Issuu on Google+

GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:05 AM

Page 1

ACT ION

THE JOURNAL OF THE GEORGIA DENTAL ASSOCIATION

JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:06 AM

Page 2


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:06 AM

Page 3

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 6 • JUNE 2013

ACTION

on the cover

ACT ION

THE JOURNAL OF THE GEORGIA DENTAL ASSOCIATION

GDA ACTION (ISSN 0273-5989) The official publication of the Georgia Dental Association (GDA) is published monthly. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDA Action at 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Road N.E., Suite 200, Building 17, Atlanta, GA 30328. Phone numbers in state are (404) 636-7553 and (800) 432-4357. www.gadental.org. Closing date for copy: first of the month preceding publication month. Subscriptions: $17 of membership dues is for the newsletter; all others, $75 per year. Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, GA. Dr. David Bradberry GDA Editor 1070 Woodlawn Dr NE Suite 250 Marietta, GA 30068

Delaine Hall GDA Managing Editor 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd NE Suite 200, Building 17 Atlanta, GA 30328

2012-13 Georgia Dental Association Officers Sidney R. Tourial, DDS, President Marshall H. Mann, DDS, President Elect Douglas B. Torbush, DDS, Vice President James B. Hall III, DDS, Secretary / Treasurer R. David Bradberry, DMD, Editor

GDA/GDIS Executive Office Staff Members Martha S. Phillips, Executive Director Nelda Greene, MBA, Associate Executive Director Delaine Hall, Director of Communications Skip Jones, Director of Marketing (GDIS) Courtney Layfield, Director of Member Services Victoria LeMaire, Medical Accounts Manager Judy Lively, Administrative Assistant (PT) Melana Kopman McClatchey, General Counsel Denis Mucha, Director of Operations (GDIS) Margo Null, Property and Casualty Accounts Manager Meg Robinson, Director of Governmental Affairs Patrice Williams, Administrative Assistant Phyllis Willich, Administrative Assistant Pamela Yungk, Director of Membership & Finance

JUNE 2013

House Bill 132, the GDA’s priority legislation this year that passed the House and Senate and was signed by Governor Nathan Deal in June, moves the Georgia Boards of Dentistry and Pharmacy from the Secretary of State’s Professional Licensing Division to the Department of Community Health. Read the article on page 24 that discusses what the dental board’s move means for Georgia dentists and patients and how the licensure renewal process will be affected this year.

other features

sections

10

4

Parting Shots

5

Editorial

6

News and Views

8

Calendar of Events

28

Classifieds

34

Minutes: Board of Trustees

13

18

ADA Launches Action Plan to Address Access to Care Issues Departing GRU Dental Dean Connie Drisko Discusses the State of Dental Education Register for the GDA Annual Meeting Held in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

GDA Action seeks to be an issues-driven journal focusing on current matters affecting Georgia dentists, patients, and their treatment, accomplished through disseminating information and providing a forum for member commentary. © Copyright 2013 by the Georgia Dental Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. Publication of any article or advertisement should not be deemed an endorsement of the opinions expressed or products advertised. The Association expressly reserves the right to refuse publication of any article, photograph, or advertisement.

Member Publication American Association of Dental Editors

index of advertisers Note: Publication of an advertisement is not to be construed as an endorsement or approval by the GDA or any of its subsidiaries, committees, or task forces of the product or service offered in the American Academy of Facial Esthetics . . . . . . .9 Atlanta Age Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 AFTCO Transition Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Atlanta Dental Imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Center for TMJ Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Craniofacial Pain Center of Georgia . . . . . . . .29 Dental Care Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 5th Avenue Acquisitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 GDA Dental Recovery Network . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

advertisement unless the advertisement specifically includes an authorized statement that such approval or endorsement has been granted.

Georgia Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry . . . .11 Georgia Dental Insurance Services . . . . . . . . .36 Georgia Denture & Implant Specialists . . . . . .14 Great Expressions Dental Centers . . . . . . . . . .31 Heartland Dental Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Hospital Dentistry—Dr. Kurtzman . . . . . . . . . .27 Law Office of Stuart J. Oberman . . . . . . . . . . .12 National Practice Transitions, LLC . . . . . . . . . .30 Dr. Mark Padolsky—TMD Dentist . . . . . . . . . .31

Paragon Dental Practice Transitions . . . . . . . .33 PNC Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Professional Practice Management . . . . . . . . .29 Robert Rutrick, DMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 The Shaul Law Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Southeast Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 UBS Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

4

1/12/04

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

10:06 AM

Page 4


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:06 AM

Page 5

editorial perspective Welcome New Graduates

R. David Bradberry, DMD

All across the country, new dentists are graduating and preparing for boards. They are planning additional study, beginning military service, joining a practice, and launching solo careers. For the last year (can you believe it?) I have talked about the notion of the “perfect storm” whirling around our esteemed profession. I know from talking to many practicing dentists that you are thinking about the issues I have raised. Our new dentists are now facing those winds with us head on. What can we tell them about the progress we are making to prepare dentistry’s ship? I hope that you contribute regularly to a dental education scholarship fund, such as the Emile T. Fisher Foundation for Dental Education in Georgia. The generations training to come after us in the profession are facing a debt storm. I am privileged to give back and educate these fine students in a small way and the amounts of dollars I’ve heard them discuss seem unimaginable. I hear about loans of $150,000 and $200,000, and even ones north of $500,000. These students are borrowing on 20 and 30-year notes and their costs go up every semester. The pressure to repay debt this high is tremendous and will affect every practice decision that new dentists make. A dentist must produce sufficiently to satisfy their debt burden and starting a small practice slowly is simply not an option. In a free market vacuums are filled quickly by innovators. Such is the advent of corporation-based models of dentistry. They have simply responded to economic needs of patients and young practitioners and are picking up patients and new graduates alike in their wake. Are we talking to colleagues who are just starting out about the importance of attending GDA meetings and study club events? Are we communicating with them about the importance of practicing the way they were taught and want to care for patients, and not simply looking the bottom line as their top goal? Meanwhile, practice costs are at an all time high, and the increases continue. When was the last time you bought a supply say a month apart and did not pay at least slightly more on the second purchase? Are we finding ways to buy wisely? Are we talking to our younger colleagues about ways they can utilize GDA and ADA dis-

counts? Are we communicating with the GDA and ADA about ways we have found to save money and encouraging them to consider new, innovative endorsements? New and established dentists are all feeling the ever-increasing pressure of regulations. I’ve run through the letters of this governmental nightmare alphabet before. This arm of the storm is expanding daily. I now have employees who spend hours complying with regulations, and large notebooks filled with material safety data sheets and instructions on safety and privacy. My computers are secured, backed up, and encrypted to keep the wrong people out and the right in—or maybe it is the other way around. I have more passwords than all my limbs, fingers, and toes combined. I have resorted to using an “app” to keep up with them all, and now mSecure is the software I use most. The ADA is doing its best to counter the regulations thundering down from Capitol Hill—I have seen staff and volunteer dentists in action during the Washington Leadership Conference, for instance, educating legislators about the punitive excise tax that is part of the Affordable Care Act. How often do you communicate with your Congressional representatives? The ADA has talking points to share about key issues, and ways that you can become involved at the grassroots level to elect representatives and senators friendly to dentistry’s issues. Take a look at www.ada.org and find out what you can do. Another lightning flash from the perfect storm? Patients are seeking out regular dental care less and less. The GDA workforce census of dentists across this great state demonstrated that Georgia dentists are under-utilized, readily available, and willing to provide care. The census demonstrated that patients are not even fully utilizing our safety net public health clinics. Despite this fact, we have several large foundations and even some in our own profession advocating for mid-level providers as the solution to the access issue. The issue in Georgia isn’t providers. It is in large part patient awareness. Our ADA recently launched the “Action for Dental Health: Dentists Making a EDITORIAL Continued on page 34

5

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:06 AM

Page 6

general news NORTHERN Dr. Gowasack Dr. Brian Gowasack, of Conyers, Georgia, recently donated two dental chairs, an x-ray machine, and office equipment to Mercy Heart Health Clinic in memory of general practitioner Dr. Bill Roberts. Dr. Roberts passed away in January after suffering a stroke at the clinic while providing volunteer dental care to uninsured and low-income residents of Rockdale County. Dr. Roberts maintained a practice in Conyers until he retired in 2010, and he and his wife Cheryl were regular volunteers at the three-year-old charitable clinic. Dr. Wayne Kerr, Dr. Gowasack’s associate, donated $1,000 to the clinic in memory of Dr. Roberts. The clinic is always in need of volunteers—interested dentists may call Mercy Heart at (678) 374-5132 for information

International College of Dentists. He most recently attended and addressed the Convocation and meeting of Section XII in Chinese Taipei. Dr. Aronson’s recorded message to College inductees was also the subject of the ICD’s first YouTube.com video posting. Kudos to this past GDA president and Award of Merit honoree for continuing to work to better dentistry.

hygiene, but it has blossomed into a program where we raise money to provide free dental treatment to the veterans,” said Dr. Katharine Ciarrocca, Faculty Advisor for Dentists for Della and Assistant Professor in the Department of Diagnostic Sciences at GRU. In January, the college started a weekly rotation where basic dental treatment is provided to the nursing home residents at no cost. During the spring semester, dental students provided nearly $5,700 worth of free dental treatment. The Dentists for Della program is named in honor of the late Dr. Victor Della-Guistina, a founding faculty member of the College of Dental Medicine and was created by former dental students Chris DeLeon, Ryan Fulchi, Ross Levine, and William Bennett.

ICD International President (and GDA Past President) Dr. Leon Aronson of Savannah addresses a Convocation held in Chinese Taipei in May (Photo Credit: International College of Dentists).

GRU CDM Dentists for Della Dr. Brian Gowasack recently donated the dental equipment shown here as well as additional items to Mercy Heart Health Clinic in Conyers in memory of fellow clinic volunteer Dr. Bill Roberts. Dr. Gowasack is pictured with Sheryl Adams, RDH; dental staff Marie Fusaro; and Cheryl Roberts, wife of the late Dr. Roberts. (Photo Credit: Sue Ann KuhnSmith, Rockdale Citizen)

SOUTHEASTERN Dr. Aronson Dr. Leon Aronson of Savannah, a retired orthodontist, is currently serving as the 2013 International President of the

6

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Dentists for Della, a student-operated service organization in the College of Dental Medicine at Georgia Regents University, has received the Horizon Award for being the university’s best new student organization. The organization was established in 2010 as a service initiative to provide oral hygiene to residents of Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home in Augusta. Each month, 20 to 40 dental students provide basic oral hygiene and denture care to nursing home residents, and the program was recently expanded to include free weekly basic dental treatment. “Dentists for Della started as a monthly program that provided only oral

GRU dental student Bob Wilson talks to a resident of Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home in Augusta prior to performing a dental screening. The student-operated “Dentists for Della” program provides basic oral hygiene and denture care to individuals at the facility.

ALLIANCE National Conference Georgia’s dental Alliance spouses group had a terrific turnout at the Alliance of the American Dental Association national conference in Branson, Missouri, in April.


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:06 AM

Page 7

Dr. Janine Bethea (l) and Molly Bickford were part of the Georgia Alliance and GDA team that took part in a national Alliance conference in April in Missouri.

GDA Alliance Beulah K. Spencer Service Award honoree Julie Vaughn, her GDA spouse Dr. Ryan Vaughn, and the youngest of the couple’s four children Piper Annalee. Mrs. Vaughn received “The Beulah” award during a national Alliance conference in Missouri for her dental health education work.

Kudos to Julie Vaughn who was one of four Alliance members selected as a Beulah K. Spencer Service Award honoree. “The Beulah” is a distinguished service award that recognizes members who have been active for fewer than 10 years who exemplify outstanding leadership and volunteer spirit through excellence in service and commitment to the Alliance. She and Dr. Ryan Vaughn live in Flowery Branch, Georgia, and she has helped plan numerous dental health education activities in the Northern District that have reached hundreds of children.

GDA Alliance President Tammy Fussell and her GDA spouse Dr. Timothy Fussell headed up a team of GDA and Alliance members who attended a national Alliance conference in April.

Members Tammy Fussell (Georgia president), Janelle Kauffman, Debbie Torbush, Gigi Kudyba, Dr. Janine Bethea, Julie Vaughn, and Molly Bickford, as well as GDA members Dr. Timothy Fussell, Dr. Ryan Vaughn, and Dr. Thom Kauffman, attended sessions on networking for success, the American Dental Association Political Action Committee, and national legislative issues, and enjoyed a tour of the Titanic museum in Branson as well as a silent auction to benefit the Alliance’s Foundation for Dental Health Education.

7

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

Page 8

Upcoming GDA / Dental Events JULY 2013 Thurs, July 4: GDA Office Closed for Independence Day Holiday. Mon, July 8: Northern District Executive Council Meeting, GDA Office. Fri, July 12: White Coat Ceremony, GRU College of Dental Medicine. Sat, July 13: GDA Alliance Family Day at Turner Field. Thurs, July 25: GDA House of Delegates, Hilton Head, South Carolina. Thurs-Sun, July 25-28: GDA Annual Meeting, Hilton Head, South Carolina. See www.gadental.org for registration details.

AUGUST 2013 Sat, Aug 10: GDA Board of Trustees Meeting / Committee Orientation, GDA Office.

8

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Sat, Aug 24: Northern District “Boots and Bling Ball,” Druid Hills Golf Club, Atlanta. Sat, Aug 24: Special Olympics Special Smiles Dental Screenings, Warner Robins.

Fri, Sept 20: Southwestern District Membership Meeting and GDA Officer Visit, UGA Tifton Center.

OCTOBER 2013 Thurs, Oct 10: Western District OSHA Course, Green Island Country Club, Columbus.

Tues, Aug 27: Western District Membership Meeting and GDA Officer Visit.

Thurs-Sat, Oct 10-12: ADA Fifth District Caucus (GA, AL, MS Delegations) Meeting, Atlanta.

SEPTEMBER 2013

Wed, Oct 16: Northern District CE Program, Villa Christina, Atlanta.

Mon, Sept 2: GDA Office Closed for Labor Day Holiday. Mon, Sept 9: Northern District Executive Council Meeting, GDA Office.

Mon, Oct 28: Northern District Membership Meeting / GDA Officer Visit, Villa Christina, Atlanta.

Wed, Sept 11: Northern District CE Program, Villa Christina, Atlanta.

Thurs-Sun, Oct 31-Nov 3: ADA Annual Session, New Orleans, LA.

Thurs, Sept 12: Central District Membership Meeting and GDA Officer Visit, Macon.


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

Page 9

9

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

Page 10

ADA Launches Action Plan to Address Access to Care Issues The ADA House of Delegates passed a resolution last year to retain a public relations firm in order to take the Association’s common sense messages on oral health to a wider public audience. In May 2013, the ADA with the help of the public relations firm FleishmanHillard launched an initiative that promises to tackle the dental access to care issue on multiple levels. “Action for Dental Health: Dentists Making a Difference” (www.ada.org/8585.aspx) aims to reduce the numbers of adults and children with untreated dental disease through oral health education, prevention, and providing treatment to people in need of care.

During the press conference, [ADA President] Dr. [Robert] Faiella noted that while dentistry had made great progress, there was still a “dangerous America

divide”

between

those

those without. He stated that, “Our mission is to close that divide. Good oral health isn’t a luxury. It’s

10

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

TARGET AREA: Provide care now to people suffering with untreated disease • Reduce by 35 percent by 2020 the number of people who visit the emergency room for dental conditions, by referring them to community health centers, private dental practices, or other settings, where they can receive proper dental care. • Implement in at least 10 states by 2015 a long-term care program to improve the oral health of nursing home residents. • Expand the ADA Give Kids A Smile local community programs to provide education, screening, and treatment to underserved children in order to achieve the vision statement of Give Kids a Smile: the elimination of cavities in children under five by 2020.

in

with good dental health and

essential.”

A press conference announcing the initiative was attended by both dentists in Congress, Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona and Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho, as well as ADA President Dr. Robert Faiella, who noted that Action for Dental Health is national and coordinated in its scope and approach, and is designed to address the dental health crisis in three distinct areas:

lined their credentialing process to less than one month.

TARGET AREA: Bring dental health education and disease prevention into communities • Ensure that 80% of Americans on public water systems have access to optimally fluoridated drinking water by 2020. • Increase from seven to 15 the number of states where Community Dental Health Coordinators (CDHCs) are active by 2015. CDHCs provide dental education and prevention services to the community and help people navigate the dental health system. During the press conference, Dr. Faiella noted that while dentistry had made great progress, there was still a “dangerous divide” in America between those with good dental health and those without. He stated that, “Our mission is to close that divide. Good oral health isn’t a luxury. It’s essential.” To underline his statement, he pointed to the results of an April 2013 “Dental Divide in America Study” conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of the American Dental Association that found:

TARGET AREA: Strengthen and expand the public / private safety net to provide more care to more Americans

• Nearly half of lower-income adults say they haven’t seen a dentist in a year or longer. The majority of middle- and higher-income wage earners (70 percent) have.

• Help provide more care to people by having private-practice dentists contract with Federally Qualified Health Centers, therefore increasing the number patients receiving oral health services 175% by 2020.

• Lower-income adults 18 and older are more than two times as likely as middleand higher-income adults to have had all of their teeth removed (7 percent vs. 3 percent).

• Fight for increased dental health protections and simplified administration under Medicaid by increasing by 10% the number of states that have stream-

• Nearly one in five (18 percent) lowerincome adults have reported that they or a household member has sought treatment for dental pain in an emergency room at some point in their


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

lives, compared to only seven percent of middle- and higher-income adults. • Only six percent of those low-income adults who went to the ER reported that the problem was solved in the ER. • Even though the Affordable Care Act offers little relief for adult Americans who lack dental coverage, 40% of lowerincome adults believe that health care reform will help them obtain dental care. (Editor’s Note: A recent ADA analysis finds that only an estimated 5.3 million adults are expected to gain extensive oral health coverage as a result of the ACA, almost all due to Medicaid expansion in the few states that provide extensive dental benefits. In Georgia, Gov. Nathan Deal has stated he has no plans for a Medicaid expansion due to state budget constraints. Currently, adult dental Medicaid benefits in the state are limited to emergency extractions. Pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid have some additional services available.) The 2013 Harris Interactive survey’s findings echo prior research from multiple

Page 11

sources. According to a new ADA Health Policy Resources Center analysis of 2010 MEPS and U.S. Census data, 181 million Americans did not visit the dentist in 2010. Nearly half of adults over age 30 suffer from some form of gum disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and nearly one in four children under the age of five already have cavities.

What Does Action for Dental Health Mean for Georgia? Now that the ADA has launched this national campaign, every state will be asked to seek progress in the areas targeted for improvement. The GDA has already made progress in many of the target areas, and will consider what direction to take in others. “We are proud that 93 percent of Georgia’s community water systems are currently fluoridated,” said GDA President Sidney Tourial. “The GDA Committee for Oral Health in Institutional Settings is pursuing funding now to reach out to every nursing home facility in Georgia and give facility staff tools they can use to provide daily oral health care to

residents and know when to seek professional dental care. We are also considering how we might develop partnerships and work to divert patients with dental pain away from Georgia emergency departments. “Meanwhile, the GDA remains a consistent, effective advocate for Medicaid doctors and patients at the state level,” Dr. Tourial continued. “Our most recent Give Kids a Smile Day featured 31 events statewide and reached thousands of children. Our GDA workforce census stands as proof that we have sufficient dentists to care for Georgians’ oral health and don’t need mid-level providers. “The GDA will need to take a hard look at what additional resources we can allocate to tackle additional targets,” Dr. Tourial continued. “In the short term, we are glad that the ADA can bring important dental issues to the forefront at a national level. That allows us to capitalize on this initiative and continue conversations at the state and local level and hopefully continue to make progress in areas that make sense for Georgia.”

11

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

12

1/12/04

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

10:07 AM

Page 12


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

Page 13

Dr. Connie Drisko Steps Down After 10 Years as Dental Dean: Challenges, Accomplishments, and Goals on the Horizon As Dean and Merritt Professor of the College of Dental Medicine at Georgia Regents University (AKA the Medical College of Georgia, then Georgia Health Sciences University), Dr. Connie L. Drisko oversaw an increase in student enrollment from 60 to 80 individuals per class and directed the funding, design, and construction of a $112 million, 5-story, 269,000-square-foot clinical facility that opened in 2011. She is leaving her role as dean on July 1, although she will remain with the school and pursue multiple special projects. Dr. Drisko spoke with GDA Editor Dr. David Bradberry in March about the challenges faced by dental schools nationwide, how GRU and the Augusta community have built bridges, and the special characteristic that identifies GRU dental graduates.

GDA: What challenges face dental schools that desire to thrive in today’s climate? Dr. Drisko: Schools faced a huge challenge a few years ago with recruiting and retaining faculty, but over the last 10 years, I believe the primary challenge for most dental schools has been balancing increasing costs against decreasing resources and support, and running dental schools more like businesses. For instance, state financial support for Georgia Regents University (GRU) has decreased, so the university must constantly identify new resources and be much more innovative and discriminating in the way we use the money we do have. The GRU College of Dental Medicine (CDM), for instance, has only seen a minimal increase in state support over 10 years, but our operating costs have almost tripled. So the College has been forced to make up almost $20 million by bringing in money from clinics, tuition, and research. This financial pressure is requiring all deans and all dental schools, whether they’re public or private, to be extraordinarily good at managing money.

Another challenge facing already cash-strapped schools is how to handle infrastructure and equipment improvements. Since the economy’s been depressed for so many years, universities have not been able to replace or renovate their dental schools. There are a lot of dental facilities, like our old school was, that were built in the 1960s and have had very little done to them. Many schools are being forced to patch up buildings with semi-satisfactory renovations because they don’t have the money to build or replace older facilities. Dental schools are particularly concentrating on creating simulation labs. If you don’t have a simulation lab in today’s world, students won’t come to your dental school. So many students scrutinize facilities now before they commit, and they’re not as likely to go to beat-up, worn-down schools. They want something that looks clean, neat, and cool.

GDA: Has the competition to recruit dental students changed during your tenure? How successful has GRU been in recruiting dental students? Dr. Drisko: I think students primarily make their schooling decision based on reputation and cost. We have some issues to overcome with our school reputationwise because we’re on our third name in 10 years and we have to re-identify ourselves to people outside of Georgia who don’t realize that we’re the old MCG. We only had the GHSU name for a couple of years. We have to re-brand ourselves again. We’re still the fantastic school we’ve always been, but people may not recognize us. GRU was asked recently to open up our dental school to non-state residents. This is a dilemma because we still have four-and-a-half to five students within the state for every slot we offer, so we send 80something students out of Georgia to go to

Dr. Connie L. Drisko will step down as dean of the College of Dental Medicine within Georgia Regents University on July 1. During her 10 years as dean, Dr. Drisko oversaw major expansions in student enrollment and directed the funding, design, and construction of a $112 million, 5-story, 269,000-squarefoot clinical facility that opened in 2011.

dental school because we cannot accept all qualified students into our school. We will get up to 100 slots eventually, probably by 2017, to help address that. I am seeing more and more competition to recruit under-represented students because some wealthy private schools are able to offer under-represented students four-year scholarships. We accept many highly qualified under-represented students, but they get lured away with scholarships. The most urgent need I see at the CDM is for scholarship money. We need endowed scholarship funds and that’s going to be a focus of our fundraising in the future. Who is going to take on $150,000 to $200,000 in debt when they can attend another dental school for free?

DRISKO Continued on page 14

13

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

DRISKO Continued from page 13 GRU currently cannot offer any dental student a ‘full ride’ scholarship. We do have more students benefitting from military scholarships that require service upon graduation, but apart from that, no. Students benefit from exposure to multiple scholarship opportunities, but the closest we come to a full ride might be when the Georgia Health Sciences Foundation funds one scholarship every year for a sophomore student, and that sophomore gets their tuition paid until they graduate. The Hinman Dental Society funds three one-year full tuition scholarships for freshmen. That is not nearly enough for 80 students. GRU doesn’t have a problem getting good students. We are reluctantly telling good students we cannot accept them. However, we are losing good students to scholarships at other schools.

GDA: How have you seen recent economic downturns affect GRU? Dr. Drisko: Students attending GRU will see a 3.5 percent tuition increase for the

14

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Page 14

next fiscal year. The university has lost, I believe, some 25% of our state dollars in the last 5 to 10 years. That’s millions of dollars. Our challenge is trying to keep the cost of education down without impacting the quality of education. We’ve been able to lower costs by achieving internal efficiencies. Just like in a private dental office we must figure out how to buy a product that’s just as good for a lesser cost or buy that product in bulk. The process is not easy, but you must figure out ways to save money.

GDA: In what ways must the dental school make up for decreased state funding? Dr. Drisko: Trying to keep a healthy research enterprise going without substantial federal funds is very difficult to do. The federal government keeps cutting the National Institutes of Health budget, so we find ourselves going more to private foundations to seek funding. That presents another set of issues because private foundations often don’t fund basic science ventures. The school receives funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation. We’ve been tremendously fortunate to receive $11 million from the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation over the last few years, $3 million for the new dental school building and an $8 million grant to help build an interprofessional state-of-the-art simulation center in GRU’s planned Education Commons building. We are also pleased that some of the specialty foundations have awards they give to new faculty. We have also been fortunate to receive grant funding to support some of our important educational programs. I wrote a grant with some of my faculty members the first year I came that got funded—a Medicaid Administrative Grant that totals $566,000 a year. We’ve had that grant renewed every year for the last eight years. Dental students previously participated in externships in private dental offices as part of their education. With the support of this grant funding, students provide care for some 15,000 indigent patients every year in public health clinics, FQHCs, or community health centers throughout the state. This helps patients and the state, gives the students valuable training, and helps the students develop


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

their sense of community awareness. If we lose this grant, we’d have to go digging for another resource to continue to support those student rotations. We are preparing to request a renewal for a grant that Dr. Carole Hanes and Dr. James Barenie won for the dental school from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Through this grant, loan forgiveness funds totaling $50,000 annually are awarded for two dentists who agree to serve in a Dental Health Professional Shortage Area. We now have 10 Georgia dentists benefitting from this grant working in underserved areas and devoting 50% of their practice to underserved patients. These 10 dentists have provided hundreds of thousands of dollars of unreimbursed care in exchange for $20,000 to $25,000 a year of loan forgiveness. To me, loan forgiveness is the most efficient and inexpensive way to get dentists in locations where you need them. When a dentist arrives and becomes part of the community, they find out that they can make a nice living once they build their base of patients. But again, it’s all grant supported and subject to renewals and budget pressures.

Page 15

We’ve also benefitted from gifts from dental companies. About five years ago we received a $6.2 million gift from Nobel Biocare that allowed us to train our dental students to place and restore implants, bring in a series of master clinicians to support our academic program, and bring in a master ceramist so we could grow our aesthetic dentistry section. The company recently gave us another pledge to continue to support our aesthetic program. This no-strings gift was a good fit because the school had been using the company’s products for 20 years anyway. We are hopeful that the gift will be renewed. Dental administrators must keep turning over every rock to find the next dollar or two. As soon as you get one source of funding going the next source dries up and you have to find a new resource to support a thriving program.

GDA: Ten years ago, the dental school consistently reported difficulty in recruiting dental faculty. Has that changed? Dr. Drisko: Well, faculty recruitment is still a problem, but not at the magnitude it

used to be. About five or six years ago, there were approximately 400 dental faculty positions open nationwide. It’s now down to about 300, so the overall shortage of faculty has been reduced. At GRU we have been very fortunate to recruit faculty members when we’ve had open positions. Since I’ve been with the school, we’ve gained 20 faculty positions as our class size has grown. I have seen 58 of our 74 faculty members join during my 10 years as dean. The challenge that remains is replacing faculty members who are retiring and nearing retirement age. Some people that we’re hiring at GRU are coming from private practice with 20 years of experience. They are fabulous teachers, but the life of their remaining career isn’t as long as if you hired a faculty member right out of dental school. We find ourselves constantly recruiting new blood. We have been successful reaching younger faculty members with young families because of what Augusta offers. The city is affordable for young families and the school systems

DRISKO Continued on page 16

GDA ACTION

15 JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

DRISKO Continued from page 15

are good. Say I am recruiting a faculty member from Pennsylvania. A family can sell their house there and come to Augusta and buy a house that’s 50 percent bigger and newer and have money left over. The city is diverse and highly educated thanks to the industries here—health care, the military, and the Savannah River National Laboratory—yet it has a small town feel.

GDA: Does GRU have a pressing faculty need right now? Dr. Drisko: Pediatric dentists are really hard to come by because of the small number of them that are trained every year and the difference in compensation in academia versus private practice. There are just not enough of them around. Dental schools in general don’t do a very good job of attracting new graduates into teaching careers. We covered that topic at deans’ meetings and discussed ways to potentially expose students to teaching while they’re students so they might consider careers in academics. They might find out teaching is really their thing. People like to learn from people who are excited about what they’re teaching.

GDA: Could you talk about the relationship between the CDM and Augusta dentists? Dr. Drisko: I think it’s much better than it has been in the past. All schools face the challenge of trying not to create “town and gown” problems. I will say that our Augusta dentists refer a lot of patients to the dental school, particularly to our residency programs. For example, if a patient can’t afford an implant, but the patient needs one, doctors will often send that patient to our residency programs where they can get a procedure done at a reduced cost. Then the school sends the patient back to the private practitioner. We see a lot of referrals to our endodontic, periodontic, and oral surgery departments. The school’s student program is able to help truly indigent patients as well. I think many of the dentists who had

16

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Page 16

concerns early on about competition or class size have seen the positive impact the dental school makes in the community and how much access to care our faculty and students provide. We have many doctors in the Augusta area who are supportive financial donors to the school. They’ve figured out that we’re a nice asset to have. Plus, they’re getting our good graduates. We have a few students graduate every year who are from Augusta. If they decide to stay in Augusta then doctors who are looking for associates can hire a person who already has a relationship with a lot of people in town.

GDA: Can you talk about the relationship of GRU and the dental school with the Augusta community? Dr. Drisko: GRU has the second biggest economic impact in the region. We employ 9,000 people and are home to nearly 10,000 students. We even have a vice president for military affairs now who was a commanding general. We have a very strong relationship with Fort Gordon. Many individuals in their dental program pursue their master’s degrees at GRU. Two days a week faculty members in our oral surgery department assist with care of soldiers at the Fort. We also have faculty members and students who work with the war veterans’ home in Augusta to meet the dental needs of the residents. Now that GRU and Augusta State have merged, we are creating programs to help veterans go back to school and get their degree.

GDA: What are the characteristics of a dentist who graduates from GRU? What do they stand for? Dr. Drisko: They’re all serious about being very good dentists and well-rounded men and women of science. We’re so fortunate to have our own oral biology department. We’re one of the few dental schools in the country that have our own biology teachers, and we’re able to introduce science into the students’ clinical care instruction all the way through their four years of college. That foundation was created with the first faculty members hired at MCG by Dean Judson Hickey. If they held a PhD, they had to go to dental school. If they were a dentist and didn’t have a PhD, they

had to get a PhD. The whole premise with the founding of the school was that the faculty needed to be men and women of science so as to give the best oral care possible. We graduate that kind of student. That shows on our board and licensing exams. We have 100% licensing exam success within the first year after graduation and it’s been that way for years. We even have a 95% first-time pass rate on our board scores. Our students consistently score above the national average. We’re graduating diverse classes— that makes for more culturally competent students. Our students all graduate after thorough exposure to community service after working at charitable clinics. The dentists who volunteer their time to supervise students at these clinics give me feedback that our students are amazing. We do an excellent job training our students in the art of dentistry. I know that because when we send our residents all over the country and I meet those residency program directors at national meetings, or meet with their military colleagues, they always say, ‘we don’t need to worry about you. Your school has a strong reputation.’ I would go to any of our graduates as a patient. We train really good people. They stand for quality, fairness, and being involved in organized dentistry. They see the members of the GDA as role models because they’ve had such a positive experience while they’ve been in dental school with all the activities the GDA supports. You can see that with the percentage of our students who join the GDA as soon as they graduate. I am already seeing some of my recent graduates serving in the GDA House of Delegates.

GDA: You have achieved many goals during your tenure. Is there a goal left that you might have wished for more time to accomplish? Dr. Drisko: I’ve not been successful in getting a new research building for my research faculty—yet. I’m working on that. We haven’t had the funds to bring in more research faculty but we’ve got the foundation for expansion ready and we have people lined up to come in. We should have some high-end recruitments that should happen in the next few months. We’re getting there.


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:07 AM

GDA: What are your personal and professional plans for the future as you step down? Will you continue involvement in dental activities at the state and national level? Dr. Drisko: I’ve been invited to spend half of my time as a special assistant to the GRU senior vice-president for development and community relations. I’m staying in fund-raising. The other part of my time will be devoted to handling special projects for the provost like leadership training. I am the current president of the Georgia Society of Periodontists and I’ll chair the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations next year. I serve on the board of the ADEAGies Foundation, which is the foundation for the American Dental Education Association. I have several irons in the fire.

Page 17

GDA: What advice would you leave with the CDM and those leaders who come after you? Dr. Drisko: Keep your ears on. Listen to the stake-holders, the community, organized dentistry, and your alumni. Pay attention to what’s important to your students and your faculty, and then act when you need to and make something happen. Be as fair as you possibly can. I pride myself on being known as a very fair dean. It is important that your own agenda doesn’t get in the way. Maintain a good relationship with the various stake-holders and learn to manage them in positive ways. It’s challenging. You have to figure out ways to work out differences and come out friends. It is extraordinarily important that you manage up well, and that you have a presence on the whole campus. The dental school must be seen as a contributor to the whole university, the whole enterprise. Make sure that the leadership is aware of all the good work that dentists do and how important the dental school is to the whole

campus. And keep a really nice, loving spouse like I have with Dick Drisko who has been so supportive of me through all this time.

GDA: What do you believe is your most significant accomplishment? Dr. Drisko: What I’ll remember the most is enhancing the visibility of the school in all the ways that I wanted it to be visible. When I first arrived 10 years ago, I called the dental school the “hidden jewel of the South.” I don’t think we’re so hidden any more. We have a lot to be proud of. I think I’ve been a good cheerleader for the school and made people aware of something that was already very good. As I traveled to do the fund-raising that went along with building our new school I got to know a lot of people. That was the perfect opportunity to educate everybody on what a great school we have here.

17

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

18

1/12/04

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

10:08 AM

Page 18


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:08 AM

Page 19

19

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

20

1/12/04

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

10:09 AM

Page 20


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:09 AM

Page 21

21

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

22

1/12/04

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

10:10 AM

Page 22


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 23

23

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 24

How the Dental Board’s Move to the Department of Community Health Affects the Profession and Patients Because of budget cuts and scarce resources for the PLB Division, the Board had been unable to appropriately fulfill its purpose of protecting the

House Bill 132, the GDA’s priority legislation this year that passed the House and Senate and was signed by Governor Nathan Deal in May, moves the Georgia Boards of Dentistry and Pharmacy from the Secretary of State’s Professional Licensing Division to the Department of Community Health. This article discusses what the dental board’s move means for Georgia dentists and patients and how the licensure renewal process will be affected this year.

public. Calls from the public

Q: What exactly does HB 132 do regarding the Georgia Board of Dentistry?

were going unanswered. Too

A: As of July 1, 2013, the Georgia Board of

few investigators meant that dental complaints were not being reviewed and explored in a timely manner. There have also been reports that dentists

Dentistry (BOD) will no longer be part of the Professional Licensing Board Division (PLBD) of the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office in Macon. Just like the Georgia Composite Medical Board, HB 132 attaches the BOD to the Department of Community Health for administrative purposes only. The Board will continue to operate in the same manner. They will hold monthly meetings, oversee dental complaints, and continue to institute and enforce the dental rules and regulations in this state.

calling the Board would often have to stay on hold for inordinately long periods of time … Once the transition is complete, patients and professionals should find that the Board will be more accessible.

Q: What does it mean for the BOD to be “administratively attached” to DCH? A: This means that DCH will provide the Board with office space, personnel, and provide other basic functions. However, the BOD will have its own budget and manage its own operations. The DCH will not have any oversight over the BOD operations except to approve the hiring of the executive director. With the exception of the budgetary process, this level of oversight is virtually identical to the oversight the BOD had under the auspices of the Secretary of State’s PLBD.

Q: What are the benefits of the Board becoming attached to DCH? A: The move will allow the public to be better served by the BOD. So many state agencies are being required to do more with less. This includes the Secretary of State’s office. Because of budget cuts and scarce resources for the PLB Division, the Board had been unable to appropriately fulfill its purpose of protecting the public. Calls from the public were going unanswered. Too few investigators meant that dental complaints were not being reviewed and explored in a timely manner. There have also been reports that dentists calling the Board would often have to stay on hold for inordinately long periods of time. When finally getting through to an employee of the PLBD, the employee had no specific knowledge about dental rules and requirements and could not provide assistance. One goal of transferring the Board to the DCH is to ensure that the Board had a sufficient number of investigators who are dedicated to pursuing dental complaints. Another was to ensure that anyone who calls the Board could reach an employee who had the knowledge to assist the caller in a timely fashion. Finally, the Board will have authority to submit its own budget request to the legislature. Doing so will enable the Board to more appropriately plan for its operational needs.

Q: Does this move give the Board more oversight over dentists and dental hygienists? A: No. The Board’s rule making authority and oversight over dentists and dental hygienists will not change at all. No additional power has been given to the board regarding instituting rules and regulations that affect the practice of dentistry.

DEPT. OF COMMUNITY HEALTH Continued on page 26

24

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 25

Q: Who are the members of the Georgia Board of Dentistry? A:

To acquaint the membership with your Board of Dentistry, below are brief biographies of each member. Dr. Richard Bennett practices general dentistry in Gainesville in the Northern District. He received his dental degree from the MCG School of Dentistry in Augusta. In addition to his GDA and ADA membership, he is a member of the Academy of General Dentistry and the Hinman Dental Society. Dr. Bennett also serves on the board of the Emile T. Fisher Foundation for Dental Education, is chairman of Good News Clinics’ Leadership Board, and is a board member and clinical assistant professor at Georgia Regents University. He was recently named a GDA Community Service honoree for his work with the Good News Clinics. Rebecca Bynum, RDH, is a state licensed dental hygienist working with Azalea City Family Dentistry in Valdosta. She is a member of the Valdosta Board of the American Heart Association, as well as various other community and civic organizations. Ms. Bynum earned an Associate of Science degree in dental hygiene from Darton College and has completed additional studies at both the University of Alabama and the University of Madrid, Spain. She was appointed to the Board by Gov. Deal in 2011. Dr. Rebecca Carlon owns a general dentistry practice in Albany and is a member of the Southwestern District. She was previously the Supervising Dentist of the Department of Dental Hygiene at Darton College and an Assistant Professor, Department of Restorative Dentistry, at the MCG School of Dentistry. She received her dental degree from Emory University School of Dentistry and a Fellowship Award from the Academy of General Dentistry in 2000. She and her husband, Dr. Daniel Carlon, have two children. Dr. Randy Daniel has been a private practice dentist in Stockbridge in the Northern District since 1984. He is a member of the medical staff of Henry Medical Center. Dr. Daniel is a GDA Honorable Fellow and received the President’s Award from the Northern District Dental Society for outstanding service to the dental profession. He earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from the College of William and Mary and a dental degree from the Medical College of Virginia. Ms. Connie Engel is the lay person member of the board. She is a partner for the Atlanta division of Childress Klein Properties. In 2010, she received the Award of Excellence from NAIOP, a commercial real estate development association, for her career in the commercial real estate industry. Engel is the former president of Commercial Real Estate Women and the Georgia Chapter of NAIOP. Her other community related responsibilities include being elected as a board member and treasurer of the Cumberland Community Improvement District. Engel was selected to serve on the Board of Trustees for Kennesaw State University in 2005, and in 2007 she became chairperson of their real estate committee. Dr. Tracy Gay has practiced dentistry with Middle Georgia Family Dentistry since 2001 and is a member of the Central District. He is a graduate of Georgia Southern University and the MCG

School of Dentistry. He and his wife, DeLynn, have two children. They reside in Dublin. Dr. Thomas Godfrey practices general dentistry in Atlanta in the Northern District. In addition to his ADA and GDA membership, he is a member of the Academy of General Dentistry and the American College of Forensic Examiners. Dr. Godfrey is a life member of the Georgia Tennis Association, the Southern Tennis Association, and the United States Tennis Association. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Emory University and a dental degree from the MCG School of Dentistry. Dr. Stephan Holcomb has been in private, general practice since 1974. He practiced in Warner Robins for 34 years and is currently practicing at Dental Associates of Middle Georgia in Byron. He is a Central District member. He serves as chair of the Robins Regional Military Affairs Committee and the Joint Commission on National Dental Exams. Dr. Holcomb also serves as a medical forensic examiner for the Georgia Crime Lab. He served as president of the Central District Dental Society, the Robins Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Southern Regional Testing Agency, and as chair of the Warner Robins Cancer Society. He is a GDA Honorable Fellow and Medical College of Georgia (MCG) Distinguished Alumni honoree. Dr. Holcomb received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a dental degree from MCG. Dr. Logan Nalley has practiced prosthodontics in Augusta since 1980 and is a member of the Eastern District. He had enlisted service in the U.S. Navy and retired from the U.S. Army Reserve as a Lt. Colonel. His bachelor’s degree is from North Georgia College and his dental degree and prosthodontic certificate are from the MCG School of Dentistry. Dr. Nalley is a GDA Honorable Fellow and MCG Distinguished Alumni honoree. He has served as a Dental Examiner for the Southern Regional Testing Agency and The Northeast Regional Board, and currently examines for The Central Regional Dental Testing Service. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics, Fellow of the American College of Prosthodontists, American College of Dentists, and the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. Dr. Barry Stacey has practiced in Cobb County since 1977. He attended the University of Georgia and the University of Alabama, Birmingham School of Dentistry, graduating in 1972. He served in the U.S. Army Dental Corps in Ft. Riley, KS. He completed his oral and maxillofacial surgery residency at UAB Hospitals and Clinics in 1977. He was elected as a GDA Honorable Fellow in 2000 and is a member of the Georgia Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and Southeastern Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. He served as President of the GSOMS from 1994-1996. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Dental Society of Anesthesiology, National Dental Board of Anesthesiology, and Pierre Fauchard Academy. Dr. Bert Yeargan is a practicing dentist in Brunswick in the Southeastern District. He attended Brewton-Parker, where he was drafted to play professional baseball. He later attended Auburn University, where he earned a B.S. degree in Building Science. After several years in construction, he attended the Medical College of Georgia. He graduated in 1983 with his dental degree and began practicing in Brunswick. He is active in the Rotary Club and the Glynn County Dental Society.

25

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

DEPT. OF COMMUNITY HEALTH Continued from page 24

Q: What changes will dentists, dental hygienists, and patients notice once the Board transitions to the DCH? A: Once the transition is complete, patients and professionals should find that the Board will be more accessible. Personnel will be versed in dental issues and able to assist callers. Investigations of

Page 26

complaints will also be completed in a timely manner. Another change which may occur is an increase in licensure fees. The GDA reported during the session that in order to fund this change, the license renewal fee for dentists may increase by up to $175 per biennium. To ensure greater services to the public and licensees, the Board will need to generate additional revenue. The GDA will continue to report on the Board’s transition and offer guidance to dentists and dental hygienists once the biennial licensure renewal process begins this fall.

Q: Where will the Georgia Board of Dentistry be located beginning July 1, 2013? A: The BOD will move from its current physical office location in Macon to downtown Atlanta at 2 Peachtree Street in the 30303 zip code by July 1. This is the same location as the Georgia Composite Medical Board. The Board has hired Ms. Tanja Battle to be the Board of Dentistry’s executive director. Ms. Battle will also serve as executive director for the Georgia Board of Pharmacy.

Gov. Nathan Deal signed House Bill 132 into law in May. Attending to witness the signing on behalf of dentistry (pharmacy board representatives are shown on the governor’s right) were bill sponsor Rep. Lee Hawkins (a Gainesville dentist); Sen. Butch Miller (who carried the bill through the Senate); GDA President Dr. Sidney Tourial; BOD members Dr. Richard Bennett, Dr. Randy Daniel, Ms. Connie Engel, Dr. Tom Godfrey, and Dr. Steve Holcomb; Mrs. Robin Holcomb; BOD and BOP Executive Director Tanja Battle (second from left); Governmental Affairs Committee Chair Dr. Jack Bickford; and GDA staff members Martha Phillips (Executive Director), Nelda Greene (Associate Executive Director), Melana McClatchey (General Counsel), and Meg Robinson (Director of Governmental Affairs).

26

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 27

27

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 28

classified ads Dental Equipment How GDA members can place classified ads AD FORM: Submit all ads on a GDA Classified Advertisement Form. To obtain a form, call Skip Jones at (800) 432-4357 or (404) 636-7553, or email jones@gadental.org. (Note: The GDA may accept or reject any ad for any reason and in its sole discretion.)

AD DEADLINE: Ads and ad check payments are due by the first of the month before the publication month (i.e., Dec. 1 for January).

AD RATES: ADA member dentists pay $75.00 per 60-word ad per month. There is a 25 cents per-word charge for each word over 60. Non-dentist-owned companies (real estate firms, etc.) pay $195 per 60-word ad per month (additional word charges as above). Non-member dentists may not place ads.

LATE FEE: Ads for which full prepayment is not received by the first day of the ad’s publication month (i.e.; Nov. 1 for a November ad) will incur a $25 late fee in addition to the ad rate.

FORMS OF PAYMENT: Submit a check or money order with the ad form. (Make checks payable to GDA.) Credit cards are not accepted as payment.

WEB SITE PLACEMENT: Prepaid ads will appear on the GDA Web site www.gadental.org for the month the ad appears in print. Non-prepaid ads will NOT be placed online.

28

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

6 orthodontic / pedodontic dental chairs for sale. Unitek / Metal craft brand with pump bases and electric backs. Light blue vinyl color in good condition. Will email photos. Four chairs have gray plastic backing and two cream colored. Will divide. $600.00. Email: samdds@aol.com.

Dental Related Services Hands On Extraction Class—June 30July 5, 2013 in Guatemala. Participants will learn about crane picks, 301 elevators, extraction techniques, elevating flaps, and suturing. Forty hours accepted for FAGD / MAGD credit on live patients. For complete information call or email Dr. Murph at (843) 488-4357 or drtommymurph@yahoo.com.

X-RAY SAFETY COURSE FOR DENTAL ASSISTANTS: Special $99.95 for limited time. Save $60.00! Taken ONLINE in the convenience of home! Also great for RDH Continuing Education credit recognized by the Georgia Board of Dentistry. Make sure your assistants are legal. Don’t risk a possible spot inspection and citation. Order at www.gaxray.com/gda using Coupon Code “gda” when checking out.

Dentists Available for Locum Tenens Dentist will fill in for illness, vacation, or continuing education. Licensed, insured, DEA #. Call (404) 786-0229 or email breighard@gmail.com.

CLASSIFIEDS Continued on page 30


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:10 AM

Page 29

29

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:11 AM

CLASSIFIEDS Continued from page 28

DENTIST: Need Part Time Fill In? Vacation, Illness, Maternity? GENERAL DENTIST SOLD LONG ESTABLISHED PRACTICE. GA & DEA LICENSED. (Available Expanded Atlanta Area.) Cell: (404) 219-4097. Home: (404) 842-1196. Jesse Hader, DDS. Dentist available during emergencies, vacation, CDE courses. I have a current license, DEA certificate, and insurance. Contact me at (706) 291-2254 or cell (706) 802-7760. I hope I can be of service to you. Patrick A. Parrino, DDS, MAGD.

Positions Available General Dentist Needed: LaGrange, GA. We are looking for a General Dentist to join our team in a part-time position. We practice a wide range of dental procedures. Please email resume to: eharry@dreharry.com or fax to: (706) 885-9940.

30

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Page 30

Associate Dentist Needed: General family practice with locations in Peachtree City and Newnan looking for a part-time general dentist. Two days per week with future growth. Candidate must practice all aspects of dentistry. Please email resume to aberdeendental@bellsouth.net. GEORGIA – ATLANTA. Multiple pediatric dental offices in Metro Atlanta are seeking pediatric dentists and general dentists to work in an extremely successful, expanding business. We offer a team motivated working environment and a competitive salary. We believe in a high level of patient and parent education and making sure that children have an excellent dental experience at each visit. Our practice provides all levels of care, including oral sedation, IV sedation, and general anesthesia at local hospitals. Candidate must have excellent communication skills, be enthusiastic, and be motivated. For more information please call (678) 923-4466 or email brian.friedman@dentistry4children.com. Visit our web site at www.dentistry4children.com.

Full time associate dentist needed for a fee-for-service practice focused on comprehensive dentistry and great patient service in Stockbridge, GA. Associate to replace a retiring dentist and will take over his existing patient base. Applicants should be experienced with implants, root canal treatment, extractions, dentures, and partials. Office has great stable staff with most employed over 10 years. Ideal candidate should be looking for long term associateship and establishing a relationship with the patients. Options available for future partnership or buyout. Email CV / resume to newnandentistry@yahoo.com. Mature family practice in Gwinnett County seeks independent dentist for 1-2 days a week. Well equipped modern office. Great staff. Bonus. Excellent opportunity! Send resumes to: mydentalmailbox@gmail.com.


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:11 AM

Page 31

Do you have a love for kids? We are seeking a skilled Pediatric Specialist or General Dentist with pediatric experience to join our successful, quality-oriented, multi-location practice. We are offering a competitive salary, health insurance, 401(k) plan, paid vacation, malpractice insurance, and CE and professional organization allowance. If interested, please send your C.V. to pcdentistry@yahoo.com or call (770) 497-0110. ATLANTA / DUNWOODY AREA ORAL SURGEON ASSOCIATE: #8887—Board certified / eligible OMS needed immediately. For more information, call Dr. Earl Douglas (770) 664-1982 or email earl@adssouth.com. WEST GEORGIA PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATE NEEDED: #8906. For more information, call Dr. Earl Douglas (770) 664-1982 or email earl@adssouth.com. Associate Dentist Needed: Busy general dentistry practice NW of Atlanta is looking for an associate to add to our practice. Immediate full time employment; must be skilled and practice all aspects of general dentistry. Our office is a beautiful, modern facility with an experienced staff. Come join us! Please email beiges66960@ mypocks.net or call (770) 546-2775. SAVANNAH: General dentist with a caring, patient focused approach to join busy practice. Associate and / or buy-in opportunities are available. Please contact Nick Cease, 502-254-8514, ncease@mfdc.net. Pediatric Dentist Needed: We have an outstanding full time opportunity for a Pediatric Dentist in our successful, wellrespected, quality-oriented private pediatric dental practice for the right candidate. We are seeking a special, motivated, personable full time pediatric dentist to join in our success. We are a booming practice with tremendous growth and earning potential. We offer in office sedation. We offer excellent compensation and benefits. For more information, please contact Dr. Vishant Nath at (678) 763-2600 or email drnath@kidshappyteeth.com or you can contact Amanda at (678) 352-1090 or (678) 352-1090 / (678) 429-9931. CLASSIFIEDS Continued on page 32

31

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:11 AM

CLASSIFIEDS Continued from page 31

Coast Dental is one of the largest providers of general and specialty dental care in the United States with practices in California, Florida, Georgia, Nevada, and Texas. Coast Dental is currently looking for General Dentists and Specialist to practice in the greater Atlanta area. We have full and part-time opportunities available for experienced dentists to practice where contributions are valued and the sky is the limit on opportunities to grow. Coast Dental offers competitive wages with sign-on bonuses available for select locations, a great benefits package and a chance to work with advanced technology and devoted people who take a visionary approach to making every patients smile a work of art. If you are interested in an opportunity in one of our practices, please email psherberg@ coastdental.com or apply online at www.coastdental.com/careers/dentists.

Page 32

Practices / Office Space Available Fantastic Fayetteville Opportunity! Build or expand the practice of your dreams in this large dental suite comprising 3,600 square feet, rent part or all. Ideally located in affluent neighborhood with high visibility on Hwy 85. Equipped with 11 operatories, extensive closet space, dark room, kitchen, restroom, and office. Great landlord! Available immediately, incentives offered. Contact Peter at (907) 250-8822 or padipete@gmail.com. Available Dental Spaces for Specialist! Stockbridge, Fayetteville, Duluth, and Riverdale locations. Ideal for Pediatric Dentist, Periodontist, Endodontist, or Oral Surgeon looking to add satellite location or new startup. Already plumbed & fully equipped with 4 operatories and room for 2-3 more. Save time and money by sharing space in these new multi-specialty locations. Contact us at: dentalspecialist2@gmail.com.

Available: NORTH ATLANTA #8897— Gross Collections $1.57M; COLUMBUS AREA #8824—Gross Collections $389K; ATLANTA ORAL SURGERY #8887— Gross Collections $1.1M; ATLANTA PERIO #5241—Gross Collections $1.3M. For more information, call Dr. Earl Douglas (770) 664-1982 or email earl@adssouth.com. South Georgia: High net practice, $850,000 gross. Insurance and FFS 60% with 4 ops. Hunting, fishing, and golf paradise. Call Dr. John Wagner (636) 517-1136. Available: CANTON: Beautiful office grossing $393,000, 4 operatories. LAKE OCONEE AREA: Exceptional opportunity, grossing $823K. NORTH ATLANTA: Gorgeous new facility with 6 operatories, grossing $1.4M with high volume of cosmetics and implants. WOODSTOCK: Beautiful 5 operatory office grossing $400K. Richane Swedenburg, New South Dental Transitions: (770) 630-0436 or info@newsouthdental.com. Check new listings, www.newsouthdental.com. CLASSIFIEDS Continued on page 34

32

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:11 AM

Page 33

33

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:11 AM

Page 34

board minutes

CLASSIFIEDS Continued from page 32

Unofficial Minutes of the April 6, 2013, Board of Trustees Meeting Only the persons present, resolutions passed, and key issues discussed at this meeting are printed in this journal. For full minutes, visit www.gadental.org. If you do not have Internet access, contact Phyllis Willich at (800) 432-4357 for a copy of the minutes. President Sidney Tourial called the meeting to order on April 6, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. After the invocation and pledge of allegiance to the flag led by Dr. Byron Colley, Secretary/Treasurer Dr. Jim Hall called the roll and declared a quorum. Present: Dr. Sidney Tourial, presiding; Drs. David Bradberry, Robert Carpenter, Byron Colley, Brad Hall, Jim Hall, Jim Hutson (for Stan Halpern), Jay Harrington, Ben Jernigan, Mike Loden, Marshall Mann, Greg Morris, Robin Reich, Ben Duval (for Julie Ann Routhier), Steve Sample, Ched Smaha, Ed Smith, Doug Torbush, Mike Vernon, Carol Wolff. Absent: Dr. Erik Wells; Visitors: Drs. Elizabeth Lewis and Richard Weinman. GDA staff: Martha Phillips, Nelda Greene, Delaine Hall, Skip Jones, Courtney Layfield, Meg Robinson, Melana McClatchey, Phyllis Willich, Pam Yungk. Minutes: The minutes of the January 12, 2013, meeting were approved by general consent. President’s Report: Dr. Tourial stated that Dr. Jim Reynierson has resigned from the ADA Delegation. He thanked Dr. Reynierson for his many years of dedicated service on the Delegation and for his tenure as Delegation Chairman. ADA Delegation: Due to the resignation of Dr. Jim Reynierson as the Eastern District’s Delegate, the Eastern District nominated Dr. Mike Vernon to fill the unexpired term of Dr. Reynierson (expires 1/14). [13-4.01] Dr. Marshall Mann moved to approve the nomination of Dr. Mike Vernon to fill the unexpired term (January 2014) of Dr. Jim Reynierson on the ADA Delegation. The motion passed unanimously.

34

GDA ACTION JUNE 2013

Governmental Affairs Committee: The Board recognized the efforts of those dentists participating in the LAW Day Program. The District Challenge for LAW Day was won by the Central District. Following are the district percentages for participation of district membership in LAW Day: Central—12%; Northwestern—7%; Southwestern—6%; Northern—4%; Eastern and Western—3%; Southeastern— 0. Public Relations Committee: Dr. Robin Reich presented action items from the Committee’s March conference call and asked for ratification of these items: [13-4.02] Dr. Robin Reich moved for the GDA to contract with the Colorado Dental Association for a 12 month period to provide the Business Brief videos via email to GDA member dentists. The motion passed unanimously. Dr. Reich presented the proposed policy concerning skyscraper ads on the GDA web site. The recommended policy is to incentivize GDA Action advertisers to sign a six or 12-month contract for display ads in GDA Action and then they can purchase a skyscraper ad on the GDA web site for an additional cost. Advertising will not be on the home page and dentists’ practice ads will not be listed. [13-4.03] Dr. Robin Reich moved to approve the GDA web site advertising policy as presented. The motion passed unanimously. Adjourn: Being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 1:30 p.m.

NORTH FULTON COUNTY: Small, well-established practice in a great location! Consistently collecting $300K. Doctor to retire and building is for sale. Please call or email for details using reference #GA1032. For more information call (678) 482-7305, email amanda@southeasttransitions.com, or visit www.southeasttransitions.com. COBB COUNTY GEM: Long term, bread & butter practice, in a fantastic location with lots of room for growth! Staff will stay on after the transition. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to grow in a very desirable area! Please call or email for details using reference #GA1031. For more information call (678) 482-7305, email amanda@southeasttransitions.com, or visit www.southeasttransitions.com.

EDITORIAL Continued from page 5 Difference” campaign to reduce the numbers of adults and children with untreated dental disease through oral health education, prevention, and providing treatment to people in need of care. That is a positive step to get the message out to our communities that dentists can provide the best care and are there for them day and night. Are you sharing information about the campaign with your colleagues and those in your community? Are you talking with consumers about the ADA’s 2min2x campaign that encourages caregivers to brush children’s teeth two minutes two times a day and see a dentist? During my first year as editor, I have been blunt about the challenges we face. The storm is here. We must act to educate those inside and outside the profession so that when the winds subside we are still a strong and highly reputable profession. Graduates, welcome to the profession. Please add the preservation of your profession to your to do list.


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:12 AM

Page 35


GDAction 0613 using.qxd

1/12/04

10:12 AM

Page 36

Inside This Issue • Register for the GDA Annual Meeting by July 1 • GRU Dental Dean Dr. Connie Drisko Discusses Her 10 Years of Leadership DATED MATERIAL PLEASE DELIVER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

ACTION

Suite 200, Building 17, 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Road Atlanta, Georgia 30328-1655 www.gadental.org


GDA Action June 2013