niles, John

LaFond, Doug Severson and Arnie Borchert. The eight bid went to Sandy Hickey and Nona Severson. The winners for 500 were Steve Wenthe, Dave Peterson and Phyllis Peterson. The nine bid went to

Nina and Lawrence Hines were supper guests of Diana and John Mangelsen on Monday. Karen and Hank Mangelsen and Lawrence and Nina Hines visited Gerry and Donna Hines Wednesday afternoon. Donna and Gerry Hines went to Maple Grove, Minn., Thursday and stayed with Brian and Jane Hines that night and Friday. On Saturday, they were overnight guests of Brenda and Tim Sweet. Sun-

Siren news

day morning Gerry and Donna went to church with Barry and Sue Hines and family. Later they had Easter brunch at the home of granddaughter Nicole and Luke Gruber with other family members. Hank and Karen Mangelsen joined their children and grandchildren at the home of April and Dave Close in Siren on Saturday to celebrate Easter. April’s birthday was celebrated also. Pastor Jack Starr portrayed Simon Peter during

Sympathy is extended to the family of Leona Wilke, who passed away March 19. Hubby and I spent Saturday afternoon just a little north of Amery at the Cricket Bar and Grill, attending the 134th-annual Luck Mutual Insurance Company meeting and dinner. After the chicken dinner, there was a short meeting. Then prizes were given out for those whose names were drawn. Hubby and I headed to Siren United Methodist Church on Sunday at the crack of dawn for the “Sonrise” service. The service was totally put on by the youth group. I stayed at church to finish some things while hubby took off for home to feed the tree rats and fill feeders. Well, bear country was a mess. The feeders were down and the disc blade feeder was down on its side, 6 inches into the ground. I wonder if they got their toes hit. Congratulations to David Doty for being chosen Siren Schools student of excellence for the week. Keep up your great work. Congratulations to middle schooler Dylan Keim and high schooler Laurel Kannenberg for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. You will excel. I hope all my readers had a very special Easter with family and friends.

Interstate Park Final story time at the park ST. CROIX FALLS – Join naturalist Julie Fox for the final winter nature story time at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 31, at the Ice Age Center at Wisconsin Interstate Park. After a brief spring break, the popular program will resume for the summer beginning Thursday, June 9. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south

We hope to see you at the center.

For questions about the center ask for Patzy or Wally. You can even email us at gburg118@gmail. com. Coming events: • Business meeting the third Thursday of the month, 11 a.m. • Bingo the second Wednesday of the month, 2:30 p.m. Bring a $1 to $2 wrapped gift.

• Rummage sale, Saturday, April 2, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. • Medica workshop, Tuesday, April 19, 2 p.m. • Ladies tea day, Friday, April 29, 9-11 a.m. • Fun with friends, every day. Wi-Fi available.

Karen Mangelsen

Bev Beckmark 715-349-2964

Old Man Winter must have taken pity here in bear country during that last snowstorm because it missed Burnett County. Our daughter Tammy didn’t see a flake in Chetek, but our grandson Darren and his fiancee Amy, and our granddaughter Alayna and her daughter Makiya, of Eau Claire, got at least 10 inches, maybe more in some areas. Many of our regular tree rats seem to be busy elsewhere these days. I have a feeling they are now busy with their youngsters. They are usually born by now. We usually won’t see the little ones until sometime in the middle of June. You can tell they are the little ones by their size, and they seem to be a little unsure of themselves while climbing up and down the trees. I heard on Saturday at the Luck Mutual Insurance dinner meeting that a sow and her three little cubs had been seen not too much south of Frederic. There are still no signs of bluebirds or robins here in bear country. However, some of our summer birds are back. We have had several red-winged blackbirds in the bird yard under the feeders over the weekend. Little Doctor Lake, just west of Siren, has had several trumpeter swans, flocks of Canada geese and a lot of ducks. Maybe it will be early nesting this year with many little ones bobbing on the lakes. Let’s hope so. They are so cute when small.

Bob Peterson and John LaFond. Remember that we play Spades on Monday at 1 p.m. and 500 on Thursday at 6:30 p.m. I hope everyone had a nice Easter.

Patzy Wenthe

We are collecting items this week for the rummage sale on Saturday, April 2. If you need to drop off items late in the day, and the door is locked, please call Patzy at 715-463-2677 or 715-222-6400. Remember we offer Wi-Fi, coffee and goodies and the book nook. For meal reservations call 715-463-2940. For hall rent or other questions contact Patzy Wenthe at 715-222-6400 or Wally Mitchell at 715-463-2940.

Dewey-LaFollette

hounds make very nice house pets and companions. I myself was totally unaware of that fact until I started to volunteer at the shelter and got to know the hound breeds. Like Sherlock, they are generally loving, gentle and affectionate dogs who just want to be your best friend. Sherlock has a calm, steady demeanor and gets along with some dogs. He doesn’t do well around cats as he views them as critters to chase and tree. Maybe he thinks they are little raccoons! He hasn’t found a person he doesn’t like and has impressed us all at the shelter with his good looks and friendly personality. We are hopeful that he gets his perfect home real soon. With April just a day away, I would like to remind you all about our upcoming fundraiser, the annual spaghetti supper, raffle and silent auction on Saturday, April 30. It will be held at the community center in Webster. The end of May brings our next fundraiser, the annual plant sale that will be held on Saturday, May 28, in the shelter parking lot. Two fun events to look forward to. We hope to see you there. The Humane Society of Burnett County, hsburnettcty.org, is saving lives, one at a time. Phone 715-866-4096, license No. 26335-DS. You can check us out and like us on Facebook too. Have a great week.

Dave Peterson

Grantsburg Senior Center We hope everyone had a blessed Easter. I’m sure it was busy all week long for most of us, but it’s always rewarding when we can spend time with our families. We had a full house again for Thursday lunch. It was liver and onions. It’s amazing the crowd we get on that meal day. Gratitude is extended to the nutrition program kitchen workers for the great meal. We hope you’ve been busy cleaning your closets.

Cream would play-attack Calvin and the little fellow would try hard to hold his own against the much Calvin bigger cat. There is never a dull moment whenever Calvin is around, he is one fun, lively and happy fellow. He gets along with cats and dogs alike and will fit into most any home environment. Sherlock was the featured dog not too long ago but I think he really deserves another mention. If you recall, Sherlock is a 1-year-old, tricolored walker hound. He is tall and regal looking, athletic and very handsome. I have come to know Sherlock very well as we have shared many long walks together and I can’t believe he is still with us as this is one very nice dog. I think some people don’t realize that

of Hwy. 8. Nature story time is free of charge, but a state park sticker is required to enter the park. Annual passes for 2016 are $28 for Wisconsin residents or $38 for nonresidents. Daily passes are $8 for residents or $11 for nonresidents. For more information call Fox at 715-483-3747, visit wiparks.net or become a friend on Facebook at Friends of WI Interstate State Park. – from Interstate Park

his Easter message Sunday at Lakeview UM Church. He acted out what might have happened as Peter accompanied Jesus into Jerusalem, his interpretation of the events during the week before the crucifixion of Jesus, Peter’s denial of his Lord, and the eventual forgiveness he received from Jesus. Karen and Hank Mangelsen were Easter Sunday dinner guests at the home of Marlene Swearingen. Marlene’s children, several grandchildren and

great-grandchildren, friends, and Lida Nordquist were there for the meal and fellowship also. Nina and Lawrence Hines went to Eden Prairie, Minn., Sunday to have an Easter celebration with Nancy and Steve Hagen and other relatives. Don and Pat Israel hosted Easter dinner for family members Sunday. Later Hank and Karen Mangelsen stopped by to visit.

St. Croix Valley Senior Center Pat Willits Spring break is over, and it’s time to plan the garden. The Easter celebration is over for another year, too, a wonderful time for family and friends to be together and celebrate that Jesus has risen. The children enjoyed Easter egg hunts and the Easter Bunny too. So it was a slow week at the senior center, but we did play cards as usual, just fewer of us each day. We should be back up to speed this week. Come on downtown to the center. Sunday, March 29, 500 winners were Ray Nelson, Steve Wendt and Nel Medchill. The nine bid went to Bob Norlander. Tuesday, March 22, 500 winners were Ray Nel-

son and Rich Hustad. The nine bid went to BrenNel Ward. Hand and Foot winners were Bill McGrorty and Ione White. Thursday, March 24, 500 winners were Bruce Medchill and Elroy Petzel. The nine bid went to Bruce Medchill. The center was closed on Easter Sunday. The senior center is located downtown at 140 N. Washington, St. Croix Falls, phone 715-483-1901.

Siren Senior Center We are getting items in for the silent auction and door prizes. We have a large selection to bid on. Stop in to the center and check out the items. Anyone can come and bid on the things, you do not have to be present when the drawings are done. The decorating crew came in and changed the theme at the center from shamrocks to bunnies and colored eggs. Rick and Rose Miller, Diane Norman, Barb Geske, Lynn, and Ralph and Nona Severson were the decorating crew. Remember our center is available to rent for meetings, graduations, anniversaries, birthdays, etc. Our 500 winners were Lorna Erickson, Sue Newberger, Nona Severson, Marilyn Colvin and Sandy Hickey. Spades winners were Dwaine Bentley, Marilyn Niles and Steve Wenzel. I hope everyone had a great time with their families over Easter. Can you believe that three months are gone out of our new year? It’s hard to believe that our snowbirds will soon be home. We look forward to having them back.

Nona Severson

Dates to remember: Tuesday, April 5: Burnett County Tourism annual fundraiser at Crex Meadows. Tuesday, April 5: Election for school board and local officials. Wednesday, April 6: Our evening meals will start again. Menu will be roast beef, gravy, mashed potatoes, green beans, salad bar and lemon pie. Wednesday, April 13: An ambulance driver will be at the center at 10 a.m. to give a presentation on how to use the defibrillator. Wednesday, April 13: Potluck at 11:30 a.m., come for the presentation and stay for our potluck and then 500 at 1 p.m. Make it a whole day at the center. Thursday, April 21: Monthly meeting. Wednesday, April 30: 500 card party 1 p.m. with silent auction, door prizes and lunch. Thursday, June 2: Music in the park will start again.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK • COUNTRY CHATTER Fleas and ticks are dangerous to dogs, cats and their humans. They carry a variety of diseases, some of which can be deadly. During flea and tick season, your pet’s life could depend on you keeping them protected. Flea bites can cause intense itching, leading to secondary bacterial skin infections, hair loss and discomfort. Fleas feed on the pet’s blood; heavy infestations can cause anemia or low levels of red blood cells and tapeworms. Ticks are vectors for such diseases as Lyme disease, Ehrlichia and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, just to name a few, which can be difficult to diagnose and are serious if left untreated. All experts agree that a healthy wellness program will undoubtedly include some flea and tick prevention for dogs as one of the first priorities. Over the past decade, preventative treatment for fleas and ticks has developed a number of options for pet owners. With so many treatment products to choose from, the decision can be overwhelming.

Happy Tails

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County Flea and tick shampoos typically work by killing any parasite already on the pet. They are not generally recommended as a sole treatment for effective parasite control. Topically applied flea and tick prevention products are some of the most commonly used and effective parasite-control methods. They are topically applied products that are absorbed through the skin to work systemically and must be purchased from a veterinarian. These products are generally applied once a month and act as insecticides. Similar topical products are dosed to an amount safe to be applied on the pet without a prescription and are

available over the counter. New medicated flea and tick collars have been developed. If your dog has side effects from a topical treatment, the tick collar may be a better choice. They can be an effective method to fight and prevent a number of parasites and in fighting tapeworms caused by fleas. Ingredients used in these products can be toxic if swallowed; consulting with a veterinarian before using a flea or tick collar

Polk County residents support child abuse prevention efforts by wearing blue

Birth announcements Born at Burnett Medical Center: A boy, Beckett Michael Johnson, born March 23, 2016, to Daman and Tiffany Johnson of Grantsburg. Beckett weighed 10 lbs., 5 oz. and was 22 inches long. Siblings are Kendall and Riley Johnson. Grandparents are Tom and Cindy Freeman of St. Peter, Minn., and Sue Heslop of Adelaide, Australia. Great-grandparents are Helen Cardwell of Chicago, Ill., and Carl and Betty Freeman of East Moline, Ill. ••• A girl, Payton Grace Bennett, born March 24, 2016, to Michael and Elizabeth Bennett of Grantsburg. Payton weighed 8 lbs., 12.5 oz. and was 21.25 inches long. Sibling is Christian Bennett. Grandparents are Greg and Molly Gaffney of Grantsburg, Peggy McCormick-Vaughan of Amite, La., and Donnie Bennett. •••

Born at Osceola Medical Center: A boy, Finnegan Paul Schulte, born March 20, 2016, to Chris Schulte and Jennifer Farley of St. Croix Falls. Finnegan weighed 6 lbs., 15.6 oz. ••• A boy, Liam Austin Anderson, born March 22, 2016, to Cody Anderson and Britnie Thornell of Osceola. Liam weighed 7 lbs., 8.6 oz. •••

Born at Amery Hospital and Clinic: A boy, Brier Ray Anderson, born Feb. 23, 2016, to Bailey Sigsworth and Dylan Anderson of Amery. Brier weighed 6 lbs., 6.3 oz. ••• A boy, Bowen Allen Lindus, born Feb. 25, 2016, to Kacie and Richard Lindus of Deer Park. Bowen weighed 8 lbs., 6 oz. ••• A boy, Ashton James Bradley, born Feb. 26, 2016, to Trista Bradley and Daniel Clark of Clear Lake. Ashton weighed 6 lbs., 7.4 oz. ••• A girl, Zoey Paige Boettcher, born March 1, 2016, to Sabrina and Kyle Boettcher of Luck. Zoey weighed 7 lbs., 14 oz. •••

A girl, Lexi Jay Hanacek, born March 3, 2016, to Jessica Foster and Daniel Hanacek of Cushing. Lexi weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Riley Cassandra Valleen, born March 3, 2016, to Danielle Brenholt and Aaron Valleen of Frederic. Riley weighed 6 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A boy, Zavier Raymond Wendt, born March 4, 2016, to Dominique Wendt and Thomas Johnson of Balsam Lake. Zavier weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Bennett Scott Beauvais, born March 4, 2016, to Jennifer and Travis Beauvais of Balsam Lake. Bennett weighed 7 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A boy, Liam Edward Strobach, born March 5, 2016, to Amy and Benjamin Strobach of Clear Lake. Liam weighed 6 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A boy, Isaiah Delore Lodermeier, born March 8, 2016, to Rebecca Lodermeier and Jared Peper-Rucks of Clear Lake. Isaiah weighed 8 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A boy, Jameson Loyd Scholes, born March 8, 2016, to Alicia Pilgrim and Terrance Scholes of Amery. Jameson weighed 6 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Jeremiah Jazz Lundberg, born March 11, 2016, to Andrea and Mark Lundberg of Frederic. Jeremiah weighed 9 lbs., 1 oz. ••• A girl, Hailey Renee Seaman, born March 16, 2016, to Rikki and Adam Seaman of Osceola. Hailey weighed 8 lbs., 0.3 oz. •••

A boy, Ezra James Alen, born March 17, 2016, to Amy and Mark Alen of Balsam Lake. Ezra weighed 8 lbs., 1 oz. •••

A boy, Kaiden Michael Andersen-Scott, born March 18, 2016, to Beryn Scott and Kevin Andersen of Amery. Kaiden weighed 9 lbs., 12.5 oz. •••

is a good idea, especially for pet owners in multipet households. Another new product comes in chewable pills or chews. They utilize many of the same ingredients found in other flea and tick prevention products and may last up to three months. While most commercial products for flea and tick prevention for dogs have been shown as very effective with rare side effects, many pet owners are concerned about their side effects and safety. Flea and tick products have been reported to cause short-term depression, vomiting, nausea and hair loss. Finding the best flea and tick prevention for dogs will depend on several variables, such as the environment and pets themselves. Some of the ingredients have been shown to be extremely toxic to cats but not dogs, so carefully reading the label is important. In fact, all flea and tick remedies should be tailored to your pet.

The Polk County Citizen Review Panel and Polk County Child Advocacy Referral Interagency Network Group encourage Polk County residents to wear blue on Friday, April 1, to help promote Child Abuse Prevention Month. We believe that every child deserves to grow up in a safe, stable and nurturing environment. Children are the foundation of our society, our community and our future. When we focus on preventing child abuse and neglect, the results are better childhoods, leading to healthier adults and stronger communities. Every adult in our community has an opportunity to “Say Something, Do Something for Kids.” It could be as simple as offering an encouraging word to a parent or organizing a family-fun event. Please join us on Friday, April 1, by wearing blue to help promote and strengthen child abuse efforts in our community. Post your “blue” picture on social media using hashtag SaySomethingDoSomething. Throughout the month of April, the Polk County Citizen Review Panel and Polk County C.A.R.I.N.G. will be promoting a countywide blue ribbon campaign through various activities. You may notice

blue ribbon yard signs and parenting information throughout the communities; hear information over the radio; see articles in the paper; and talk to your kids about what they heard at school. You are invited to join us to raise awareness of child abuse and neglect in Polk County by attending the following events: • Friday, April 1: Countywide, Wear Blue Day to show support of Child Abuse Prevention Month. • Friday, April 1: Hands Across the Courthouse, noon-12:20 p.m., Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, followed by a presentation by Mike Pistorino at the justice center, 12:30-1:30 p.m. • Friday, April 1: Mike Pistorino presentation 6-7:30 p.m., Polk County Government Center, 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake. • Saturday, April 2: Nationwide Million March Against Child Abuse, noon-4 p.m., St. Croix Falls Elementary School, 651 E. Louisiana St., St. Croix Falls. Stop child abuse! Together, we can make sure it doesn’t hurt to be a child.

CLIP & SAVE

EVERY MON. Amery Area Community Center

• Bridge, 1 p.m. • Grief Support, 1 p.m.

715-268-6605

Frederic Senior Center

EVERY TUES. • Pool, 9 a.m. • Quilting, 9:30 a.m. • Wii Games, 1 p.m. • 500 Cards, 2nd & 4th Tues., 6:30 p.m.

EVERY WED. • Bridge, 1 p.m.

EVERY THURS. • Pool, 8 a.m. • Hand & Foot Cards, 12:30 p.m. • Bridge, 6 p.m.

EVERY FRI. • Polish Poker, 9:30 a.m. • Bingo, 2nd & 4th Fri., 1 p.m. • Pool Night, 6 p.m.

EVERY SAT. EVERY SUN.

• Overeaters Anonymous, 6 p.m.

• Spades, 1 p.m.

• 500, 6:30 p.m.

715-327-8623

Grantsburg Senior Center

• Cribbage, 2:30 p.m.

• Bingo, 2nd Wed., 2:30 p.m.

• Monthly Meeting, 3rd Thurs., 11 a.m. • Evening Meal, 3rd Thurs., 5 p.m.

Luck Senior Center

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Dime Bingo, 1 p.m. • Wii Bowling, 9 a.m. (Call First)

• Free Coffee Wednesday Mornings • 500 Cards, 1 p.m. • Monthly Potluck 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. • Canasta 1st & 3rd Thurs. • Dining at 5, Every 1st Wednesday • Monthly Senior Meeting, 3rd Thurs., 9:30 a.m.

St. Croix Valley Senior Center

• Skip-Bo, 11 a.m. • Hand & Foot, 12:30 p.m. • 500 Cards & Dominoes, 12:30-4 p.m. • Monthly Meeting, Third Tues., 11:45 a.m.

• Mahjong, noon.

• Skip-Bo, 11 a.m.-Noon • 500, 6:30-10 p.m.

• Cribbage, 4:30 p.m. • Bridge, 10 a.m.-Noon • Bingo, 1st & 3rd Friday, 1-3 p.m.

Webster Senior Center

• Senior Monthly Meeting, 3rd Tues.

• Dime Bingo, 12:30 p.m. • Ping-pong, 1 p.m.

• Cards, Dominos and Pool, 1 p.m.

• Brunch, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 715-327-4425

• SCF, Noon-6 p.m. • Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • SCF, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

• Siren Moose Lodge, Bingo, 7 p.m. • Frederic/Lewis VFW, 2nd Tues. 7 p.m.

• Indian Creek American Legion Post 396, Dirty Clubs, 6 p.m. • Siren VFW Aux., 2nd Wed., the hall, 7:30 p.m.

• Frederic Legion Aux. 249 Every 3rd Thurs., Golden Oaks, 7 p.m.

• Siren Moose Lodge Fish Fry, 7:30 p.m.

715-463-2940 715-472-8285

Siren Senior Center

• Mahjong, 1 p.m.

715-349-7810

715-483-1901 715-866-5300

Food Shelf

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • SCF, noon-5 p.m., 715-483-2920

VFW Aux./Legion Aux./ Burnett County Moose Lodge

TOPS

EVERY MON.

EVERY TUES.

• Bingo At Siren Moose Lodge, 7 p.m.

EVERY WED.

• Burnett VFW At Little Mexico, 6 p.m. • CRA, Shooters Bar, 6 p.m.

Meat Raffles/Bingo

EVERY TUES.

• Good Sam, St. Croix Falls, 5:45 p.m., 715-483-3666

EVERY THURS.

• Alternating At Dug Out or Susy Q’s, 6:30 p.m. • Siren Lions At Kris’, 6 p.m. • Webb Lake Charities Bingo At Northwoods Bar, 1-3 p.m. • Milltown VFW Post, 1st & 3rd Thurs., 5 p.m. • Last Call, 5 p.m.

EVERY TUES. • Luck Senior Center, 4:15 p.m., 715-472-2341 • Balsam Lake Municipal Building, 3:30 p.m., 715-485-3002

EVERY FRI.

• Fishbowl Sportsmen’s Club At Sweeny’s Bar, 5 p.m. EVERY FRI. • Memory Days, Harvest Moon, 7 p.m. • Lake Country Snowmobile Riders At Jed’s Laker Lounge, 6:30 p.m. • Fish Fry at Siren Moose Lodge, 5-7:30 p.m.

EVERY FRI.

• Lake Country Riders At The Pour House, 5:30 p.m. EVERY FRI. • S.N.O.W.S., Skol Bar, Frederic, 5:30 p.m. • PICTO, Whitetail Wilderness, Webster, 6:30 p.m. • H.S. Fishing Team, Crow Bar, 6 p.m. • Sharon’s Webb Lake Charity, at Cabaret, 6 p.m.

CLIP & SAVE

EVERY WED.

• Spades, 1 p.m.

EVERY WED.

• Pokeno, 2nd & 4th Fri., 12:30 p.m. • Potluck Lunch, Every Sunday, 12:30 p.m.

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-Noon

EVERY THURS.

• Trinity Lutheran Church, Osceola, 7 a.m., 715-755-3123 • Comforts of Home, Frederic, 5:15 p.m., 715-327-8063

EVERY SAT.

• YLRA At Yellow Lake Lodge, Webster, 3-5 p.m. EVERY SAT. • Lions at Whiskey Joe’s, 5 p.m. • Blacksmith Shop, 3 p.m. • The Ridge Eatery, 3 p.m. • Last Call, 7 p.m. • Grantsburg Legion, 6:30 p.m.

EVERY SAT.

• BC Fair At The Tap, 4 p.m. • At Indian Creek Legion, 3 p.m. EVERY SAT. • VFW At C&J’s Hideaway, Lewis, 3 p.m. • Youth hockey At Whitetail Wilderness, 6 p.m. • Devils Lake Assoc. at Bump’s Lakeside Bar, 5 p.m.

EVERY SUN.

• Wonderland At Yellow Lake Golf Course, 4 p.m. EVERY SUN. • Unity Friends of Music, Bingo, Blacksmith Shop, 6 p.m. • Bingo At Whiskey Joe’s, 4 p.m.


PAGE 8 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

LIBRARY CORNER Centuria Public Library Good books for first and second grade – chapter books By the time children get into the first and second grade, they are ready for chapter books. There are many authors that write specifically for children of this age group and they write a series of books that fall into the chapter book category. Here at the Centuria Public Library, we have many chapter books. Below is a list of authors the library has and their series of books. There are many, many more book series in the library. These are some recommendations: Jeff Brown, “Flat Stanley” series Mary Pope Osborne, “Magic Tree House” series Catherine Hepka, “The Pet Rescue Club” series Sally Rippin, “Hey Jack” series and “Billie B. Brown” series Mike Thaler, “Black Lagoon Adventures” series Abby Klein, “Ready Freddy” series Darrel and Sally Odgers, “Jack Russell: Dog Detective” series Barbara Park, “Junie B. Jones” series Erica Silverman, “Cowgirl Kate” series

G. Stilton, “Geronimo Stilton” series Kate DiCamillo, “Mercy Watson” series

Library materials

library has four public-use computers available for anyone who has the need to use a computer. Library staff is available to assist anyone with their computer needs.

The new books for 2016 are arriving. Stop in and browse through our library collections. We have new adult books by the most popular authors available for you to check out. Many new DVDs are being added every week to the collection. Wonderful, high-interest books are available for children to check out and participate in the Bee-A-Reader Program that promotes reading literacy for preschoolers. If there is a book you would like to read and the library does not have it, please consult with a librarian and we will be happy to assist you in requesting the material you are looking for.

New materials to support reading

Wi-Fi hot spot

The library is open six days a week. The hours are Monday, Wednesday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon.

The library has free Wi-Fi for public use. Bring your devices and connect to the Internet to search the Web or connect with Facebook. The

The library is developing a library collection that supports reading in school. Many new chapter books have been added to the collection for the young emerging reader. In addition, many high-interest books that promote growth in areas of science and social studies have been added to the collection. Stop in soon and see what we have to offer here in Centuria to support the learning concepts that are being taught in school.

Hours

St. Croix Falls Public Library The Big Read

Adult activities

Computer cafe

Help us kick off The Big Read in the St. Croix Valley at 7 p.m. this Friday, April 1, with an evening with Charlie Maguire at the Phipps Center For the Arts in Hudson. Inspired by the themes of “The Grapes of Wrath,” this year’s Big Read selection, Maguire will sing songs of the era including dipping into “The Ballad of Tom Joad.” Maguire was the National Park Service’s first and only “singing ranger,” a perfect way to celebrate the park service’s centennial year. For more events and information, visit stcroixsplash.org, or call 651-439-1465.

Card club is every other Monday at 10 a.m. Strategy games are played every other Tuesday at 5 p.m. Adult coloring is every Wednesday 1-2 p.m. Open art time is held Fridays 10 a.m. to noon.

A menu of topics is available for one-on-one instruction or gather your friends and come as a group. The computer cafe is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-3 p.m. Please call or email to reserve a time.

Youth programming We havee after school youth programming Monday through Thursday, baking, coloring, gardening, maple syrup and more; check it out on our website. Media Lab every Wednesday, Pokemon Club is the first and third Thursdays, and Minecrafters Guild is held the second and fourth Thursdays. Stop by and grab a calendar, or print one off the Web!

Classic Movie Mondays Classic Movie Mondays are the second Monday of the month at 1 p.m. Have a favorite classic movie suggestion? Let us know. Stop in and grab a calendar and tell all your friends.

Story time Fun learning for preschool families including singing, games, stories and crafts is held Fridays at 10:30 a.m.

AARP tax help AARP Tax Aides will be here one last time on Thursday, March 31, from 9 a.m. until noon. Walk-in appointments taken if time allows. For more information call 715-268-7884.

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten Giving young children the tools to become successful readers, 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten is a research-based early literacy program that encourages all families and caregivers to read 1,000 books with their young children before they enter kindergarten.

Hours/contact The library is open from 9:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. Phone: 715-483-1777. Email: scflibrary@scfpl.org. Online: scfpl.org. You can also find us on Facebook.

Balsam Lake Public Library National Library Week

For kids and families:

April 10-16 is National Library Week and in celebration we are offering you a chance at great deals and prizes. Just visit any participating Balsam Lake business and show them your library card (any library card from anywhere) and you will be qualified to receive a “deal” at that business. Then visit the library to enter for a cash prize. It’s that easy.

Story time

Coffee and Crayons

Movies

Coffee and Crayons will be held Friday, April 8, 10:30 a.m. Relax and enjoy coffee while coloring pages from adult coloring books. A fun and unique way to unwind and express creativity. All coloring supplies will be provided. Adults only.

Tech time Tech time with Barbara Krueger will be held Friday, April 8, and Saturday, April 9. Sign up for a 30-minute session and get your technology questions answered. Space is limited. For more specific times or to sign up, call or email us. Barb from Krueger Solutions is also available for personal appointments, contact her directly for more information at 651-343-5078 or email: kruegersolutions@icloud.com.

Check our website and Facebook for the most current activities. Story time is for children 18 months to 5 years and is held Tuesday mornings at 10:30 a.m., with stories and activities. “Peanuts,” released in 2015 and rated G, will be shown Thursday, April 7, at 4:30 p.m.

LEGO Club Lego Club will be held Thursday, April 21, 4:30 p.m.

Tween Time April 28: Jewelry making. All programs begin at 4:30 Thursday afternoons. Ride bus 304 after school, get dropped off right here at the library.

Cribbage

12:30 p.m. For all ages.

Book club Book Etc. meets in the community room at the library, every third Wednesday of the month at 1:30 p.m.

Anytime, Anywhere Book Club Anytime, Anywhere is a completely online book club for adults. It’s all online, so you can join the discussion whenever you have time. For more information visit the book club page on Facebook, facebook.com/ AnytimeAnywhereBookClub.

Hours and contact info Check out our website, balsamlakepubliclibrary.org. We offer free Wi-Fi, public computers, faxing and copying, free coffee and an inviting atmosphere. Hours: Monday - Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. For the most updated information, like us on Facebook or email us at library@ balsamlakepl.org. Our phone number is 715-485-3215.

Play Cribbage at the library Wednesday afternoons beginning at

Frederic Public Library Book group meets April 14 The evening book group will meet Thursday, April 14, note the date change, at 6:30 p.m., at the Chateau St. Croix to talk about “The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck. This discussion is part of the St. Croix Valley Big Read and everyone is welcome to attend this free event. Copies of the book are available at the library, and new book group members are always welcome.

join the fun.

eyeglasses for the Lions and groceries for the local food shelf.

Library Friends meet March 31

Technology help

The Friends of the Library will meet Thursday, March 31, at 6:30 p.m. at the library. If you are interested in ways to support the library, we welcome you to see what we’re about.

Need to create an email account? Want to do some research? Bring in your concerns and we will help you find the answers. We can also show you how to download free e-books. If you have questions about terminology, Internet, email, Facebook or anything else computer-related, talk to us.

April 15 is filing deadline

It’s story time for preschoolers and their caregivers Wednesday mornings at 10:30 a.m., with books, music and activities. Come and be part of the energy.

Basic Wisconsin tax forms and booklets including 1, 1A, WI-Z, and Wisconsin Homestead Credit are now available. We also have the basic federal forms but we do not have instruction booklets. Let us help you download the forms you need.

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

Board of trustees meeting

The 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program is for children who have not started 5-year-old kindergarten. Keep track of the books read to your children, and for every 100 books the kids get stickers and record their progress on a wall mural at the library. Register soon and

Neighbors helping neighbors

Wacky Wednesday morning fun

The Frederic Library Board of Trustees will meet at the library Monday, April 4, at 5 p.m.

Free wireless at the library Wireless is available 24/7 inside (and outside) of the library.

Keep in touch Like us on Facebook at Frederic Public Library. Our website is fredericlibrary.org. Email us at library@fredericlibrary.org. Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak St. West. 715-327-4979. Hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Story time for preschoolers is held every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m.

The library collects food product labels for Frederic school projects,

Milltown Public Library Upcoming events we are beginning to plan for: Summer reading program – plans are under way for another great summer; Movies in the Park, and at the lake – plans have started for picking movies and dates; Preparation for book sale during Fishermen’s Party; and Child Development Days at Unity School, April 21-22.

Recent events The library’s Adult Winter Reading Challenge ran through March 8. Participants earned cash prizes by reading books in a mix of broad categories. Winners in the drawing were: Vicky Wheeler, Tara Mitchell, Kay Dorrance, Linda Jones, Jenelle Lindquist, Stephanie Dorrance and Amanda Nissen.

Ongoing events Fiber arts group The next fiber arts group for adults will be on Thursday, April 28, from 1-3 p.m. If you knit, crochet, quilt, sew or engage in any of the fiber arts, bring your current project to the library for a casual gathering

with other like-minded folks. We’ll work on our projects together as we share tips and chat. No registration required.

Computer basics Open lab for beginners is available on Mondays at 1 and 2 p.m. Sign up for an hour-long session at the circulation desk or call 715-8252313.

Morning story time Morning story time is held every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Join the group for a half-hour of stories, singing and fun. Designed for toddlers and preschool-age children. Stay tuned for new summertime hours starting in June.

Create and Connect This program is an all-ages art and social night and is held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. This is a great night for the whole family to choose stories together and to exercise creative energies.

Bee-A-Reader Bee-A-Reader and complete 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten. This is a literacy program, offered at all three Unity area libraries, designed to help parents prepare their children for kindergarten. Children ages birth to 5 can sign up and start or continue reading.

Hours and information Phone: 715-825-2313, open Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Email milltownpl@milltownpubliclibrary.org. Fresh coffee and fast Wi-Fi are served every day. Besides the myriad of books in all genres and reading levels, the library also has oodles of movies, books on audio and even e-books and e-audiobooks.

Join the Friends of the Milltown Public Library The next meeting is Thursday, April 7, 6 p.m., at the library. Anyone can be a member and can help in many ways.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Free health clinics scheduled LUCK - Do you have health concerns and want to talk to a health professional? Home and Away Ministries will

be holding health and wellness clinics on Tuesdays, April 5 and 12, from 2-5 p.m. at the Home and Away Minis-

Memorial Blood Centers is calling all lifesavers DULUTH, Minn. – Memorial Blood Centers invites all eligible blood donors to roll up their sleeve and give blood. Every two seconds someone needs blood, from heart transplant and cancer patients to accident victims. The need for blood is constant but the supply is not. Only volunteer blood donors can make a lifesaving difference to someone in need. Step up to give blood at a blood drive in your neighborhood and help save lives. Donating blood is convenient and safe when you are in good health; free of antibiotics for 24 hours, unless taken daily for a skin condition; symptom free for at least three days following a cold or a flu; and 17 years or older, 16 with written parental con-

sent, form available at mbc.org. In Burnett County, there will be a blood drive at Webster High School on Wednesday, April 13, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. While walk-in donors are always welcome, they encourage appointments to be made in advance. To register for a blood drive, go online to mbc.org or contact the sponsoring organization directly. Patients in local hospitals depend on Memorial Blood Centers to be there with the right blood type they need to survive. All types are needed, especially O negative and O positive. – from Memorial Blood Centers

Wild River Fitness Center to host blood drive OSCEOLA – The Wild River Fitness Center in Osceola will be hosting an American Red Cross blood drive Friday, April 29, from 1-7 p.m. The fitness center is located right next to Osceola Medical Center. Blood is a perishable product that can only come from generous volunteers. By donating blood, individuals can make a difference in the lives of patients in their commu-

nity and throughout the nation. In only about an hour, volunteer blood donors can help save lives and feel instant gratification. Download the American Red Cross blood donor app, visit redcrossblood.org or call 800-RED CROSS (800-7332767) to make an appointment or for more information. – from American Red Cross

try Center located at 210 Park Ave., Luck. The ministry’s health and wellness services focus on preventive care and education. Currently the clinic provides patient support and referral services. Dr. Deziel will be at both of the April clinics. Please call 715-472-7000 to schedule an appointment. Home and Away Ministries is inspired by the Gospel to provide free primary health-care services to Polk County and Burnett County residents with low resources. This includes both the uninsured and the underinsured. They provide medical and social services that promote dignity in the people being served. Home and Away Ministries is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization, and they are not affiliated with any denomination. Their mission is to serve the whole community regardless of race, religion or ethnicity. – submitted

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not use the tool. “Nearly one in four Americans live in rural areas, and this study has the potential to improve their health and quality of life because research clearly shows that, in general, people in rural areas have higher rates of chronic illnesses than people who live in larger cities,” said Dr. Tom Elliott, HealthPartners Institute senior research fellow and principal investigator. “This tool will create a patient’s risk profile for cancer and display it in one place so that the clinician and the patient can engage in a shared decision-making discussion to create a plan for primary prevention of cancer and cancer screening. The rapid collection of the data creates efficiency for a busy clinician, and how it displays this data for the patient will lead to better patient engagement,” said Dr. Joe Bianco, Essentia Health co-investigator on the study. This research is supported by a $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01 CA193396. It is the third partnership between HealthPartners and Essentia Health to use clinical decision support tools in electronic medical records to provide evidence-based guidelines in the exam room to improve care. Other decision support tools being studied include providing current recommendations to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with serious mental illness and identifying patients that have prediabetes who are at risk of developing diabetes if left untreated. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, rural residents have fewer visits to health-care providers and are less likely to receive recommended preventive services including cancer prevention and management of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

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in electronic medical records called the Cancer Prevention Wizard can increase preventive care in rural areas for cancer. The Cancer Prevention Wizard helps primary-care providers identify all eligible patients ages 11-80 who are not up to date on recommended cancer-prevention services, and it provides them with evidence-based recommendations for primary and secondary cancer prevention. Primary cancer prevention will include smoking cessation, body-weight management and human papilloma virus vaccination. Secondary cancer prevention will include screening tests for colorectal, breast, cervical and lung cancer according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. The five-year study, Implementing Cancer Prevention Using Patient-Provider Clinical Decision Support, will involve more than 150,000 patients who receive care at 30 Essentia Health primary-care clinics in northern Minnesota, northwestern Wisconsin and eastern North Dakota. Using a cluster-randomized trial design, the study will compare three groups of clinics. In one group, primary-care providers will use the tool to identify and offer prevention services to their patients. In a second group, certified medical assistants will use the tool and discuss screening and prevention options with patients before they see their doctor. The third group includes clinics where patients will get usual care that has no cancer-prevention activities promoted by the CP Wizard. In addition, the CP Wizard will personalize recommendations by determining each patient’s unique characteristics and using special cancer-risk-assessment tools from the National Cancer Institute. Researchers will assess whether use of the CP Wizard results in more patients getting recommended primary and secondary cancer-preventive services and whether certified medical assistants have an effect on patient outcomes. The study will also evaluate if use of the Cancer

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HealthPartners, Essentia Health study to look at increasing NOW ACCEPTING preventive cancer care in rural areas MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. – A HealthPartners Institute Prevention Wizard results in higher short-term health-care NEW PATIENTS study will assess whether a clinical decision support tool costs but lower long-term costs compared to clinics that do

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PAGE 10 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

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MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

More than 45 Siren students will be taking the stage this Friday and Saturday, April 1 and 2, at 7 p.m., in the Siren School auditorium following a weeklong Prairie Fire Children’s Theatre production of Robin Hood. This musical rendition is a modern take on a classic tale. Playing the part of Prince John is Joel Hillman. Justine Phernetton will play Jezebel and Abby Hayman will play Anabel. - Photo by Becky Strabel

An art show featuring the work of local artist Gregg Rochester will begin with a reception Friday, April 8, in the Amery Community Food Hub. The show will run through May 31. – Photo submitted

Local artist featured at the Amery Food Hub AMERY - Amery’s Hungry Turtle Institute and Farm Table Restaurant, located in the Amery Community Food Hub, announce an upcoming art show titled “Love of the Land,” featuring local artist Gregg Rochester. His large, colorful, lively, contemporary landscapes have been developed by the artist’s interpretations of the Wisconsin farmlands, fields and woodlands. The show will open Friday, April 8, with a reception from 5-8 p.m., and will continue through May 31. The reception is free and open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be provided by Hungry Turtle Kitchens. Rochester was named Wisconsin Artist of the Year in 2012, by TOSCA, a Twin Cities art publication. His work has been featured in solo art shows in several national venues. Images of his paintings have been presented in several national publications.

He is collected nationally and internationally, his large paintings often adopted in health-care settings, public buildings and corporate settings. A chapter of the 2014 book “Profiles in Passion” by Buz Swerkstrom was devoted to Rochester’s painting career. Rochester is a third-generation artist, following his grandfather and mother. Prior to his art career, he was a secondary educator and a clinical psychologist. Since his adolescence, he has been “in training” in the arts in Mexico, Dakota Wesleyan University, the University of Kansas, the University of Indiana and the Scottsdale Artist’s School, where he studied with renowned landscape painter Michael Workman. Other artistic pursuits include pottery, silversmithing and music. His work can be viewed online at greggrochesterart.homestead.com. – with submitted information

PFCT’s “Robin Hood” on the stage this weekend SIREN - “Hahahahahaha!” The hearty laughter of Robin Hood and his merry band will sweep through the trees of Sherwood Forest temporarily transplanted to Siren Schools this weekend, as scores of local children take the stage along with two professional actors in Prairie Fire Children’s Theatre original musical production of “Robin Hood.” Performances are slated for Friday, April 1, and Saturday, April 2, both at 7 p.m., in the school’s auditorium. “Robin Hood,” with original script and music by Daniel Nordquist, continues the Prairie Fire Children’s Theatre tradition

of presenting classic tales as you’ve never seen them. Though set traditionally in the 12th century, complete with faeries and gnomes, Prairie Fire’s version features the sheriff of Nottingham as a man ahead of his time ... way ahead ... eight centuries ahead, in fact. He is a visionary, and in his vision he sees the trees of Sherwood Forest gone, and in their place stand the Sherwood Theme Park and the Mall of Nottingham. In his way stands the environmentally conscious outlaw, Robin Hood. - submitted

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PAGE 12 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

Calling all Cheeseheads! 10 things to do during your Titletown getaway In Wisconsin, we bleed green and gold. From September through January, Sundays revolve around being in front of the television ready for kickoff and wearing our favorite player’s jersey. For those lucky enough to score tickets to a home game, there’s nothing quite like being at Lambeau Field, tailgating in the Jennifer Ingish parking lot and cheering on the Pack with 80,000 fellow Cheeseheads. But even when the final pass has been thrown, the last grill packed up and the jerseys put away at the end of the season, you can still experience all the thrills that come with being a Packer fan with a trip to Green Bay. Here are some of the “Discover Wisconsin” crew’s favorite Packers activities for a Titletown getaway: 1. Packers Heritage Trail – The brainchild of Green Bay Packers team historian Cliff Christl, the Packers Heritage Trail is a self-guided walking tour that takes visitors past significant places from the Lambeau and Lombardi eras of Packers history. The trail celebrates the intertwined legacy of the team with its devoted fans who have made the Packers what they are today. If you

Packers legends have before is enough to give even the most dedicated Bears fan chills!

bike! You never know who may want to “borrow” it on their way to practice.

4. Packers Hall of Fame – Opened in 2015, the Packers Hall of Fame is located right in the Lambeau Field atrium. Fans can relive the greatest moments in Packers history, hear from legendary players and coaches and see historic memorabilia throughout the interactive exhibits. Watch plays from the Ice Bowl, view the trophies from the Packers world championships and even see a replica of Vince Lombardi’s office.

8. Packers Family Night – Kick off the football season at Packers Family Night. Fans can tailgate in the parking lot before heading into Lambeau to watch the team perform on field drills and play in a scrimmage. With tens of thousands of excited fans filling Lambeau Field, Family Night can feel like a real game! At the end of the night, fans and players alike enjoy a spectacular fireworks show that lights up Lambeau Field.

don’t feel like walking the whole way, guided Segway tours of the trail are available with Segway the Fox!

2. Packers Heritage Trail Plaza – If you don’t have time to tackle the entire Heritage Trail, be sure to at least stop by the Packers Heritage Trail Plaza located on the corner of Washington and Cherry Streets in downtown Green Bay. Considered the centerpiece of the trail, here you’ll find life-size monuments of Packers legends and old photographs of the early team. 3. Lambeau Field stadium tour – See a number of behind-the-scenes areas and learn about the rich history of Lambeau Field when you take a stadium tour. Hear about all the new renovations, check out the view of the field from a private suite and even walk through the players tunnel. Walking the same path that so many

5. 1919 Kitchen & Tap – After a full day of Packers fun, everyone needs a bite to eat, right? Luckily, 1919 Kitchen & Tap is located right in the Lambeau Field atrium. Experience a new twist on classic Wisconsin comfort food; yes, there are cheese curds. Enjoy a delicious Bloody Mary with house-made bitters or indulge in the peanut butter bread pudding. 6. Oneida Nation Walk of Legends – Made up of 24 granite monuments, the Oneida Nation Walk of Legends is dedicated to the history and heritage of the Green Bay Packers. Each monument celebrates a Packers legend including Bart Starr, Vince Lombardi and Tony Canadeo. 7. Packers Training Camp – Before the season begins, catch a glimpse of this year’s team at Packers Training Camp. Fans can welcome the team to practice each day and watch the players work on drills at their practice field across from Lambeau. And, kids, don’t forget your

9. Packers Pro Shop - Whether you’re a lifelong fan or a brand-new Cheesehead, you can never have too much Packers gear! Find everything, and I mean everything – clothes, posters, furniture, even a Packers toaster – you need to cheer on the Pack at the brandnew Packers Pro Shop. 10. Titletown Brewing Company – Enjoy a bite to eat or a cold drink at a historic Green Bay landmark. Now a restaurant and microbrewery, Titletown Brewing Company is located in the old Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot, a stop on the Packers Heritage Trail. Fans used to send the players off and welcome them back after road games. After the Packers defeated the Bears in their first NFL championship, 20,000 fans gathered here to welcome their beloved team home. For more on this topic, watch “Welcome to Titletown, USA—Green Bay” on “Discover Wisconsin” April 2324. Jennifer Ingish is a producer for “Discover Wisconsin” which airs every Saturday at 10 a.m. on Fox Sports Wisconsin.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Local dining destination featured on Discover Wisconsin TV April 2-3 “Destination Dining” episode highlights unique restaurants and Wisconsin Cheese

About “Discover Wisconsin”

MADISON – Eight unique dining destinations celebrating Wisconsin’s agricultural diversity will be featured in an upcoming episode of the nation’s longest-running tourism TV show, “Discover Wisconsin.” “Destination Dining” airs April 2-3, and was produced in partnership with the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board and “Discover Wisconsin.” The program airs Sunday, April 3, at 5 p.m. on WQOW 18 as well as Saturday, April 2, at 10 a.m. on Fox Sports Wisconsin. “Destination Dining” may also be streamed online after Saturday, April 2. “Wisconsin is well-known for its award-winning cheese and beautiful scenery,” said Liz Fitzsimmons, director of local market communications for the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board. “The destinations featured in this episode provide unique local food experiences designed Host Maria Haberman interviews owner Heather Sicrest of to celebrate our state’s farmers and chefs while connect- Suncrest Gardens Farm. - Photos submitted ing people back to the land. These family-friendly locations are serving up great food and fun for everyone.” Haberman and crew then trek to Sister Bay in Door Hosts Mariah Haberman and Jake Zimmermann criss- County to attend Outstanding in the Field at Hidden cross the state, with Haberman making her first stop at Acres Farm. This national dining event was founded by Campo di Bella in Mount Horeb. Marc and Maryann California native Jim Denevan, who wanted to connect Bellazini run this farm and winery in the beautiful roll- people with the environment where their food is grown ing hills of southwestern Wisconsin, where the family and raised, at one long and elaborately set table. serves guests Italian-inspired farm-to-table dinners twice A handful of unique dining destinations in western a month. Wisconsin are featured in “Discover Wisconsin’s” “Destination Dining” episode, including the Farm Table in downtown Amery. Jesse Spitzack, executive chef at Farm Table, discusses the restaurant’s three-part business model and the importance of supporting local farmers.

The Farm Table in downtown Amery will be part of th “Discover Wisconsin” show. Jesse Spitzack, executive chef at Farm Table, will discuss the restaurant’s three-part business model and the importance of supporting local farmers.

As the nation’s longest running tourism program, Discover Wisconsin can be seen statewide on Fox Sports North Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. For more on this and other episodes or the broadcast schedule in other areas please visit www.discoverwisconsin. com. Connect with Discover Wisconsin on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

About Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board is a nonprofit organization of Wisconsin dairy producers that promotes the consumption of milk, cheese and other dairy products made in America’s Dairyland. For more information, visit EatWisconsinCheese.com.

Zimmermann also enjoys wood-fired pizza at the historic Nelson Stone Barn in Nelson, one of the first openair pizza farms in the state. Heading a few miles south to Maiden Rock, the crew visits Vino in the Valley. Another outdoor dining experience, Vino in the Valley boasts an Italian menu featuring local Wisconsin mozzarella from the nearby Ellsworth Co-op Creamery. Guests can dine on Italian specialties while enjoying views of the Rush River Valley. Following the Great River Road south to Cochrane, Haberman meets Heather Secrist, owner of Suncrest Gardens Farm, another farm-to-table locale that presents wood-fired pizzas topped with farm-grown vegetables and local cheese to its guests. “I am a huge fan of the farm-to-table movement and I think Wisconsin is ahead of the curve when it comes to incorporating foods grown in our own backyards,” said Haberman. “Every farmer, chef and restauranteur we met while filming was passionate about using Wisconsin dairy products and farm-grown vegetables. Trust me, you’re going to want to put all eight of these dining destinations on your travel bucket list!” Braise in Milwaukee’s Historic Third Ward and its executive chef, Dave Swanson, are also highlighted in the program. In order to help patrons understand where his restaurant’s food is grown and produced, Swanson holds three-course farm dinners at his restaurant-supported agriculture farms during the summer months. Heading to the center of the state, Zimmermann discovers Christian’s Bistro in Plover. The crew interviews Chef Christian Czerwonka, who uses ingredients from area farms, such as Whitefeather Organics, to create his ever-changing seasonal menu. - from Discover Wisconsin

Larsen Family Public Library celebrates National Library Week, April 10-16 WEBSTER - First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association and libraries across the country each April. This year’s theme is Libraries Transform. Libraries today are more about what they do, for and with library users, as opposed to what they have for patrons. Libraries aren’t only a place of quiet study, but also creative and engaging community centers where people can not only borrow books, magazines and DVDs, but can also use public computers or just relax. The Larsen Family Public Library offers access to a variety of print and digital materials including employment resources, e-books and early literacy resources that can be accessed in person or online. Libraries are many things to many people. They work with elected officials, small-business owners, students and the public at large to discover and address

the needs of their communities. Whether through offering e-books and technology classes, materials for English-language learners, programs for job seekers or offering a safe haven in times of crisis, libraries and librarians listen to the community they serve, and they respond. Library week activities at the Larsen Family Public Library include: •Monday, April 11, 1 to 5 p.m., Joe Molitor, coin collecting through the years. •Tuesday, April 12, e-book help sessions. Learn how to borrow and download e-books to your reader. Help is available from 10 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. •Wednesday, April 13, 10:30 a.m., kids story time. Free book for those attending. •Wednesday, April 13, 3:30 p.m. Kathryn Schiedermayer, Master Gardener volunteer, will talk about container gardening including plants suitable for containers, maintenance and growing herbs in containers.

•Thursday, April 14, 7 p.m., Jim Anderson, author of “Discovering America One Marathon at a Time.” Anderson is a member of the 50 States Marathon Club. •Saturday, April 16, 11 a.m., special kids story time with Annette Starkite, sponsored by Burnett County Family Literacy.

For more information, visit the Larsen Family Public Library in Webster, call 715866-7697 or check the library’s website at webster.wislib.org. – submitted

GRANTSBURG ELEMENTARY RECEIVES SCHOOL OF RECOGNITION HONORS State Superintendent Tony Evers congratulated Grantsburg Elementary School for being among 169 schools in the state that received Wisconsin Title I School of Recognition honors for the 2015-16 school year during a special Monday, March 14, ceremony at the state Capitol in Madison. Shown (L to R) are: Dana Morrin, Title I coordinator; Patricia Bergman, Title I teacher, Evers and Elizabeth Olson, elementary principal. “We congratulate the Grantsburg Elementary School students and staff for earning the Wisconsin Title I Schools of Recognition Award as a beating-the-odds school. GES is in the top 25 percent of high-poverty schools in the state and has an above-average student achievement in reading and mathematics when compared to similar schools. This award reflects the hard work of students and staff each day in the classrooms. We are proud of this accomplishment and appreciate the way that staff work together on behalf of Grantsburg youth,” said Dr. Joni Burgin, superintendent. – Photo submitted


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New Frederic Library director feels right at home Reading room named for Brian Rogers E. Royal Emerson | Staff writer FREDERIC - The community gathering place and cultural focal point that is the Frederic Public Library held an open house on Thursday, March 24, to say goodbye to longtime director Chris Byerly and to welcome the new library director, Eric Green. Green was born and raised in the small southwest Wisconsin town of Elroy, an old railroad switchyard best known as being the home to former Gov. Tommy Thompson. Having graduated from Elroy High School in 2002, Green attended UW-Eau Claire, attaining an education-related degree. While initially having hopes in becoming a teacher, Green found himself instead working full time at the Chippewa Valley Regional Airport. “I went through a lot of soul searching,” Green said, on his first day settled in to the small director’s office at the library. “I needed to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. I knew I still wanted to be in education. I knew I still wanted to be in some form of public service. And then it dawned on me that being a librarian is where I wanted to be.” Green volunteered at a local library and “fell in love with it right away.” Green went back to school and attained a master’s degree from Drexel University. In 2014, single and with no kids, Green secured a job as library director for the Lincoln Parish Library in Ruston, La. “It was good experience. They have a $4 million budget. But after a while I realized there is no place like Wisconsin. I got homesick,” Green said. Green has already purchased a home in Frederic, moving in Saturday, March 19, on his birthday. “Frederic is a wonderful community. It feels like a real good fit,” Green said. “I have a great library board and terrific staff. Everybody that I have met is very friendly. Once things settle I might join the Lions Club and try to make an impact.”

Shared visions The Frederic Library, located at 127 Oak St., downtown, celebrates its 80th year. It has been at its current location since 2004. Under Byerly’s leadership, the Frederic Library has been transformed into “the community’s living room,” attracting a wide diversity of folks, including a retired nuclear physicist, a former used-book dealer and a lifelong union auto mechanic. Byerly is retiring after serving 11 years as Frederic librarian and 26 years with the Polk County Library System. Just prior to leaving, Byerly named the living room

Eric Green, the new director of the Frederic Public Library. A lot of soul searching led to his choosing to be a librarian as a career. - Photo by E. Royal Emerson area of the library the Brian Rogers Reading Room. Rogers, born with cerebral palsy and raised in Frederic, was a nationally recognized activist for the disabled. After a career serving as director for a number of social service agencies aiding the disabled, Rogers returned to Frederic. Rogers served for many years on the library board and was honored as Frederic’s Volunteer of the Year in 1990. Rogers was freed of the constraints of his body in November of last year, passing away at the age of 68. Green embraces the community’s living room concept, although he resisted the good-natured jesting of the regulars, who tried to convince Green that as library director, he is responsible for providing the group its morning donuts and cookies. Green seems open and unimposing and shares Byerly’s vision to open wide the doors of the library to the community. “The long-term vision I have for the library is to eventually find a bigger space. Right now, we have no study rooms and limited community meeting space,” Green said. “It’s a five- to 10-year goal. Maybe we could partner with the village and build something new?”

How warm weather affects sap collection An early spring makes for a short maple-syrup season Jerry Clark | UW-Extension STATEWIDE - Early warm weather and the influence of El Nino is causing maple sap to start running, requiring maple-sap collectors and syrup producers to scramble to capture the harvest. The ideal weather conditions for sap collection are daytime temperatures around 40 degrees Fahrenheit and nighttime temps below freezing. Sustained higher temperatures provide an environment for a rapid, massive release of sap by trees over a very short period of time. The formation of maple sap is determined by tree physiology. In the later summer and fall, maple trees virtually stop growing and begin storing excess starches throughout the sapwood, especially in their xylem ray cells. This excess starch remains in storage as long as the wood remains colder than about 40 F. But whenever wood temperatures reach around 40 F, enzymes in the ray cells transform the starches to sugars, largely in the form of sucrose. This sugar then passes into the tree’s sap. Temperature increases create pressure inside trees, causing sap to flow. When a hole is bored into a tree, wood fibers that transmit fluids are severed and sap drips out of the tree. So if warm weather causes sap to flow, why would there be a big rush and short collection season? The quick answer is sugar content is reduced in the sap flow. As the wood temperature increases to about 45 degrees Fahrenheit, the enzymes stop functioning and sugar is no longer produced. Sap flow may continue but with reduced sugar content, resulting in poorer quality syrup. If buds on trees begin to swell and break due to ongoing warm weather, the sap flow will stop and the collection season officially ends, ceasing production. Sugar and red maple trees growing along roadsides, in lawns or in other open settings, where their crowns have grown large without competition from other trees, generally produce larger volumes and sweeter sap than forest-grown trees. Open-grown trees are capable of producing one-half gallon of syrup in one season, requiring 15 to 20 gallons of sap for production, whereas trees growing in a more crowded forest setting generally produce about 1 quart of syrup, around 10 gallons of sap. In addition to

OBITUARIES Dona Maiden Florence Donelda “Dona” Maiden, 87, passed away peacefully Saturday, March 19, 2016, at the Christian Community Home in Osceola, Wis. Born Nov. 28, 1928, she was the daughter of Ella Faye Burmester of Waterman, Ill. Dona grew up in Waterman living with her mother, Faye, her grandmother, Mayme, and her great-grandmother, Lou Hobble. She attended Waterman High School, graduating in 1946. She worked at the Cyclone Fence Company, paying her way through college, first at Park College in Parkville, Mo., then graduating in 1951 from Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, being the first person in her family to matriculate. It was at Cornell that she met Merle Maiden of nearby Martelle, Iowa, and the two were married in 1952. They first lived in Hinckley, Ill., and in 1962, moved to Minnesota to be near Dona’s mother, Faye, and her husband, Joseph Griska, living first in Cottage Grove, and then St. Paul Park. Dona taught school, worked for Ecolab for several years, then began a long career in the Visual Products division of the 3M Company. 3M moved her division to Texas in 1989, and she and Merle resided there until she retired, whereupon they moved to Knoxville, Iowa. She moved to Luck, where daughter Mary and her family reside, in 2006, when Merle passed away. She then divided her time between Luck and son Daniel’s home in Bradenton, Fla. Dona’s health began to fail in 2012, and she moved to assisted living at the Christian Community Home, where she resided until her passing. Dona was active in church most of her life, and her faith was an important pillar of her life. She was a lifelong musician, playing piano, accordion and clarinet, and singing in school and church choirs. She loved to sit at the family’s old upright in the dining room playing old hymns and rustic tunes, creating the Fumble Fingers Fellowship with her children on their own instruments. Dona and her family loved camping and traveled throughout the country. She roller-skated first with Merle and later with the entire family before they discovered square-dancing, an activity in which she and Merle participated for over 20 years. She enjoyed knitting and sewing, an activity which was shared with other family members. Dona enjoyed gardening and canning, and was a lifelong reader, passing on her love of books to her children. Throughout her life, Dona loved cats and many fortunate felines enjoyed the love of her family. Dona was preceded in death by husband, Merle; son, Joseph (Deborah) Maiden; and mother, Faye (Joseph) Griska. She is lovingly remembered and survived by son, Robert (Jeanine) Maiden of Roseville, Minn.; son, Wesley Maiden of Austin, Texas; daughter, Mary (Paul) Maiden Mueller of Luck; and son, Daniel (Paul Ledford) Maiden of Granite Falls, Minn.; granddaughters, Lauren (Alan) Maiden-Aery of Roseau, Minn., Ruth (Chris) Brown of Madisonville, Ky., and Mary (Michael) Schultz of Eagan, Minn.; grandsons, John (Savannah) and Jacob Maiden of Madisonville, David Maiden Mueller of New London, Conn., and Geoffrey Maiden Mueller of Luck; great-grandsons, Leeland, Alden and Christopher Brown of Madisonville, and Dalton, Jesse and Elliott Maiden-Aery of Roseau. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, April 8, 2016, at Saint Mark Lutheran Church, 550 West Seventh St., St. Paul, Minn., with visitation held one hour prior. Luncheon will follow. You are invited to sign an online guest book at rowefh. com. Arrangements are entrusted to Rowe Funeral Home in Luck, phone 715-472-2444.

Mary E. (Ott) Sjoberg

The 2015-16 El Nino is shortening the maple-sap harvest and make collectors and syrup producers scramble. Here, sap is being collected near Cadott. – Photo by Jerry Clark, UW-Extension greater sap volume and sweetness, open-grown trees also generally offer greater accessibility for collection. If sap is collected in buckets, the best place to tap the trunk is 2 to 3 feet above ground to allow for easy collection. A tap hole should be drilled 2 to 2-1/2 inches into the tree at a slight upward angle to facilitate flow of sap. If the tree has been tapped in previous years, the new tap hole should be at least 6 inches laterally and 24 inches vertically from the old hole to ensure access to fresh, productive sapwood. For trees with more than one tap, the tap holes should be distributed around the circumference of the tree. Most maple sap is about 2 percent sucrose, sugar. The amount of sap required to produce 1 gallon of finished syrup can vary from 20 to 60 gallons or more depending primarily on the sap’s sugar content. A large amount of water must be evaporated from the sap to produce a finished syrup of 66 to 67 percent sugar. The Cornell Sugar Maple Research and Extension Program finds that sap becomes syrup at 219.25 degrees Fahrenheit, or 7.25 degrees higher than water’s boiling point at the same altitude. Concentrations of syrup below 66 percent sugar content can sour over time. If sap is boiled above 67 percent density, sugar crystals can form in the bottom of storage con-

Mary Ellen (Ott) Sjoberg, 76, of Mora, Minn., passed away on Sunday, March 27, 2016, at her home. A visitation will be held Friday, April 1, from 5-7 p.m. at Dresser-Methven Funeral Home in Mora. A prayer service will follow the visitation at 7 p.m., officiated by Marv Ott. Arrangements are entrusted to Dresser-Methven Funeral Home. tainers. Finished syrup will often create a wide sheet or drip on the edge of a spoon when dipped in and quickly withdrawn above the boiling liquid. The early sap run in 2016 is making fresh syrup more readily available at an earlier date than most years. Prices may remain steady with an ample flush of syrup over the spring. However, prices could rise later if demand stays steady and the sap season is shortened by ongoing warm conditions. Maple syrup is one of the oldest natural foods in Wisconsin and has been passed from generation to generation and culture to culture. Interest in sap collection and processing is increasing as more landowners and small farms look for ways to provide a locally grown, natural product. According to USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service Census figures for 2002 to 2012, there was an increase of 88 farms in Wisconsin reporting tapped trees. Hopefully new sap collectors and syrup makers will not get discouraged from an early and hectic 2016 collection season. Jerry Clark is crops and soils educator for UW-Extension Chippewa County.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

OBITUARIES Ferne Bertha Hanna Dumke

Mark S. Johnson

Maxine Harriet “Dode” Ross

Ferne Bertha Hanna Dumke, 93, of Aitkin, Minn., and formerly of the St. Croix Falls/Centuria/Balsam Lake area, passed away on Easter Sunday, March 27, 2016, at the Aicota Health Care Center in Aitkin. Ferne Bertha Hanna (Ailts) Dumke was born Jan. 10, 1923, to Frieda and Henry Ailts at Forest, Wis. She was baptized in their log home near Forest. She was confirmed at Good Hope Lutheran Church at Titonka, Iowa. Ferne graduated from Glenwood City High School in 1941 and attended many class reunions until a few years ago. On Dec. 6, 1945, she was married to Donald Dumke at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Forest. Ferne spent most of her life farming with her late husband, Don: From 1945-1950 at Deer Lake Community; 1950-1955, New Richmond, Wis.; 1955-1966, managed Deer Lake Farm at St. Croix Falls, Wis.; 1966-2006, owned their farm approximately one mile east of Deer Lake Farm near St. Croix Falls; 2006-2010, Balsam Lake senior apartment; 2010 to present, Golden Horizon Assisted Living in Aitkin. Ferne worked from 1966-2006 at Wayne’s Cafe near St. Croix Falls. She enjoyed demos at Walmart stores in the St. Croix Falls area on new products for many years. Ferne enjoyed meeting people by selling Avon products. She served as chairman of St. John’s ladies aid for over 40 years. She was a lifetime member of St. John’s Lutheran Church at Centuria. Ferne was the key leader of the Happy Lakers 4-H Club for many years. She loved playing cards, growing flowers, putting puzzles together and entertaining family and friends. Survivors include her son and daughter-in-law, David and Pamela Dumke, St. Croix Falls; daughters and sonsin-law, Joy and Carroll Janzen, Aitkin, and Mary and Rick Petroske, Lino Lakes, Minn.; grandchildren, Ann (Janzen) and Jon Finifrock, Barnum, Minn., Christine (Janzen) and Jon Midthun, St. Cloud, Minn.,Tony and Dena Petroske, Rice Lake, Wis., Michael Petroske, Lino Lakes, and Drew Dumke, St. Croix Falls. Great-grandsons, Trent, Nathan, Nicholas, Brady and Isaac; many nieces and nephews; other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, Donald, of 40 years; and parents, Henry and Frieda Ailts. The funeral service for Ferne will be held on Thursday, March 31, at 2:30 p.m., at the Kolstad Family Funeral Home in Centuria. Ferne’s family will greet visitors at the funeral home from 12:30 p.m. until the time of service. Ferne will be laid to rest at St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery, Centuria, following the service. Pallbearers will be Tony and Michael Petroske, Drew Dumke, Ann Finifrock, Christine Midthun and Donnie Ellefson. The Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with arrangements.

Mark S. Johnson, 59, of Bismarck, N.D., died Thursday, March 17, 2016. He was born May 11, 1956, in St. Paul, Minn., to John and Sandra (Perrault) Johnson. Mark was raised in the Turtle Lake area before his family moved to Argyle where he graduated from high school. Following high school, Mark attended UW-Platteville and received his degree as a civil engineer. He enjoyed reading books from his favorite author, Louis L’Amour. Mark was a member of a competitive sailing crew in Chicago, Ill. He also loved spending time outdoors, golfing, hunting and fishing. Mark is survived by his sons, Andrew Johnson of Norfolk, Va., and Sean Johnson of Philadelphia, Penn.; his mother, Sandra Johnson of Frederic; brothers, James (Kay) of Blanchardville, Paul (Gail) of Amery, and Christopher (Julie) of Mt. Horeb; sisters, Mary Hauschen of Beaver Dam, and Ann Church (Robin Haines) of Lampertville, N.J.; along with many nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, John. Funeral services were held Tuesday, March 29, at St. Ann Catholic Church, Turtle Lake, with Father Tom Thompson officiating. Honorary pallbearers were Pete Johnson, Steve Johnson, Henry Kaehler, Robb Johnson, David Johnson and Paul Johnson. Military honors were accorded by a Wisconsin Military Honors Team. Skinner Funeral Home of Turtle Lake is serving the family.

Maxine Harriet “Dode” Ross, 90, of Grantsburg, Wis., passed away on Tuesday morning, March 22, 2016, at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, Minn. Maxine was born in Grantsburg on Jan. 12, 1926, to the late George and Alice (Nelson) Williamson. She attended the Orr School through the eighth grade and then attended Grantsburg High School, graduating in 1945. Soon after graduation, she went to St. Paul, Minn. She resided there and worked for Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, now known as The 3M Company. On March 16, 1946, Maxine married Edward C. Ross in Red Wing, Minn. In 1950, they moved to Los Angeles, Calif., returning to Wisconsin in 1961. They ventured out to live in Arizona in 1972, residing primarily in Apache Junction and Coolidge, and returned to Grantsburg in 1978. One place the family really enjoyed while living in Arizona was called Top of the World, a small mountain community, eight miles west of Miami, Ariz. They both loved the camping. A homemaker for the majority of her life, Maxine did work a number of years at Alcan Manufacturing Company in Centuria. She also helped her husband, Edward, in their auto repair shop located at their home in Grantsburg. Maxine took tender, loving care of Edward prior to his passing on March 3, 2008. They had been married almost 62 years at the time of his passing. Maxine was a self-reliant lady who loved visiting and talking with others. She received a lot of pleasure taking care of her yard and vegetable gardens, and watching and feeding the birds. She was known for her skills and talents canning fruits and vegetables, making jellies and jams, and sewing and quilting. Maxine also loved baby-sitting her grand-dogs. Besides her parents, George and Alice Williamson, and her husband, Edward Ross, she was preceded in death by a brother, Duane (Edna) Williamson; and sisters: Vivadel Leaverton, Marjorie (Gene) Bystrom and Nancy (Darold) Johnson. Maxine is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Lanie and Judy Ross; granddaughter, Tammy Syring (Jeff Johnson); great-grandson, Dean Syring; great-granddaughter, Becky Syring; and great-great-grandsons, Leland and Jake. She is also survived by brothers: George (Mary Jo) Williamson and Maynard (Carleen) Williamson; sister, Carol (Gary) Olson; and many nieces and nephews and their families, as well as dear friends. The memorial service honoring the life of Maxine Ross was conducted Saturday, March 26, at Trade River Evangelical Free Church, 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg, WI 54840, with Pastor Dale Van Deusen officiating. A fellowship luncheon followed the service. Arrangements have been entrusted with Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Grantsburg. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com.

David W. Jenderny David W. Jenderny, 58, of Centuria, Wis., passed away March 10, 2016, at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minn. He was born April 29, 1957, in Portsmouth, Ohio. He was preceded in death by his parents, Fred C. and Maxine Jenderny; and brother, Fred H. Jenderny of Centuria. Per his wishes, there will be no public services. Dave will be missed by family and many friends.

Paul E. Saugestad Paul E. Saugestad, 84, passed away Sunday, March 27, 2016, in Spooner, Wis. Paul was born Dec. 8, 1931, to Paul O. and Hattie A. (Zillmer) Saugestad. He was born and raised north of Woodville, Wis., and graduated from Woodville High School in 1950. He then went to Dunwoody College of Technology. Paul became a machinist working at Remmele Engineering Inc. for 33 years. He was also a member of the East County Line Volunteer Fire Department in Maplewood, Minn., for 14 years. Paul married the former Elizabeth Diller. They lived in Maplewood until they retired to Voyager Village. Paul was preceded in death by first wife, Joycelyn; his parents, Paul and Hattie; in-laws, Charles and Jane Diller; sister and brother-in-law, Maxine and Malcolm Gunderson; and brother-in-law, Leslie Rademaker. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Elizabeth; sister, Shirley Rademaker; nephew, Robert Rademaker; nieces: Jodi, Jill and Jessica; brother-in-law and sister in-law, Leigh and Nancy Diller; and sister-in-law and brotherin-law, Barbara and Fred Gorka. The funeral service for Paul Saugestad will be conducted at 11 a.m. with visitation 10 to 11 a.m., Thursday, March 31, at Grace United Methodist Church, Webster, with Pastor Eddie Crise officiating. The interment will be held at 3 p.m., Thursday, in Sunset Memorial Cemetery, Woodville. Pallbearers are: Allen Rand, Timothy King, Randy Klink, Robert Rademaker, Randy Olson and Fred Gorka. Honorary pallbearer is Dave Boatman. Arrangements have been entrusted with Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com.

Ann Shirley Zach Ann Shirley Zach, 80, of the Town of Oakland, Burnett County, Wis., passed away Saturday, March 19, 2016, at Essentia Health - St. Mary’s Medical Center, Duluth, Minn. Shirley was born in Chicago, Ill., on Jan. 18, 1936, a daughter of the late Joseph J. and Josephine V. (Gerdzos) Konstant. She attended Saints Peter and Paul Catholic School in Chicago, the Aspen School near Riverside in Burnett County and Webster High School, graduating in 1954. On April 7, 1956, Shirley was united in marriage to Robert Jerome Zach at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Webster. They initially resided in Webster where Shirley was employed at the Webster branch of the First Bank of Grantsburg. They then moved to Maple, Wis., in 1978, and she was employed by the Douglas County Credit Union. Shirley and Bob returned to the Webster/Danbury area when she retired in June of 1989. Shirley was a longtime member of St. John the Baptist Parish in Webster and also frequently attended Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church in Danbury. During the time she lived in Maple, she belonged to the local Lioness Club. She enjoyed working with ceramics and liked to do needlepoint. She also enjoyed snowmobiling with her husband, Bob. Shirley is survived by her husband of 59 years, Bob Zach; a son, Robert Joseph Zach; a daughter, Kimberly Ann Zach; a sister, Joan M. Bjorklund; and a brother, Richard Konstant. She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Josephine Konstant; and brother-in-law, Larry Bjorklund. A memorial service honoring the life of Shirley Zach will be conducted at 2 p.m. with visitation 1 to 2 p.m., Thursday, March 31, at Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, with Father Michael J. Tupa officiating. Interment will be held in Oakland Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements have been entrusted with Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Webster. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com.

Eleanor L. Jepson Eleanor L. Jepsen, 83, Turtle Lake, Wis., died Friday, March 25, 2016, at Amery Hospital and Clinic in Amery, Wis. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 2, at Bone Lake Lutheran Church in rural Luck. Burial will be at the Bone Lake Cemetery in the Town of Bone Lake. Visitation will be one hour prior to services at the church. For further information and to sign the online guest book visit williamsonwhite.com. Arrangements are being made with the Williamson-White Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Amery.

Joyce A. Rimer Joyce A. Rimer, 77, of Malmo and Isle, Minn., formerly of Dresser, Wis., and Bayport, Minn., died Saturday, March 26, 2016, at the Mille Lacs Nursing Home in Onamia. A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 9, at 11 a.m. at Bethesda Lutheran Church in Malmo with the Rev. James Raisanen officiating. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service at the church. Burial will be at a later date in the Pleasant Prairie Cemetery at Osceola, Wis. Arrangements are with the Sorensen-Root-Thompson Funeral Home in Aitkin, Minn., srtfuneral.com.

Ardyce I. Haglund Ardyce I. Haglund, 87, of Luck, Wis., passed away on Thursday, March 24, 2016, at the Amery Regional Medical Center. Ardyce MacDonald was born on June 1, 1928, in Minneapolis, the daughter of William S. and Irene Ella (Jensen) MacDonald. She was married to Reuben J. Haglund on July 30, 1948. Ardyce was a devoted military wife. She could often be found cutting a rug to her favorite jazz tunes. Ardyce was also a gifted storyteller and left an impression on everyone she met. She loved being a “GG” to her five great-grandchildren. Ardyce leaves to celebrate her memory her daughters, Victoria Bowler, Minneapolis, Loretta (Larry) Sondrall, Tyler, Texas; and Mary LoRusso, Luck; son, Thomas (Lynn) Haglund, Davie, Fla.; grandchildren, Susan LoRusso, Minneapolis, Matthew (Jennifer) LoRusso, Luck, Carl (Stephanie) LoRusso, Stillwater, Minn., and Elizabeth Haglund, Davie, Fla.; great-grandchildren, Landyn, Logyn, Lylah, Emily and Sofia LoRusso; brother, Robert MacDonald, Inver Grove Heights, Minn.; sister-in-law, Mary Ann MacDonald, Bloomington, Minn.; and other loving family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, William and Irene MacDonald; husband, Reuben Haglund; son, Garry Haglund; brother, William MacDonald; and her son-inlaw, William Bowler. The funeral service for Ardyce was held Wednesday, March 30, at the Kolstad Family Funeral Home in Centuria. She was laid to rest alongside her husband, Reuben, at the Bone Lake Township Cemetery following the funeral. Pallbearers were Tom Haglund, Carl LoRusso, Matt LoRusso, Ben Blanchette, Brian Koecher and Eric Olson. There was lunch and fellowship following the cemetery services at the Luck Senior Center. The Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with arrangements.


PAGE 16 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

CHURCH NEWS Germ warfare

N

o matter where I encounter a group of people, I hear sneezing and coughing. Is it that time of year? Or do we hear coughs and sneezes behind us and across the room at any season? Sometimes they come from our own bodies. The germs in the air around us are probably so thick, it’s a wonder we can move through them without becoming sick. But God has given us some defenses against destructive microorganisms. Our diet, as well as our genetic makeup and our lifestyle, contribute to good immunity. Medicines help, too. Regardless of the defenses available, we

Morality is just as important as education in our society Q: I’ve heard you advocate for teaching moral values in our homes and to our children. Your view, however, seems archaic and misguided. People are “immoral” for only one reason: They’re ignorant. Your approach seems not only ineffective, but a distraction from the greater need of formal education. Doesn’t this reasoning make more sense? Jim: Teddy Roosevelt is credited with saying, “A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.” His point? Education alone is inadequate to build character. I’ve noticed a peculiar pattern in our culture. Whenever a new statistic is released that reveals some negative trend in society, it seems the call immediately goes out for more education. Whether it be the growing tide of drug abuse, teen pregnancy, or any other social challenge, conventional wisdom suggests these problems could be resolved if people simply knew better. Now, let me be clear. I believe that education is critical and invaluable to any

Eternal perspectives Sally Bair know we can’t avoid germs. We’re also exposed to spiritual germs, and we can’t expel them with a simple cough or sneeze. Some of them make us ill not only physically but emotionally. Take the germ of fear, for instance. Whether we fear rejection, failure or God’s wrath, we can become paralyzed by it. You may face other kinds of fear, such as illness, disaster, bankruptcy or

culture, and there is no questioning that ours is better for it. But as President Roosevelt so aptly explained, intelligence and morals are not the same thing. Intelligence deals with information; morals provide a foundation of wisdom for how that information ought to be used. A society needs both in order to be healthy. Although some may be inclined to dismiss the importance of moral values, I’m firmly convinced that we would do well to heed the words of Dr. Wilbur Crafts, who observed, “It is not worthwhile to educate a man’s wits unless you educate his conscience also.” ••• Q: My toddler has been fondling his genitals a lot. I’ve caught him at it several times at home, and once it even happened in public. What should I do? Danny Huerta, executive director, parenting: Relax. You’ve no reason to be overly concerned. This behavior is a normal expression of early sexuality. If you respond calmly and in an age-appropriate way, the habit should pass as soon as maturity and social pressure begin to take effect. Many parents are surprised to learn that genital fondling does not produce a sexual “charge” with small children. Instead, they do it because they find it self-soothing, often as a way of dealing

even spiders. God provides us with armor that will help us defeat fear. “Stand, therefore, having girded your waist with truth, having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and having shod your feet with the preparation of the gospel of peace; above all, taking the shield of faith with which you will be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the spirit, which is the word of God ….” (Ephesians 6:14-17) Besides the weapon of prayer, all of these, except one, are defensive methods we can use to fight our spiritual germs. The only offensive weapon mentioned is the word of God. His word is powerful enough to destroy any problem we face,

Focus on the family Jim Daly with boredom, anxiety or nervousness. If you want to curtail it, start by saying something like, “I’ve noticed you touching your penis (or vagina) a lot lately.” Be frank and open and ask questions, for example, “Why have you been doing this? Does it make you feel good?” Determine the emotions that are driving the behavior and then redirect it by encouraging your child to focus on something else. Point out other ways he can soothe himself or feel more secure. Offer alternatives, like a teddy bear, a pillow or a special blanket. Depending on your child’s age, you can explain that there are some things we don’t do in front of other people (it might be helpful to use the analogy of using the toilet). These things aren’t bad, just private. If we do them in public, they can make others feel uncomfortable. Your purpose in speaking this way is simply to sensitize your child to the social implications of his behavior. Throughout

including fear. “For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind.” (2 Timothy 1:7) Choosing to have the same mind as Christ’s, of love and obedience to the Father, will guarantee strength, power and soundness to defeat the spiritual germs we encounter. Lord, thank you for giving us the weapons to use against any germ warfare we face. Cause us to rely on your truth, your righteousness, your salvation and faithfulness, and your powerful word to win the war against fear. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@ gmail.com.

this conversation, your tone should be firm and confident, not shocked or embarrassed. In the final analysis, it’s important to remember that children are not asexual. Your child’s behavior is merely demonstrating that he’s properly wired. So relax and give your child, and yourself, a break. ••• Jim Daly is a husband and father, an author, president of Focus on the Family and host of the “Focus on the Family” radio program. Catch up with him at jimdalyblog.com or at facebook.com/DalyFocus. Copyright 2014 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

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Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BASS LAKE LUMBER

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• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

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FREDERIC BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE

LUCK

SIREN

WEBSTER

VAN METER’S MEATS

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

Churches 8/10

ALPHA

Hwys. 35 & 48, Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

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“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4475

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

Church DirectoryCHURCH DIRECTORY ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC 605 Benson Road; Pastor John Redlich Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Senior Pastor Gary Russell Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH Meeting in homes. Elder: Cliff Bjork, 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH 1115 Mains Crossing, Amery 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St. Sun. Worship 8:30 a.m.; Sun. School 9:45 a.m. BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m. BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m. BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Pastor Paul Peterson, Cell # 715-566-3758 Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. Worship - 8:30 a.m.; Sun. School 9:45 a.m. BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Blended contemp./traditional serv. 9 a.m.; Education hour and fellowship 10:15 a.m. BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Ann Fenlason, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535; Pastor - 715-472-8153, 9 a.m. Sun. Schl., Adult Bible Study & Middle Schl cafe; 9:15 a.m. SHY; 10:30 a.m. Worship with Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. Of The Month; 11:30 a.m. Fellowship CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS) Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; christlutheranpipelake.com CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC) Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt, 218-371-1335 715-327-4461 Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m. FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG Rev. Sandra Hutchens; 715-463-5388 myfaithlutheran.org Sunday Worship with Communion 9:30 a.m.; Sun. service radio broadcast 100.9 FM FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN 561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN, 651-465-5265; tflutheran.org Sun. Worship 9 a.m. (Memorial Day - Labor Day) FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Marilyn Crossfield, cushingparish.org 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m. FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Worship 9 a.m. GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA 877 190th Ave., CTH G, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) serving@georgetownlutheran.net Interim Pastor Paul Settergren; Parish Office - 715-857-5580 Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m. GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 260-336-5974, Pastor Thomas McShannock Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter Office: 715-866-7191; Parsonage: 715-866-4622 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:45 a.m. LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791, Pastor Bill Schroeder Sun. Wor. w/Comm. 10 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m. LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Marilyn Crossfield, cushingparish.org Sun. Wor. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:45 a.m. LUCK LUTHERAN Pastor Ralph Thompson - 715-977-0694 Office 715-472-2605; lucklutheran.org Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m. (Sept. 13 - May 29); Sun. Schl. 9-10:30 a.m. (Sept. 27 - May 8) MILLTOWN LUTHERAN Vicar Angie Kutney, Pastors Mel Rau & Maggie Isaacson; 113 W. Main St.. W., 715-825-2453 9:30 a.m. Sunday Schl.; 10:30 Worship Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the Month

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH Senior Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 newhopelutheranchurch.org 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER Pastor Jody Walter Office: 715-866-7191; Parsonage: 715-866-4622 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. facebook/OurRedeemerWebster PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA) 2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 plcdresser.org Rev. Alan Buresh Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl 9:35 a.m. PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA) Pastor Paul Peterson 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 10:30 a.m. pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN (Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Timothy Blauret 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:15 a.m. ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod) 350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC 1614 CTH B, North Luck, 715-472-8190 Pastor Roger Kastelle Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Study Thurs. 6:30 p.m. SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m. TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA 10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) Interim Pastor Paul Settergren Parish Office 715-857-5580 Church 715-822-3001 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:15 a.m. TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. TRINITY EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH (WELS) 300 Seminole Ave. (Hwy. M), Osceola, WI 715-294-2828, Pastor David Rosenow www.trinity.osceola.com Sunday Worship 9 a.m., Bible Class 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 7 p.m. WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m. WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 June 7, 2015 - Sept. 6, 2015 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN 1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, yellowlakelutheranchurch.org Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra, Myron Carlson and Danny Wheeler Service at 9:30 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (LCMC) 5 miles E. of Frederic on W, 2 miles south on I; Church: 715-472-8660 Pastor Mike Fisk, 715-417-0692 Sunday Schl. & Adult Study 9:15 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Bible class 9:15 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.; Thurs. Serv. 4:30 p.m. Communion 1st & last Sunday of month ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE Pastor Janeva Stromberg, 320-679-1012; Council Chair, 715-244-3301 Worship - 11 a.m.; Sunday School - 10 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE Pastor Thomas McShannock 715-327-8384, 260-336-5974 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Pastor Barbara Anne Keely 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St., St. Croix Falls Fellowship - 10:15 a.m.; Sunday Wor. - 11 a.m. METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST - UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m. CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST - UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH - GRANTSBURG Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker 715-463-2624 Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:30 a.m. DANBURY UNITED METHODIST 7520 Water St., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sunday Worship - 8:45 a.m.

GRACE UNITED METHODIST - WEBSTER 26503 Muskey Ave., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor, Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m., Sun. Worship - 10:30 a.m. HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST htslumc@gmail.com 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m. LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST 3482 115th St., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m. OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST osceolaunitedmethodistchurch@gmail.com 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275, Rev. Carolyn Saunders Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Fellowship - 11 a.m. Wed. School: Weds. 3:30-5 p.m. Oct.-May ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker Sunday Worship Serv. - 10 a.m.; Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available ST. LUKE UNITED METHODIST - FREDERIC 100 Linden Street, Frederic Pastor “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. Serv. 5:15 p.m. SIREN UNITED METHODIST 24025 1st Ave. So., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Wor. - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available) TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m. WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sunday Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor. 10:30 p.m. Elevator provided, welcome SIREN COVENANT Pastor Brian Pardun 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Dan Pearson Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Andy Anderson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Sunday 9 a.m. IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG Rev. Tom Thakadipuram, 715-327-8119 Mass: Sat., 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt. OUR LADY OF THE LAKES Balsam Lake Father Gene Murphy; Pastor - 715-405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sunday or by appt. SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt. ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC Rev. Tom Thakadipuram, 715-327-8119 Mass: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times ST. ANNE PARISH Rev. Andy Anderson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 7 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Tues., Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9:30 a.m. ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept.-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer) ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 a.m. Tues. - Fri. 7:30 a.m. ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC 1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father Gene Murphy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 10:30 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC Rev. Andy Anderson 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-2243 Saturday Mass 4 p.m.; Sunday Latin Mass 8:30 a.m., Mass 11 a.m. ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 2492 Education Drive Sunday Serv. - 10 a.m. Child care offered at both services SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Andrew Bollant Morn. Serv. - 9:30 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening Youth

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA) Pastor Justin Hosking, 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery, 715-268-2176 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Morning Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH 933 248th St., Osceola Pastor Dave Williams Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided TRADE RIVER EVANGELICAL FREE Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 1816 108th St., CTH I Pastor Gabe Brennan, 715-857-5411 eastbalsam.org Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School - 10:30 a.m. EUREKA BAPTIST 2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls 715-483-9464 Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Adult Sun. Schl. - 10 a.m. FAITH FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m. FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; fbcamery.org; Email: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sun. Serv.: 9 - 10:15 a.m.; All ages Sun. Schl. 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.; Nursery available FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN 715-689-2125 or 715-689-2156 Mike Kleven, Lead Pastor Steve Ward, Assoc. Pastor of Visitation Sun. School (all ages) 9:30 a.m.; Church Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Assoc. Pastor Dan Mielke Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided. FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111 Pastor Tim Quinn Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery provided) GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church” 722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m. GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG 716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore George Selbher, Assoc. Pastor Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship 10:15 a.m. LIVING HOPE CHURCH Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. TRADE LAKE BAPTIST Pastor David Prince, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST - FREDERIC Minister Guy McCarty Frederic Senior Citizen Building Robert Rutherford, 715-327-8387 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m. HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET 231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m. DWELLING POINT Timbers Theatre in Siren, 912-424-5993 Pastors Bryan and Rebekah Davis Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER 1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor. 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX 523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Sat. Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sun. Liturgy - 9:30 a.m. HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago City, MN; holyx.net Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Rev. Richard Brunner, 715-483-3696 Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. FAITH COMMUNITY 7534 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Pastor Jason Peterson Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m. & 7 p.m.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

ST. CROIX UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 715-483-1113 201 N. Adams, St. Croix Falls Services On 1st 3 Sundays of the Month, 10 a.m. www.scuuf.org

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN CHURCH 28509 CTH H, 1/8 mi. north of A&H intersection Pastor Tryg Wistad 715-635-4816 crossroadschurch@gmail.com Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 201 Hwy. 35, Dresser (formerly The Boulevard) Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982; Office 715-417-0945 Sunday Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Nursery available. NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, 715-338-2751 Pastor Scott Petznick Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. NORTHERN PINES QUAKER MEETING 715-866-5016 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting OSCEOLA MEDICAL CENTER SPIRITUAL CARE 2600 65th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-5645 Rev. Thomas Reaume MyOmc.org/specialtyserv 1chapel.php Chapel open daily for meditation.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN 1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH “Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-553-1800, Pastor Rick VanGundy Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 18 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

MINUTES OF THE

Amendment as follows: Page 7, paragraph 5, subparagraphs 2 & 3 of the proposed Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master 2. Only two designated Special Use motorized events will be authorized. 3. Two Special Use Events will be allowed for nonmotorized events to occur during the motorized time of trail operation. Motion by Supervisor Schmidt to amend said motion by amending plan language at Page 7, paragraph 5, revising subparagraph 2 and striking subparagraph 3 as follows: “2. Only two one designated Special Use motorized events will be authorized for the purpose of the Veterans motorized ATV ride.; and 3. Two Special Use Events will be allowed for nonmotorized events to occur during the motorized time of trail operation.” Prior to said motion, receiving a second, Supervisor Schmidt requested the motion be withdrawn. Acting Chair Sample declared the motion to amend the motion to amend withdrawn. Acting Chair Sample called for a roll call vote on the motion to amend the proposed plan to conform with the language adopted by the County Board at its January 19, 2016, meeting. Motion to amend the plan carried by a roll call vote of 12 Yes, 3 No. Voting Yes: Supervisors Schmidt, Johansen, Hallberg, Sample, Caspersen, Edgell, O’Connell, Jepsen, Luck, Arcand, Bonneprise and Demulling. Voting No: Supervisors Moriak, Nelson and Johnson. Motion (Schmidt/O’Connell) to amend the plan language at Page 7, paragraph 5, revising subparagraph 2 and striking subparagraph 3 as follows: “2. Only two one designated Special Use motorized events will be authorized for the purpose of the Veterans motorized ATV ride.; and 3. Two Special Use Events will be allowed for nonmotorized events to occur during the Acting Chair Sample called for a roll call vote on the motion to amend the plan language. Motion was defeated by a roll call vote of 6 Yes, 9 No. Voting Yes: Supervisors Schmidt, Johansen, Moriak, Caspersen, O’Connell and Nelson. Voting No: Supervisors Hallberg, Sample, Edgell, Jepsen, Luke, Arcand, Bonneprise, Demulling and Johnson. At 9:15 p.m., Supervisor Arcand was excused for the remainder of the meeting. Motion (Johansen/Jepsen) to amend Resolution 15-16 at Line 26 by inserting, as follows: Proposed amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan, “and that in the calendar year 2016 an ad hoc committee be created with the with the purpose of revising the Master Plan in a comprehensive manner that includes Burnett County, Polk County, Douglas County and the Gandy Dancer Trail Commission reporting to the county board with as comprehensive revision by April 2017 .” Acting Chair Sample called for a roll call vote on the motion to amend Resolution 15-16. Motion to amend Resolution 15-16 carried, by a roll call vote of 13 Yes, 1 No. Voting No: Supervisor Hallberg. Acting Chair Sample called for a roll call vote on the motion to approve Resolution 15-16 as amended. Motion to approve Resolution 15-16 as amended, carried by a roll call vote of 13 Yes, 1 No. Voting No: Supervisor Johnson. Resolution Adopted. Acting Chairman Sample relinquished the Chair for the purpose of Chairman Johnson to return to the Chair. Chairman Johnson resumed the Chair and continued the meeting. Chairman Johnson called for a 10-minute recess at 9:25 p.m. Chairman Johnson called the meeting back into session 9:35 p.m.

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MARCH 15, 2016 - 6 p.m.

Chairman Johnson called the regular March 15, 2016, meeting of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to order at 6:00 p.m. Chairman Johnson recognized the County Clerk for purposes of receiving evidence of proper notice. The County Clerk stated that the notice of meeting was properly posted in three public buildings, published in a legal newspaper in accordance with Wisconsin Statute Section 985.02 and posted on the county website the week of March 7, 2016. In addition, the Office of the County Clerk distributed on March 3, 2016, copies of such notice of meeting and proposed resolutions to supervisors in accordance with Article 3, Section 2 of the County Board Rules of Order. The County Board received the verbal opinion of Corporation Counsel that the initial advance written meeting notice, posted and distributed, as described by the County Clerk satisfied the applicable provisions of Wisconsin Open Meetings Law and the applicable procedural provisions of the Polk County Board Rules of Order. Chairman Johnson recognized the County Clerk for purposes of taking roll call. All members were present. Chairman Johnson led the Pledge of Allegiance. Chairman Johnson asked for a volunteer for a Time of Reflection. None offered. Chairman called for a motion to approve the consent agenda. Consent agenda included: a. March 15, 2016, County Board Agenda b. Minutes of January 19, 2016 c. Confirmation of Emergency Fire Wardens for Polk County, 2016 Motion (Jepsen/Schmidt) to approve the consent agenda as noticed. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Time was given for public comment. Chairman Johnson clarified the order for public comment. Elizabeth Hagen, from Public Health, addressed the board with a presentation on Marijuana Awareness. Chairman called for a 15-minute break. Chairman called the meeting back in session 7:20 p.m. Time was given for Receipt and Discussion of Committee Reports. Chairman’s Report was received as presented by Chairman Johnson. Chairman Johnson recognized Administrator Frey for the purpose of receiving the Administrator’s Report. The County Board received the Administrator’s appointment of Emil Norby to the position of Polk County Highway Commissioner. Chairman Johnson called for a motion to approve Administrator’s appointment of Emil Norby as Highway Commissioner. Motion (Luke/Nelson) to confirm the Administrator’s appointment of Emil Norby to the position of Polk County Highway Commissioner. Motion to confirm Administrator’s appointment, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolutions and Ordinances: Chairman Johnson announced that the Board would take up Resolution 1516 first. Chairman Johnson announced that he was relinquishing the chair for the purpose of participating in debate on Resolution 15-16. Chairman Johnson announced that Vice Chair Jepsen and Second Vice Chair Schmidt also relinquished the Chair for such purposes. Chairman Johnson declared that upon consensus, the Board had determined Supervisor Sample to act as presiding chair on Resolution 15-16. Chairman Johnson stood down as presiding chairperson. Acting as Chair, Supervisor Sample assumed the chair to preside over the meeting.

ORDINANCE 05-16

RESOLUTION 15-16

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING SUBMISSION OF PROPOSED AMENDED GANDY DANCER TRAIL - POLK COUNTY SEGMENT MASTER PLAN FOR WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES APPROVAL TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, on March 1, 2016, the Polk County Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee conducted a public hearing on the Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan, pursuant to Resolutions 20-15 and 02-16; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendment, Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan, updates the 1990 plan in its entirety; and WHERES, the Polk County Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee recommends that the Polk County Board of Supervisors receive the Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan for the purposes of authorizing the submission of a request to the State of Wisconsin Natural Resources Board to modify the 1990 plan and to provide for final approval of the Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan in accordance with Wisconsin Administrative Code, s. 44.04 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors receives the Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan, as attached hereto and incorporated herein.* BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes and directs the Polk County Department of Parks and Recreation to submit on behalf of Polk County a request to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to modify the 1990 trail plan and to seek approval of the Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that further tasks required of Polk County in the approval process of said proposed plan be assigned to said department under the policy and advisory recommendation of the Polk County Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee. * A copy of the Polk County Segment Master Plan can be viewed in the Polk County Clerk’s Office or on the Polk County website. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Reviewed as to Appropriations: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted To County Board: January 19, 2016. Submitted by Dana Frey. Reviewed by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 15-16: Resolution Authorizing Submission Of Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan For Wisconsin Department Of Natural Resources Approval, as follows: Adopted by simple majority of the board of supervisors by a vote of 13 in favor and 1 against, as amended. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Acting Chairman Sample called to the floor, Resolution 15-16, Resolution Authorizing Submission Of Proposed Amended Gandy Dancer Trail - Polk County Segment Master Plan For Wisconsin Department Of Natural Resources Approval. Motion (Johnson/Jepsen) to approve Resolution 15-16. Motion (Jepsen/Hallberg) to amend the proposed plan to conform with the language adopted by the County Board at its January 19, 2016, meeting.

644045 33L

POLK COUNTY TEMPORARY SPEED LIMIT ORDINANCE (WIS. STAT. S. 349.11(10)) TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, the Polk County Highway Department performs work on the Polk County system and the state highway system within the geographical boundaries of Polk County; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 349.11(10), the Highway Commissioner or his/her designee is authorized to, for the safety of the highway construction and maintenance workers, pedestrians and highway users, cause to be posted temporary speed limit less than the speed limit imposed regularly in their jurisdiction when a county highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, when performing maintenance on the state trunk highway system under s. 84.07, or in those instances with respect to highways not under its jurisdiction that are being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired by the local authority; and WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Polk County Public Safety and Highway Committee, it is in the interest of the County to enact an Ordinance that adopts and allows for the posting of temporary speed limits consistent with Wisconsin Statute Section 349.11(10). NOW, THEREFORE, the Polk County Board of Supervisors enacts the Polk County Temporary Speed Limit Ordinance and ordains as follows: 1. If a highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, temporary speed limits may be imposed as set forth in Wisconsin Statute s. 349.11(10). 2. The Polk County Highway Commissioner and in his/her absence, his/her Highway Superintendent or Foreman is authorized, at his/her discretion to impose mandatory temporary speed limits under the continuing authority of this section and without need of further action by the County Board. 3. Temporary speed limits shall be in accord with this section and shall be imposed by the posting of either portable or fixed temporary regulatory speed limit signs of the same face size and design as permanent regulatory speed limit signs, type R2-1, as described in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices as adopted by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. 4. Signs may be posted on any highway under the jurisdiction of this authority (and any state trunk highway upon which this County performs maintenance under §84.07, Wis. Stats.) when such highway is being constructed, reconstructed, maintained or repaired, but only in the immediate area of such work and of those persons engaged in performing such work. 5. Any temporary speed limit imposed in an area where construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair is being performed on the shoulders or what is normally the traveled portion of the roadway, or where the highway construction or maintenance workers performing such work as necessary on the shoulders or what is normally the traveled portion of the roadway, shall be 45 mph or 10 mph less than the speed limit normally in effect for that portion of highway, whichever is the lower temporary speed limit (i.e. temporarily 35 mph in a normally 45-mph zone or temporarily 45 mph in a normally 65-mph zone). 6. No temporary speed limit shall be imposed when construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair work is being performed inside the highway right of way but not on the shoulders or the traveled portion of highway. 7. Any speed limits imposed under the authority of this section are temporary, and the signs imposing such limits shall be removed, covered or otherwise obscured when the highway construction or maintenance workers performing construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repairs and their equipment are not present on the shoulders or traveled portion of the highway. 8. The area in which any temporary speed limit imposed shall be terminated by posting a regulatory speed limit sign informing the public of the specific speed limit outside of the area where construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repair work is being performed.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19 9. Nothing herein shall prohibit the Polk County Highway Commissioner or his/her designee from posting advisory speed limit signs, of the type W13-1 as described in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, in areas of highway construction, reconstruction, maintenance or repairs suggesting such speed as he or she deems appropriate to promote the safety of highway construction and maintenance workers, pedestrians and highway users and that such advisory signs may also be posted in conjunction with the temporary mandatory speed limit signs, as described and authorized above. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Reviewed as to Appropriations: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Date Submitted To County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted and Sponsored by the Polk County Public Safety and Highway Committee: Jay Luke, Larry Jepsen, John Bonneprise, William Johnson and Marvin Caspersen. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above ordinance, Ordinance 0516: Polk County Temporary Speed Limit Ordinance, as follows: Enacted by unanimous vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk Chairman Johnson called to the floor, Ordinance 05-16, Polk County Temporary Speed Limit Ordinance. Motion (Jepsen/Sample) to approve Ordinance 05-16. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Ordinance 05-16. Motion to approve Ordinance 05-16, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution Adopted.

TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, Wisconsin Statute Section 74.29 provides counties the discretion to settle in full with local units of government and taxing authorities for special assessments and charges; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Polk County Resolution 64-98, the County Treasurer is directed to pay in full all special assessments and special charges on or before August 20 of each year, that were included in the tax roll which have not previously been paid to, or retained by the local municipal treasurer; and WHEREAS, Wisconsin Statute Section 75.365 authorizes agreements as to delinquent taxes, including special assessments and charges, between counties and local units of government and taxing authorities; and WHEREAS, it is in the best interest of Polk County to enter into agreements with local units of government and other taxing authorities which set forth terms by which Polk County would continue to settle in full on delinquent special assessments and charges; and WHEREAS, Polk County may incur financial losses because the amount of said outstanding taxes, special assessments and charges exceeds the fair market value of the property; and WHEREAS, the attached Agreement as to the Delinquent Special Assessments and Charges provides mutual financial benefits to both Polk County and the respective participating local units of government and taxing authorities; and WHEREAS, said Agreement as to Delinquent Special Assessments and Charges will be offered to all local units of government and taxing authorities within Polk County on an equal basis; and WHEREAS, said Agreement allows the Polk County Treasurer to collect from the municipality and taxing authority any outstanding special assessments and charges when the County takes title of any property within the municipality by foreclosure of tax liens as provided for in Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 75; and WHEREAS, the Agreement authorized herein will equitably apportion the cost of special assessments to the municipality and taxing entity that incurred the assessments and special charges, as opposed to a countywide distribution of the assessment or special charges to municipalities that did not incur such expenses; and WHEREAS, said Agreement recognizes that specific local units of government and taxing authorities may, at their discretion or option, decide whether or not it is to their advantage to elect to execute said Agreement. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors does reaffirm that pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 74.29 that Polk County will continue to settle in full for all delinquent special assessments and charges with those local units of government and taxing authorities which enter into an Agreement as to Delinquent Special Assessments and Special Charges which conforms to Wisconsin Statute Section 75.365, and is in substantially the same format and language as the sample Agreement as to Delinquent Special Assessments and Charges, attached hereto and incorporated herein. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors amends Polk County Resolution 64-98, as follows: 1. The Polk County Board of Supervisors directs the County Treasurer to pay to the municipalities that have entered into such Agreement in full all special assessments and special charges on or before August 20 of each year, that were included in the tax roll which have not previously been paid to, or retained by the local municipal treasurer. 2. The Polk County Board of Supervisors directs that the Polk County Treasurer shall not settle in full for delinquent special assessments and charges with those local units of government and taxing authorities which decide, in the exercise of their discretion, not to enter into the Agreement authorized herein. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Agreement will first be applicable on delinquent accounts foreclosed upon in 2016 (2013 tax roll) and will apply to all delinquent special assessments and charges due for said delinquent accounts. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this Agreement will automatically renew on an annual basis, in all of its terms and conditions without modification, unless written Notice of Intent to Terminate is received by the Clerk of the municipality or taxing authority or the Polk County Clerk at least 90 days prior to calendar year-end. BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the Polk County Clerk be directed to forward a copy of this resolution to the Polk County Treasurer and all municipalities within Polk County. Funding amount: Undetermined at this time. Funding source: Undetermined at this time. Date Reviewed as to Appropriations: January 14, 2016. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted To County Board: January 19, 2016. Submitted and Sponsored by: William Johnson. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 0816: Resolution To Authorize Agreement Concerning The Payment Of Delinquent Special Assessments And Special Charges (Amending Resolution 6498), as follows: Adopted by unanimous vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 08-16, Resolution To Authorize Agreement Concerning The Payment Of Delinquent Special Assessments And Special Charges (Amending Resolution 64-98). Motion (Jepsen/Schmidt) to approve Resolution 08-16. Administrator Frey addressed the resolution. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 08-16. Motion to approve Resolution 08-16, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 06-16

RESOLUTION TO DESIGNATE THE WEEK OF APRIL 11-15, 2016, AS WORK ZONE AWARENESS WEEK IN POLK COUNTY TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, in 1999, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) partnered with the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHTO) to create the National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week campaign, held annually in April prior to the construction season in much of the nation; and WHEREAS, the Federal Highway Administration has designated April 11 through April 15, 2016, as National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week; and WHEREAS, construction and maintenance activities on roads and highways periodically require that work zones be established; and WHEREAS, also include locations where emergency vehicles, utility vehicles, tow trucks, law enforcement, fire and EMS services are operating with their lights flashing, requiring motorists to move over or slow down; and WHEREAS, work zones often require narrowed lanes, lane shifts, temporary pavement, reduced speeds and evening and overnight work hours; and WHEREAS, in a typical year, over one thousand people are killed in work zones nationwide, either as drivers, passengers or pedestrians; and WHEREAS, in the past few years, Wisconsin work zones have averaged approximately 1,200 accidents annually with an average of 15 fatalities per year; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Public Safety and Highway Committee recommend passage of this resolution. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors that the week of April 11 through April 15, 2016, be designated “Work Zone Safety Awareness Week” in Polk County. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Reviewed as to Appropriations: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted To County Board: March 15, 2016. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 06-16: Resolution to Designate The Week Of April 11 - 15, 2016, As Work Zone Awareness Week In Polk County, as follows: Adopted by unanimous vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor, Resolution 06-16, Resolution To Designate The Week of April 11 - 15, 2016, As Work Zone Awareness Week In Polk County. Motion (Bonneprise/Demulling) to approve Resolution 06-16. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 06-16. Motion to approve Resolution 06-16, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution Adopted.

RESOLUTION 07-16

POLK COUNTY LAND INFORMATION PLAN 2016 WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors created the Polk County Land Information Department in 1990 in compliance with the Wisconsin Land Information Program (WLIP) and, since July 1990, Polk County has been collecting funds through document recording fees through the Register of Deeds Office in support of Land Records Modernization; and WHEREAS, previously the WLIP required Counties to submit a Land Records Modernization Plan (Plan) every 5 years in order to retain the recording fees in order to participate in the WLIP and be eligible for grants and other assistance from the WLIP, but recently changed the requirement to a Land Information Plan every 3 years; and WHEREAS, administrative rules were promulgated by the WLIB in 2004 with instructions for counties to develop updated Plans in 2005 and 2010 and updated instructions for counties came from the State Department of Administration for 2016 Plans; and WHEREAS, Polk County Land Information Department and Land Council in coordination with several other County Departments have collaborated to update the Polk County Land Information Plan 2016; and WHEREAS, Polk County Conservation Development Recreation & Education (CDRE) Committee adopted the updated Plan for 2016 on March 2, 2016. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors recognizes the importance of and the benefits obtained through continued participation in the Wisconsin Land Information Program and hereby adopts the Polk County Land Information Plan 2016, as approved by the Polk County CDRE Committee for submittal to the State Department of Administration. Funding amount: $0.00. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted To County Board: March 15, 2016. County Board Action: Adopted. Submitted by Polk County Conservation Development Recreation & Education Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Craig Moriak, Dean Johansen, James Edgell, Warren Nelson and Dale Wood. Adopted by unanimous vote. Chairman Johnson called to the floor, Resolution 07-16, Polk County Land Information Plan 2016. Motion (O’Connell/Johansen) to approve Resolution 0716. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 07-16. Motion to approve Resolution 07-16, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 09-16

RESOLUTION 08-16

RESOLUTION TO AUTHORIZE AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE PAYMENT OF DELINQUENT SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AND SPECIAL CHARGES (AMENDING RESOLUTION 64-98)

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AMENDMENTS TO THE POLK COUNTY SHORELAND PROTECTION ZONING ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors amended said ordinance by Resolution 12-10; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendment concerns substantial revisions to the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance, enacted April 1, 2010, to bring said ordinance into compliance with Wisconsin Statute Section 59.692, as amended by 2015 Wisconsin Act 55, and Wisconsin Administrative Code, s. NR. 115.05; and WHEREAS, the lands affected by the proposed amendment are any lands within Polk County that are within 1,000 feet of the ordinary high-water mark of any pond, lake or flowage and any lands within Polk County that are within 300 feet from the ordinary high-water mark of any river or stream or the landward side of the flood plain as provided by Wisconsin Statute Section 59.692(1)(b); and WHEREAS, the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee held a public hearing on February 17, 2016, to amend the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, a copy of the existing Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance, proposed Amended Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance and map of the property affected by the amendment are attached to and incorporated herein. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain that the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance is amended in the attached Amended Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication.


PAGE 20 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016 William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. March 18, 2016 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. March 21, 2016 Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 11-16. Resolution To Set Compensation For Elected Officials for Term 2017-2020 (County Clerk, Register of Deeds and Treasurer). Motion (Bonneprise/Demulling) to approve Resolution 11-16. Administrator Frey addressed the resolution. Motion (Jepsen/ Johansen) to amend Resolution 11-16 by setting the wages as follows: Between lines 12 & 13 of Resolution 11-16 January 1, 2017 8% January 1, 2018 2% County Clerk 60,750 County Clerk 61,965 Register of Deeds 60,750 Register of Deeds 61,965 Treasurer 60,750 Treasurer 61,965

Submitted & Sponsored by the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee: Warren Nelson, Dale Wood, Dean Johansen, James S. Edgell and Kim A. O’Connell. Reviewed by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 09-16: Amendments To The Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance by a voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 09-16. Amendments To The Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance. Motion (O’Connell/ Moriak) to approve Resolution 09-16. Supervisor O’Connell addressed the resolution. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 09-16. Motion to approve Resolution 09-16 carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

January 1, 2019 2% January 1, 2020 2% County Clerk 63,204 County Clerk 64,468 Register of Deeds 63,204 Register of Deeds 64,468 Treasurer 63,204 Treasurer 64,468 And inserting at Line 30 the following: Funding Amount: $751,161 over 4 years 2017: $182,250 2018: $185,895 2019: $189,612 2020: $193,404 Funding souce: Future annual budgets. Motion (Schmidt/Edgell) to amend the proposed amendment to Resolution 11-16 by setting wage increase at 2% each year. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to amend the proposed amendment to Resolution 11-16. Motion to amend Resolution 11-16, failed by voice vote. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to amend Resolution 11-16. Motion to amend Resolution 11-16, carried by voice vote. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 11-16 as amended. Motion to approve Resolution 11-16 as amended, carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 10-16

AMENDMENTS TO THE TELECOMMUNICATION TOWERS, ANTENNAS AND RELATED FACILITIES ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted said ordinance by Resolution 29-13; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendment concerns substantial revisions to the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, enacted August 20, 2013, to bring said ordinance into compliance with Wisconsin Statute Section 66.0404; and WHEREAS, the lands affected by the proposed amendment are any lands within the unincorporated areas of Polk County; and WHEREAS, the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee held a public hearing on March 2, 2016, to amend the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance; and WHEREAS, a copy of the existing Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, proposed Amended Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance, and map of the property affected by the amendment are attached to and incorporated herein. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain that the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance is amended in the attached Amended Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage & Publication. Submitted & Sponsored by the Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Craig Moriak, James S. Edgell, Warren Nelson, Dean Johansen and Dale Wood. Reviewed by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 10-16: Amendments To The Telecommunication Towers, Antennas And Related Facilities Ordinance by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Ordinance 10-16. Amendments To The Telecommunications Towers, Antennas And Related Facilities Ordinance. Motion (Johansen/O’Connell) to approve Resolution 10-16. Supervisor O’Connell addressed the ordinance. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Ordinance 10-16. Motion to approve Ordinance 10-16 carried by unanimous voice vote. Ordinance adopted.

RESOLUTION 12-16

RESOLUTION TO RESCIND RESOLUTION DECLARING ENGLISH AS THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF POLK COUNTY TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, on January 21, 2014, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted Resolution 03-14, entitled “Resolution Declaring English as the Official Language of Polk County;” and WHEREAS, the rationale for this resolution was to reduce county costs and increase efficiency, to promote proficiency in the English language, to remove barriers to understanding and to benefit Polk County both economically and culturally; and WHEREAS, experience to date has shown that this resolution has had no discernible beneficial effect on Polk County costs, government operations or the County’s economy; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors remains committed to providing the best quality services to all of its citizens; and WHEREAS, the prohibition on expenditures for translation or interpretation services contained in this resolution could result in risks to health and safety of Polk County citizens and public officials and consequent liability due to miscommunication, especially in an emergency; and WHEREAS, the federal and state governments may require use of languages other than English for publications or in legal proceedings and, without detailed analysis of these requirements, failure to do so could place the County in legal jeopardy. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors rescinds Resolution 03-14. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Reviewed as to Appropriations: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted by: William Johnson. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 12-16: Resolution To Rescind Resolution Declaring English As The Official Language Of Polk County, as follows: Adopted by a vote of 8 in favor and 6 against. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 12-16. Resolution To Rescind Resolution Declaring English As The Official Language Of Polk County. Motion (Luke/Caspersen) to approve Resolution 12-16. Administrator Frey and Corporation Counsel addressed the resolution. Chairman Johnson called for a roll call vote to approve the motion to approve Resolution 12-16. Motion to approve Resolution 12-16 carried by a roll call vote of 8 Yes, 6 No. Voting Yes: Supervisors Johansen, Hallberg, Sample, Caspersen, Edgell, Jepsen, Luke and Johnson. Voting No: Supervisors Schmidt, Moriak, O’Connell, Nelson, Bonneprise and Demulling. Resolution Adopted.

RESOLUTION 11-16

RESOLUTION TO SET COMPENSATION FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR TERM 2017-2020 (COUNTY CLERK, REGISTER OF DEEDS AND TREASURER) TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, it is in the best interests of Polk County to provide for the economic well-being of its elected officials and to create a work environment in which employees are compensated in a fair and equitable manner; and WHEREAS, Wisconsin Statute 59.22 (a) (1) requires the county board to establish the total annual compensation of elected officials before the earliest time for filing nomination papers for elective office which is established as {date} with respect to the elected offices of the County Clerk, Register of Deeds and Treasurer for the term commencing January 1, 2017; and WHEREAS, the Personnel Committee has considered several salary increase options and is recommending the following salary schedule for the offices of County Clerk, Register of Deeds and Treasurer for 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the annual compensation for the following elected officials be established at the amounts indicated for the term of the elected office effective on the dates noted below: January 1, 2017 8% January 1, 2018 2% County Clerk 60,750 County Clerk 61,965 Register of Deeds 60,750 Register of Deeds 61,965 Treasurer 60,750 Treasurer 61,965 January 1, 2019 2% January 1, 2020 2% County Clerk 63,204 County Clerk 64,468 Register of Deeds 63,204 Register of Deeds 64,468 Treasurer 63,204 Treasurer 64,468 BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this salary schedule shall apply to all incumbent office holders as well as any individual newly elected or appointed to any of the listed offices after the adoption of this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said compensation shall mean salary which shall not be increased nor diminished during the noted term of office. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the compensation set by this resolution is separate and distinct from any other fringe benefit that the County may establish at its discretion or those benefits which state law may impose and adjust. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said elected officials shall be required to pay one-half (1/2) of total WRS required contribution on a pretax basis and the said share may change each year when the required WRS rate is adjusted each year by the Wisconsin Department of Employee Trust Funds. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said elected officials are conditionally eligible for health insurance through Polk County’s Group Health Insurance Plan, such eligibility for health insurance coverage is expressly subject to the same terms and conditions (e.g., premium contribution, deductibles, copays, etc.) as full-time nonrepresented employees of Polk County. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said elected officials are otherwise eligible for the fringe benefit package provided to, and subject to the same terms and conditions as full-time nonrepresented employees of Polk County. Funding amount: $751,161 over 4 years. 2017: $182,250 2018: $185,895 2019: $189,612 2020: $193,404 Funding source: Future annual budgets. Effective date: January 1, 2017. Date Submitted to County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted by the County Administrator: Dana Frey. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 11-16: Resolution To Set Compensation For Elected Officials For Term 2017-2020 (County Clerk, Register of Deeds and Treasurer), by a voice vote as amended.

RESOLUTION 13-16

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RESOLUTION ADOPTING COMPREHENSIVE REVISION TO POLK COUNTY PERSONNEL POLICIES - CHAPTER 8 PERSONNEL POLICIES TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, it is in the interest of the County to provide for a comprehensive revision of existing county personnel policies that conforms to law, is compatible with the County Administrator form of organization, and facilitates the development of a General Code of County Ordinances; and WHEREAS, the General Government Committee has recommended that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopt the attached “Chapter 8 Personnel Policies,” as a comprehensive revision to the various existing county personnel policies. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopts “Chapter 8 Personnel Policies,” attached hereto and incorporated herein.* BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the various county policies identified in the Appendix - Table of County Personnel Policies Repealed and Superseded by Resolution 13-16, attached to and incorporated in said policy, shall be repealed and be superseded by “Chapter 8 Personnel Policies.” Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted by: Dana Frey. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. *A copy of the Chapter 8 Personnel Policies can be viewed in the Polk County Clerk’s Office or on the Polk County website. At the special meeting held, after issuance of proper written notice on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 13-16: Resolution Adopting Comprehensive Revision To Polk County Personnel Policies - Chapter 8 Personnel Policies, as follows: Adopted by a unanimous vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk.


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21 signed either to the full Polk County Board of Supervisors or to County Board standing committees, as follows:

Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 13-16. Resolution Adopting Comprehensive Revision to Polk County Personnel Policies - Chapter 8 Personnel Policies. Motion (Bonneprise/Sample) to approve Resolution 13-16. Administrator Frey addressed the resolution . Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote to approve Resolution 13-16. Motion to approve Resolution 13-16 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution Adopted.

County Board Or Committee County Board

RESOLUTION 14-16

Board of Health and Human Services Conservation, Development, Recreation and Education Committee

RESOLUTION ADOPTING COMPREHENSIVE REVISION TO POLK COUNTY FINANCIAL POLICIES - CHAPTER 5 FINANCIAL POLICIES TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, it is in the interest of the County to provide for one comprehensive financial policy that incorporates into one document the various county financial policies, that repeals and supersedes inconsistent existing county finance-related resolutions and policies, that conforms to law, is compatible with the County Administrator form of county government organization and facilitates the development of a General Code of County Ordinances; and WHEREAS, the General Government Committee has recommended that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopt the attached “Chapter 5 Financial Policies,’’ as a comprehensive revision to the various existing county financial policies. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopts “Chapter 5 Financial Policies,” attached hereto and incorporated herein.* BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the various finance-related resolutions and policies identified in the Appendix - Table of County Resolutions and Policies Affected by Resolution 14-16, attached to and incorporated in said policy, shall be repealed and be superseded by “Chapter 5 Financial Policies.” Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted by: Dana Frey. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. *A copy of the Chapter 5 Financial Policies can be viewed in the Polk County Clerk’s Office or on the Polk County website. At the special meeting held, after issuance of proper written notice on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, Resolution 14-16: Resolution Adopting Comprehensive Revision To Polk County Financial Policies - Chapter 5 Financial Policies, as follows: Adopted by a unanimous vote as amended. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 14-16. Resolution Adopting Comprehensive Revision To Polk County Financial Policies - Chapter 5 Financial Policies. Motion (Jepsen/Johansen) to approve Resolution 14-16. Administrator Frey addressed to resolution. Motion (Jepsen/Demulling) to amend Resolution 1416 as follows: Page 14, Section 3,010 strike clause “g” Page 15, Section 4.02, after the last sentence, insert a sentence to read: A purchasing agent must take steps to ensure that any information relating to a bid provided a single potential bidder is provided to all potential bidders, e.g. through a listing of questions and responses on the County’s website. Page 17, Section 4.10, Invoices. 1st line strike any Page 17, Section 4.10, In paragraph beginning after item (d). Strike Payments, insert Payment. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to amend Resolution 14-16. Motion to amend carried by a unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to approve Resolution 14-16 as amended. Motion to approve Resolution 14-16 as amended, carried by a unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

Executive Committee General Government Committee

Public Safety & Highway Committee

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County Board define the purpose, responsibilities and the desired outcomes related to participation on these boards, councils or commissions by a County Board Supervisor. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County Board direct the assigned supervisors as to the reporting responsibilities as related to the County Board or standing committee as well as the extent of information on these boards, councils or commissions contained on the County’s website. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the term of appointment of a Polk County Supervisor or other appointee to these boards, councils or commissions is to end immediately prior to the County Board organizational meeting on April 19, 2016, subject to reaffirmation at that organizational meeting and unless otherwise precluded by contract or agreement. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Committee Recommendation as to Appropriation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: March 15, 2016. Submitted by: Dana Frey. Reviewed by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on March 15, 2016, the Polk County Board of Supervisors considered and acted on the above resolution, adopted Resolution 14-16: Resolution Assigning To Committee Reporting Of Affiliated Organizations, as follows: Adopted by a majority voice vote as amended. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 16-16. Resolution Assigning To Committee Reporting Of Affiliated Organizations. Motion (Hallberg/Sample) to approve Resolution 16-16. Supervisor Sample addressed the resolution. Supervisor Jepsen requested that WestCAP be moved out of the CDRE standing committee and moved under the Board of Health and Human Services. Chairman Johnson declared that on consensus of the County Board, WestCAP moved to the Board of Health and Human Services. Motion by (Sample/Jepsen) to amend Resolution 16-16: By inserting, following Line 26, the following resolved clause: “BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that except as provided by applicable statutory mandate or existing contractual obligation, any County authorizations related to the above-identified organizations and committees shall sunset and expire prior to the organizational meeting of a newly elected board, and may be reauthorized as such newly elected board may determine as appropriate.” Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on the motion to amend Resolution 16-16. Motion to amend carried by a unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote on motion to approve Resolution 16-16 as amended. Motion to approve Resolution 16-16 as amended, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted. Time was given for Supervisor reports. Motion (Demulling/Bonneprise) to adjourn. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson declared meeting adjourned 10:55 p.m.

RESOLUTION 16-16

RESOLUTION ASSIGNING TO COMMITTEE REPORTING OF AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: WHEREAS, Polk County Supervisors or other appointees participate in a number of boards, councils and commissions outside of Polk County government and in cooperation with other governments or agencies; and WHEREAS, Polk County receives value from participation on these boards, councils and commissions through information dissemination, better coordination of efforts and overall oversight over operations; and WHEREAS, it is important to assure that Polk County receives the maximum benefit possible from such participation and, to do so, have an opportunity for regular reporting of by appointees to these boards, councils or commissions to Polk County standing committees or the County Board of Supervisors; and WHEREAS, it is also of value to review this participation on a regular basis, in conjunction with the organizational meeting of the County Board of Supervisors to determine whether the benefits of participation exceed the costs. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that responsibility for oversight of County participation in the following boards, councils or commissions is as-

Board, Council Or Commission Aging and Disability Resource Center Board County Board Consortium Greater Wisconsin Agency on Aging Resources Polk County Housing Authority Gandy Dancer Trail Commission Northern Regional Trail Advisory Committee Polk County Economic Development Corporation Polk County Fair Society Polk County Museum Polk County Tourism Council Renewable Energy Committee Revolving Loan Fund/EDC Loan Committee River Country Resource Conservation & Development Council West CAP - Moved Under Board Of Health & Human Services by Consensus of County Board West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Committee WITC Board Nominating Committee Arnell Memorial Human Society Indianhead Federated Library System Polk County Library Planning Committee County Criminal Justice Collaborative Local Emergency Planning Committee

STATE OF WISCONSIN COUNTY OF POLK

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) )

I, Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk for Polk County, do hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are a true and correct copy of the County Board Proceedings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors Session held on March 15, 2016. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk

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PAGE 22 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

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Food Served From 3 - 7 p.m. At The Dresser Fire Hall

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MARTEN TRANSPORT: Now hiring drivers for dedicated & regional runs! Dedicated fleet, top pay, new assigned equipment, monthly bonuses. Weekly hometime! CDL-A, 6 mos. OTR exp. req’d. EEOE/AAP Limited positions! Apply today! 866-370-4476 www. drive4marten.com (CNOW) WEEKLY HOMETIME CHOOSE: The total package regional runs available, auto detention pay after 1 hr! Top pay, benefits; mthly. bonuses & more! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. req’d. EEOE/AAP 866-322-4039 www. drive4marten.com (CNOW)

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AUCTION LIVE AUCTION; Sat. April 2, 11am, 201 N Main Street, Deer Park, WI. Over 100 guns and pistols, ammunition, 3 outdoor wood stoves and more items. 715-338-4212, Lucas Evenson, Registered Wisconsin Auctioneer #2656-052 (CNOW)

PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, April 11, 2016, 11:15 a.m. Grantsburg Mini Storage, Grantsburg, WI, 800236-3072. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: Meghan Schallenberger GB01. 33-34Lc

Donations for auction please contact Raeann at 715-472-2388. Items in good condition, please!!

643539 22-23a,d 33-34L


MARCH 30, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Students of the Week Frederic

Julia Fredericks has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. Julia is in fourth grade and the daughter of Megan Johnson and Jacob Fredericks. She has one sister and two brothers. Her favorite subject in school is social studies. Her hobbies are knitting and clogging. She also loves to play guitar. She is a great student who works very hard every day and always has a smile on her face.

Ricky Frank has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. Ricky is in sixth grade and the son of Brett and Dawn Frank. He enjoys playing football and doing things outside. He is getting very good grades in his classes and is a good listener and a very hard worker. His future plans include playing in the NFL.

Grantsburg

Tyrone Keith has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. Tyrone is a junior and the son of Mary Ellen Anderson. He is mature and does great work in the classroom. He is kind, positive and appreciative. He is involved in basketball and works at Wilkin’s Bar, Grill and Resort and also helps at Bruce Potter’s farm. When not in school he likes to run, hike, exercise, lift weights and hang out with friends.

Luck

Erick Olave has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. Erick is the son of Robyn and Jaime Olave. He is a very pleasant student to have in class. In his free time, he enjoys talking, watching TV, playing video games and going outside. His classmates describe him as a hard worker, creative and quiet.

Adeline Thompson has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. Adeline is in seventh grade and the daughter of Tom and Elsa Thompson. She has a positive attitude, uses class time wisely and asks great questions. She is involved in 4-H and confirmation. In her spare time, she enjoys her animals, cooking, traveling and spending time with family in the Cities.

Markus Linski has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. Markus is a sophomore and the son of Jamin and Stephanie Linski and Cheryl Jorgenson. He shows responsibility for his learning by checking to see if he is on track with his work. He is involved in volunteer work and working at Pizza Planet. He enjoys snowboarding, watching sports and NASCAR and playing outdoor games. His future plans include attending technical college.

Rhorrie Johnson has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. Rhorrie is in first grade and the daughter of Nicole Johnson and Dustin Eiffler. She is an excellent role model and friend. She has a friendly smile and an outstanding attitude. She is helpful and gets excited to learn new things. She is an excellent reader. She enjoys volleyball and T-ball. At home, she likes to help with the cleaning. She has a cat and she hopes to get a puppy someday.

Evan Hunter has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. Evan is in kindergarten and the son of Olivia and Marc Hunter. He displays many fine qualities. He is dependable, caring, responsible and approaches his work with a positive attitude. His favorite color is light blue and he likes to write and draw during free-choice time. He also enjoys building with blocks, gym class and recess with his friends.

Siren

Taedon Nichols has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. Taedon is in sixth grade and the son of Jake and Karen Nichols. He is a very driven student who always strives to do his very best. He is involved in band, wrestling and baseball. In school, he enjoys math class and outside of school, he enjoys hunting and fishing. He would like to be a forester, because he enjoys being outdoors.

St. Croix Falls

Nathan Boesel has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. Nathan is in first grade and lives at home with his mom, dad and little brother. At home, the family likes to play on the toy race track that their dad made. Nathan’s mom loves to read. At school, he likes to read books to himself. His favorite books are in the Little Critter series. When he grows up, he wants to be a firefighter to save people’s lives.

Liam Roach has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. Liam is a sophomore. He has been working very hard at his classes and is doing very well academically. He is a leader in his math class and is setting a great example of what hard work can do for you.

Emilie Albrecht has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. Emilie is in fourth grade and the daughter of Amy Albrecht and Kevan Albrecht. She was chosen because of her kind and caring actions toward her teachers and peers. She works very hard in all subjects and is respectful to everyone she meets.

Alexis Nadeau has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. Alexis is in fifth grade and the daughter of Beth Vold and Steve Nadeau. She was chosen because of her positive attitude and her ability to work well with others. She has an admirable personality and a bright smile.

Proudly Supporting Our Students Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283 www.polkburnett.com

Jacob Berg has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. Jacob is in eighth grade and the son of Kimberly Benjamin. He is an incredibly kind person and comes to class eager to learn. He has a somewhat joking nature that makes him easy to get along with. He is well liked by his teachers and peers. He has demonstrated immense growth in English and strives to do his best. He is involved in football and likes to fish.

Jason Peterson is Siren High School’s student of the week. Jason is a freshman and the son of Jason and Crystal Peterson. He is on the wrestling team and is a great student. He enjoys hanging out with friends and his family. He hopes some day to be involved in the game-programming industry.

Unity

Webster

Cole Pardun has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. Cole is a first-grader. He is an excellent student and a hard worker. He says he enjoys everything about school. At home, his favorite thing to play with is Legos. He is very responsible and always does his best work. He has become an excellent reader this year and is always helpful to his teacher and classmates.

Walker Louis is Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. Walker is a junior and the son of Stacie Louis. He has shown excellent participation and curiosity about learning another language/cultures. He is helpful and enthusiastic. Classmates appreciate his sense of humor. He works at Hay Chix and Webber Contracting. He is involved in landscaping, wrestling, track, trap and football. Future plans include working in the family carpentry business and possibly school for something in the biology field.

Brady Ulmaniec is Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. Brady is in fourth grade and the son of Jim and Jen Ulmaniec. He is an absolute joy to have in class. He has such a funny sense of humor and really entertains his teacher and classmates. He has made some great growths with his reading this year. He likes math because he likes to solve tricky problems. He likes phy ed and especially likes to play hockey.

Maiya Fuller has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. Maiya is a freshman and the daughter of Adrienne Fuller. She is a very mature young lady. She has top grades and works very hard for them. She also has excellent dedication to choir, forensics and the school play. She is involved in 4-H, student council, Student Leadership Committee and theater.

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments.

Stop In or Call Us Today

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza)

www.sterlingbank.ws

Helping young people reach towards their goals and promote kindness in a world that sometimes doesn't remember the significance of it. Helping people find their way in back in life.

LEADERNEWSROOM.COM

wingsontheweb.org


PAGE 24 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MARCH 30, 2016

MARCH

NOW-THURS./31 Amery • “Wood & Metal” at artZ Art Gallery, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., 715268-8600, artzgallery.com.

THURSDAY/31 Amery • Bingo at the VFW post, 6:30 p.m. • Book sale at the library, 4-7 p.m., 715-268-8357.

Center City, MInn. • Free Women’s Health Conference at Hazelden CORK Center 5:30 p.m., scrmc.org.

Dresser • GriefShare, support group for those grieving a death, at New Life Christian Community in Dresser, 6:30-8 p.m., 715-755-1431.

Events Coming

SEND YOUR COMING EVENTS ITEMS TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR EMAIL leadernewsroom@gmail.com

Northwest Passages InANewLight featured photo

NATURE’S SKYSCRAPERS

by Cooper, 16

Falun • Free bread distribution, every Friday until further notice at Trinity Lutheran Church, 10 a.m.

• AARP Tax Aides at the library, 9 a.m.-noon. Call for appointment, 715-483-1901.

Frederic

THURS./31 FRI., APRIL 1

• Head injury support group at the library, 2 p.m. • Northwest Wisconsin Regional Writers meeting at The Ridge Eatery, 1 p.m., 715-349-2291.

Webster

Grantsburg

• 4-yr.-old Tiny Tiger & 5-year-old kindergarten registration at the school. Call for appoint., 715-866-8210.

• Bat Night at Crex Meadows, ages 12-plus. RSVP required, 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

APRIL

Webster • Variety show at the high school, 7 p.m.

SAT. & SUN./9 & 10

FRI.-SUN./1-3

St. Croix Falls

Grantsburg

• Festival Theatre’s “The Grapes of Wrath” at Franklin Square. Sat. 7:30 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m., 715-483-3387, festivaltheatre.org.

• “Our Town” play at the high school. Fri. & Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m.

Luck • The Spring Show at the school, 7:30 p.m., lucksd.k12. wi.us.

Siren

“My past was difficult and rough. I fought with my family and I have not seen my mom since I was 10. InaNewLight has meant a lot to me. I see photography as a type of art. It is about capturing a story in a photograph. I see photography as a talent of mine.” InaNewLight is a therapeutic nature photography project at Northwest Passage. To see more of the kids’ photos, visit the gallery, one mile south of Webster, or the website inanewlight.org.

St. Croix Falls

Osceola

• Nationwide Million March Against Child Abuse at the elementary school, noon-4 p.m., facebook.com/millionmarchagainstchildabuse.

• Military family support group meeting at the community center, 6-7:30 p.m., 715-557-0557. • Living with Diabetes seminar at the medical center, 6:30 p.m. Regis. at 715-294-4936 or MyOMC.org/registration.

Webster

• PFCT’s “Robin Hood” at the school, 7 p.m., 715-3497392.

• Interfaith Caregivers & Webster Lions pancake breakfast & bake sale at the community center, 8-11 a.m.

FRIDAY/1

SUNDAY/3

Amery • St. Croix Valley Orchestra Spring Concert at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7:30 p.m.

Balsam Lake • Hands Across the Courthouse, noon, followed by speaker Mike Pistorino, 12:30 p.m., at the justice center. • Child Abuse Prevention presentation at the government center, 6-7:30 p.m.

Milltown • Breakfast benefit & book sale at the community center, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-501-8488.

St. Croix Falls • 150th-anniversary celebration at First Presbyterian, 11 a.m., 715-483-3550.

West Sweden

Falun

• Taste of West Sweden Brunch at Grace Lutheran Church, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

• Free bread distribution, every Friday until further notice at Trinity Lutheran Church, 10 a.m.

MON.-WED./4-6

Luck • “Moby Dick” movie at the Luck Museum, 7 p.m.

Siren

Webster • AARP tax assistance at the library, 715-866-7697 for appointment.

MONDAY/4

Rice Lake • Communiversity Symphonic Band concert at UWBC, 7 p.m., 715-458-4803.

WED.-SUN./6-10 Rice Lake • “The Tragedy of Macbeth” TeensOnStage production at Northern Star Theatre. Wed.-Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., 715-736-4444.

WEDNESDAY/6 Amery • Early-stage Alzheimer’s support group at the community center, 10 a.m., 715-268-6605.

Frederic • Blood pressure screening at Bremer Bank, 9 a.m.

Webster

• Pre-K & kindergarten registration at the school. For appointments, 715-349-2278, ext. 101. • Mini Copeland Head Start open house, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. • RSVP deadline for a community health forum at the government center on Fri., April 15, 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 715-349-7600, ext. 1230.

• Compassionate Friends, Tri-County Chapter, grief support in death of a child at First Lutheran, 7 p.m., 715-263-2739.

THURS. & FRI./7 & 8

St. Croix Falls

Dresser

• AARP tax assistance at the library, 715-463-2244 for appointment.

• Start of Living Well with Chronic Conditions 6-week workshop at medical center, 9:30 a.m.-noon. RSVP at ADRC, 877-485-2372.

SATURDAY/2 Amery • Book sale at the library, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-268-8357.

Danbury • Ruby’s Pantry at the town maintenance shop, $20 donation. Open 9:30 a.m., distribution 10-11:30 a.m.

Grantsburg • Rummage sale at the senior center, 8:30-11:30 a.m. • Legion Auxiliary rummage sale at the hall, 8-11 a.m. • Ducks Unlimited banquet at Hummer’s Rendezvous, 715-431-0362, for info/tickets.

Indian Creek • Easter egg hunt at the Legion Hall, 11 a.m.

Lewis • Gospel music at Lewis Methodist Church, 6-9 p.m.

Luck • Polk/Burnett Farmers Union to meet at Oakwood Inn, 11 a.m.

Amery • VFW gun show at the hockey arena, Fri. 3-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Balsam Lake

St. Croix Falls

Balsam Lake

FRI. & SAT./8 & 9

• Poco Penners meeting at the library building, 2 p.m., 715-648-5244, 715-825-5357. • Coffee and Crayons, coloring for adults at the library, 10:30 a.m., 715-485-3215.

• Domestic violence family group, 5-6 p.m., 800-2617233. • Domestic violence support group, 6-7 p.m., 800-2617233.

• Salvation Army disaster services volunteer training at the justice center. Preregister at 715-485-9280.

Amery • “Love of the Land” art show at Amery Community Food Hub. Reception Fri., Apr. 8, 5-8 p.m., 715-268-4500.

FRIDAY/8

Milltown

• Spring home show at the ice arena. Fri. 5-8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 715-268-8101, amerywi.gov.

FRI. APR. 8 THRU TUES., MAY 3

• “Cinderstein” play at the elementary school, by middle school drama team. Fri. 7 p.m., Sat. 1 p.m.

• Bus trip to “Country Roads: The Music of John Denver.” RSVP at 715-472-2152, ext. 103. • League of Women Voters of the Upper St. Croix Valley meeting at the library, 6:30 p.m.

Amery

Webster • Lions & Lioness food distribution at Connections, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-866-8151.

St. Croix Falls

Grantsburg

FRI. & SAT./1 & 2

Rice Lake • “Living the Good Life: What Psychology Research Tells Us,” at UWBC Blue Hills Lecture Hall, 12:301:20 p.m., 715-234-8176.

Clear Lake

• RSVP deadline for Thrivent Economic Update & Social Security info on April 7 at Trollhaugen, 715-4728107.

Grantsburg • Grief support group 6-week session at the medical center begins. 1-2:30 p.m. RSVP at 715-635-9077.

Luck • Indianhead Gem & Mineral Society meeting at the senior center, 6:30 p.m., 715-497-7517.

TUESDAY/5 Amery • AARP Tax Aides at the library, 9 a.m.-noon. Call for appointment, 715-268-6640

Clam Falls • Coffee hour at Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.

Grantsburg • Kindergarten registration at Nelson Primary School, 10:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m. or 6:30 p.m., 715-463-2320.

Luck • Free medical clinic at Home & Away Ministries, 25 p.m., 715-472-7770 for appointment, myfreeclinic.org.

• Fall prevention workshop at Grace United Methodist, 9-11 a.m., 877-485-2372, Carrie.

Grantsburg

THURSDAY/7 Amery • AARP Tax Aides at the library, 9 a.m.-noon. Call for appointment, 715-268-6640. • Bingo at the VFW post, 6:30 p.m.

Balsam Lake • “Peanuts” movie at the library, 4:30 p.m., 715-4853215.

Center City, MInn. • Free Women’s Health Conference at Hazelden CORK Center 5:30 p.m., scrmc.org.

Dresser • GriefShare, support group for those grieving a death, at New Life Christian Community in Dresser, 6:30-8 p.m., 715-755-1431.

Milltown • Friends of the Library meeting at the library, 6 p.m., 715-825-2313. • Domestic violence family group, 5-6 p.m., 800-2617233. • Domestic violence support group, 6-7 p.m., 800-2617233.

SATURDAY/9 Amery • Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Doors open 8:30 a.m. Dist. 9 a.m. $20 donation, 715-268-7390. • Concert by Cornerstone at Balsam Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-9291.

Cushing • Spring Bash at the community center. Lasagna supper 4-7 p.m., Bingo 4:30-6:30 p.m., live auction 7 p.m., 715488-2467.

Dresser • D.O.G. Fire Assoc. spaghetti fundraiser at the fire hall. Food 3-7 p.m., raffles 3 p.m.-?.

Frederic • Spaghetti & meatballs at the Masonic Lodge, 11 a.m.1 p.m.

Grantsburg • Crex Meadows Nature Photography Club meets at Crex, 10 a.m.-noon, 715-463-2739. • Pinko Jam fundraiser at Denny’s, Hummers & the Legion, noon-closing. • Youth Photo Club meeting for ages 12-plus at Crex Meadows, 1-3 p.m. 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org. • Maple Syrupin’ Time demo at Crex Meadows, ages 8-plus, 1-3 p.m. RSVP required, 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

Lewis • VFW Post 10232 meeting at the hall, 11 a.m.

Luck • EMT smelt fry at the fire hall. Food 3:30-7 p.m., auction 7:30 p.m.

Milltown • Color Run at the community center. Register 8:30 a.m., run 9:15 a.m. Register at UnityColorRuneventbrite.com. • Angels Island Bingo fundraiser at the community center. 5 p.m. taco bar, 6:30 p.m. Bingo. Must prebuy ticket, facebook.com/angels/playground.

Siren • Rainbow of Fun Carnival at the school, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. • Larry Moody Memorial Dart Tourney at the Pour House. Sign-up 5 p.m., start 6 p.m. • Lions/Lioness yard sale donations drop-off day at their building, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-349-2400.

Turtle Lake • Smelt fry at the Legion, 4-8 p.m., 715-556-5664.

Webster • Used book sale at the library, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-8667697.

SUNDAY/10 Siren • The Big Gig Fundraiser concert for the Siren Music Dept. $5/seat, 2 p.m., 715-349-2277.

MON.-WED./11-13 Webster • AARP tax assistance at the library, 715-866-7697 for appointment.

Send event information (include contact information) to news@leadernewsroom.com

Leader | March 30 | 2016  
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