Page 1

M E X I CO

PUEBLA

GLOBAL ARCHITECTURE

PROFILING

G A P 2016


X

ISBN : 978 0 7340 5306 0 GAP 2016 © THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

GAP COMMITTEE

M E X I CO

Blair Gardiner Alexia Baikie

Brydie Singleton

YoungWook Chang

Charlotte Sudholz

Geoffrey Goerling

Chan Hei Tun

Michael Groppo

Peiyi Wang

Li Hannah

Shelley Wu

Anwyn Hocking

Louis Wyatt

Jonathan Leong

Chantalle Yarrow

Win Zie Lee

Hsin Yeh

Xindi Lu

Daniel Zou

PUEBLA 15th - 29th September, 2016 OPENING NIGHT: 15th September, 7:00pm Andrew Lee King Fun Gallery, Ground floor, Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Students within the Bachelor of Environments degree at the University of Melbourne have been responsible for curating this exhibition. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information and to correctly source attributable content. However, there may be inadvertent and occasional errors or omissions for which we apologise. Necessary editing of translations has taken place in order to clarify content whilst endeavoring to avoid compromising the author’s intention.

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE


CONTENTS

Introduction

03

Foreword

04

Adaptable

07

Arkiza Arquitectos

17

CROMA Arquitectura

25

Dionne Arquitectos

33

Itech Kali

43

MX TAD

51

Proyecto Cafeina

61

RA3 Arquitectura

71

Taller 503

79

Puebla map

88

Acknowledgements

90

GAP 2016. 01.


01:

I N TROD U CTI ON

Global Architecture Profiling (GAP) showcases the work of contemporary and emerging architects in urban locations around the world. The exhibition and accompanying catalogue aim to promote contemporary architecture in cities that are often absent from major architectural publications. Curated by students in the Bachelor of Environments program at the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne, the 2016 exhibition continues the tradition of widening design discourse, which has been realised through previous exhibitions that have showcased: Casablanca, Kingdom of Morocco (2015); Seoul, Republic of Korea (2014); Reykjavik, Iceland (2013); Ljubljana, Slovenia (2012); Santiago de Chile, Chile (2011) and Bangalore, India (2010). In 2016 GAP continues this precedent by presenting contemporary architectural work from the Mexican city of Puebla. Located between Mexico City and Veracruz, Puebla is both architecturally and culturally diverse as a result of its long history. Founded in 1531 at the base of the Popocatépetl volcano by the Spanish, the city boasts a mélange of Renaissance and Classical styles, introduced by the Spanish colonialists, which led to the emergence of the Mexican Baroque. It is for this reason that the historic centre of Puebla carries a UNESCO World Heritage Site classification. Today, Puebla is the fourth largest city in Mexico and is known for its cuisine and prestigious tertiary intuitions, which attract students from across South America. The vibrant history and culture of Puebla are manifest in the architectural works presented in this exhibition. The catalogue includes a selection of the exhibited works and includes interviews with members of each firm, offering an insight into their design process and philosophy. The GAP Committee is sincerely appreciative to the 2016 GAP participators, without whom the exhibition would not have been possible.

“Puebla”, by Russ Bowling (Flickr), available from https://www.flickr.com/photos/robphoto/5552891672/in/album-72157629795133613/ under Creative Commons Attributions 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

GAP 2016. 03.


02:

F OR EWA R D

This catalogue of contemporary architects’ work from the city of Puebla demonstrates the degree to which architecture is now a global system of production. One can recognise much that is common between Puebla and the work of emerging architects in our region in South East Asia, China and Australia. The working through of modernist and current global themes to create an emotive language, utilising vernacular materials is evident in the work of Proyecto Cafeina. This is very much evident in the Tadeo 4904 project which could easily be in the inner suburbs of Melbourne, Sydney or perhaps even Singapore. Directly mentored by the remnants of Archigram, Adaptable Arqitectura establishes a series of projects that explore the possibility of linking design directly to construction and production processes. Itech Kali’s work mediates between issues of context, local construction materials and the traditions of Mexican modernism of Legorreta and Barragán. MX TAD gives us the pleasure of seeing Barragán’s work directly reinterpreted in the most difficult of local contexts in the Prados #2 and the Punta Cascatta project. RA3 Arquitectura’s work also investigates through a modernist lens the handcrafted and labour intensive traditions of Mexican construction. This approach sits alongside an earnest effort to fashion a socially responsible and culturally appropriate architecture. Croma Arquitectura’s Gym Ibero with an expressive form and vibrant colour, also draws on Barragán as well as the work of Bjarke Ingels. In the work of Taller 503, we are witness to a series of refined and delicate houses that could just as easily sit well in the suburban cities of Australia, South East Asia or China. The facade of the Casa Sordo Mudo of 2015 is a delight. Finally, in the work of Dionne Arquitectos we are witness to the results of the collaborative design process which seems to characterise much of the work of contemporary and emerging architects across the globe. It is easy to think that the results of the architects published here in GAP 2016 look like they have much in common with our own conditions of architectural production. Like all emerging architects, the struggle to establish a design practice in a regional or provincial city is always difficult. A shared experience everywhere. The projects published here make the architectural endeavour in Puebla Mexico look easily achieved. But, in fact, these projects are all intensely shaped by their location. There is a struggle in this work. This is a place where, unlike our region, the practice of architecture faces many structural obstacles. For this reason, the emerging architects of Puebla are remarkable because they are far removed from our easy comforts of production.

GAP 2016. 04.

“Puebla, Mexico”, by Russ Bowling (Flickr), available from https://www.flickr.com/photos/robphoto/2832639761/in/album-72157607031453956/ under Creative Commons Attributions 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).


03:

A DA P TA B L E Pr i v a d a d e l C r i s t o 2 2 0 8 , L o ft 6 D, S a n A n d r e s C h o l u l a +52 1 222 2383887 proyectos@adaptablead.com w w w. a d a p t a b l e a d . c o m

GAP 2016. Adaptable Studioplace, Space, stair detail, Puebla, Mexico, Adaptable, Photo © Adaptable Name of project, year, firm, Photo © firm

07.


PROFILE Adaptable was founded in 2008 by Armamdo Reyez Vazquez. Vazquez’ designs are inspired by ARCHIGRAM members, Peter Cook and Dennis Crompton, whose work he encountered during his training at the Bartlett, UCL. Their influence is strongly reflected in the dynamic megastructures Adaptable developed for the Puebla housing exhibition, which speculate on the implications of contemporary technology on the built environment. Adaptable’s recent work has focused on designing public spaces, such as the Puebla Linear Park. Employing an elevated path, this project has allowed for the knitting together of public spaces within the city, reflecting the firm’s commitment to Puebla and its inhabitants.

GAP 2016. 8.

Adaptable Studioplace, Space, Puebla, Photo © Adaptable Name of project, year, firm, Mexico, Photo ©Adaptable, firm


Cultural Civic Center, Puebla, Mexico, Adaptable, Photo © Adaptable


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? Open collaboration and the conscience that every project is unique and at the same time has to play a part in the making of a better quality of life for those who inhabit the city. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/ designer? From an academic point of view, Peter Cook and Dennis Crompton from Archigram were direct influences during my master’s degree at the Bartlett in London. From that point, public space and innovation have been the central focus of my practice. 3: What role does the architect play in society? I concur with many colleagues in their position that architects have to rethink their role as definers of space and move towards enablers for new lifestyles and the contemporary needs of society. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have? Observation, flexible thinking and adaptability. 5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? Puebla is the backdrop and the driver for good decision making and the reference point to balance any design proposal. GAP 2016. 1Linear 2 . Park, Puebla, Mexico, Adaptable, Photo Š Adaptable

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6: What role does the construction and production processes play in design? I think they are one and the same; you cannot design anything without thinking about its materialisation. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? I think the biggest challenge in the years to follow will be the redesign of the role of the architect itself, which will lead to a rethinking of the design process. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.” - Bruce Mau GAP 2016. Civic Center, Puebla, Mexico, Adaptable, Photo © Adaptable 1Cultural 4.

GAP 2016. 15.


04:

A R K I Z A A R Q U I T E C TO S Pu e b l a 7 2 0 0 0 M e x i c o +52 222 680 9865 arkizaarquitectos@gmail.com https://facebook.com/Arkiza-Architectos

GAP 2016. Casa Zago, Puebla, Mexico, 2012, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo © Arkiza Arquitectos

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PROFILE Run by Jacqueline Zago; Arkiza Arquitectos is committed to providing green solutions to renovations and new homes with a focus on minimal, elegant design. Through attention to detail, the team seek to create spacious, light filled residential and commercial spaces incorporating passive design.

GAP 2016. 18.

Terraza, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo Š Arkiza Arquitectos


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? Casa Zago northwest kitchen section, Puebla, Mexico, 2012, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo © Arkiza Arquitectos

It is based on minimalist architecture; simple but elegant with the care of each detail. The organisation of my buildings is based on geometric frames with clear lines and volume management. Mostly my buildings are white with high transparency to create feelings of spaciousness and openness, while managing natural light to create sensations of light and shadow. Garden design and free areas are also other important points to provide quality of life for inhabitants. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/ designer?

Casa Zago northeast section, Puebla, Mexico, 2012, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo © Arkiza Arquitectos

Influences arrive every day, we live in a world that is moving faster and faster where styles and trends do not stay for a long time. We’re looking for something more innovative in our lifestyle, the design itself has to adapt to these needs. In my training as an architect, I had an exceptional teacher and my learning was highly critical. Perhaps this was one of the most important episodes in my training as an architect. 3: What role does the architect play in society? The architect has the ability to transform the environment to operate in the kindest way everything we inhabit. We can sort and distribute thowardsspaces so that each of them meets the function for which it was intended. The architect has been formed to cover the different areas involved in the process of design and construction of buildings for habitat and performing human activities, commercial, cultural, educational, health, tertiary, leisure or those related to transport infrastructure buildings. The architect is able to improve the quality of life of a community or a country.

Casa Zago northwest living room section, Puebla, Mexico, 2012, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo © Arkiza Arquitectos

4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have? Ability to perceive, conceive and manage space in three dimensions and on different scales. Creativity, observation, capacity for graphic, oral and written communication.

GAP 2016. 20.

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5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? The city of Puebla plays a paramount role. We have to adjust the design of natural conditions, historical and heritage values, determining legal requirements and regulations, social organisation, mobility, land use, population density, equipment, infrastructure networks and street furniture, but always looking for a distinctive image within context. 6: What role does the construction and production processes play in design? They play an important role when designing, we always think about building systems best suited to create the shape and appearance we want. No structure can be conceived without knowing how to build. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? We live on a planet that has less and less to offer, in a time of more and more people - many still unborn - who will want more and more things. Without losing sight that we are in a period of climate change. So some of the challenges lie in not only reducing energy use but also cleaner energy options. Our buildings should not only use less energy but should produce zero carbon and zero waste. Some questions arise: how should new cities be developed? What do we do with our current cities? How to adapt to new environmental challenges? How does one deal with existing requirements and respond to future changes? 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Elegance and style have nothing to do with money.” - Caroline Herrera. I apply this quotation to architecture. GAP 2016. Casa Zago, Puebla, Mexico, 2012, Arkiza Arquitectos, Photo © Arkiza Arquitectos

23.


05:

CROMA ARQUITECTURA Hacienda La Gavia # 4, Geovillas Hacienda, San Andrés Cholula, Pu e b l a . M e x i c o . +52 222 246 6686 proyectos@cromaarquitectura.mx w w w. c r o m a a r q u i t e c t u r a . m x

GAP 2016. Gym Ibero, San Andrés Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Croma Arquitectura, Photo © Croma Arquitectura

25.


PROFILE Titled after the Greek word for colour, Croma utilises the concept of three primary colours as the basis for the development of the firm’s core design manifesto, centred upon the human, the site and the environment. Inspired by the Mexican architect Luis Barragan as well as Bjarke Ingels Group and Le Corbusier, Croma undertakes projects in architecture and interior design as well as urban planning. Through the physical application of light and colour as well as the history of the city, Croma imbues a sensitivity of the importance of architecture upon the further cultural re-development of Puebla.

GAP 2016. 26.

GAP 2016. FFCC2306 Terrace, Atlixco, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Croma Arquitectura, Photo Š Croma Arquitectura

27.


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? Our architecture is defined by application of three essential design axis: 1 The human axis (space shaped by user needs) 2 The territorial axis (context circumstances enrich designed space) 3 The environmental axis (the use and optimisation of resources to reduce environmental damage) These three axis combined let us achieve the desired architectural result. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? Mexican architect, Luis Barragán has been an influence for us for a long time, we also admire Danish architect Bjarke Ingels work. The main drivers for us as architects are the use of colour and light, the application of textures, and the game of volumes. 3: What role does the architect play in society? The architect has always played one of the most important roles in society because architecture defines the development of civilizations and in consequence, culture itself. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have?

Gym Ibero, San Andrés Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Croma Arquitectura, Photo © Croma Arquitectura

GAP 2016.

28.

There are many skills that as architects we have to have for achieving our goals, but definitely we consider that architects must: • Be responsible, we have to always remember that we have a deep compromise with society and the environment, so we must choose wisely before any act, design, proposition, because all our decisions have consequences. • Be sensible to understand user’s needs and achieve the best architectural result. • Know how to communicate and express our ideas.

GAP 2016. 29.


5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? Puebla city is and will always play a very important role in our design process. Our professional development started here; our work is constructed here and each time we start a new project we look back again to history, characteristics, materials and experiences we’ve been through in our city. Puebla is our first analogue case. 6. What role does the construction and production processes play in design? Gym Ibero, San Andrés Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Croma Arquitectura, Photo © Croma Arquitectura

Both have a close relationship with design. Together they have to be seen as an integrated, complex system leading us to the definition of each new project. Many times they define the way we resolve design, so we can’t leave them separated. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? We think that optimisation of every resource (environmental, economic, human, etc.) would be the most significant challenge to manage. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Architecture is the learned game, correct and magnificent, of forms assembled in the light.”- Le Corbusier

GAP 2016. 30.

GAP 2016. 31.


06:

D I O N N E A R Q U I T E C TO S 4 1 Po n i e n t e 2 1 2 0 – 2 0 , L a N o r i a 7 2 4 1 0 Pu e b l a , Pu e . , M e x i c o +52 222 404 9431 proyectos@dionnearquitectos.com w w w. d i o n n e a r q u i t e c t o s . c o m

GAP 2016. 8A House, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Dionne Arquitectos, Photo © Dionne Arquitectos

33.


PROFILE

Named after the founding partner, Fred Dionne Espinosa, Dionne Arquitectos formalised their practice following the completion of their first project in 2005. Over this time the practice has curated an attention to detail as a result of their collaborative explorations of light, texture and materiality. Inspired by the collective responsibility to engage within environmental, social and cultural progress, Dionne Arquitectos translate their design philosophies into residential, commercial and landscape architectural language committed to promoting transformative experiences.

GAP 2016. 34.

SA House, Puebla, Mexico 2013, Dionne Arquitectos, Photo Š Dionne Arquitectos


San Antonio, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Dionne Arquitectos, Photo © Dionne Arquitectos


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? Our architecture is defined as an intuitive exploration complemented with a collaborative design methodology, always focused on attention to detail. We are dedicated to exploring the blend of light, the use of clean shapes, textures and materials. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? We are eager to always work the best way possible and enjoying what we do at all times, teamwork and collaboration with different people have always influenced our way of working. 3: What role does the architect play in society? The architect is a necessary element for the society, nowadays most things and moments of our lives need to be designed and thought out. Architecture must be committed to promoting new and better ways of living. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have? The ability to understand and bring together the needs of clients and user requirements, all being composed in an aesthetic and timeless combination, which speaks for itself and correctly responds to its environment. 5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? Currently, Puebla has a growth spurt that is leading us to a moment of densification; it is necessary to design projects that have a positive influence in society, in the urban context and architectural design. We must try to strengthen urban dynamics without losing the human scale and raise awareness about the environment when doing any project. GAP 2016. 3San 8 .Antonio, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Dionne Arquitectos, Photo Š Dionne Arquitectos

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6. What role does the construction and production processes play in design? They are the key to materialise our ideas, so it is always important to bring them to the design process, always trying to take them to the next level. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? Architects should be able to develop designs with new technologies and self-sustaining techniques as part of the design process. Working at all times with a local/global vision. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “You employ stone, wood and concrete, and with these materials, you build houses and palaces. That is construction… But suddenly you touch my heart… That is Architecture.” - Le Corbusier GAP 2016. San Antonio, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Dionne Arquitectos, Photo © Dionne Arquitectos

41.


07:

ITECH KALI Pa s e o s d e S a n A n d r é s 7 2 1 9 7 M e x i c o +52 1 222 148 6976 Itech.Kali@gmail.com w w w. i t e c h - k a l i . c o m

GAP 2016. Casa Cuayantla, San Andres Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Itech Kali, Photo © Itech Kali

43.


PROFILE

Under the direction of Arturo Antonio JuĂĄrez Robles since 2007, Itech Kali has been committed to creating innovative designs, highly contextualised and dedicated to users. Through a design process focused on construction and inspired by modernism, they aim to create functional, aesthetic and sustainable homes.

GAP 2016. 44.

Casa 10, San Angel, Mexico City, Mexico, n.d, Itech Kali, Photo Š Itech Kali


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? At Itech Kali we are committed to the creation of innovative architectural projects contextualised with each place and user. In addition, our work integrates design and construction, which lets us create functional, aesthetic, sustainable and highly valued creations. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? Our principal influences for the design at Itech Kali is modernism and all the innovations that come with it, but at the same time, our identity is based on the ancient architecture of the region with all its different materials, colours and textures. The fusion of those two very different concepts make us what we are; it is because of these reasons that we could label our work as postmodern architecture. 3: What role does the architect play in society? The architect or designer in modern society plays a fundamental roll of humaniser of technique. Architects are the intermediary between the cold part of function and the warmth of the emotions, bringing a quality of life to the people that interact with them. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have? The capacity of formal synthesis, for spaces that will be in contact with the environment that surrounds us. 5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? The context is fundamental to our design process; Puebla is our home and a place of enormous heritage. It is important for us rescuing all of that culture with its style and construction techniques, but interpreting it in a contemporary way. GAP 2016. 4Casa 6 . Cuayantla, San Andres Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d, Itech Kali, Photo Š Itech Kali

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6: What role does the construction and production processes play in design? The construction and production of materials must be an integral part of every design. You have to know the properties of the forms that you project. Also, the materials with which you are building so you can take advantage of material properties in projects, while taking aesthetics and efficiency into account. It is like the artist becoming one with material and technique. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? In the context we live, architectural design must change the paradigm that its only purpose is to make beautiful constructions. It also has to work to integrate the importance of reducing environmental impact, increasing the quality of life and making it possible for most of the population to have access to it. 8: What is your favourite quotation? Casa Cuayantla, San Andres Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, n.d Itech Kali, Photo © Itech Kali

GAP 2016. 48.

“Success is not the key to happiness; happiness is the key of success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.” - Albert Schweitzer GAP 2016. 49.


08:

M X TA D U n i ó n S u r 1 6 , S t a . C r u z G u a d a l u p e , Pu e b l a , 7 2 1 7 0 , M e x i c o +52 222 221 2338 hola@tallerad.mx w w w. t a l l e r a d . m x

GAP 2016. NameFraile, Casa of project, Puebla, place, Mexico, year,2014, firm, Photo MX TAD, © firm Photo © MX TAD

51.


PROFILE In 2012 after studying within the city of Puebla, founding partners Fernanda Miranda, Mauricio Romero, Monir Jiménez, and Adolfo Meneses formed MX TAD (Taller de Arquitectura & Diseño), through a united design discourse aimed at creating a simpler, analytical architecture underpinned by the functional needs of the day-to-day user. Serving as the inspirational basis for new projects, Puebla also allowed MX TAD to evolve into a collaborative design workshop, expanding into branding and graphic design, web development, interior design and commerce, as well as public, educational and urban design. Ensuring to always keep an ethos of quality, honesty and responsibility at the forefront of their creations, MX TAD aims to further the benchmark of Mexican design.

GAP 2016. 52.

Prados #2, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD


Casa Fraile, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD


INTERVIEW

Prados #2, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD

1: What defines your architecture? Integral architecture: we analyse every aspect of the project, the users and the surroundings, and reflect them into simple, functional architecture. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? Luis Barragan’s architecture and his understanding of space, the drive to transform space in a unique, livable way. Punta Cascatta, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD

3: What role does the architect play in society? The architect has the power to influence in ways that few people imagine, they can transform habits, moods, even lives. They serve as a mediator between people and their activities; they are in charge of space-human synchrony. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have? The perfect blend of creativity and analysis focused on space and its interaction with people. 5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process?

Punta Cascatta, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD

GAP 2016. 56.

All MX TAD partners studied architecture in Puebla, during which the city had a great growth, it has been a recurring case study. The city serves as the basis for new projects. Exploring Puebla has become a persistant exercise, searching for better, simpler architecture. GAP 2016.

57.


6: What role does the construction and production processes play in design? Construction methods are key to any architectural design. In an inclusive architecture, knowledge of these methods defines the project, optimises it and makes your performance and function easier. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? Generic architecture. Today, architects are increasingly developing architecture designed for anyone and everyone, whereas what we should be developing is analytic architecture, focused on the user and their needs. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Make it simple, make it memorable.” - Leo Burnett. GAP 2016. Prados #2, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, MX TAD, Photo © MX TAD

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09:

P R OY E C TO C A F E I N A A v 1 7 O t e , E l C a r m e n , 7 2 5 3 0 Pu e b l a , Pu e . , M e x i c o +52 1 222 242 2283 info@proyectocafeina.com w w w. p r o y e c t o c a f e i n a . c o m

Sol 25, San Pedro Cholula, Puebla, México, 2014, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo © Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.

GAP 2016. 61.


PROFILE

Since 2007, the team at Proyecto Cafeina have strived to create architecture that provokes an emotional experience through a dedication to quality, a focus on sustainability and consideration for their social responsibility as modifiers of the built environment. The team find inspiration in the everyday life of Puebla – the textures, colours and geometries, allowing for designs to tie into the culture and landscape of the city. Through focusing on construction early in the process, the team use material and construction processes as design parameters, enabling more fulfilling, contextual designs.

GAP 2016. 62.

Sol 25, San Pedro Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo Š Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.


SPA TosepanKali, Cuetzalan del progresso, Puebla, Mexico, 2011, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo Š Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.


INTERVIEW

1: What defines your architecture? SPA TosepanKali, Cuetzalan del progresso, Puebla, Mexico, 2011, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo © Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.

The main goal of Proyecto Cafeina is to inspire with authentic and inclusive spaces, shape the landscape and provoke intense emotions. Our intention is not only to produce expressive, interesting and functional architecture, but to create a full experience for our users. 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? Every day is a great experience for an architect. You are exposed to many stimuli: colours, textures, smells, geometries, flavours, etc. Travelling has been the best influence for me because it makes these stimuli even more meaningful, new and exciting. Walking around a city while receiving and processing the external environment has determined most of what I do as an architect. 3: What role does the architect play in society?

Tadeo 4909, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo © Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.

We are responsible for the creation of the places where human lives take place. Most of the important events of our lives occur inside, around or next to a certain building, park or street. These have immense and complex implications; I will just focus on a couple of factors. We modify the landscape with our creations, so in a very specific way we are responsible for the built landscape and how we modify the unbuilt landscape. We can create spaces that act as a catalyst for social space connection and collaboration or spaces that create segregation and conflict. We can create spaces that generate a rich experience for the users or create cold unexpressive and depressive areas. Of course, we are part of a system, but we can really make a difference in society. These are just a few examples. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have?

Sol 25, San Pedro Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, 2014, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo © Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.

GAP 2016. 66.

An architect must have sensitivity and intelligence to integrate complex systems and elements related to one project like the context, weather, users needs, materials, culture, tectonics, program, aesthetics, function, engineering and budget. All of this produces a work of art that you can live in. GAP 2016. 67.


5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? The context is a crucial factor for the design of any project. I strongly believe in site specificity, emphasising the local elements to reify the identity of the space. Understanding the local culture, materials and environment. Puebla, my hometown, is a city rich in culture, gastronomy and architecture. Walking around the city is a really attractive experience for all of the senses. I am exposed to contrasting textures, colours, geometry and depth. Contrast is the only way to understand diversity, the components of depth and understanding. The city is a valley surrounded by mountains which allow stunning views that I enjoy. I try to design projects in a way that others can experience this beauty. 6. What role does the construction and production processes play in design? It is crucial to understand how the project is to be built from the initial process of conception. Never as a limitation. Understanding the production processes means you understand the context, local materials and labour. Materiality is essential to architecture. I believe in unveiling the nature of the elements, exacerbating its imperfections and differences 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? Mass production in architecture is a challenge that must become mass customisation. Technology should become an ally to create architecture that can be less generic, more human, sustainable and adapted to the user’s needs. Able to change and evolve as the user’s change and evolve. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Among the planets of the arts, architecture is the dark side of the moon.” - Bruno Zevi Tadeo 4909, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, Proyecto Cafeina in collaboration with Leonardo Neve and Diego Vilatela, Photo © Leonardo Neve and Patrick Lopez Jaimes.

GAP 2016. 69.


10:

RA3 ARQUITECTURA A v. J u a r e z 1 , L a Pa z , Pu e b l a 7 2 1 6 0 M e x i c o +52 (222) 249 03 75 ra3.arq@gmail.com https://ra3arquitectura.com

GAP 2016. Casamentos, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, RA3 Arquitectura, Photo © RA3 Arquitectura

71.


PROFILE

Founded in 2013, RA3 Arquitectura reflects deeply upon the social and cultural responsibilities of design in order to generate creative responses that ensure an appropriate addition to Puebla. Engaged within both residential and commercial building realms, RA3 is consistently influenced by the hand-craft evident in traditional Mexican construction processes. Additionally, the works of RA3 speak of creating space in an awareness of inhabitant’s lives prior to the architectural process, generating designs informed by furniture.

GAP 2016. 72.

Estancia Para 2, Puebla, Mexico, 2013, RA3 Arquitectura, Photo Š RA3 Arquitectura


INTERVIEW 1: What defines your architecture? Clients, site and our knowledge are what defines our projects. We can go as far as our clients let us do, the trust we get from them is essentially in what we plan and what we design. Site, is the space where each project is born and becomes unique, a part of the universe which cannot be repeated or copied in essence. Our knowledge and practice are what let us exploit site and client for a greater goal, a space that people will inhabit; it is what makes us think faster and be prepared for any project . 2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/designer? When we decided to open our firm (RA3 Arquitectura) in 2013, we looked at other options and firms to work in, but sadly, Puebla is a place where there are not many opportunities as an Architect Junior, so we had to leave and search in another city. We think architecture and practice must be part of any community, an essential element of the rebirth of the city. So, we decided to be in the city, to be part of it. Our name, RA3 means Ra! Ra! Ra! which is a kind of cheering up to people and organisations to do its best. 3: What role does the architect play in society? It plays two roles. First, the most important, and the most insignificant the greater the role an architect thinks he/she plays the greater effort and responsibility assume in his/her projects. Secondly, as a citizen, the architect is just a tiny part of this body named ‘city’, his/ her role consists of understanding necessities and involving people in solutions. 4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have?

Estancia Para 2 (sketches), Puebla, Mexico, 2013, RA3 Arquitectura, Photo © RA3 Arquitectura

GAP 2016. 74.

Cingo (sketches), Puebla, Mexico, Arquitectura, Photo © RA3 Arquitectura

RA3

Great space understanding, representation of abstract ideas, and a sense of belonging. First of all, if as an architect you still don’t understand space as a fourth dimension canvas, then it is extremely difficult to do something complete, relevant or integral. Then, if there is a huge idea in someone’s mind, but he/she is unable to communicate it, then it is just a great imagination. Architecture and innovation must be communicated, to empower people, and let other complementary ideas develop and improve them. GAP 2016. 75.


5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? It is our canvas. In every project, we plan or design in Puebla we cannot ignore significant data. Puebla is the Mexican city with the poorest people and is also the second city with the highest Gini Index (inequality measure). When we design, we like that architecture is honest, not ornamental or of luxury, but responsible to make others admire it and be part of it, understand it as a public space, but maybe in private land. 6. What role does the construction and production processes play in design? If Puebla plays the main role in our design process because of its social inequality, another factor we consider is the construction process. In Puebla, most of the construction process is handcrafted, by people, we know, and we care about, builders and workers who get their rewards with their hands. So, we like to do simple forms, which can be built with simple methods. We also accept people make errors and therefore let projects speaks the language of their builders. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design? We firmly believe that architecture is transforming itself, into something we don’t know yet, but it is something with a more social approach and more about a communication of ideas. In the future maybe architecture could be 3D printed, without a geographical attachment or site understanding. We think architects in the future will be dealing more with informing clients, people, and general society, about spaces, life quality, and interaction nearer with cities and neighbourhoods. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “Circunstacias previstas e imprevistas. Naturales como proximidad, y el pensamiento como distancia. La distancia entonces hace repensar el placer del tiempo, del proyecto y de su proceso.” - Carlos Jiménez

Casamentos, Puebla, Mexico, 2015, RA3 Arquitectura, Photo © RA3 Arquitectura

GAP 2016. 76.

“Previewed and no previewed circumstances. Natural ones as proximity, and thoughts as distance. The distance then, makes rethinking the pleasure of time, of the project and of its process.” GAP 2016.

77.


11:

TA L L E R 5 0 3 3 1 2 AV J u a r e z , c o l L a Pa z , Pu e b l a (+52) 222 132 1731 info@taller503.com w w w. t a l l e r 5 0 3 . c o m

GAP 2016. Loft tropi interior, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

79.


PROFILE

A small interdisciplinary team founded in 2012; Taller503 is characterised by their commitment to locally sourcing all project construction materials to ensure economic and environmental sustainability. Dedicated to working towards bridging the disparity of wealth evident in the country, Taller503 are interested in how the future of computational technology including robotics and 3D printing will enhance the construction process. Operating within commercial and residential sectors, founding partners, Rafael Ojeda Núñez and Brice Turlais, have realised their dream of generating, as well as influencing thoughtful, inclusive architecture.

GAP 2016. 80.

Loft tropi patio, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503


GAP 2016.

0Loft 1 .tropi, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

GAP 2016.

83.


INTERVIEW

Casa Sordo Mudo, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

1: What defines your architecture? For us, the first step of an architectural project is the human relationship with our client or the user. We first listen, in order to encounter the challenges of each project and as architects, we search for the best response; it may be using the site, cultural context, etc. Another point is that our work uses local material; in Mexico, we cannot import material from the US. It is also not sustainable in economic or environmental terms. Instead, we seek durability with the simplest constructive solutions available. These two fundamental principles define the final results of our architecture. Casa Sordo Mudo facade, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

2: What have been the major influences and drivers on you as an architect/ designer? No one ideology rules our work; in this sense, we do not have a dogmatic approach towards architecture, but rather a vision of space experimentation. We understand this as a possible guide that we may use, depending on the project. The major drivers for us are the life experience, anecdotes and will of our interlocutor in each project, and then turning it in the most surprising way. 3: What role does the architect play in society?

Consultario M interior, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

GAP 2016. 84.

In a country like Mexico with little public competition, we largely work for people of the upper classes in society. However, one of our roles is to dissuade the separation between the different social classes in society. We have to think and produce inclusive architecture.

GAP 2016. 85.


4: What are the most important skills for an architect to have?

Consultario M sketch, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

An architect is a problem solver; they resolve conflicts in the construction of a new building, as well as conflicts between engineering and architecture, as well as on the construction site. Each specialist has their solutions, but the architect is the only person with the big picture in mind. So the most important skill for an architect is the capacity to listen and analyse quickly, to give the best response possible for the client and the building. 5: What role does the city of Puebla play in your design process? As previously explained, the city of Puebla is important as the source of building material and construction methods. Beyond that, its significance varies with each project. 6: What role does the construction and production processes play in design? It is important to define the construction process as quickly as possible in the design, as it can be the centre of an architectural project. The construction method is a recurrent question in our work. 7: What challenges do you see in the future of architectural design?

Casa Sordo Mudo sketch, Veracruz, Mexico, 2015, Taller503, Photo © Taller503

We see an increasing gap between the workshop and construction site. In the workshop, we have the tools to produce complete and complex information, but it does not translate to the construction site. One of the most exciting challenges in the future is to take revolutionary new technologies such as BIM, robots, 3D printing out of the laboratories and the workshop and bring them to the construction site. It is the final pass of the numeric revolution in the construction industry. 8: What is your favourite quotation? “You can put down a bad book; you can avoid listening to bad music, but you cannot miss the ugly tower block opposite your house.” – Renzo Piano

GAP 2016. 86.

GAP 2016. 87.


12

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3 15

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5

4

14 9

13

SELECTED BUILT WORKS Located within Puebla

17

8 7

6

16

MX TAD 8. Casa Fraile, Avenida del Sol #2509. Concepción la Cruz. Puebla, Pue. CP 72197 Proyecto Cafeina 9. Prados #2, Privada 11 Sur 4901, Prados Agua Azul. 1. Tadeo 4909, San Judas Tadeo, Santa Cruz Buenavis- Puebla, Pue. CP 72430 ta Sur, 72170 Santa Cruz Buenavista, Pue., Mexico 10. Punta Cascatta, Corporativo Angelópolis. Paseo Ópera #2, Town Center Sonata. San Andrés Cholula, Adapatable Architecteros Puebla. CP 72830 2. Adaptable Studio, Privada del Cristo 2208 , Loft 6D, San Andrés Cholula, México RA3 Arquitectos 3. Cultural Civic Centre, Calzada de los Fuertes S/N, 11. Casamentos, Avenida Cipreses 1804, Interior 5, Rincón del Bosque, 72290 Puebla, Pue., Mexico Col. Barreal, Puebla 4. Eco Park Centre, Calle 24 Sur S/N, Azcarate, 72501 12. Estincia Para 2, Retorno Caoba 14, Fracc. CipresPuebla, Pue., Mexico es, Puebla 13. Cingo, Calle Constitución 1205, Tlaxcalancingo Arkiza Arquitectos 5. Casa Zago, 7 Sur 80B Chipilo de Francisco Javier Croma Mina, Puebla Mexico. C.P 74325 14. Gym Ibero, Blvd. Del Niño Poblano 2901, Reserva Territorial Atlixcáyotl, 72810 San Andrés Cholula, Itech Kali PUE, Mexico 6. Cuavantla House, Recta a Cuayantla #12, San Bernardino Tlaxcalancingo Dionne Arquitectos 7. Casa 10, Calle San Baraquiel #25 Residencial San 15. 8A House, Puebla Angel, San Andrés Cholula, Puebla. 16. SA House, Puebla 17. San Antonio, Puebla

Located Outside Puebla Proyecto Cafeina A. SPA TosepanKali, Carretera Federal Libre Cuetzalan-San Miguel Km 1.5, Nahuiogpan, 73560 Cuetzalan del Progreso, Pue., Mexico B. Sol 25, Sta Cruz Buenavista72170 Puebla, Pue. Mexico Croma D. FFCC2306, #2306 Blvd. Ferrocarriles, Atlixco Taller 503 E. Loft Tropi, Veracruz F. Casa Sordo Mudo, Veracruz G. Consultario, Veracruz

A

B

C

D

E

F


09:

AC K N OW L ED G EM EN TS

The GAP 2016 Committee wish to express our warmest thanks to the participating firms – Adaptable, Arkiza Arquitectos, CROMA Arquitectura, Dionne Arquitectos, Itech Kali, MX TAD, Proyecto Cafeina, RA3 Arquitectura and Taller503 without whom our exhibition and catalogue would not have been possible.

CO N T R I B U TO R S

We are grateful to David J Aarons - the Victorian Honorary Consul of Mexico and Andrew Hutson – Deputy Dean, for opening the exhibition.

INTRODUCTION Content: Global Architecture Profiling Image: Russ Bowling (Flickr)

The University of Melbourne’s Events & Exhibitions, Engagement & Marketing, and Facilities & Finance departments have been a significant support and we wish to extend our thanks for their invaluable assistance in facilitating this endeavour. In particular, we must mention Jasmine Budisa and Phillippa Knack for their help in organising the logistics of the exhibition.

FOREWARD Content: Dr. Peter Raisbeck Image: Russ Bowling (Flickr) PROYECTO CAFEINA Content: Proyecto Cafeina Images: Supplied by Leonardo Neve Sanchez ADAPTABLE Content: Adaptable Arquitectura Images: Supplied by Armando Reyes Vázquez ARKIZA ARQUITECTOS Content: Arkiza Arquitectos Images: Supplied by Jacqueline Zago Hurtado ITECH KALI Content: Itech Kali Images: Supplied by Arturo Antonio Juárez Robles

GAP 2016. 90.

MX TAD Content: MX TAD Images: Supplied by Adolfo Meneses Soria RA3 ARQUITECTURA Content: RA3 Arquitectura Images: Daniel Savedra Olivo CROMA ARQUITECTURA Content: Croma Arquitectura Images: Rodrigo Martinez Campos

Associate Professor Andrew Hutson - Deputy Dean and Associate Professor Alan March also deserve our sincere gratitude for their support of the GAP student initiative. Finally, we wish to acknowledge and thank The University of Melbourne Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning academic and founder of GAP, Blair Gardiner for his guidance, patience and support in fostering this project. By being part of the GAP 2016 Committee, each of us has been afforded the opportunity to broaden our architectural experience through curating the GAP 2016 – Puebla Exhibition.

TALLER 503 Content: Taller 503 Images: Supplied by Rafael Ojeda Núñez DIONNE ARQUITECTOS Content: Dionne Arquitectos Images: Francisco Baxin

GAP 2016. 91.


Profile for Global Architecture Profiling

GAP 2016 Digital Catalogue - Puebla, Mexico  

As part of the Global Architecture Profiling (GAP) series 2015, from the 15th September until 29th September 2015, the seventh annual GAP ex...

GAP 2016 Digital Catalogue - Puebla, Mexico  

As part of the Global Architecture Profiling (GAP) series 2015, from the 15th September until 29th September 2015, the seventh annual GAP ex...

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