__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


YOU MATTER AND SO DOES YOUR HEALTH

That’s why starting and staying on HIV-1 treatment is so important.

What is DESCOVY ?

What are the other possible side effects of DESCOVY?

DESCOVY is a prescription medicine that is used together with other HIV-1 medicines to treat HIV-1 in people 12 years and older. DESCOVY is not for use to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 infection. DESCOVY combines 2 medicines into 1 pill taken once a day. Because DESCOVY by itself is not a complete treatment for HIV-1, it must be used together with other HIV-1 medicines.

Serious side effects of DESCOVY may also include:

®

DESCOVY does not cure HIV-1 infection or AIDS. To control HIV-1 infection and decrease HIV-related illnesses, you must keep taking DESCOVY. Ask your healthcare provider if you have questions about how to reduce the risk of passing HIV-1 to others. Always practice safer sex and use condoms to lower the chance of sexual contact with body fluids. Never reuse or share needles or other items that have body fluids on them.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about DESCOVY? DESCOVY may cause serious side effects: •

Buildup of an acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious medical emergency. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include feeling very weak or tired, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, stomach pain with nausea or vomiting, feeling cold (especially in your arms and legs), feeling dizzy or lightheaded, and/or a fast or irregular heartbeat.

Changes in body fat, which can happen in people taking HIV-1 medicines. Changes in your immune system. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new symptoms after you start taking DESCOVY. Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys. Your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking DESCOVY if you develop new or worse kidney problems. Bone problems, such as bone pain, softening, or thinning, which may lead to fractures. Your healthcare provider may do tests to check your bones.

The most common side effect of DESCOVY is nausea. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or don’t go away. What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking DESCOVY? •

Serious liver problems. The liver may become large and fatty. Symptoms of liver problems include your skin or the white part of your eyes turning yellow (jaundice); dark “tea-colored” urine; lightcolored bowel movements (stools); loss of appetite; nausea; and/or pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area.

All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis virus infection. All the medicines you take, including prescription and overthe-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Other medicines may affect how DESCOVY works. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. Ask your healthcare provider if it is safe to take DESCOVY with all of your other medicines. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if DESCOVY can harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant while taking DESCOVY.

You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or serious liver problems if you are female, very overweight, or have been taking DESCOVY for a long time. In some cases, lactic acidosis and serious liver problems have led to death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any symptoms of these conditions.

Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. DESCOVY is not approved to treat HBV. If you have both HIV-1 and HBV and stop taking DESCOVY, your HBV may suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking DESCOVY without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to monitor your health.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in breast milk.

Please see Important Facts about DESCOVY, including important warnings, on the following page.

Ask your healthcare provider if an HIV-1 treatment that contains DESCOVY® is right for you.

DVYC0019_B_10x10-5_GeorgiaVoice_Jardon_p2.indd 2-3


4/5/17 3:21 PM


IMPORTANT FACTS This is only a brief summary of important information about DESCOVY® and does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your condition and your treatment.

(des-KOH-vee) MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT DESCOVY

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF DESCOVY

DESCOVY may cause serious side effects, including: • Buildup of lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious medical emergency that can lead to death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms: feeling very weak or tired, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, stomach pain with nausea or vomiting, feeling cold (especially in your arms and legs), feeling dizzy or lightheaded, and/or a fast or irregular heartbeat. • Severe liver problems, which in some cases can lead to death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms: your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice); dark “tea-colored” urine; loss of appetite; light-colored bowel movements (stools); nausea; and/or pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area. • Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. DESCOVY is not approved to treat HBV. If you have both HIV-1 and HBV, your HBV may suddenly get worse if you stop taking DESCOVY. Do not stop taking DESCOVY without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to check your health regularly for several months. You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or severe liver problems if you are female, very overweight, or have been taking DESCOVY or a similar medicine for a long time.

DESCOVY can cause serious side effects, including: • Those in the “Most Important Information About DESCOVY” section. • Changes in body fat. • Changes in your immune system. • New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. • Bone problems. The most common side effect of DESCOVY is nausea. These are not all the possible side effects of DESCOVY. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking DESCOVY. Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with DESCOVY.

ABOUT DESCOVY • DESCOVY is a prescription medicine that is used together with other HIV-1 medicines to treat HIV-1 in people 12 years of age and older. DESCOVY is not for use to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 infection. • DESCOVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS. Ask your healthcare provider about how to prevent passing HIV-1 to others.

HOW TO TAKE DESCOVY • DESCOVY is a one pill, once a day HIV-1 medicine that is taken with other HIV-1 medicines. • Take DESCOVY with or without food.

BEFORE TAKING DESCOVY Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Have or had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis infection. • Have any other medical condition. • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. • Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV-1 to your baby. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take: • Keep a list that includes all prescription and over-thecounter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with DESCOVY.

GET MORE INFORMATION • This is only a brief summary of important information about DESCOVY. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more. • Go to DESCOVY.com or call 1-800-GILEAD-5 • If you need help paying for your medicine, visit DESCOVY.com for program information.

DESCOVY, the DESCOVY Logo, GILEAD, the GILEAD Logo, and LOVE WHAT’S INSIDE are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. All other marks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners. © 2016 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. DVYC0019 11/16


GEORGIANEWS

The ‘sterilization’ of Cheshire Bridge Road How the LGBT, eclectic culture can thrive amidst new developments By DALLAS ANNE DUNCAN dduncan@thegavoice.com Bobby Hamill calls it “the little red-light district” of Atlanta. “You can get anything on Cheshire Bridge,” Hamill, owner of BJ Roosters bar, said. “You can get the best Italian food in the city. You can get the most amazing Thai food. You can get a blowjob. You can buy a dildo. You can get dry cleaning. Anything you need is on Cheshire Bridge.” But the scenery of this eclectic corridor is changing: zoning allows for more apartment complexes to replace the patchwork of older retail and restaurant structures, and some worry what this may mean for the historically LGBT-friendly part of the city. “Atlanta is already bad enough with Sherman coming through and destroying everything, burning all the buildings down, and to me it feels like the same thing,” said Teri Darnell, an out photographer who lives in the area. Construction zone “The community’s been in an uproar for at least a decade about wanting to get rid of Cheshire Bridge Road. They don’t want strip clubs. They don’t want the gay bars. They don’t want any of it. They tried to make it go away, and the legislation didn’t pass,” Darnell said. “This vision that the community had for Cheshire Bridge Road — making it a work/livetype of community — nothing came of that.” What did happen was an economic recession, followed by developers swooping in. “You see these huge gaps on Cheshire Bridge of things just being totally plowed down. Those are going to be another 300 apartments,” Darnell said. “They’re building apartments and storage facilities instead of having a planned community like the neighbors had hoped. Now it’s … becoming just a sterile place.” The zone change to make Cheshire Bridge neighborhood-commercial was approved in the mid-2000s, and grandfathered in adult businesses. Alex Wan, an openly gay Atlanta City Council member, said that at the time, www.thegeorgiavoice.com

As more residential developments pop up along Cheshire Bridge Road, business owners and residents speculate how the shift might affect LGBT-owned bars and businesses like BJ Roosters, left, and The Heretic. (Photos courtesy Teri Darnell)

neighbors wanted a Virginia-Highland-like feel with bars, retail, offices and eateries that they could walk to. “Basically what they’re saying is no new adult businesses could come in and the existing ones … if you’re doing something and we change the zoning, we can’t force you out. You can continue operating so long as you don’t expand your nonconforming adult business,” he said. In 2013, the City Council moved to give these adult businesses five years to comply with the underlying zoning. This motion, which did not pass, was interpreted by some to be anti-LGBT and a slight against gay bars. “The gay bars were never in question,” Wan said. “It was only those that were adult businesses. … The proposed zoning change was simply to impact those that were operating as adult businesses, and that would give them five years to wrap up what they were doing.” The free market at work “All the redevelopment on Cheshire Bridge is organic,” Wan said. “I’ve long said this corridor is ripe for some major developments going on. That’s why I’ve been trying to do whatever I can to make sure it realizes its full potential.” He said the only tool the city government has in the development game there now is ensuring the new buildings comply with those zoning

laws. No business owners have approached him to discuss leases running out on their buildings and what they should do if a developer purchases their land out from under them. Hamill, who owns the property and buildings his bar and the next-door hair salon sit on, thinks the construction promises new customers, and plans to stick around for the long haul. He’s already turned down a number of offers from developers. The Heretic and Jungle, which did not respond to interview requests, do not own their own buildings. Representatives from Tripps, located just around the corner from Cheshire Bridge, and Opus 1 were unavailable as of press time. Dean Chronopoulos owns both the building and the land for ROXX Tavern. “[Losing a gay bar] would definitely make an impact, but I also think that because of its history, its background, because of the gay culture of the street, I think if some were to leave it would be filled in with other gayowned, gay-themed, gay-friendly businesses because Cheshire Bridge has such a strong history of that,” Chronopoulos said. Where everybody knows your name Another transition, especially with rumors about looming closures of popu-

lar LGBT hangouts, is from “gay bars” to “neighborhood bars.” “This is a gay bar, yes. But I welcome everybody. I want everyone to feel comfortable,” Hamill said. “As gay people, we don’t want to be segregated, so why do we segregate ourselves?” He said one reason gay bars were so segregated before was because LGBT Atlantans had to hide from the anger and hatred toward them. Darnell echoed his sentiments, saying it was refreshing when she first moved to the area to see gay bars and businesses right on the street instead of hidden down alleyways. “Cheshire Bridge is going through another evolution,” Chronopoulos said. “Cheshire Bridge has been, and probably always will be, an eclectic street, and its diversity gives it such a unique perspective of city life that it draws a lot of attention. … I think hopefully with the new residents on the street, that will just add more strength to our culture over here.” No matter what happens, Hamill said he doesn’t feel LGBT businesses are being “squeezed out” by the new construction. “I think it’s just growth,” he said. “Either you’re going to change with it or it’s going to pass you over. We’re all about change. I like change. It’s a little scary at first, but we’re going to make it.” July 7, 2017 News 5


GEORGIANEWS

Mixed emotions as Karen Handel takes over 6th District seat Human Rights Campaign, Log Cabin Republicans caution congresswoman on LGBT rights

liberty. We can talk about … marriage. But when we talk about adoption, it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that we’re talking about children who are seeking a home, and I would hope that Congresswoman Handel would see that above anything else.”

By DALLAS ANNE DUNCAN dduncan@thegavoice.com

How LGBT friendly is the GOP? “We have seen a massive sea change in the GOP in the one year, in less than one year since the Republican National Convention, a convention that was marked by historic moments that included affirmative mentions of the LGBT community from Newt Gingrich, Peter Thiel, even Ted Cruz, and of course our then-nominee and now-president Donald Trump,” Angelo said. “Leadership comes from the top and I don’t think it’s any accident that you’re seeing far more muted rhetoric when it comes to LGBT issues among Republican elected officials and party leaders.” Scott Taylor, a Republican from Virginia, introduced the Fair and Equal Housing Act that would protect LGBT Americans from being discriminated against. “You have a young Republican, former Navy Seal, … and his first act as a newly minted Republican in the House of Representatives was to file a piece of legislation that would protect LGBT individuals from discrimination,” Angelo said. “Right now, that bill has — I believe — six Republican co-sponsors.” For many of them, it was the first proLGBT legislation they put their name to. Angelo said Republican legislators put their names on the bipartisan resolution condemning anti-gay violence in Chechnya, and there was support to keep anti-transgender amendments from being added to Pentagon policies related to military service. Both Angelo and Sgro said their organizations would be open to sitting down with Handel as she takes her seat in Congress. At least one of her constituents hopes she’ll do so with open ears. “I want her to listen because Jon listened. And so far, she has not made herself available to the public, her constituents,” Yanes said. “It’s always behind closed doors and I want her to make herself available to the public, on the street corner or in the grocery store, and she doesn’t.”

It was about 10 p.m. on June 20 when a tangible mood shift fell over the Westin Atlanta Perimeter hotel. The crowd, packed tightly into a ballroom, spilling out into the hallways and foyer and even the outside area with a view of the King and Queen Buildings, had until moments before been cheering and high-fiving, dancing to blaring music with beers in hand, buying pins and bumper stickers and hugging representatives from Planned Parenthood. Suddenly, the cheers died down. CNN anchors’ voices came over the speakers, announcing that Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff just lost the 6th District House seat to Republican candidate Karen Handel, a former Georgia secretary of state. The “boos” started. So did chants of “not my congresswoman.” So did the tears. “I’m heartbroken,” said Marietta resident Jan Yanes, an Ossoff supporter. “We have worked so hard and knocked on so many doors and I don’t know what it’s gonna take for people to educate themselves about the real issues, and not get distracted.” District 6 and LGBT rights Some of those “real issues” are where the two candidates stood on LGBT rights. Throughout the campaign, Ossoff touted himself as an ally, and the Georgia Young Democrats Stonewall Caucus even hosted a LGBT families meet-and-greet in his honor. Handel, however, stayed quiet for the most part. Just before the election, Handel told a Reporter Newspapers writer — and former Georgia Voice editor — that her “faith calls me to a very different place on” the issue of same-sex adoption. Following a debate against Ossoff, Handel also refused to speak with openly queer state Rep. Park Cannon (D-Atlanta) about issues affecting the LGBT community. Throughout the campaign, and

Jon Ossoff supporters, including queer Atlanta City Council District 5 candidate Liliana Bakhtiari, center, react to the announcement that former Secretary of State Karen Handel won the 6th District runoff election on June 20. (Photo by Dallas Anne Duncan)

after the election, Handel’s team did not return repeated interview requests from Georgia Voice. Prior to the 2017 special election, Handel had a rocky LGBT rights record. During her early 2000s campaign for Fulton County Commission, Handel supported domestic partner benefits and was both a member of and endorsed by the Log Cabin Republicans. She flipped from those positions during later campaigns for both secretary of state and governor, saying she never joined the Log Cabin Republicans, and revealed she doesn’t believe gay parents are in a child’s best interest. “Karen Handel’s record, unfortunately, speaks for itself. It was part of the reason why HRC was engaged in the Georgia 6th race,” said Chris Sgro, communications director for Human Rights Campaign. “She’s refused to commit to protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and especially transgender Georgians from discrimination, and that, coupled with the fact that Donald Trump — who has been an enemy to our community in his time in office — gave his support, we’re obviously very worried for her time in Congress and intend to make sure that she’s held accountable for her actions.” Gregory Angelo, president of Log Cabin Republicans, said he hopes Handel will

“demonstrate an awareness” that LGBT families are a part of America. “I think that Ms. Handel should understand that she was elected to represent all of the people in her district. There are a number of LGBT people in that district and, for the most part, whether they live in Karen Handel’s district, whether they live elsewhere in the United States, desire nothing more than to live our lives in quiet dignity,” Angelo said. “I would advise Ms. Handel that being LGBT goes far beyond marriage. There are human rights abuses taking place against LGBT individuals abroad. There’s discrimination taking place against LGBT individuals here within the United States and it’s important to stand up against that, and we would certainly encourage her to do that.” Angelo, who used to work in a foster care agency, said he saw firsthand the “crisis” of parentless children. “I have seen youth who are disabled, who have learning disabilities or who otherwise are seeking a place to call home, appreciate nothing more than to be welcomed into a household, whether that household is headed by two individuals of the same sex or whether it is headed by individuals of the opposite sex,” he said. “Their No. 1 concern is that they have parents. … We can talk about religious

6 News July 7, 2017 www.thegeorgiavoice.com


NEWSBRIEFS Rainbow crosswalks installed in time for July 4 holiday Barely weeks after announcing that they’d be coming to 10th and Piedmont, the city of Atlanta installed permanent rainbow crosswalks the first weekend in July. The installation of the publicly funded sidewalks began at 5 a.m. July 1 and finished ahead of schedule the next day, in time for runners in the annual Peachtree Road Race to dash across the intersection in a historically LGBT part of town. Mayor Kasim Reed announced the plan to install the crosswalks on June 12, the oneyear anniversary of the Pulse shooting. “I believe that symbols of unity matter; in recognition of the outstanding and ongoing contributions of Atlanta’s LGBTQ community to our city, I am pleased to announce today that the City will install the rainbow crosswalks at the intersection of Piedmont Avenue and 10th Street year-round,” Reed said in a news release. “This intersection in Midtown is recognized for its history as a hub for Atlanta’s LGBTQ community, and it is fitting that such an important and recognizable place should feature the rainbow flag.” Temporary rainbow crosswalks were installed using private funds in time for Atlanta Pride in October 2015. At the time, city officials said safety concerns kept them from making the project permanent. Talk of permanent crosswalks came up again in April, when local LGBT musician Sarah Rose, lead singer of Sarah and the Safe Word, started a Care2 petition campaigning for it. The petition garnered more than 20,000 signatures, including those of several Atlanta mayoral hopefuls, before Reed’s announcement in June. 17-year-old Atlanta transgender woman murdered in Athens The Georgia LGBT community mourned the loss of 17-year-old Ava Le’Ray Barrin of Atlanta, who was shot and killed on June 25 in Athens. Barrin was murdered by an acquaintance named Jalen Breon Brown, but police did not know what led to the shooting. According to Human Rights Campaign, Barrin is the 14th known death of a transwoman due to violence this year. Nearly all of the women, including Barrin, were black. Barrin, who was mis-gendered and identified as Rayquann Deonte Jernigan in early media reports, was shot once in the chest at www.thegeorgiavoice.com

The installation of permanent rainbow crosswalks at 10th Street and Piedmont Avenue began July 1 and ended the next day. (Photo by Patrick Saunders)

about 11:45 a.m. during a fight with Brown in the Riverview Apartments complex on College Avenue. Brown, who is also a transwoman, was quickly arrested and faces murder and aggravated assault charges. She claims she shot Barrin in self-defense. Epifanio Rodriguez, spokesman for the Athens-Clarke County Police Department, told the Athens Banner-Herald the shooting occurred as an argument escalated, and police “do not believe Brown’s self-defense claim based on witness interviews and evidence collected at the scene.” Rodriguez would not comment further. In an online obituary, Barrin was described as a “young, full of life, beautiful soul” who “feared nothing, nobody and especially not being herself.” Atlanta Pride names 2017 grand marshals On June 23, Atlanta Pride announced the grand marshals that will helm the Pride Parade this October. The eight individuals and organizations represent HIV/AIDS activists, Black Lives Matter, the Latinx and trans communities, family advocates and more. “We are excited to introduce this year’s slate of grand marshals,” Atlanta Pride Executive Director Jamie Fergerson said in a news release. “The Atlanta Pride Committee

has a mandate to capture and compliment the wide range of diverse activists among us. We strongly believe that we have done that again this year.” The three organizations selected are VOX Teen Communications, a youth-driven media outlet for uncensored publishing and self-expression; Planned Parenthood Southeast, which provides low-cost family planning services, education and health care; and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition, which works to reduce the number of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, sexually transmitted disease and substance abuse cases in the metro area. Freelance deaf interpreter David Cowan, who interpreted at a number of protests and marches, including the Women’s March and Black Lives Matter, was selected, as was Holiday Simmons of Lambda Legal. Simmons describes himself as a “black Cherokee transmasculine two-spirit activist,” and his work with Lambda focuses on transgender rights, police violence, black resiliency and LGBT Native Americans. East Lake resident and attorney Jamie Roberts will join them, as will Jerry Gonzalez, founder and executive director of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials. Sandy Lane rounds out the group, representing PFLAG. Lane was recently awarded the Georgia Mountains Unitarian Church’s Courageous Love award. July 7, 2017 News 7


FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

When rainbows have bigots seeing red BY PATRICK SAUNDERS psaunders@thegavoice.com PO Box 77401 • Atlanta, GA 30357 P: 404-815-6941; F: 404-963-6365

EDITORIAL

Editor: Patrick Saunders psaunders@thegavoice.com Deputy Editor: Dallas Anne Duncan dduncan@thegavoice.com Editorial Contributors: Ashleigh Atwell, Cliff Bostock, Melissa Carter, Jim Farmer, Shannon Hames, Ryan Lee, Robbie Medwed, Matt Schafer, Dionne N. Walker, Simon Williamson

PRODUCTION

Art Director: Rob Boeger rboeger@thegavoice.com

BUSINESS

Managing Partner/Publisher: Tim Boyd tboyd@thegavoice.com

SALES

Sales Executive: Dixon Taylor dtaylor@thegavoice.com Business Advisor: Lynn Pasqualetti Financial Firm of Record: HLM Financial Group National Advertising: Rivendell Media, 908-232-2021 sales@rivendellmedia.com Publisher Emeritus: Chris Cash

FINE PRINT

All material in Georgia Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Georgia Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers and cartoonists published herein is neither inferred nor implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons. We also do not accept responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Unsolicited editorial material is accepted by Georgia Voice, but we do not take responsibility for its return. The editors reserve the right to accept, reject or edit any submission. Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request. A single copy of Georgia Voice is available from authorized distribution points. Multiple copies are available from Georgia Voice office only. Call for rates. If you are unable to reach a convenient free distribution point, you may receive a 26-issue mailed subscription for $60 per year. Checks or credit card orders can be sent to Tim Boyd, tboyd@thegavoice.com Postmaster: Send address changes to Georgia Voice, PO Box 77401, Atlanta, GA 30357. Georgia Voice is published every other Friday by The Georgia Voice, LLC. Individual subscriptions are $60 per year for 26 issues. Postage paid at Atlanta, GA, and additional mailing offices. The editorial positions of Georgia Voice are expressed in editorials and in editor’s notes. Other opinions are those of the writers and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Georgia Voice and its staff. To submit a letter or commentary: Letters should be fewer than 400 words and commentary, for web or print, should be fewer than 750 words. Submissions may be edited for content and length, and must include a name, address and phone number for verification. Email submissions to editor@thegavoice.com or mail to the address above.

Join us online: facebook.com/thegavoice twitter.com/thegavoice instagram.com/thegeorgiavoice youtube.com/user/GAVoice

8 Outspoken July 7, 2017

“This was a national effort to spew hatred against the LGBT community, and it was all focused on one intersection in Atlanta, Georgia, because the city had the gall to recognize us.” The idea was simple. Run by the intersection of 10th and Piedmont to see how the rainbow crosswalks were coming, do a Facebook Live showing Georgia Voice readers the progress so far and answer any questions people had about it. The install started early that Saturday morning, so the work crew only had one side of the intersection done and were making progress on the next one by the time I arrived. I noticed immediately that there was a huge interest, with tons of people quickly joining in to view and share the live feed and ask questions. After about a half-hour, I thanked everyone and ended it. Then the torrent of negative comments came. One person after the other calling the crosswalks “sick” or “disgusting,” talking about how wrong it was to glorify what they considered to be sin, and how we were all going to Hell. And that was the key here: the flood of anti-LGBT abuse was all rooted in these people’s interpretation of scripture. This was a religion thing. I got back home and watched the comments pile up as I was about to get out of my car, attempting to moderate it as best as possible, but after reviewing the entire thread and starting back at the top, there would be another hundred or so comments. I sat in my car for nearly an hour as wave after wave of comments came through from across the country, banning people from our page if they said anything homophobic or threatening. As I write this, it’s 48 hours later and people are still lashing out on the thread. Over 100 users were banned and the video generated 2,000 shares, 4,000 comments and 220,000 views. And counting. Just two days prior to the install, when we reported that it was to take place that weekend,

a debate broke among those in the LGBT community on our Facebook page about whether and why the crosswalks were needed. Make no mistake, the backlash that followed showed why we need them. This was a national effort to spew hatred against the LGBT community, and it was all focused on one intersection in Atlanta, Georgia, because the city had the gall to recognize us. Could the money have gone to a worthy local LGBT cause instead, as many asked? Actually, no. This was a publicly funded project, so if not to the crosswalks, the city would have allocated the money to a different Office of Transportation project. This controversy also brought to mind the fact that a certain segment of the right side of the political spectrum likes to lob the term “snowflake” at those on the left for being overly sensitive or fragile. The term appeared numerous times in the crosswalks video thread. These people spent the better part of their 4th of July weekend on a gay newspaper’s Facebook page bitching and moaning about a crosswalk. Now, who exactly has the more delicate sensibilities here? Unfortunately, the uproar also brought out the worse in some of those within the LGBT community. It’s troubling how many used misogyny as a weapon in reaction to anti-LGBT comments. To those that did, you’re doing absolutely nothing to help the situation. And your comments were flagged just as quickly as the anti-gay ones. We’ll see if the anti-LGBT bigots continue to stir up controversy. That’s out of our control. What is in our control is deciding whether or not we want to continue the infighting in our community about the crosswalks. They are here to stay. Let’s move on to bigger fights.

FEEDBACK Re: “DeVos won’t vouch for LGBT students under school voucher programs,” June 22 “She’s ignorant and proud of it!” -Jeff Brown via Facebook Re: “Ashleigh Atwell: Pride, police and #NoJusticeNoPride,” June 22 “One-hundred percent agree. It’s true, African-American transgender women have it tough. Society at large is this hegemony over this disproportionately marginalized special group of people. I believe that creating ‘decent jobs’ exclusively for transgender women of color would serve to enrich the quality of their lives. Jobs not punishment! There are excellent African-American transgender activists right here in Atlanta, Georgia, taking the lead on these serious issues. Tori Cooper facilitates a transgender support group here in Atlanta. And, of course, DeeDee Chamblee has been fighting for rights of the transgender community for decades. It’s never OK to assume anything about anyone. We are all unique individuals.” -Daphany DuBois via Facebook “Thank you, Georgia Voice. The words ‘black’ and ‘safe’ often are not in the same sentence.” -Tori Cooper via Facebook Re: “Atlanta Pride announces slate of LGBT organizations, activists as 2017 Pride grand marshals,” June 23 “Kudos to my @LambdaLegal conspirator Holiday Simmons on being chosen as one of @atlantapride 2017 grand marshals! LOVE.” -@SimoneLoves via Twitter Re: “Patrick Saunders: A flag and a conversation,” June 26 “For those of you who keep bitching about how divisive this flag is, maybe stop to think for two seconds about all the other versions of the rainbow flag you’ve never bitched about. Now look in the mirror. You’re looking at someone who supports white supremacy. Try to do better.” -Todd Garrison via Facebook Want to be featured in Feedback? Leave a comment to a story via social media or on our website, or email editor@thegavoice.com with the subject line “Feedback.” www.thegeorgiavoice.com


OUT IN THE WILD

“We bear all of the costs of this. The Steve Scalises of America bear none. This is not a fair fight. It is not a free exchange of ideas. It is sure as hell not a mere political disagreement.”

By Simon Williamson

It’s about more than ‘political differences’ Simon Williamson lives with his husband in heteronormatively-assimilative fashion in Athens, after a year of surviving rural Georgia.

I didn’t think that there could be a group within our community that annoyed me more than the performers over the two stripes Philadelphia added to the rainbow flag, as if that now sacrosanct symbol hasn’t ever been changed (it has), commodified (on myriad occasions) or appropriated (the rainbow police cars – my god). But, when someone tried to murder Republican congressmen two weeks ago, liberals, including in our own community, prostrated themselves so strongly when it came out it was a Democratic voter out to kill Republican officials over “political differences.” I don’t want anyone to get shot, and that goes from people who dare be black before police all the way up to the president. I am awfully sorry for the victims and their families. But

I am quite turned off by the idea that the only difference between me and Steve Scalise is “political.” Because in the fight for LGBT+ rights, we carry all of the costs, and those who oppose our right to live openly carry none. Me and the Republican Party do have mere political differences, like school choice, what an appropriate tax rate is and whether or not we should have a buy into Medicare. But, when it comes to me, my husband and our family, our basic day-today ability to live rests with people like Steve Scalise: when he wins (and his party controls the whole government), we lose. When we win, his life doesn’t change in the least. We don’t merely share “political differences” with people who don’t want us to be able to spend time with our spouses in hospital. Scal-

ise’s family was with him while he suffered in hospital after he was shot; in Scalise’s perfect world, we wouldn’t be allowed to visit our shot spouses in the exact same situation. We would also need separate health insurances because government-sanction of one’s relationship is how that is passed around, and we’d have less money to pay for any expenses because we would be paying individual tax rates. And our boss could fire us if he doesn’t like LGBT+ people. If we fix all those holes in the law, Steve Scalise’s life changes not a whit. If we got every right we demand, our opponents’ lives barely change. Instead, because of people like Steve Scalise, we fight about marriage equality on the most ridiculous terms, like that straight marriages are somehow to be affected. Should trans

immigrant inmates be treated like human beings, Scalise’s life remains unaffected. If we add resources to fight the slaughter of transwomen, or forbid discrimination in housing laws, or do something to tackle LGBT homelessness, or paint rainbow fucking crosswalks all over America, it does nothing to anyone else. We bear all of the costs of this. The Steve Scalises of America bear none. This is not a fair fight. It is not a free exchange of ideas. It is sure as hell not a mere political disagreement. Let me be clear: I do not want anyone shot. Anyone. But I also don’t want Democrats to weakly self-flagellate themselves into pretending there is equitable disagreement between the parties because a nutcase got hold of a gun and targeted the opposition.

W E ’ R E FA M I LY Y ’A L L

V.I.P . s s a P l a v i t s

Fe

ATLANTAPRIDE.ORG

www.thegeorgiavoice.com

July 7, 2017 Outspoken 9


PETS

Bringing home a fur-ever friend Atlanta vet advises which pet may be right for you By DALLAS ANNE DUNCAN dduncan@thegavoice.com Picking the perfect pet is no small decision. Between time management, finances and intown breed restrictions, there’s a lot of factors to consider. Georgia Voice sat down with Dr. Cheryl Coplon, an associate veterinarian at North Springs Animal Clinic in Atlanta, to give some advice on which creature may make the best furry, finned or scaly roommate for you. Say you’re looking for a Bruiser to your Elle Woods …

If fashion trends and matching threads are your jam, Coplon recommends the Cavalier King Charles spaniel. “They’re great to dress up and they’re adorable with their long beautiful ears,” she said. “They have wonderful personalities and they prance around, so they’re the perfect one for a fashionista.” What if your favorite place to be is anywhere that doesn’t have walls?

Labradors are the way to go for outdoorsy Atlantans. “They love to go on water, they love hiking, they pretty much love to do everything outdoors. They like to roll in dirt,” Coplon said. There are three different lab colors, and each has a slightly different personality type. Coplon said chocolate labs are more high-energy, playful and super-active, whereas yellow labs tend to be more laid back. Black labs are the middle ground and tend to enjoy water the most.

If Phipps is your go-to mall …

For Atlantans who prefer the luxe life, a Himalayan cat may be the way to go. The long, fluffy colorpoint coat and crystal-blue eyes make them quite a statement piece. “They’re high-maintenance in grooming because they’re long-coated, but they’re pretty low-maintenance cats in the sense that they’re not always stressed. They don’t have to be in your face all the time,” Coplon said. “It’s good to brush them on a regular basis.” What if your kid won’t stop bugging you about a puppy?

dragon,” Coplon said. She said if you’d like to have more than one beardie, get them about the same age. Otherwise, the older one could be prone to attack her younger siblings. You ain’t nothin’ but a hound dog …

So if you’re a diehard music lover, you need a hound to croon alongside you. Coplon recommends breeds like the basset hound or the beagle, which will be loving pets and great duet partners as well. “I want an animal, but …”

If you’re looking for something to keep you company, but don’t have the finances or time to care for a dog or cat, a betta fish might be up your alley. Betta, also known as Siamese fighting fish, are known for their vibrant colors and fluttering, flowing fan tails. According to the PetSmart Betta Fish Care Guide, one of these little guys (or ladies!) can live up to three years in a tank or small aquarium, requiring little maintenance other than regular cleaning and feeding.

“Families with small children, I say a golden retriever, mainly because they’re just happygo-lucky,” Coplon said. “They go with the flow. Generally when they’re puppies they are high-energy and they can run with the kids. As the kids get older, the goldens tend to get more mild-tempered and mellow out a little bit more.” She said golden retrievers do need some grooming because of their long coats. And if the child that wants a puppy happens to be allergic, Coplon recommends either an American hairless terrier or a goldendoodle, which is a golden retriever-poodle cross that can carry a gene that makes them shed less.

What if your friends nicknamed you after a superhero?

Does the saying “hold the door” make you get a little teary-eyed?

Then your first cape-wearing feat should be to rescue a pet, of course! Take a look at page 12 to see some of the Atlanta-area furbabies looking for fur-ever homes.

Then a bearded dragon may be the pet for you. “They’re really cool little reptiles. They like to hang out, and they’re actually really social animals, so it’s a really cool pet to have around. And then you have your own

You’ve always wanted a cat, but you’re allergic.

“I would go for a Sphinx,” Coplon said. “They are hairless and they have really cool personalities. They’re really fun to have around. They still act like cats, even though

they have no hair.” Sphinxes, which look like wrinkly, fur-less Egyptian felines, also make for great cuddlers. OK. Your mom keeps bugging you to “settle down” and “find the right one” … but you’re too shy to talk to that hottie.

Clearly, you need an attention-grabbing pup. Clearly, you need a schipperke, Coplon said. “They like to dance for you in a circle, and they’re a little less fluffy than a Pomeranian,” she said. “There’s still some grooming that needs to be done, but it’s not as involved as a Pomeranian would be. They’re just as much energy, just as much yippy-ness. They’re fun to have around.” Need a couple extra bucks?

Depending on where you live in the Atlanta area, you may be able to have a few backyard birds or even small ruminants such as goats, both of which can help you earn a few extra dollars. Though dairy goats can be picky eaters, some agribusiness owners rent out Boer goats to maintain lawns, or you can craft a chicken coop and bring home some biddies to lay eggs to sell (or gift) to your neighbors. If you aren’t zoned to allow for agriculture, but still want some animal interaction, you can always call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to find workshops and farms to teach you all you want to know. And if you’re not very good at keeping things alive?

Well. In that case, there’s always a pet rock.

10 Pets July 7, 2017 www.thegeorgiavoice.com


PETS

Atlanta shelters abound with adoptable pets Dogs, cats in all shapes, sizes and personalities available

now lives at FurKids. I’m an energetic, affectionate boy and I love to go for walks with my stuffed lion!

By PATRICK SAUNDERS psaunders@thegavoice.com Thinking about taking in a dedicated dog or fancy feline? We asked shelters across the city about the pups and kitties looking for forever homes. The little guys and gals tell a bit about themselves so you can see who’s a good match to add to your life.

Details

Angels Among Us Pet Rescue 877-404-5874 www.angelsrescue.org Atlanta Humane Society 404-875-5331 www.atlantahumane.org

Cornelia Parker I’m a 2-year-old treeing walker coonhound mix and I was rescued from animal control. I’m playful, pretty (if I do say so myself ) and I love going hiking! Ask for me at FurKids.

FurKids Animal Rescue & Shelters 770-613-0880 (cat shelter) and 678-624-1003 (dog shelter) www.furkids.org Ms. Kisses I’m an 8-month-old pitbull mix and yes, I love to give kisses! I also like to play and snuggle, and I’m good with kids. You can find me at Angels Among Us Pet Rescue.

LifeLine Animal Project 404-292-8800 www.lifelineanimal.org fetch. You can find me at LifeLine Animal Project.

Amado I’m a Chihuahua and I had a brain injury last year, but I have recovered and am ready for my very own family! I have some special needs, but I am worth it, I promise. Ask Angels Among Us Pet Rescue about me!

Buddy Boy I’m a fantastic feline and I don’t let the fact that I’m FIV-positive get me down. My friends at FurKids have placed dozens of FIV-positive cats like me in great homes and I would love to join yours!

Izzy I’m a 3-year-old terrier/shepherd mix who is an Atlanta Humane Society newcomer. I’m a super sweet girl, I’m really good at walking on a leash and I will sit for treats!

Lego I’m a 2.5-year-old pointer/retriever mix who was rescued from animal control and

Squash I’m a 1-year-old boy and I’ve been wanting a forever home since April. I’m affectionate and get along well with other cats. I am FIV-positive but the folks at Atlanta Humane Society say I will still live a long and happy life!

Rommer I’m a 5-year-old boy who’s short, stout and silly! I love hanging out with other dogs, playing with toys and occasionally playing

Zany I’m a 3-year-old beagle boy and I love being around other dogs! I’ve been told I would make an excellent family dog and you can find me at the Atlanta Humane Society.

12 Pets July 7, 2017 www.thegeorgiavoice.com


PETS

Cats that test positive for feline immunodeficiency virus, or FIV, can still make great pets. Providing them with healthy indoor environments can help stop disease spread. (Photo via iStock)

FIV status shouldn’t keep felines from being adopted Symptoms of HIV-like autoimmune disease reduced in indoor environments By DALLAS ANNE DUNCAN dduncan@thegavoice.com Just like a baby, new pets need to get a few shots and tests done to make sure they’re healthy. For cats, one of those is the FIV test — and just like humans, it’s quite possible for felines with this autoimmune disease to live a healthy life. Feline immunodeficiency virus — or FIV — positive cats can have shorter lifespans than other cats, but most will live eight to 10 years if they are raised in an indoor, healthy environment, said Aaron Caldwell, head veterinary technician at The Cat Clinic in Roswell, Georgia. “Cats don’t tend to typically die from FIV. A lot of times, it’s the same with people, where it’s not the HIV that kills them, but it’s the symptoms of other illnesses they get from having FIV because they have a compromised immune system,” he said. Approximately 1.5 to 3 percent of healthy cats have FIV, according to the Feline Health Center at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Biting is the most common way it’s transmitted, so outdoor, aggressive male cats are most likely to be infected. FIV-positive females can transmit www.thegeorgiavoice.com

the virus to their kittens as well, and it is less common, but possible, to pass FIV on through sexual contact. FIV reproduces in white blood cells called T-lymphocytes in the lymph nodes, and can result in poor coat condition, a loss of appetite, chronic infection and “slow but progressive weight loss, often followed by severe wasting.” New pet owners should take their kittens in for a FIV test when they’re at least 8 weeks old, and then for a second test at 6 months. Caldwell recommends cats undergoing a regular yearly test after that. To keep FIV from spreading, cats should be spayed or neutered, kept indoors and away from other cats — especially if the FIV-positive cat tends to be aggressive. “There’s not really any treatment for it, just monitoring and managing it, keeping them from messing around with other cats,” Caldwell said. There is a vaccine for FIV, but after a kitten or cat is vaccinated, she will always test positive for FIV, even if she doesn’t have the virus. Regardless, Caldwell said a FIV-positive status is no reason not to adopt a furry feline. “They should just because they could provide a better life for the cat,” he said. July 7, 2017 Pets 13


PETS

Pet owners turning to holistic therapy Traditional vet care being blended with reiki, color therapy, acupuncture By DIONNE N. WALKER It’s a situation many pet parents have faced: Your beloved fur kid just isn’t itself and you’re at the end of your rope. You’ve maxed out on vet visits and overloaded on pet painkillers. Still, your pup is struggling with arthritis, diabetes or some other painful condition that conventional methods aren’t helping. You can cross your fingers and turn to another traditional vet. Or you can join the growing number of pet owners looking to aromatherapy, chiropractic and even energy work to sooth their struggling animals. It’s called holistic medicine, and while the discipline – which combines Eastern and metaphysical theories to treat mostly chronic conditions – has long been common among human patients, animal specialists say its use is exploding among pet owners. They point to younger pet parents and more animal owners who live a holistic lifestyle and increasingly want their dogs, cats and even lizards to do the same. These pet parents aren’t replacing stethoscopes and scalpels with pendulums and sage. Rather, experts say they are increasingly blending traditional vet care with things like reiki, color therapy and acupuncture to treat their animals inside and out. Healing mind, body and spirit Sometimes referred to as alternative medicine, holistic medical care is best described as treatment focused on healing mind, body and spirit. Where conventional Western medicine focuses on tests and X-rays, holistic treatment is often intuitive, with heavy focus on emotional blockages, energetic imbalances and other less tangible concepts. The field encompasses a diverse number of specializations, including hypnotherapy, sound therapy, herbal treatments and reiki, a technique in which a practitioner uses touch to channel energy and restore balance in patients. It may sound a little hokey to newcomers, www.thegeorgiavoice.com

“We see clients that start because they’ve been to 15 other regular vets and they haven’t had any help with their animal’s problems. We help them and they see the success.” —Dr. Tricia Stimac, president of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association and an active veterinarian

but lots of Americans have bought into the faith-based healing modalities: An estimated 59 million Americans spent some $30.2 billion on alternative treatments in 2012, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Four-legged patients are increasingly included in those expenditures, said Dr. Tricia Stimac, president of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association and an active veterinarian. While treatments can be used on exotics – think lizards and snakes – Stimac said the most common pets are cats, dogs and surprisingly, horses. “Acupuncture and chiropractic have been amazing modules of therapy for that species,” she said, explaining horses in particular often suffer chronic pain from wearing saddles. Years ago, she said holistic medicine was more of a fringe thing, practiced by a select few vets who had personal experience with it. Nowadays, however, it’s patients demanding botanicals and more for things like chronic ear infections, she said. “You realize, as you’ve been in practice for a long period of time, that there are other options,” she said. “And the younger generation, they are hearing of these modalities and they are being requested.” Stimac said many pet parents belong to the Whole Foods set – practicing clean eating and other holistic lifestyle choices that they extend to their pets. But others are simply ready for something new.

Experts say holistic options like acupuncture and chiropractic are beneficial to pets of all kinds. (iStock photo)

“We see clients that start because they’ve been to 15 other regular vets and they haven’t had any help with their animal’s problems,” she said. “We help them and they see the success.” That doesn’t mean, however, that alternative medicine is a replacement for traditional medicine entirely, she said. Rather, Stimac said alternative medicine should complement traditional methods in certain cases. Alternative medicine should not be used to replace emergency care if a pet is hit by a car or having acute heart troubles, for instance. “But the beauty is that we can not only utilize the surgeon to fix that bone or that cardiologist to add on pharmaceutical medications, but we can also use our alternative therapies to support that,” she said. “You can use a homeopathic to help heal the bone post surgery. You can use supplements in conjunction with heart medicines.” Soothing music, crystals used for joint pain, anxiety It all sounded like hocus pocus to pet lover and mobile dog groomer Mary Oquendo. Then, a decade ago, her miniature pinscher, Marcus, fell sick. “He had Cushing’s (Syndrome), he was diabetic, every month his medications were increasing,” she said. “His prognosis was not good.”

When she saw some crystals in a local alternative store, Oquendo impulsively grabbed a few she thought were pretty. Weeks later, when she felt her mood lift, Oquendo said she started researching the crystals’ properties and how they could also help her pooch. It ultimately lead to a longer, healthier life for Marcus and a new specialty for Oquendo. who now offers crystal and reiki pet therapy, in addition to running her mobile business Pawsitively Pretty, and teaching at events like the Atlanta Pet Fair and Conference, in March. “By the time he passed away, he was off Cushing’s medication and we had reduced his diabetes medicine by about 25 percent,” said Oquendo, who is based in Danbury, Connecticut. These days, she is sharing what worked for her Marcus with cats and dogs suffering everything from joint pain to chronic anxiety. Sessions typically involve soothing music, placing the pet in a circle of crystals and using a pendulum placed over the animal’s body to guide her to where healing is most needed. While her pet patients don’t have the words to say thanks, Oquendo said they show their appreciation in their own way. “You can see it in their faces,” she said. July 7, 2017 Pets 15


What is TRUVADA for PrEP? TRUVADA for PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is a prescription medicine that is used together with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting HIV-1. To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, talk openly with your healthcare provider about your sexual health. Ask your healthcare provider if you have questions about how to prevent getting HIV. Always practice safer sex and use condoms to lower the chance of sexual contact with body fluids. Never reuse or share needles or other items that have body fluids on them.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION |What is the most important information I should know

about TRUVADA for PrEP?

Before taking TRUVADA for PrEP: u You must be HIV-negative before you start taking TRUVADA for PrEP. You must get tested to make sure that you do not already have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA to reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed to be HIV-negative. u Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection in a person who has recently become infected. If you have flu-like symptoms, you could have recently become infected with HIV-1. Tell your healthcare provider if you had a flu-like illness within the last month before starting or at any time while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection include tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck or groin. While taking TRUVADA for PrEP: u You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP may not keep you from getting HIV-1. u You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP: • Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months. • If you think you were exposed to HIV-1, tell your healthcare provider right away. u To further help reduce your risk of getting HIV-1: • Know your HIV status and the HIV status of your partners. • Get tested for other sexually transmitted infections. Other infections make it easier for HIV to infect you. • Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer sex partners. • Do not miss any doses of TRUVADA. Missing doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 infection. u If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not a complete treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. TRUVADA can cause serious side effects: u Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV and stop taking TRUVADA, your HBV may suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to monitor your health.

|Who should not take TRUVADA for PrEP? Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP if you: u Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do not know your HIV-1 status. If you are HIV-1 positive, you need to take other medicines with TRUVADA to treat HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not a complete treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. u Also take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B infection. |What are the other possible side effects of TRUVADA for PrEP? Serious side effects of TRUVADA may also include: u Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your kidneys before and during treatment with TRUVADA. If you develop kidney problems, your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking TRUVADA. u Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. u Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. u Bone problems, including bone pain, softening, or thinning, which may lead to fractures. Your healthcare provider may do tests to check your bones. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP are stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away. |What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking

TRUVADA for PrEP?

u All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or

have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis.

u If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if TRUVADA

can harm your unborn baby. If you become pregnant while taking TRUVADA for PrEP, talk to your healthcare provider to decide if you should keep taking TRUVADA. u If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can be passed to the baby in breast milk. u All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. TRUVADA may interact with other medicines. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine. u If you take certain other medicines with TRUVADA, your healthcare provider may need to check you more often or change your dose. These medicines include certain medicines to treat hepatitis C (HCV) infection. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Important Facts about TRUVADA for PrEP including important warnings on the following page.

TVDC0093_B_10x10-5_GeorgiaVoice_p1.indd 1-2


Have you heard about

TRUVADA for PrEP™? The once-daily prescription medicine that can help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 when used with safer sex practices. • TRUVADA for PrEP is only for adults who are at high risk of getting HIV through sex. • You must be HIV-negative before you start taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Ask your doctor about your risk of getting HIV-1 infection and if TRUVADA for PrEP may be right for you.

visit start.truvada.com

6/6/17 11:21 AM


IMPORTANT FACTS

This is only a brief summary of important information about taking TRUVADA for PrEPTM (pre-exposure prophylaxis) to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 infection. This does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your medicine.

(tru-VAH-dah) MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP Before starting TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must be HIV-1 negative. You must get tested to make sure that you do not already have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP to reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed to be HIV-1 negative. • Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection in a person who has recently become infected. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection include flu-like symptoms, tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck or groin. Tell your healthcare provider if you have had a flu-like illness within the last month before starting TRUVADA for PrEP. While taking TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP may not keep you from getting HIV-1. • You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you think you were exposed to HIV-1 or have a flu-like illness while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. • If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. • See the “How To Further Reduce Your Risk” section for more information. TRUVADA may cause serious side effects, including: • Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV, your HBV may suddenly get worse if you stop taking TRUVADA. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to check your health regularly for several months.

ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA for PrEP is a prescription medicine used together with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting HIV-1. • To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, talk openly with your healthcare provider about your sexual health. Do NOT take TRUVADA for PrEP if you: • Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do not know your HIV-1 status. • Take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B infection.

HOW TO TAKE TRUVADA FOR PrEP • Take 1 tablet once a day, every day, not just when you think you have been exposed to HIV-1. • Do not miss any doses. Missing doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 infection. • Use TRUVADA for PrEP together with condoms and safer sex practices. • Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months. You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP.

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA can cause serious side effects, including: • Those in the “Most Important Information About TRUVADA for PrEP” section. • New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. • Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. • Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. • Bone problems. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP include stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. These are not all the possible side effects of TRUVADA. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with TRUVADA for PrEP.

BEFORE TAKING TRUVADA FOR PrEP Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis. • Have any other medical conditions. • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. • Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can pass to the baby in breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take: • Keep a list that includes all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with TRUVADA for PrEP.

HOW TO FURTHER REDUCE YOUR RISK • Know your HIV status and the HIV status of your partners. • Get tested for other sexually transmitted infections. Other infections make it easier for HIV to infect you. • Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer sex partners. • Do not share needles or personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them.

GET MORE INFORMATION • This is only a brief summary of important information about TRUVADA for PrEP. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more, including how to prevent HIV infection. • Go to start.truvada.com or call 1-800-GILEAD-5 • If you need help paying for your medicine, visit start.truvada.com for program information.

TRUVADA, the TRUVADA Logo, TRUVADA FOR PREP, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. All other marks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners. Version date: April 2017 © 2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. TVDC0093 05/17

TVDC0093_B_10x10-5_GeorgiaVoice_p1.indd 3

6/6/17 11:21 AM


PETS

Georgia Voice Reader Pet Photos!

BRUNO AND NIBBLER Owners: Tamer and Spenser Barsbay Location: Midtown

FAI Owner: Joshua D. Lorenz Location: Atlanta

AUBREY Owner: Jill Roberts Location: Atlanta

JACE AND ALDEN Owner: Dennis Boecker Location: Atlanta

DORI Owner: Aaron Born Location: Midtown

BENTLEY Owner: Ruben Rodriguez Location: Atlanta

Jenny Owners: Jerry and Ray Gonzalez Location: Atlanta

Grace Owners: Joe Joyce and Robert Cheng Location: Duluth

BELLE AND BEBE Owner: Brad Abercrombie Location: Atlanta

CLEMENTINE Owners: Nora and Lisa Spencer-Loveall Location: East Atlanta

BEATRICE AND ARTHUR Owner: Michael Shutt Location: Atlanta

SAPHIRA, GRACIE AND NALA Owners: Sarah and Courtney Jewell Location: Clarkston

VICTORIA Owners: Ronnie and Winston Bass Location: Atlanta

JANE Owner: Joshua D. Lorenz Location: Atlanta

www.thegeorgiavoice.com

SUEDEE, ROXIE AND MINNIE Owners: Richard Funderburke and Jim Powell Location: Decatur

July 7, 2017 Pets 19


SATURDAY,J UL Y22 FOXTHEATRE

T I C K E T SONS A L ENOW!|8 5 5 2 8 5 8 4 9 9|F OX T HE A T R E . OR G


S W

RE RTS VIE A

LGBT T

ER

TA I

TA

N

T

EN

AT L A N N ME

Ready to make ‘Noise’ Atlanta’s own Taylor Alxndr on releasing debut EP, organizing Southern Fried Queer Pride By SHANNON HAMES Atlanta is known for a lot of things in Southern queer culture, including producing some of the nation’s finest drag queens, vocalists and activists. Griffin native Taylor Alxndr does them all with the intelligence and panache that one would expect from someone born and raised in the South. Alxndr, who is executive director of Southern Fried Queer Pride and outreach and events specialist at Atlanta Pride, performs July 7 at Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery. She will release her first EP, “Noise,” later this month. Tell me about your upcoming EP, “Noise.” It’s my first official music release and I am so excited about it. There are five songs on it. It’s upbeat, high energy synthpop with a little bit of house and some influence from the ballroom scene. I think it’s unique because the songs are about the different struggles that my community and I go through. I don’t write love songs, but I do try to focus on writing things that I know about. I’ve worked on it for almost a year now. It’s going to be released on July 21. CONTINUES ON PAGE 22

www.thegeorgiavoice.com

July 7, 2017 A&E 21


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

Can you dance to it? I certainly hope so. I want people to dance to it. But I also want people to think to it. The lyrics are kind of deep. I have one song about Black Lives Matter. There’s another song that talks about my tug-ofwar relationship with my mom. It’s all very danceable, but it will invite people into their feelings when they listen to it. You’re also a drag queen here in Atlanta? Yes, I am. I perform at Burkhart’s Pub and Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery. I also run a show on the second Tuesday of every month called “Sweet Tea.” It’s a queer variety show that has drag, comedy, performance art and things like that. I am also starting a new drag show at Sister Louisa’s Church of the Living Room & Ping Pong Emporium on Edgewood. It will start on July 6 and continues every first Thursday [after that].

Taylor Alxndr performs at Eyedrum on July 7 and her debut EP ‘Noise’ comes out July 21. (Photos courtesy Taylor Alxndr)

How did you get into music and performance? I’ve been singing and performing since I was very young. I used to do these shows at local banks and businesses in my home city of Griffin, Georgia. I sang at the Georgia [National] Fair in Perry one year. But, then I didn’t feel that I had the resources to have a viable musical career. About two years ago, I bought some software and started experimenting and making songs. It wasn’t until this past six months that I saw the EP coming together and just kept working at it until I felt I had something really good to share.

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

22 A&E July 7, 2017

How do you identify? I identify as queer sexually and politically and as agender – I consider myself genderless, although I use “they” or “her” as my pronouns. What was growing up in Griffin like for a genderless queer? Griffin was very chill. There was not a lot to do there. I grew up on a 400-acre farm so there wasn’t really much to do besides go outside and then go back inside. It was [more] easygoing back then than it is currently. Now, they have an influx of people moving in because it’s so cheap to live there and is on the southern edge of the metropolitan Atlanta area. A lot has changed, but I had a good childhood. I can’t complain. Does your family support your career? My family doesn’t know anything about my sexual identity, my gender identity or my music. I just don’t bring it up. Having the acceptance of my parents isn’t something that is of high importance to me. As long as I’m happy and fulfilled by what I do, I’m good. You are also an organizer for Southern Fried Queer Pride (SFQP). Tell me about your role. I am a co-founder and the current executive director. I co-founded it in 2014 with my friend Mickey Bradford. We started it mainly because we didn’t see a space for trans or people of color, especially artists and activists in the community. There were a lot of issues surrounding our community, so we wanted to create an event for there to be an outlet.

Details

Taylor Alxndr with Diaspoura, MonteQarlo and Akata Friday, July 7 from 9 p.m. - midnight Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery 88 Forsyth St. S.W. Atlanta, GA 30303 $7 - $20 www.facebook.com/ events/1594020373941606 At the core of what we do is creating events that facilitate experiences for people of color, the trans community and those who are more marginalized in the South. In national LGBT conversations around the country, the South is often left out of these conversations because we are considered too conservative or not relevant. We wanted to be the link between the queer community and artists and activists and try to give a voice to those who aren’t often heard. What kind of events does SFQP have? We just had this year’s festival. It was five days long. We had typical dances and socials but we also kicked it off with an event specifically for the Latino community. We had another event called “The Jewel Box” specifically for the trans community for building inner community trans resilience. We had workshops, a variety show for queer performance art, discussions about racism in the queer community – a lot of things like that. Next year, it will be on Stonewall Weekend in June.

To advertise, contact: sales@thegavoice.com

www.thegeorgiavoice.com


ACTING OUT

By JIM FARMER

‘Little Shop,’ ‘Heathers’ hit theaters in the ATL

Two new summer musicals in the ATL are perhaps best known from their film versions. Actor’s Express is about to open “Little Shop of Horrors,” the best-known adaptation of which is the 1986 movie starring Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene and Steve Martin. The hit musical, with book and lyrics by the late, openly gay playwright and lyricist Howard Ashman, is about a plant that grows to an enormous size and needs human blood to survive. In “Little Shop of Horrors,” Trevor Perry plays one of the urchins/ Doo Wop Girls in full drag. Perry has already appeared in several versions of the musical. “It’s one of my favorite shows of all time,” Perry admitted. “It imprinted me when I was younger, at an early age. The Doo Wop Girls are such an important part of the musical. Being one has always been a dream.” He feels his fellow Doo Wop Girls – Brittani Minnieweather and Kiona D. Rese – have strengths that they incorporate into this version. “Kiona is a fabulous dancer and Brittani is the funniest of us all,” said Perry, who regularly performs drag at various venues around town under the name Gwendolyn Van Cartier. And OnStage Atlanta just debuted its take on “Heathers: The Musical,” based on the cult classic “Heathers,” which starred Winona Ryder and Christian Slater and was about a popular female clique at high school and the murderous outsider who disrupts them. Directed by out director Charlie Miller, “Heathers” shares a lot with its film counterpart. “The two are similar, but they combine a few characters,” he said. “As far as the story, the movie picks up with Veronica already being a part of the [clique] Heathers, and in the musical there is an opening song about her being accepted and transformed into the group. We get her backstory. There are some tweaks here and there. It’s tighter, I think.” The show was produced by Georgia State University, the only theater company in town to ever do so. That’s a bit of a surprise, given its high profile. “I think it’s edgy in the sense that there are some dark themes – killing, murder, www.thegeorgiavoice.com

ATLANTA’S FIRST URBAN WINERY, INTIMATE MUSIC VENUE, RESTAURANT & PRIVATE EVENT SPACE

upcoming shows jul 12

LES NUBIANS Up Close & Personal Tour jul

Juan Carlos Unzueta, Bill Murphey and Kylie Brown star in ‘Little Shop of Horrors,’ premiering July 15 at Actor’s Express. (Courtesy photo)

Details

“Heathers: The Musical” Through Aug. 13 OnStage Atlanta 2969 East Ponce de Leon Ave. Decatur, GA 30030 www.onstageatlanta.com “Little Shop of Horrors” July 15 – Aug. 20 Actor’s Express 887 W. Marietta St., Atlanta, GA 30318 www.actorsexpress.com

teenage sex,” Miller said. “It’s a dark comedy for sure. I think some theaters would probably want to choose something safer. We think our audiences are going to love this. It’s my era. People who saw this when it came out in 1989 – those people are now parents of teenagers with fond memories of the movie.” He thinks the material holds up very well, with themes of cliques, acceptance and loneliness. “Every generation of students in high school faces that,” Miller said. “Freshmen in high school have to wonder, ‘Where do I fit and will I be alone at the lunch table?’ Veronica is looking for love and she falls for a bad boy.” The show also has a gay subplot, although giving away the specific nature of that takes away the surprise for patrons unfamiliar with it.

13

q parker of 112 jul 14

Experience Clubesque NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH! 11am-3pm | mon-sat

Become a City Winery VinoFile Member! Buy tickets before the public, avoid service fees, attend members-only events & much more!

650 NORTH AVENUE NE, SUITE 201, ATLANTA, GA 30308 PONCE CITY MARKET | CITYWINERY.COM | 404.WINERY1

July 7, 2017 Columnists 23


A MODICUM OF DECORUM By SHANNON HAMES

Trust fall with your intuition “The power of intuitive understanding will protect you from harm until the end of your days.” – Lao Tzu One of the greatest things about getting older is also becoming wiser. Even the dullest among us hardly makes it to midlife without learning a few lessons from the hard knocks that life seems to be so adept at dishing out. I like to think we are all souls having a “human experience” for the purpose of learning lessons that make us better souls. Several years ago, I started going to therapy to help me deal with my father’s terminal illness. I began a journey of learning about the tools I have to not only cope with grief, but also to grow: to learn from experiences that I perceive as “negative” and to guard my peace from people who would disturb it. Each of those tools and how I’ve learned to use them could be their own column because my experiences have been rich. But, the tool that has been on my mind lately is that of our intuition. As I reflect on the mistakes and bad decisions I have made in the past, I can see a pattern of me seeing my intuition as a barrier, not a helper. Because of my background in a fundamental evangelical church, I mistook my intuition for something like being sinfully judgmental. When my intuition made me feel a certain way about someone based on the things that they were saying or doing, I would almost instantly feel guilty about it because I was “judging” them, or perhaps I was “projecting” from a past experience and not giving the person the benefit of a doubt. When you have had to overcome your past and you felt the warmth and love from people who didn’t judge you, you become much more of a grace-giver to others. So, when new people in my life would tell me about the things they’ve done in their past, I wanted to give them the gift of my unconditional love and acceptance. I set my judgments aside and let them have a fresh start with me.

“When you have had to overcome your past and you felt the warmth and love from people who didn’t judge you, you become much more of a grace-giver to others.” Doesn’t that sound wonderful and benevolent of me? It wasn’t. In fact, it was the suck! I ended up inviting every type of dramafilled scenario into my life. My peace was non-existent and I was unable to see that the common thread in all of the friendships and relationships I had with people who were destroying my peace was that I had ignored my intuition about them. I could actually go back to specific conversations with people and recall things that they said to me that revealed the thing about themselves that I really needed to know to protect myself, yet I chose to ignore it. In doing so, my life became a whirlwind of drama, liars, addicts, alcoholics, cheaters and all of the bad junk those people were attached to. Last year, I made a decision that I was going to change this one thing about how I make decisions regarding who gets my time and energy. Although I still struggle with some guilt about not knowing “for certain” if someone is really good or bad for me, I’m getting much more comfortable with trusting my gut. I now experience the peace of knowing that I have a badass tool, that I’ve become skilled at using it and now see results. Shannon Hames is a mom, writer, realtor, volunteer, rocker chick, world traveler and ’80s hair band aficionado. She loves babies, observing people, reading great books and taking hot baths. She has been writing for Georgia Voice since 2010.

24 Columnists July 7, 2017 www.thegeorgiavoice.com


www.thegeorgiavoice.com

July 7, 2017 Ads 25


B

BETS T ES

T A T GB

A T N LA T

S

L

Our Guide to the Best LGBT Events in Atlanta for July 7-20

EVEN FRIDAY, JULY 7 – SUNDAY, JULY 9

Francis Bennett, a transgender teacher and former Trappist and Buddhist monk, presents Deep Listening from Presence, a silent retreat in the Georgia foothills. The daily schedule includes periods of meditation and Satsang and time for personal reflection. Outside of the Satsang, where questions may be asked, the retreat will be held in silence, Elohee Center, 1478 Bean Creek Road, Sautee Nacoochee, GA 30571, www.elohee.org/retreat/958/the-art-oflistening-from-presence

FRIDAY, JULY 7

Kick back under the stars on the Great Lawn and enjoy the amazing sounds of Michael Feinstein: Songs of Sinatra during Concerts in the Garden, 8 p.m., Atlanta Botanical Garden, 1345 Piedmont Ave., Atlanta, GA 30309, atlantabg.org/visit/events/ michael-feinstein (Publicity photo)

FRIDAY, JULY 7

Join the latest edition of Baddest Bitch to pay tribute to Sunnydale’s Buffy Summers, who was slaying well before Gaga. To celebrate this night at The Bronze, WUSSY magazine will be hosting a yearbook photo shoot upstairs at the Boozy Cougar. Pull out your best high school Hellmouth looks and dance to all the best Buffy-inspired hits (that means all ‘90s, all night). Hosted by Biqtch Puddin’ with DJ Headmaster, 10 p.m. – 2 a.m., Mary’s, 1287 Glenwood Ave. S.E., Atlanta, GA 30316, www.facebook. com/events/1137563293014464

SATURDAY, JULY 8

Film and television star Justin Deeley stars in a revisionist version of “Macbeth” at Serenbe Playhouse, at 8 p.m. tonight running through July 9, 11213 Serenbe Lane, Chattahoochee Hills, GA 30268, www.serenbeplayhouse.com Out artist Hannah Thomas visits Eddie’s Attic tonight with special guest Sonia Tetlow, 9:15 p.m., 515-B North McDonough St., Decatur, GA, 30030, www.eddiesattic.com

26 Best Bets July 7, 2017

SUNDAY, JULY 9

“Queer Moxie.” filmed in Atlanta with local subjects, is returning to Midtown Art Cinema to celebrate the documentary’s online streaming launch. Missed the sold-out shows? Now is your chance to watch the film and celebrate queer artists. Those who attend the screening will get a sneak peek of a project the filmmakers are currently working on. There will also be a special performance by Theresa Davis. 12 – 2 p.m., 931 Monroe Drive N.E., Atlanta, GA 30308, www.facebook.com/ events/141534306394734

The Atlanta Dream hosts the Dallas Wings today at 3 p.m., Georgia Tech McCamish Pavilion, 965 Fowler St. N.W., Atlanta, GA 30313, dream.wnba.com Rotten Peaches hosts a Queer Picnic in the Park, complete with games, snacks and fun, 4 – 7 p.m., Piedmont Park, www.facebook.com/ events/287477464995934

MONDAY, JULY 10

It’s Dine Out Week at Doc Chey’s Noodle House, Doc Chey’s Dragon

Bowl and Osteria 832. Don’t forget to mention “Pride” to ensure that 25 percent of your dine-in, carry-out or catering bill is donated to Atlanta Pride. 1 – 4 p.m., www.facebook.com/ events/1268863793227190

TUESDAY, JULY 11

The Rainbros host a Healthy Relationships: Intimacy, Sexual and Non-Sexual session today, looking at commitment, longer term visioning and creating a home together. 7 – 10 p.m., Creative Approach Atlanta,

www.thegeorgiavoice.com


TELL US ABOUT YOUR LGBT EVENT Submit your LGBT event for inclusion in our online and print calendars by emailing event info to editor@thegavoice.com

1080 W. Peachtree St. N.W., Atlanta, GA 30309, www.facebook.com/ events/1889895914558863

WEDNESDAY, JULY 12

The High Museum of Art is the exclusive East Coast venue for the Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation retrospective featuring more than 250 prints and ephemera by artist Andy Warhol. This comprehensive show is the largest exhibition of its kind and includes such iconic screenprint portfolios as Marilyn Monroe (1967), Campbell’s Soup I (1968), Electric Chair (1971) and Mao (1972), 1280 Peachtree St. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30309, www.high.org

THURSDAY, JULY 13

SAGE Atlanta’s bi-monthly meetings occur from 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. on the second and fourth Thursday of each month, Phillip Rush Center Annex, 1530 DeKalb Ave., Atlanta, GA 30307, www.rushcenteratl.org Join Jerusalem House to celebrate fundraising for AIDS Walk Atlanta with a dine-out at Jason’s Deli in Midtown. Mention Jerusalem House and 15 percent of your bill will be donated to the HIV/AIDS housing organization. Click on the RSVP link to let organizers know if you’re coming to qualify for the donation from Jason’s Deli: www.groupraise.com/events/28689jerusalem-house-aids-walk-team-at-jasons-deli, 5 – 10 p.m. Jason’s Deli , 230 N. 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30309, www.facebook.com/events/274533076348270 Metro Atlanta Association of Professionals (MAAP) hosts a special charity event for For the Kid in All of Us at TEN Atlanta. To support For the Kid’s goal of helping kids in need as they prepare to return to school, MAAP asks you to bring needed school supplies as well as new, unused backpacks for dona-

www.thegeorgiavoice.com

TUESDAY, JULY 11

The Rainbros host a walk-and-talk event today. Come to meet people and make new friends. It’s great for new people in town or those seeking to widen their social circles. Meet at the 14th and Piedmont entrance of Piedmont Park. 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., www. facebook.com/events/790511211130035 (Courtesy photo) tion. 6 – 8 p.m., 990 Piedmont Ave. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30309, www.facebook.com/ events/264838493922000 Join Charis Books and More in celebrating the release of Charlene Ball’s “Dark Lady: A Novel of Emilia Bassano Lanyer.” Ball will read a bit from the novel, take questions and sign copies of the book. “Dark Lady” tells the tale of Emilia Bassano, who has four strikes against her: she is poor, beautiful, female and intelligent in Elizabethan England. When she is raped as a teenager, she knows she probably will not be able to make a good marriage, so she becomes the mistress of a much older nobleman. 7:30 – 9 p.m., 1189 Euclid Ave. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30307, www.facebook.com/ events/1885715895023825

FRIDAY, JULY 14

Produced by Cherith Fuller, Jen O’Neill Smith and Paige Bowman, Laughs Trump Hate is a comedy show series to benefit those negatively affected by the election. $10 tickets benefiting the National Immigration Law Center can be found at www.freshtix.com/events/ laughs-trump-hate-national-immigration-law-

center, 8:30 – 10 p.m., Highland Inn & Ballroom Lounge, 644 N. Highland Ave. N.E. Atlanta, GA 30306, www.facebook.com/events/232866147203518 What’s your damage, Heather? OnStage Atlanta has opened a musical version of the cult classic film “Heathers,” with an 8 p.m. show tonight running through Aug. 13, 2969 East Ponce de Leon Ave., Decatur, GA 3003, www.onstageatlanta.com

SATURDAY, JULY 15

Don’t miss Drag Queen Storytime at Ponce City Market today with Edie Cheezburger. Edie will entertain and read books in her typically energetic fashion. 3 – 4 p.m., Posman Books Atlanta, 675 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E., C197, Atlanta, GA 30308, www.facebook.com/events/1851572041825307 The pool party of the year, Joining Hearts 30, takes place today, raising awareness and money to stop the spread of HIV throughout Atlanta. This year’s version is Thirty, Flirty, Thriving, with live entertainers throughout the evening and

CONTINUES ON PAGE 28

EVENT SPOTLIGHT SUNDAY, JULY 16

Isaac Escalante spins for those late night Joining Hearts revelers, 3 – 7 a.m., Xion, 2043 Cheshire Bridge Road N.E., Atlanta, GA 30324 (Publicity photo)

July 7, 2017 Best Bets 27


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 music by DJ Grind from LA and NYC’s DJ Joe Gauthreaux and opening set by Atlanta’s own DJ Seth Breezy from 4 – 10:30 p.m., Piedmont Park, joininghearts.org/event-3 The Atlanta Rollergirls host a playoff double feature – the Denim Demons take on the Toxic Shocks at 5 p.m. and then the Apocalypstix battle Sake Tuyas at 7:30 p.m., Yaarab Shrine Center, 400 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, GA 30308, www.atlantarollergirls.com Meet Mr. Right! Woofs hosts a Gay Singles Mixer, 6 – 9 p.m., 2425 Piedmont Road N.E., Atlanta, GA 30324, www.facebook.com/events/1356810297719149 We’ve Only Just Begun: Carpenters Remembered is a concert show remembering one of the most successful recording acts of all time. Expect a wonderful trip down memory lane at 8 p.m. at Chastain Park Ampitheatre, 4469 Stella Drive N.W., Atlanta, GA 30827, www.chastainseries.com

EVENT SPOTLIGHT SATURDAY, JULY 22

Broadway actress and performer Idina Menzel will get the gay boys out in droves tonight at 8 p.m. at the Fox Theatre, 660 Peachtree St. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30308, www.foxtheatre.org (Photo via Facebook)

“Feed Me, Seymour!” Actor’s Express opens its version of the classic musical “Little Shop of Horrors” tonight at 8 p.m., running through Aug. 20, 887 W. Marietta St. N.W., Atlanta, GA 30318, www.actorsexpress.com

lanta, GA 30308, www.facebook.com/ events/1973208239578508

SUNDAY, JULY 16

The PFLAG support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning people and their parents and family meets tonight from 2:30 – 4 p.m., Spiritual Living Center of Atlanta, 1730 Northeast Expressway N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329

MONDAY, JULY 17

Trans and Friends is a youth-focused group for trans people, people questioning their own gender and aspiring allies, providing a facilitated space to discuss gender, relevant resources and activism around social issues. 7 – 8:30 p.m., Charis Books and More, 1189 Euclid Ave. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30307, www.charisbooksandmore.com

TUESDAY, JULY 18

Angelica D’Paige heads up Drageoke tonight at 10:30 p.m. at Burkhart’s, 1492 Piedmont Ave., Atlanta, GA 30309, www.burkharts.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19

Put on your best skivvies because it’s Underwear Night at The Atlanta

28 Best Bets July 7, 2017

SUNDAY, JULY 16

The Queer Community Circus and Performance Jam is today. Melissa Coffey will facilitate the free monthly playshop for any queer folks that want to play and train or practice together. Circus artists, burlesque performers, dancers, musicians, flow artists, producers, costumers, makeup artists, drag performers, lighting techs, photographers, videographers and storytellers are all part of the circus, 2 – 5 p.m., Sky Gym Atlanta, 6780 Roswell Road N.E., Studio D100, Sandy Springs, GA 30328, www.facebook.com/ events/1796269940683063 (Publicity photo) Eagle, 7 p.m. – 2 a.m., 306 Ponce de Leon Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30308, www.atlantaeagle.com

THURSDAY, JULY 20

The Atlanta Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce hosts its Business Builder Luncheon today. Hosted by Chip Ivie on the third Thursday of each month at 11:45 a.m., the event is limited to 14 respondents with a $20 (cash only) preset menu. Email RSVPs to chipivie@kw.com. Henry’s Midtown Tavern, 132 10th St.

N.E., Atlanta GA 30309 Georgia Voice unveils the winners of this year’s Best of Atlanta awards in a slew of categories tonight from 6 – 9:30 p.m. at the Georgian Terrace Hotel. Admission is free and the awards ceremony is hosted by Melissa Carter, with beats by DJ Calvin, complimentary cocktails by Green’s Beverages and Jackson Family Wines, lite bites by Henry’s Midtown Tavern, Campagnolo and more, 659 Peachtree St. N.E., At-

Dance for Your Life is a one-night-only event featuring 12-15 dance acts. Solo numbers, duets, trios and/or groups are being accepted at forallhumans.co/danceforyourlife. The first place prize is $200 and a booking at ICON, 8 – 11:30 p.m., Jungle Atlanta, 2115 Faulkner Road N.E., Atlanta, GA 30324, www.facebook. com/events/1507426135966248

UPCOMING THURSDAY, JULY 27 – SATURDAY, JULY 29

Atlanta LGBTQ theater group Out Front Theater Company opens the world premiere of the reboot of “Zanna, Don’t!,” set at Heartsville High, where everyone is gay – well, almost everyone! The students write a controversial show called “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” about straight people in the military, which becomes the catalyst for a young man and woman to fall in love. The show runs tonight through Sunday at 8 p.m., 999 Brady Ave., Atlanta, GA 30318, www.outfronttheatre.com

www.thegeorgiavoice.com


Come join us on July 20th at The Georgian Terrace Hotel for

Georgia Voice’s 2017 Best of Atlanta Awards! We will eat, drink, dance and present the awards to your winners in Atlanta’s LGBT community in Arts & Entertainment, Community, Eats, Nightlife, People, Pet Care, Services and Shopping! FEATURING:

BEATS BY

DJ CALVIN

AWARD CEREMONY HOSTED

BY MELISSA CARTER

COMPLIMENTARY COCKTAILS BY

LITE BITES BY

AND MORE

RSVP ON FACEBOOK NOW, AND WE WILL SEE YOU JULY 20TH! COCKTAILS & FOOD 6-8 P.M. AWARD PRESENTATION 8-8:30 P.M. DANCING 8:30 - 9:30 P.M. AND DON’T FORGET TO VOTE BEFORE THE FINAL ROUND ENDS ON JULY 7TH!


THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID By MELISSA CARTER

Giving back and risking jail time

STORAGE SPECIALS •Free Truck Rental with Move-In •12 Month Price Guarantee •24-Hour Access •Heated & Cooled Units •Security System •Clean, Well-Lit Facility •Loading Dock 726 Ponce de Leon PL NE Atlanta, GA, 30306

404-913-8977

We sell boxes & packing supplies!

1 Month Free First Month Free

New Customers. Select Units. Expires 6/30/2018

25% Off

Boxes & Packing Supplies www.morningstarstorage.com

Offer Never Expires.

It has been a while since I’ve been in a car accident, but it’s what was in my backseat at the time that almost landed me in jail. We recently had a silent auction at work to raise money for a local charity (yes, I am still at Cox Media Group working behind the scenes until my contract is up in August). Tables were erected around the office with random items either donated by a colleague or left behind by listeners or former employees. One such sales manager had just left the department, and a box of random crap he decided not to take from his office was up for grabs. The collection included several things like a classic Hawks hat, a nice binder and a bottle of Tanqueray. Thinking it was funny, and a clever way of clearing out his office, I ended up being the winning bidder, paid my money, put the box in my car and forgot all about it. A few days passed. I picked up my son and was in traffic on 285 in Sandy Springs when I decided to get off at the Glenridge exit. That is when another car started pulling out of the traffic too and all I could see was the back of the driver’s head, meaning he was not looking in my direction and didn’t see me coming in the exit lane. With only seconds to think, knowing we were going to collide and not wanting to hurt or startle my son, I chose to honk, try and make my way around him and put me as the front line of impact. The other car then T-boned me on the driver’s side. Fortunately it was a low-speed impact, my airbag didn’t go off and my son was unphased by the jolt, which of course is the most important detail of all this. I called my baby mama, Katie Jo, to let her know he had been in an accident but was OK, and she chose to come check on us and see his condition for herself. Once she saw all was well, she relaxed and we were making jokes about something when her face went stone cold and she stared at me.

“With only seconds to think, knowing we were going to collide and not wanting to hurt or startle my son, I chose to honk, try and make my way around him and put me as the front line of impact. The other car then T-boned me on the driver’s side.” “What?” I asked her. She responded, ”Is that an open container?” The box from the silent auction was in my back seat, and that is when I realized the bottle of gin had been used and was only half-full. I never paid attention to it and the fact it was an open container, all while cops are all around checking out the accident. I quickly covered the bottle with the Hawks hat before an officer came back to check on me. He must have missed it when he first took my info, distracted by the damage and making sure Mr. Carter was OK. Then Katie Jo had the nerve to ask, “Have you really had something to drink?” “Lord, no.” So much for giving back to my community. Melissa Carter is recognized as one of the first out radio personalities in Atlanta and has been heard over the years on B98.5 and Q100. In addition, she is a writer for the Huffington Post. Follow her on Twitter @MelissaCarter.

30 Columnists July 7, 2017 www.thegeorgiavoice.com


SOMETIMES ‘Y’ By RYAN LEE

The gayborhood has crossed the road After the better part of 14 years, I moved out of Midtown in February, which I consider the official end of the area’s reign as the gayest part of Atlanta. As much as I would like to claim credit, though, the post-gaying of Midtown began at the turn of the century and has accelerated without rest the past decade. The Midtown I moved away from was much different than the gayborhood I discovered during weekend trips to Atlanta while I was attending Auburn. The queens no longer hold court at the gates of Piedmont Park every Sunday evening, the 24-hour gay clubs and their feeder bars are gone from Peachtree Street and it has been five years since Outwrite Bookstore ceased being a de facto community center and concierge, welcoming me and thousands of other LGBT pilgrims looking to learn more about the gay mecca of the South and ourselves. In some ways, the rainbow crosswalks that were permanently installed at the intersection of 10th and Piedmont feel like a headstone for a Midtown that was, rather than a representation of the neighborhood or its future. But rainbows are supposed to offer hope, and the crosswalks make me believe Midtown will continue to be an area where LGBT residents and strangers are convinced that they have a place, and, however lonely it has felt on their journey thus far, they have a people. I was born and raised on Halsted Street on the South Side of Chicago, a street name that many readers may recognize as the main thoroughfare through Boys Town less than 15 miles to the north. I had never heard of Boys Town until moving to Alabama, and visited for the first time during my Christmas break freshman year. I remember seeing permanent rainbow fixtures that bore a city of Chicago seal, and couldn’t believe that I was standing on the same Halsted Street on which I had spent much of my life, and thought that if I had ever stayed on the No. 8 bus that was passing by, I would’ve found a place where my sexual orientation was celebrated instead of shamed; included rather than apart. This was in December 1998, and I know www.thegeorgiavoice.com

“Rainbows are supposed to offer hope, and the crosswalks make me believe Midtown will continue to be an area where LGBT residents and strangers are convinced that they have a place, and, however lonely it has felt on their journey thus far, they have a people.” that Boys Town has lost some of its raging homosexual identity in the two decades since then, as have so many other gayborhoods across the country. Call it karma or secondgeneration gentrification, but there’s a pattern of LGBT folks displacing residents in blighted neighborhoods, only to be replaced by young heterosexual families once the neighborhood becomes fabulous and unaffordable for single people. The triplexes and older studio and one-bedroom apartments that allowed young LGBT people to flock to Midtown in the past have been replaced by single-family homes and condo towers built for the same millennials whom we’ve been told are living en masse in their parents’ basements, a paradox of urban planning that is also occurring nationwide. However, the straight-washing of Midtown doesn’t sting as much as the loss of gayborhoods in other cities might, because LGBT Atlantans have long crossed the road. The metro area is so thoroughly queer that whether you live in Grant Park or Vine City, whether you work in white-collar or retail, whether you’re renewing your driver’s license or grocery shopping, it’s hard to take a few breaths without encountering identifiably LGBT neighbors. All of us should be proud of whatever role we play in creating that Atlanta for residents and strangers. For so many, and now many more, the civic affection we have for our hometown, the moment we knew we belonged here, began near 10th and Piedmont. Ryan Lee is an Atlanta writer. July 7, 2017 Columnists 31


For you. From you.

Unearth your treasure. Archaeological inspirations by Jill Maurer. #YouDeserveIt Fine jewelry, watches and art...

gayest

RE Y STO R L E JEW TOWN IN

Amsterdam Walk + 500 Amsterdam Ave. + Atlanta + 404/892-8294 Decatur Square + 117 East Court Square + Decatur + 404/370-3979 www.worthmorejewelers.com Vote for Worthmore - Best of Atlanta: www.thegavoice.com

Profile for Georgia Voice

07/07/17, Vol. 8 Issue 10  

Pampered Pets Holistic therapy, plus rescue pets, your pet photos and more. In the news: The ‘sterilization’ of Cheshire Bridge Road and mix...

07/07/17, Vol. 8 Issue 10  

Pampered Pets Holistic therapy, plus rescue pets, your pet photos and more. In the news: The ‘sterilization’ of Cheshire Bridge Road and mix...

Profile for gavoice