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2009

ACTION

THE JOURNAL OF THE GEORGIA DENTAL ASSOCIATION

MAY 2009

C e l e b r a t i n g 1 5 0 Y e a r s o f Se r v i c e & A d v o c a c y

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VOLUME 29, NUMBER 5 • MAY 2009

ACTION GDA ACTION (ISSN 0273-5989) The official publication of the Georgia Dental Association (GDA) is published monthly. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDA Action at 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Road N.E., Suite 200, Building 17, Atlanta, GA 30328. Phone numbers in state are (404) 636-7553 and (800) 432-4357. www.gadental.org. Closing date for copy: first of the month preceding publication month. Subscriptions: $17 of membership dues is for the newsletter; all others, $75 per year. Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, GA. Dr. Jonathan Dubin GDA Editor 2970 Clairmont Rd Suite 195 Atlanta, GA 30329

Delaine Hall GDA Managing Editor 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd NE Suite 200, Building 17 Atlanta, GA 30328

on the cover You are invited to register for the 142nd GDA Annual Meeting in Asheville, North Carolina, which is July 30 to August 2, 2009. Join your fellow GDA members at the historic Grove Park Inn. Use the form in the center of this issue to register for the meeting and buy your event tickets (dentists may also register online at www.gadental.org).

2008-2009 Georgia Dental Association Officers Mark S. Ritz, DDS, President Kent H. Percy, DDS, President Elect John F. Harrington Jr., DDS, Vice President James B. Hall III, DDS, MS, Secretary/Treasurer Jonathan S. Dubin, DMD, Editor

GDA/GDIS/PDRS Executive Office Staff Members Martha S. Phillips, Executive Director Lisa Chandler, Director of Member Services Nelda H. Greene, MBA, Associate Executive Director Delaine Hall, Director of Communications Skip Jones, Director of Operations (PDRS) Barbara Kaul, Property and Casualty Accounts Manager Courtney Layfield, Director of Administrative Services Victoria LeMaire, Medical Accounts Manager Melana Kopman McClatchey, General Counsel Denis Mucha, Director of Operations (GDIS) George Stewart, Operations Manager (PDRS) Phyllis Willich, Administrative Assistant Pamela K. Yungk, Director of Membership & Finance GDA Action seeks to be an issues-driven journal focusing on current matters affecting Georgia dentists, patients, and their treatment, accomplished through disseminating information and providing a forum for member commentary. © Copyright 2009 by the Georgia Dental Association. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. Publication of any article or advertisement should not be deemed an endorsement of the opinions expressed or products advertised. The Association expressly reserves the right to refuse publication of any article, photograph, or advertisement.

Member Publication American Association of Dental Editors

other features

sections

14

How the ARRA COBRA Subsidy Affects Dentists

4

Parting Shots

16

Annual Meeting Registration Form (Special Insert)

5

Editorial

7

Letters to the Editor

8

ADA Commentary

9

Guest Commentary

11

News and Views

26

Event Calendar

27

Classifieds

17

Florida Court Strikes Down Dental Advertising Law

18

Update on FTC Red Flag Rule and Dentistry

19

History Spotlight: GDA Communication Vehicles

22

GDA Members Learn Valuable Lessons at ADA Workshop

24

Alliance of the GDA Shines at Leadership Conference

index of advertisers Note: Publication of an advertisement is not to be construed as an endorsement or approval by the GDA or any of its subsidiaries, committees, or task forces of the product or service offered in the

advertisement unless the advertisement specifically includes an authorized statement that such approval or endorsement has been granted.

ADS South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Georgia Dental Insurance Services

. . . . . . . .32

Professional Debt Recovery Services . . . . . . . .6

AFTCO Transition Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Great Expressions Dental Centers . . . . . . . . . .17

Professional Practice Management . . . . . . . . .28

Center for TMJ Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Hungeling & Sons PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Scott R. Green, DMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Dentist Available Dr. Mark Rabin . . . . . . . . . . .27

Law Office of Stuart J. Oberman . . . . . . . . . . .15

Southeast Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

The Doctor’s Safety Net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Medical Protective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Sullivan Wickley Properties, LLC . . . . . . . . . . .25

GDA Dental Recovery Network . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Paragon Dental Practice Transitions . . . . . . . .30

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editorial perspective Not To Be Forgotten

Jonathan S. Dubin, DMD

xx

With all of the clamoring about access to care and about providing funding and dental care for children, much less attention is given to another deserving group. These individuals may reside in rural or urban settings and are likely to be of lower socioeconomic status. They may be children in fact, but in reality are perpetually children. Developmentally disabled individuals are just that. Not many of us think specifically about treating these individuals, although most of us have special needs patients in our practices. These individuals with special needs have numerous barriers placed in front of them. The initial barrier is unfamiliarity. Just as some practices do not see children, if I were to call a number of practices and ask if they would treat a person with special needs and disabilities—someone who may not be the perfect patient—a percentage of those practices would answer ‘no’ simply because of a fear that they may not be able to accommodate the patient physically or emotionally. I can tell you from the perspective of someone who performs oral screenings at the Special Smiles Program held during the Special Olympics each year that if dentists had the opportunity to work with these patients they would find out that they are just patients. They may have limitations of varying degrees but their oral health is generally not that much different than that of other patients. It is estimated that 70 to 80 percent of developmentally disabled individuals can be treated in a private practice setting with only a minor modification of our normal treatment protocol. Those individuals who are adults often need to be handled as pediatric patients. Even though most can be seen in private offices, Special Smiles Program statistics tell us that these individuals have much fewer sealants than other individuals. This potentially means that they are less likely to have seen a dentist or have had any oral health care.

What of the other portion of the developmentally disabled population apart from that 70 to 80 percent? Each person’s needs are different, and in the special needs category this is true whether it is a medical condition, mental situation, or physical handicap. These persons may require a more individual treatment scenario. Specialized equipment may be required. Sedation of some degree and possibly patient management techniques are sometimes needed. Those persons with complicated medical conditions and on certain types of medications may in fact not be served adequately by a typical general dental office. Not many dentists, outside of our pediatric dentists, are trained to treat or have the equipment to treat these special needs. As Commission on Dental Accreditation standards have demanded competency in assessing treatment needs, schools are beginning to incorporate care for the developmentally disabled into their curriculum. This is important to eliminate dentists’ fear of treating these individuals, or at least eliminating their fear of examining and diagnosing these individuals so they can make an appropriate referral. Eventually this will help erase one barrier. But where will a dentist then refer a patient he or she feels needs care elsewhere? A few years ago the state made budget cuts that closed many of the regional hospital facilities capable of rendering dental care to these persons. The current, dour economic climate does not bode well for those few facilities left. The small number of equipped, staffed treatment facilities means long travel times. In addition, there is limited reimbursement available for care for the developmentally disabled on public assistance programs. As a whole, this population is more likely to be marginally employed if employed at all, and EDITORIAL Continued on page 6

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EDITORIAL Continued from page 5

they are less likely to have financial resources available to procure treatment. Medicaid coverage for dental care is limited, and Medicare does not provide coverage at all. Those persons with severe disabilities face even greater financial barriers and usually have fewer resources, even those with family support. This exceptionally vulnerable population appears to have the greatest access issues. And as director of the Special Smiles Program who has cared for these patients time and again, I can testify that no mid-level provider, no Advanced Dental Hygiene Practitioner or Community Dental Health Coordinator can adequately address this population’s needs. These persons require care from a dentist. There are dentists who dedicate much of their practices and talents to caring for special needs individuals, such as Dr. Deidra

Rondeno and her DDD Foundation, but their efforts make hardly a dent on the treatment needs in our bustling state. What is the answer? Not long ago, the GDA commissioned a task force, on which I served, to study this issue. We concluded that education, equipment, and most of all money were required before we could address access issues for the developmentally disabled and special needs population. Let’s educate ourselves to an even greater extent and let us continue to advocate for funding.

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letters to the editor Dr. Dubin, I am amazed that dental organizations in other states are showing favor towards mid-level providers (President’s Commentary “Mid-Level Providers and Independent Dental Hygiene Practitioners: They’re Here…What Now?” March 2009). Although we as dentists are certainly not all-knowing, our years of education and experience surely give us an edge over someone right out of high school with only a couple years training. We in dentistry have been in the catbird seat watching as our medical colleagues have allowed their profession to fall into the hands of the “Big Brother” of managed care. Their many levels of providers are probably necessary for them to keep their heads above water. So far dentistry has, for the most part, been able to steer clear of that. How can the allowing of independent hygiene practice and other mid-level providers truly meet the needs of the people who need them? Think about it...the independent practice of dental hygiene could not possibly be good use of tax (or out-of-pocket by the patient) dollars. I greatly value the dental hygienists who work along with me. I trust their judgment and value their opinions. However, for the

population in need, would they be better served to have clean teeth or have a dentist be able to treat the disease that is probably there? Would they be better served by a teenager who can barge in like Rambo or by a skilled professional who knows how to handle unexpected complications? It is my opinion that we as dentists should step up to the plate and fight against this. Our government is spiraling us toward socialized medicine (or socialism altogether). Organized dentistry has worked very hard through the years to establish our profession as a top-level provider in health care. We should not sit idly by and watch our own demise! I did have one more question for the legislators voting on this issue—whose chair do you want yourself and your family to sit in?

Sincerely, Dr. Alicia M. Rix Rome, Georgia

The Georgia Dental Association will not publish unsigned letters submitted to GDA Action, or letters submitted under a name the GDA office cannot verify. The GDA Editor reserves the right to edit all letters for clarity and length. Unpublished letters will not be returned. Opinions presented in letters and commentaries are the authors’ opinions, and do not necessarily reflect the adopted policies of the Georgia Dental Association. Questions, comments, and submissions may be directed to the GDA office by phone at (404) 636-7553, by fax at (404) 633-3943, or by email to hall@gadental.org.

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guest commentary Choosing a Public Health Setting for My Dental Career

Amelia B. Granberry, DMD

Access to care is a popular topic right now. States are pursuing several avenues to address what they see as shortcomings in reaching out to low income, elderly, or other designated populations. I wanted to offer some perspectives on how I decided to begin my dental career helping a “special population.” I did not initially think of working in the rural public health arena. But during my senior year of dental school at the Medical College of Georgia in 2008 we were given the opportunity to do a rotation in a public health setting. I worked with Dr. Charles Roszel in Rome, Georgia, at the Floyd County Health Department Regional Dental Clinic, and learned so much. I believe I am the fourth recent dental school graduate who did a rotation at the clinic to choose a rural public health career. During and after my time there I knew that was what I was meant to do. I had found my niche. The facility where I work Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. is the Primary Health Care Center in Trenton, Georgia, a Federally Qualified Health Center about 15 minutes away from Chattanooga, Tennessee. The center’s mission is to provide high quality, affordable, and accessible preventive services, primary health care, and dental services to all individuals, regardless of ability to pay. Our service area includes the counties of Catoosa, Chattooga, Dade, and Walker counties in Georgia; Jackson and DeKalb counties in Alabama; and Hamilton and Marion counties in Tennessee. However, our services are available to the general public, regardless of income or whether they reside in these counties. I stopped by the center when I was on a trip with my mother to Nashville, Tennessee, to do an informal interview, and I really felt drawn to work there. Turns out they wanted me to work there too. The services we provide in the dental department are mainly extractions and fillings. Many of the patients who come in have not

had access to dental care either in years or ever. Many patients don’t have the money for dental care, or it just wasn’t a part of their upbringing to put any emphasis on oral hygiene or care. In just one week this past March, for example, I performed extractions on two patients—a 48-year-old man and a 60year-old female—who had never been to a dentist. Never. I also recently performed full mouth extractions on a 26-year-old woman. So, I try to educate my patients on how to obtain and keep good oral health for themselves and their families. And they do want to learn. A lot of the patients are oblivious to what is causing their teeth to deteriorate. Mountain Dew soft drink consumption is a huge problem here, as is bottle caries—some parents pour the soft drink into the bottles. Some people drink 10 or 12 soft drink cans a day. It affects adults and teenagers, and even younger children. It’s painful to both me and the children when I have to extract permanent teeth from someone still in elementary school. It’s not that my patients are trying to rot their teeth out. It takes a lot of time just educating the patient. Then the patients tend to send their whole families, neighbors, and friends to obtain dental care. The way I get 90% of my patients is word of mouth. It feels good to see you’re making a difference. I wondered when I accepted the job here if I would develop the close bonds with patients and their families that often get developed by private practitioners. Luckily, I have been welcomed into this tightly knit community. What has helped is that I live in the community. I found a house in Trenton the day I accepted the job here. I had never lived in a rural area before. I am delighted at how I was accepted and feel like I’ve lived

GUEST COMMENTARY Continued on page 10

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ADA COMMENTARY Continued from page 8

unanimously felt that the ADA should approach CMS and obtain clarification, including written agreement, that the ADA would assume the leadership role in this Alliance and have the ability to determine if participation should continue. The Board agreed with the consensus of the councils. At this time discussion is occurring with CMS and the ADA is awaiting written confirmation of the terms for proceeding with a role in DQA. It is natural that this may take time with the change in administration this year.

ADA Executive Director Named Last, I want to mention the ADA’s search for an executive director. The Search Committee forwarded recommendations to the Board and interviews were conducted in early January. There was a second round of interviews held by the Board over the next several weeks. There were about 200 applicants initially, with the field narrowed to about 50 that fulfilled the qualifications set by the Board. I am pleased to announce that the Board of Trustees has selected Dr. Kathleen T. O’Loughlin, D.M.D., M.P.H, of Medford, Massachusetts, to serve as the next ADA Executive Director / Chief Operating Officer, effective June 1, 2009. ADA President Dr. John Findley stated about the selection that “Dr. O’Loughlin’s background represents the right mix of experiences we sought in an executive director” and we certainly agree. I recognize that some may ask why this process took so long—over 11 months. The Board felt that due to the importance of filling this job, we wanted to do due diligence to our responsibility. Here is some background on our new executive director as prepared by the ADA executive office: Prior to joining the ADA staff, Dr. O’Loughlin worked briefly for United Healthcare as its chief dental officer after having served as a consultant to Tufts University School of Dental Medicine on curriculum development in preparation for expansion of the

GUEST COMMENTARY Continued from page 9

here my whole life. I love these patients. I love seeing them in town. I never expected to love my job as much as I do. The center employed perhaps five or six dentists in the last few years, and with the turnover I think the trust level did not develop as it should have. I hope I am addressing that. While I enjoy the small town atmosphere, it is difficult to see so many of these residents face tough circumstances. Some residents don’t own cars or struggle to earn gas money. So many people have been affected by the downturn in the economy and its effect on the textile industry. For instance, Shaw Industries recently closed a plant in Trenton and 440 people lost their jobs, and there were no other employers to absorb those people. And their lack of mobility prevents them from traveling distances for work. We work on a sliding scale according to income, and most of our patients qualify at $12,000 or below for a family.

dental school facility and the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Science, Forsyth School of Dental Hygiene in preparation for their 2009 Accreditation. From 2002-2007, Dr. O’Loughlin served as president and chief executive officer of Dental Services of Massachusetts, Inc. (d.b.a. Delta Dental of Massachusetts) where, through her leadership, the company doubled its reserves, increased membership by 400 percent and executed a successful five-year growth plan.

She also served as the president of the Oral Health Foundation of Massachusetts (now called DentaQuest Foundation) and is an assistant clinical professor in the Tufts Department of General Dentistry. She is a member of the Tufts University Board of Trustees. For more than 25 years, Dr. O’Loughlin has been an active member in the American Dental Association and the Massachusetts Dental Society (MDS). She is a member of the American College of Dentists and editor of its New England Section. Other memberships include the International College of Dentists, the Santa Fe Group, Pierre Fauchard Academy, American Association of Women Dentists and the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Alumni Association. She has served as a member of the ADA Workforce Models National Coordinating and Development Committee, the MDS Council on Public Affairs, the Massachusetts Oral Health Advocacy Task Force and Health Care For All: For the People, campaign co-chair. Dr. O’Loughlin also is a member of the boards of directors of Oral Health America, Biomedical Science Careers program at Harvard Medical School, and the Children’s Dental Health Project, Washington, D.C. She is married and the mother of four. I hope you will join with me in welcoming Dr. O’Loughlin to this important leadership position.

I love the camaraderie and friendship with the other employees and health care professionals at the center. We all work there for the same reason—we want to help those in need. It is wonderful to work with the dental and medical students from MCG and the students who intern here. It is difficult however, because although the center receives federal money for caring for uninsured patients, it is not enough. We cannot do all the outreach I would like for instance. And with the number of formerly insured patients we have, we are losing money providing care. However, I really believe this center can address the access to care issue in this area. I feel our center can help break the cycle so the children of the parents we reach don’t end up in dentures by the time they’re 30. There’s a lot of difference to be made. It is a matter of adequate funding to bring dentists to these areas, proper education of the individuals who are here, and earning trust from the patients. There’s no glitz and glam but there are plenty of genuine, kind, wonderful people in this area who appreciate everything you do for them. I encourage all new dentists, all dentists really, to consider working in the rural public health area. You can make a difference. I love what I do and I’m thankful to be where I am.

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members in the news Ferguson featured in NY Times story on economic conditions in West Georgia The automotive plant is seen as a lifesaver for this small town racked by the closure of its mainstay textile mills. Kia has hired 500 people thus far, and is sifting through more than 43,000 applications it accepted online last year. Eventually, the company will employ 2,500 people. However, the plant’s suppliers will employ approximately 7,500 people. Several retail establishments, including Korean restaurants, have already opened in the town to serve Kia administrators and construction personnel, and the town is planning its first new subdivision in 25 years. These new

businesses are expected to generate many more jobs. Dr. Ferguson’s father, Drew Ferguson III, was the chairman of the West Point Development Authority that in 2005 helped cement the land purchases and negotiations that opened the way for the signing of the Kia contract. Kudos to the Ferguson family for their efforts in revitalizing this part of Western District.

Dr. Drew Ferguson.

Drew Ferguson IV, DMD, a general dentist in Western District, also wears the hat of mayor of the town of West Point near the Georgia-Alabama border. The city of fewer than 3,500 residents is welcoming the opening of a Kia Motors Corporation automobile manufacturing plant at the end of this year. The plant, the company’s first in North America, will build the Sorento vehicle. The April 22, 2009, New York Times ran a feature story on the town’s sunny jobs outlook in this time of economic gloom in which not only was Dr. Ferguson quoted, but photographed for an illustration to the story. While wearing his mayor hat, Dr. Ferguson, a 1992 Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry graduate and 2002 Western District president, is tasked with managing West Point’s growth. He told the Times, “We’re the only place in the nation that is fixing to put between 7 and 10,000 manufacturing jobs online. We are the place that has the light at the end of the tunnel.”

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MCG dental students make splash at ASDA meeting The American Student Dental Association held its annual session in March, and several ASDA members from the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry made an impressive showing. Congratulations to William Bennett, who was elected by the ASDA House of Delegates as one of two Vice Presidents. Mr. Bennett, a junior, previously served ASDA as a district trustee. Kudos as well to MCG sophomore Jack O’Neill, who was appointed as chair of the Legislative Grassroots Network Council, one of six ASDA councils. As chair, Mr. O’Neill will supervise and direct the activities of the council and facilitate council meetings. Council chairs assist the ASDA in identifying programs and developing policies to meet the needs and interests of dental students and the profession. In addition, congratulations to MCG junior Darron Alvord, who was honored as the MCG junior William Bennett Legislative Liaison for the Year addresses the ASDA House for all ASDA chapters. Darron of Delegates as one of two has been involved with many enwly elected vice presidents. legislative outreach initiatives,

(L to r): MCG ASDA Treasurer-Elect Ryan Fulchi, MCG ASDA President-Elect Chris DeLeon, 2008-09 ASDA Council on Membership Chair Dusty Janssen (Baylor), 2009-10 ASDA Legislative Grassroots Network Chair Jack O’Neill (MCG), and 2008-09 ASDA Vice President Matt Davis (Nebraska).

and has attended the GDA Student LAW Day and the ASDA National Dental Student Lobby Day. Finally, MCG’s ASDA chapter received an Honorable Mention of Ideal Chapter for Outstanding Advocacy and was recognized for having the highest percentage involvement in ADPAC for all ASDA chapters.

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ADA laboratory tests find lead not released from dental crowns Comprehensive testing and analyses by the American Dental Association (ADA) found no detectable amount of lead released from the 102 porcelain-metal dental crowns evaluated even under extreme laboratory testing conditions. Scientists from the ADA Division of Science and the ADA’s Paffenbarger Research Center (PRC) laboratories in Gaithersburg, MD, conducted the tests in response to concern over the safety of dental crowns. The PRC laboratory analyzed 44 porcelain powders—raw materials used to make dental crowns—from different manufacturers and 102 finished porcelainmetal crowns produced by domestic and foreign dental laboratories. Lead can be found in a number of porcelain products such as dinner plates and figurines. Feldspathic porcelain is a natural mineral that is mined from the earth and refined for dental use. As such, porcelain will contain naturally occurring trace elements of lead in varying concentrations, depending on the source and refining process. In assessing for total lead content, ADA scientists dissolved the powders and finished crowns, and measured the amount of lead remaining in the solution, finding only trace amounts of the naturally occurring element. The results ranged from below detectable to 113 parts per million (ppm) in the 44 porcelain powders, and an average of 46 ppm in the 102 porcelain dental crowns. The researchers also tested the finished crowns for the release of lead (to test the potential body exposure to the element) under laboratory conditions far more extreme than could occur in the mouth. This testing yielded no measureable lead escaping from the porcelain crown (with a limit of detection at one ppm), even under accelerated acidic conditions at elevated temperatures. “Based on all the information to date, both from our own testing as well as reports of other analyses, we are confident that no measurable levels of lead are released from dental crowns made from dental porcelain typical of available sources,” explains Clifton Carey, Ph.D., administrative director, PRC. He added, “Moreover, we intentionally added lead to a separate sample of dental crowns and found that even up to 500 ppm

of lead levels, no measurable amount was released. This was a much higher total concentration than any laboratoryfabricated crown tested.” Questions were raised in February 2008 about lead in dental restoratives such as crowns and bridges when an Ohio woman speculated in a news report that the problems she experienced with her bridge might be because of its manufacture at a dental laboratory in China. At a time when other products from China were under

scrutiny, the local news station investigated the issue and sent the bridge to a local laboratory for lead testing. The station then had several dental crowns manufactured in China tested, and one crown reportedly tested positive for lead. At the time however, no accepted standardized method existed to measure lead content of dental materials such as porcelain, or whether lead is released from dental crowns in the mouth. (From www.ada.org)

In Memoriam The GDA extends sympathy to the family and colleagues of the following individuals. For full obituaries on these member dentists, visit www.gadental.org or call the GDA office. Paul R. Hauser, DMD, who died April 1, 2009, at the age of 62. Dr. Hauser was a member of the GDA through the Northern District. He was a 1976 Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry graduate and general practitioner. His daughter, Dr. Jennifer Hauser Bisig, is a GDA member dentist. Bruce H. Rice, DDS, PhD, who died April 6, 2009, at the age of 85. Dr. Rice, resident of Loma Linda, California, was a founding faculty member of the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry. He served as professor and chair of the department of oral medicine from 1968 until his retirement in 1988. He graduated from the University of Southern California dental school in 1943. Charles R. Stearns, DDS, who died August 31, 2008, at the age of 67. Dr. Stearns was a member of the GDA through the Northern District. He graduated from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery (Loyola) in 1967 and served in the U.S. Navy in Albany, GA, from 1967-1969. He later practiced in Winder and Lilburn, GA.

Past GDA President Rollin Elliott Mallernee, DDS, who died April 13, 2009, at the age of 95. Dr. Mallernee was a member of the GDA through the Northern District. Dr. Mallernee served as GDA President in 1981. Dr. Mallernee received his dental degree from the Atlanta-Southern Dental College (which later became the dental component of Emory University) in 1943. He served for five years as Chairman of the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Loma Linda University in California. He was a member of the Georgia delegation to the ADA House of Delegates, was a member of the ADA Council on Journalism and Council on Annual Session. He served for six years as Editor of the Journal of the Georgia Dental Association, and was a past president of the American Association of Dental Editors. He was an Honorable Fellow of the GDA and an ADA Life Member. He was a member of the OKU Dental Honor Society, and a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and the International College of Dentists. He served as ICD Regent for six years and in 1982 was President of the U.S. Section of the ICD. Surviving are his wife, Betty Mallernee of Dawsonville; and son and daughterin-law, Rollin II and Karen Mallernee.

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How the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act COBRA Subsidy Affects Dentists The following is an explanation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) COBRA Subsidy and how it pertains to dentistry. This federal legislation was signed into law on February 17, 2009. There are two categories of coverage: (1) employers with 20 or more employees fall under COBRA; (2) employers with 19 or fewer employees fall under the Georgia Continuation Law. Currently under COBRA an employer must offer a terminated employee coverage at the employee’s expense for 18 months and up to 36 months for the employee’s dependents. Under the Georgia Continuation Law a terminated employee can apply for Georgia Continuation Coverage for up to 90 days—

this, too, is at the employee’s own expense. Because most dentist employers will likely fall into the “19 or fewer employees” category, we’ll limit our main explanation of the Act to that category. For this group, the effective date of coverage under the ARRA begins with employees losing coverage after February 17, 2009, through December 31, 2009. However, it is important to remember that to be eligible to elect Georgia Continuation Coverage an employee must have been on the medical plan for a minimum of six months prior to termination. Under the ARRA, an employee involuntarily separated from their job becomes eligible for premium assistance and is

referred to as an Assistance Eligible Individual (AEI). The terminated employee must be offered Georgia Continuation Coverage at the time of termination. If the terminated employee chooses the Georgia Continuation Coverage option the employer is obligated to pay 65% of the entire medical premium for this individual even if they were not contributing anything prior to the termination. The individual must pay the remaining 35%. The dentist will receive reimbursement from the government of the employer-paid 65% of the premium in the form of an offset in the amount of payroll tax due by the amount of Subsidy reimbursement. The employer (dentist) must file a claim for reimbursement with the IRS when they submit their

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payroll taxes. Note, however, that this process is yet to be developed. Assistance Eligible Individuals earning more than $145,000 ($290,000 joint) will have their income tax increased by the total amount of the Subsidy they receive. Individuals earning more than $125,000 but less than $145,000 (more than $250,000 but less than $290,000 joint) will have their income tax increased by a percentage of their total Subsidy received in that year. This recapture will occur when they file their personal income tax return. The Georgia Continuation Law only provides coverage for three months. After 90 days the person will have to find their own coverage or become eligible under another employer’s insurance plan. All employers (dentists) offering health insurance in their practices are affected by this and MUST convey these facts to an employee at termination. Please note that all Georgia Dental Insurance Services (GDIS) medical plan

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clients will receive specific information to help them provide appropriate notification. This time there is an advantage to being a small business owner. Most dental practices employ 19 or fewer persons. Larger organizations that employee 20 or more individuals are required to go back and cover terminated employees starting from September 1, 2008. Most dental practices will not be responsible for the cost for 18 or 36 months required under COBRA elections affecting organizations employing 20 or more persons. This program keeps with President Obama’s theme of providing universal healthcare and is an attempt to keep more people off the uninsured rolls. Other initiatives relating to universal healthcare are on the drawing table and will have to be monitored closely.

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Florida Court Strikes Down Dental Advertising Law An April 3, 2009, Florida Circuit Court ruling has granted dentists the right to advertise their membership in and credentials received from organizations not recognized as specialty organizations by the Florida Board of Dentistry. This Court found that a Florida statute restricting advertisement of such credentials violated the Florida Constitution’s guarantee of the right to be rewarded for industry or professional achievement as well as the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. Dr. Francis DuCoin along with several other Florida dentists filed the lawsuit against the State’s Surgeon General asserting their right to advertise their credentials earned from organizations not recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA). Just like many other dental boards, the Florida Board of Dentistry only acknowledged credentials issued by specialty organizations recognized by the ADA. In order to advertise such non-recognized credentials in Florida, dentists were required to include the following disclaimer(s):

interpretation of Florida law, which is first a matter for Florida authorities to comment on. The American Dental Association provides ethical guidance to its members, but is not a regulatory agency. Whether an individual qualifies to practice dentistry and the rules governing dental practice are matters of state regulation flowing from the state’s obligation to protect its residents.” The Circuit Court’s decision permanently enjoins the Florida Board of Dentistry from enforcing the statute. At press time, it was not clear whether the Florida Board of Dentistry would appeal this ruling. Keep in mind this ruling does not affect the current laws and rules governing Georgia’s dentists. The GDA will keep a close watch on this issue and provide updates as they become available.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide legal advice. Dentists must consult with their private attorneys for such advice.

(Name of the announced area of dental practice) is not recognized as a specialty area by the American Dental Association or the Florida Board of Dentistry or (Name of referenced organization) is not recognized as a bona fide specialty accrediting organization by the American Dental Association or the Florida Board of Dentistry. At trial the Florida Board of Dentistry argued that the disclaimers were necessary to reduce consumer confusion as well as safeguard consumers from mistakenly placing trust in organizations which may not be credible. Florida Circuit Court Judge Frank Sheffield found this contention unpersuasive. His order concluded that the disclaimer was an unreasonable restriction on commercial speech and “…did not act as an information guide for consumers but rather constituted a total denial of any effective means of advertising valid credentials.” In response to the news of this court decision, the ADA issued a statement: “The DuCoin decision concerns an

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Information for Dentists on the FTC Red Flag Rule Melana Kopman McClatchey General Counsel

As previously reported in Action (October 2008), the Red Flag Rule is a regulation issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) requiring any business that may provide credit to customers to take certain steps to guard against identity theft. After a six month delay, the rule was slated to go into effect on May 1, 2009. On April 30, 2009, the FTC issued a press release delaying the enforcement of the Red Flag Rule for 90 days. This announcement comes on the heels of zealous advocacy by the American Dental Association to prevent dentists from having to comply with this FTC regulation. While this delay does not mean that the regulation will ultimately be overturned, it does give the ADA more time to challenge the application of this rule to dentistry and more time for dentists to determine how to best comply with the rule. For those dentists already implementing a Red Flag Rule program in their office, there is no reason to suspend the program. At this writing, rule enforcement is now slated to begin on August 1, 2009. This article gives more information on the rule as it is now written, details on how to obtain the ADA’s free sample “Identity Theft Detection and Response Policy and Procedures” that can assist dental offices with compliance with the current rule, and an overview of ADA advocacy efforts.

When Might Dental Offices Be Subject to the Red Flag Rule as Currently Written? Dentists who meet the definition of a creditor under the FTC’s rule and have at least one covered account are subject to the Red Flag Rule. Unfortunately, the definition of creditor is so broad that a dental practice is a creditor under the rule if the practice: (a) Sends a bill to a patient for services already rendered;

(b) Agrees to accept installment payments; (c) Arranges for a patient to obtain credit to pay for services through a third party financing company such as CareCredit; or (d) Accepts insurance where the patient is ultimately responsible for payment. Additionally, a covered account is one which a dentist offers or maintains for personal, family, or household purposes and that involves multiple payments or transactions, or any other account that the dentist offers or maintains for which there is a reasonably foreseeable risk to patients of identity theft.

What is a Red Flag? A red flag is a pattern, practice, or specific activity that could indicate identity theft. One example may be an individual who falsely claims to be someone else known to the office staff. Another example could be a new patient who identifies the date of birth on a form and this date does not match the date of birth on his or her driver’s license. These are two examples of possible red flags which may make requesting further proof of identity appropriate.

How Does a Dental Office Comply with the Red Flag Rule as Currently Written? If a dental office is a creditor with at least one covered account, the office must adopt a written policy and procedures designed to: (1) Identify Red Flags relevant to the dental practice; (2) Explain how Red Flags will be detected; (3) Respond to Red Flag incidents that are detected; and

(4) Establish procedures to administer the program as well as ensure that the program is reviewed and updated periodically. While each written identity theft prevention program should contain the four fundamental elements listed above, the FTC has indicated that one size does not fit all and that dentists are free to create a program which best suits their practices.

ADA Offers Assistance to Dentists on Compliance The ADA has worked diligently to persuade the FTC to exclude dentists from the Red Flag Rule. The ADA believes that the rules were never intended to apply to dental practices, because identity theft has never been a serious problem in dental offices. The ADA believes that the rule would have very little benefit, but would add unnecessary costs to the delivery of dental care. In fact, the ADA believes that compelling dentists to comply with the rule could lead to serious conflicts with HIPAA privacy provisions. Therefore, the 90-day delay was welcome. As a member dentist benefit, the ADA has developed a comprehensive guide to help dental offices comply with the Red Flag Rule along with sample policies and procedures. The guide is available at no charge to current members, and can be printed from the ADA web site www.ada.org (http://www.ada.org/prof/index.asp).

This article is meant to provide members with helpful tips. This information is not intended to provide or to be used as legal advice. Each dental practice must appropriately respond to the Red Flag Rule including making a decision about whether the ADA’s information is appropriate for their office after careful consideration and advice from their personal legal counsel.

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Communications and the History of the Georgia Dental Association In 2009, the GDA journal will examine various aspects of the GDA’s 150-year history. This month’s article looks at the history of the journal you are holding, as well as other communications vehicles the GDA has utilized. Do you want to read more about GDA history in general? Visit www.gadental.org to purchase the newly published GDA history book Sesquicentennial for only $25!

October 1899

1932

The Dental World was published to give Georgia State Dental Society members a journal of scientific thought and dental opinion. (The Society became the GDA in 1932.) The first issue featured articles on filling materials, crowns and bridges, combination fillings, the appointment of a dentist for the Georgia State Sanitarium, and the advancement of dentistry. It also contained the proceedings of the 31st Annual Convention in Lithia Springs in June 1899. The publication had three editors—Dr. H. Herbert Johnson, Dr. Thomas P. Hinman, and Dr. W.H. Weaver—and was published until 1903, when it merged with Dental Hints, a product of the Teague Supply Company of Augusta. That publication merged in 1905 with The American Journal of Dental Science, which expired in 1909.

The Bulletin of the Georgia State Dental Society was renamed as the Journal of the Georgia Dental Association in 1932, when the Society changed its name to the Georgia Dental Association.

Swilling Dental Technicians, whose advertising message would have normally filled the space. The photos conveyed public health messages, with children pictured on the left pages “posing” questions to dentists pictured on the right pages.

January 1950

October 1969

The GDA journal ran a “convention in pictures” spread to commemorate the 81st Annual Meeting, the first such photographic spread to appear in a GDA journal.

Dr. Paul Brown resigned as GDA editor after 19 years of service, the longest term of service by any GDA editor before or since.

October 1961

The GDA journal featured a four color cover for the first time. The subject matter was the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry building, used to illustrate a feature article on the November 1972 Recognition Day held at the school. The GDA journal also began listing the graduates of the state’s dental hygiene

March 1928 The Society permanently established the Bulletin of the Georgia State Dental Society. The publication was edited by Dr. Delos L. Hill of Atlanta.

The largest advertising spread in the history of the GDA journal, eight pages, was purchased by Atlanta Dental Supply Company. The first ad from the company that is archived at the GDA office is one from the 1928 Bulletin of the Georgia State Dental Society. The company is the longest-term advertiser with the GDA journal—they still advertise today.

Winter 1972

April 1968 The GDA journal published its first twopage photos, through the courtesy of S.S.

HISTORY Continued on page 20

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HISTORY Continued from page 19

schools, along with their desired areas of practice, and encouraging members to hire a new graduate. At this time, pictures of each graduate were included. The practice of listing the graduates continues in the journal today, but the number of names precludes the inclusion of pictures.

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and four quarterly newsletters in April, June, October, and December as a better way to communicate with members. The intent was to produce a newsletter (the ones published were around six pages long) that could be compiled and printed more quickly than journals.

January 1981

The GDA journal began to accept paid classified ads for the first time, for a charge of 50 cents per word.

The GDA elected to publish 12 monthly newsletters (still entitled Journal of the Georgia Dental Association) and one journal as a way to communicate with members. The GDA also renamed the “journal,” calling it GDAction. The newsletters varied in length from 12 to 20 pages.

June 1979

September 1982

The GDA elected to publish starting in 1980 two journals in February and August

The GDA continued to distribute monthly newsletters to members. In September,

Winter 1974

the GDA redesigned the GDAction newsletter, and called it a publication of the GDA instead of a journal. Where the previous newsletter had been printed on tan stock, the redesigned publication was printed on glossy white stock. This newsletter varied in length from 12 to 28 pages.

July 1985 The first full color feature appeared in the GDA journal—a California Dental Association reprint on “The Diagnosis of AIDS and AIDS-Related Complex in the Dental Office.” GDA Editor Robert Gilbert made a side note to “not glove with every patient—dentistry is a touching profession,” a view widely held at the time.

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June 1987 The cover of GDA Action was redesigned. The GDA Action nameplate became larger, and was centered on the front cover instead of being placed in the upper right corner of the journal’s cover, and that look remains on the cover today.

January 1997 At the House of Delegates meeting, President Jim Hall debuted the GDA Web site, a small handful of Internet pages hosted on the Mindspring Internet provider service (www.mindspring.com/~gadental). Though primitive by today’s standards, the site was state of the art at the time, and provided a valuable way for members and the general public to get information about the GDA and its activities.

March 2001 The GDA Web site received its first significant re-design since 1997. The re-design was featured on the front cover of GDA Action.

September 2006 GDA Action became a full-color publication for the first time since regular publication of a GDA journal began in 1928, 78 years prior.

September 2007 The GDA rolled out a redesigned Web site. The site featured a high energy color scheme as well as increased functionality. New features included a searchable member directory that contains all the information you would find in a printed GDA directory, legal articles, GDA Action articles, meeting minutes, member news, leadership and staff contact information, a GDA calendar, and a legislative update section. The GDA offered secure online dues payments for the first time beginning in October 2007 for active, full dues paying members. As of December 5, 2007, 126 members had paid dues online. The GDA offered secure online Annual Meeting registration in Spring 2008.

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GDA Members Learn Valuable Lessons at ADA Workshop Karyn Stockwell, DMD

This year 140 people representing 30 states, the Alliance dental spouses group, and the National Dental Association attended the ADA Annual Conference on Membership Recruitment and Retention. This year’s theme of “Reaching Out: Contact, Connect, Convert” focused on the importance of networking, building relationships, and communicating value to help organizations increase ADA membership. As chair of the GDA Recruitment and Retention Committee, I was honored to once again represent Georgia at this conference. Others from the GDA who attended were GDA Director of Membership Pam Yungk and Committee members Dr. Wendy Mitchell (Northwestern), Dr. Amanda Merritt (Southwestern), and Dr. Roy Lehrman (Central). Kudos to the CDDS, NWDDS, and SWDDS for seeing the value of sending a representative to this workshop to be energized through innovative speakers and hands-on seminars! We all join in praising this conference for providing practical information and ideas we can implement at the district and / or state level. ADA President Dr. John Findley welcomed the attendees and immediately gave us a new member benefit: a guide for compliance with the new Federal Red Flag Rule. This guidance is also now available to members in the “members only” area of the ADA web site www.ada.org. The guide contains sample identity theft detection and response policy and procedures information that members may download and personalize for their offices. This benefit alone may save members $600 in costs to implement and manage the Red Flag Rule. As personal communication is the key component of the ADA’s membership outreach strategy, Susan RoAne, the “Mingling Maven” kicked off the 2009 conference with her presentation “Connecting through Conversations.” She shared her secrets of savvy networking and how to mingle memorably to help us become more comfortable with networking face-to-face

ADA membership conference attendees from Georgia (l to r): GDA Recruitment and Retention Committee Chair Dr. Karyn Stockwell, Dr. Wendy Mitchell, Dr. Roy Lehrman, GDA Director of Membership Pam Yungk, and Dr. Amanda Merritt.

in order to make contacts, create connections, and build the relationships that contribute to membership success. Information is our most valued resource and the Tripartite Membership Exchange session provided the opportunity to share successful and innovative projects and activities—the best practices in Member Recruitment, Retention, Recognition, Diversity, or Volunteer Recruitment and Retention from around the country. Twelve states were invited to come to the microphone to share the “best practices” that have helped them reach out to members and potential members. Georgia presented the Northwestern District’s “Thanks a Latte” member recognition / retention activity. The district prepared 144 coffee cups for a 2008 meeting as a way to thank returning and new members. Each cup was printed with the Northwestern District logo and “thank you” language and contained biscotti and truffles as well as a Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts gift card. Each gift card was worth at least $5, although there were $10, $15, and $25 cards scattered around, and two $50 ones just waiting for two lucky members. Dr. Susan Doroshow, chair of the ADA Council on Membership unveiled the ADA’s new membership outreach strategy, “MC2: Membership Contact and Connections.” The intent is to rebrand, reposition, and reinvigorate the Tripartite

Grassroots Membership Initiative (TGMI) and more accurately reflect the program as an ongoing strategy for membership recruitment and retention. This approach will reinforce that strong connections must be made before organized dentistry can convert potential members to membership. Can Facebook, YouTube, Ning, blog posts, Twitter, LinkedIn, or other social media outlets be used by dental societies in reaching out and connecting to members and potential members? A panel discussion called “Reaching Out through Social Networking” presented real-life scenarios from three dental associations that have already tapped into these tools. The Michigan Dental Association launched its Facebook group in June 2008 and has experienced a substantial return on investment from the endeavor. Their initial reasoning behind starting the Facebook initiative was to meet the expectations of today’s dental students—namely that legitimate organizations that they want to be a part of would be taking part in such communication mediums. After relatively little promotion, the group has grown to more than 170 members. It has given the MDA the ability to better connect students to the association and to one another. The three panelists at this discussion agreed that the most challenging aspect of the venture is keeping the sites fresh and

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engaging. One of the major pitfalls with social networking / media projects is the lack of up-keep and maintenance that ends up making a site stale and uninviting. Social networking has become a primary source for connecting with others but it is imperative to know what networks are right for an association’s members. Before deciding which social media site to use an association must listen, research, and supply what’s in demand. The discussion “Reaching Out During the Economic Downturn” presented perspectives on how the economy may impact the profession and organized dentistry and how communications can be a critical strategic management tool during challenging economic times. Two rounds of Breakout Sessions featured a variety of topics to assist with membership outreach efforts. After an awards reception that commemorated the ADA’s 150th anniversary, our Georgia contingent held a dinner committee meeting. We discussed our new member orientation progressive dinner / tour of dental offices idea, ideas for honoring certain membership anniversaries that members reach, and the potential involvement by the GDA in social media outreach. On Saturday we learned how to make

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effective recruitment and retention calls, handle objections, and build telephone scripts to use for non-members and members at risk in Jim Rosas’ presentation “Taking the Chill Out of the Membership Outreach Call.” The conference wrapped up Saturday afternoon with an energetic “Cruisin’ Through Life at 35 MPH” workshop with Brian Blasko who invited us to discover and maximize our own personal potential by learning how to gain some “fuel” for our internal gas tank…we all left with “gas”! The 2010 Annual Conference on Recruitment and Retention will be March 19-20, 2010, in Chicago. I’d like to strongly request that each district fund a representative to attend this informative conference. Our goal is for 100% district representation! I can’t emphasize enough how very helpful attendance at this workshop is to help gain a national perspective, to network with other states, to share successful programs, to refocus and hone our recruiting efforts of new members and volunteers, and to keep the momentum going when we return to our districts. There is no cost for the workshop which includes breakfast Friday and Saturday and a lunch and a reception on Friday. The district would

only need to budget for airfare to Chicago and 2 nights’ accommodations. With such a sweet deal how can you not send an attendee in 2010? Districts are welcome to contact me at kstoc@aol.com or Pam Yungk at yungk@gadental.org for more information. Thank you for the opportunity to serve on this committee, and thank you to Pam Yungk and all of our Committee members who are planning to put our good ideas to work—Drs. Kara Moore (Central), Roy Lehrman (Central), Matthew Elder (Eastern), Daren Becker (Northern), Wendy Mitchell (Northwestern), Gerald Kramer (Southeastern), Amanda Merritt (Southwestern), and Jeff Serff (Western). We will continue to work hard to let Georgia dentists know about the value of membership.

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alliance Alliance of the Georgia Dental Association Shines in Baltimore Debbie Torbush AADA District III Trustee

Seventeen Georgia Alliance members plus three spouses recently attended the Alliance of the American Dental Association (AADA) 2009 Conference in Baltimore. The conference co-chaired by Georgia members Shari Carter and Mary Percy was “over the top.” Every detail was carefully attended to from the various activities, meeting rooms, speakers, food selection, flower arrangements, and special gifts from Mary’s frequent trips to China (silk scarves, purses, shoe bags, pearl bracelets, and many wonderful door prizes). The Georgia Alliance was proud to support the conference and both Mary and Shari by being a Bronze Sponsor. Thirty two Alliance members and spouses, twelve from Georgia, started with a pre-conference tour of Washington, DC. Debbie Torbush, along with a local tour company and several staff members from U.S. Representative John Linder’s office, including Alliance member Derrick Corbett, helped put together the day’s activities. We toured Washington, stopped at several monuments, were surrounded by the Presidential motorcade not once but twice, and were fortunate to have Rep. Linder schedule a photo op with us and a visit to the U.S. Capitol. The 2009 conference started with a Welcome Event where the Georgia attendees stood out in special silk scarves. Throughout the three days, we heard some great speakers, participated in wonderful workshops, attended several social events, including a reception at the National Museum of Dentistry, and renewed and developed many friendships. Kick-off speaker Sheryl Roush gave an upbeat presentation entitled “SparkleTude: Communication with Confidence.”

District 3 Members in Baltimore (l to r): Telia Anderson, Linda Broderick (GA), Janelle Kauffman (GA), Molly Bickford (GA), Jean Harrington (GA), Mary Percy (GA), Fran Brown (GA), Rose Marie Dougherty (GA), Gigi Kudyba (GA), Dr. Janine BetheaFreihaut (GA), Helaine Sugarman (GA), Susan Rainwater (GA), Peggy Rives, Mary Miller (GA), Nancy Ferguson (GA), Debbie Torbush (GA), Sherry Kendrick (GA), and Debi Stewart. Not shown: Georgia’s Shari Carter and Deena Attia.

Her talk fit in perfectly with the newly formed AADA Membership Council which has been charged with creating ideas for retention and recruitment of members. Communication is critical in retaining members, and the Membership Council surveyed and discussed with current members what they want from the Alliance, gathered testimonials, and solicited help in establishing a list of “How To” projects such as Georgia’s Wanda Wondersmile puppet show, all during a networking lunch. Mary and Shari supported the Council’s Theme of “Find the Shoe that Fits” by providing all attendees with silk shoe bags and the council members with silk shoe design scarves.

Fortunately the Georgia Alliance continues to be the largest in the country, which helps to support many of our award winning projects. The Legislative Advocacy Breakfast and Workshop fired everyone up about the importance of participating in local, state, and national politics, and joining both your state PAC and ADPAC. Mike Dunn presented many tips for developing relationships with politicians, which he called the “Gold Standard of Politics.” He emphasized the importance of involvement and stated many times that the Alliance is a critical component of establishing those relationships. If you were not involved in politics or a PAC member before Mike’s

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talk, I am sure everyone wanted to be when they arrived home. We are fortunate in Georgia with what I feel is a well-oiled legislative machine, with our numerous LAW Days thanks to the GDA staff led by Executive Director Martha Phillips. Among AADA states, the Georgia Alliance always has the largest percentage of state PAC members, but we were also recognized at the breakfast for the most ADPAC members! Georgia member Gigi Kudyba, the AADA Dental Health Education Council Chair (DHE), hosted the afternoon of DHE presentations. A presentation by Dr. Bill Smith reminded us that even educated individuals may have difficulty with oral health literacy. Two final presenters encouraged our joint participation with the American Medical Association Auxiliary in the “Screen Out” campaign which is designed to help eliminate smoking in youth-oriented movies. The AADA web

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site (www.allianceada.org) has many links to information regarding legislative advocacy, DHE, and the “Screen Out” Campaign. Award presentations are always a highlight, and Georgia was well-represented at Conference 2009. Molly Bickford was awarded the Beulah K. Spencer New Member Service Award, while Deena Attia, Jean Harrington, and Susan Rainwater were awarded First Time Attendee Conference Grants. We are delighted that both Mary and Shari will continue as AADA Conference Chairs for 2010, and I hope that Georgia will again have the largest group in attendance and be the recipient of numerous awards. We would love to have you join us, both as an Alliance member and at the 2010 Conference!

Georgia Alliance members with U.S. Representative John Linder: Back row, l to r: Mary Percy, Rep. Linder, Debbie Torbush, Mary Miller, Gigi Kudyba, Janelle Kauffman, and Dr. Jay Harrington. Front row, l to r: Shari Carter, Molly Bickford, Dr. Janine BetheaFreihaut, Linda Broderick, Rose Marie Dougherty, and Jean Harrington.

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classified ads How GDA members can place classified ads AD FORM: Submit all ads on a GDA Classified Advertisement Form. To obtain a form, call Lisa Chandler at (800) 432-4357 or (404) 636-7553, or email chandler@gadental.org. (Note: The GDA may accept or reject any ad for any reason and in its sole discretion.)

AD DEADLINE: Ads and ad check payments are due by the first of the month before the publication month (i.e., Dec. 1 for January).

AD RATES: ADA member dentists pay $75.00 per 60-word ad per month. There is a 25 cents per-word charge for each word over 60. Non-dentist-owned companies (real estate firms, etc.) pay $195 per 60-word ad per month (additional word charges as above). Non-member dentists may not place ads.

LATE FEE: Ads for which full prepayment is not received by the first day of the ad’s publication month (i.e.; Nov. 1 for a November ad) will incur a $25 late fee in addition to the ad rate.

FORMS OF PAYMENT: Submit a check or money order with the ad form. (Make checks payable to GDA.) Credit cards are not accepted as payment.

WEB SITE PLACEMENT: Prepaid ads will appear on the GDA Web site www.gadental.org for the month the ad appears in print. Non-prepaid ads will NOT be placed online.

DENTAL RELATED SERVICES X-RAY SAFETY CERTIFICATION for dental assistants. Complies 100% with Georgia law. This six-hour course has certified over a thousand x-ray machine operators. Send $139.99 per registrant with name(s) to: Dr. Rick Waters, 385 Pinewood Circle, Athens, GA 30606. Visit www.acteva.com/go/laser for next day delivery, credit card payment, or the NEW! online version. Call (706) 255-4499 for more information.

DENTISTS AVAILABLE FOR FILL IN WORK / LOCUM TENENS Dentist Available Daily (DAD): Dentist available during vacations, emergencies and CE courses. Leave your practice in well-trained hands. I am licensed, insured, and have a DEA registration number so I can write prescriptions. Call Dr. Richard Patrick at (770) 993-8838.

Plan Meca 2002 CC panoramic x-ray unit. Makes excellent images. Air Techniques A/T 2000 processor. Both in good condition. Best offer. (404) 3521911 or syl@mygumdoc.com.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE Pediatric Dentist Needed in a busy multi-specialty practice including orthodontics. Located in the metro Atlanta area for 25 years. Full-time employment is available; however, part-time will be considered. Great benefits and salary with monthly bonus. Well-established practice that provides pediatric and sedation dentistry. Please fax resumes to (404) 349-8459.

CLASSIFIEDS Continued on page 28

Let your office PROFIT through continued PRODUCTION and PEACE of mind while you are away: Experienced licensed & insured dentist with over 20 years of private general practice available during vacation, maternity leave, disability, family emergencies, attending CE courses or unforeseen illness, or medical leave. Whether a day or a month, or on short term notice, I can help. Please contact me at (770) 5527075 or via georgiatempdent.com to discuss your special needs.

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE / LEASE Sirona Orthophos Plus Panorex with Ceph. Film based with 16 pre-programmed functions. Bought new in 2003. $8500 in excellent condition. Please call (706) 265-1700 or email JPFoxDDS@msn.com.

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CLASSIFIEDS Continued from page 27 We have an excellent opportunity for a talented Associate to join our rapidly growing, well established Family and Cosmetic office in Johns Creek / North Fulton County. We have a new facility with modern equipment and a large patient base. This full time position is available immediately. Please email your resume to manager@gradydentalcare.com or fax it to (678) 957-0778. Part-time / Full time Motivated Associate needed in a well-established, busy family dental practice, located West of Atlanta. Large patient base will keep you busy from the day you start, supported by a dedicated team of staff. Excellent compensation package. New graduates welcome to apply! Bring a smile of professionalism and quality of dentistry and start today! Send resume / CV to dentalinfo@tds.net.

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Top Atlanta cosmetic practice seeking associate dentist for restorative work in a thriving Buckhead practice. Requires five years’ experience. Must have friendly chair side manner and excellent clinical skills. Guaranteed $200K per year plus bonuses. Please send resumes to dentalsearch@gmail.com. Atlanta: Associate / Ownership positions immediately available in several practices collecting $520,000-$1.6 million. New graduates welcome. Income potential $180,000-$360,000 year 1. E-mail my staff at peachstatesmiles@gmail.com.

East Metro Atlanta—Associate Dentist. Established dynamic practice offers a unique opportunity for motivated professionals. No empty chairs…No insurance claim problems…With career high income potential. New graduates welcome…No debt and no initial practice setup. Contact Tina Titshaw at tina@myrockdale.com or call (678) 413-8130 or fax resume to (770) 760-1375.

PRACTICES / SPACE / LOTS FOR SALE / LEASE / SHARE Ortho space for lease in Smyrna, Marietta, Austell. Low start up cost & / or satellite office space. Open bay with murals along with some referrals. Call Megan at (770) 333-9952 for more information.

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2500 +/- s.f. space available for a GP or specialist in A class professional center off of I-85 and Clairmont road in Atlanta. Also dental space available in Hiram, GA. Upscale center has other health professionals and general dentist. Ideal for Orthodontist / Pediatric dentist. Intersection of Hwy 278 & 120. Please call (770) 590-4884 (o), or (678) 640-5466 (c). N. Fulton / CRABAPPLE – DENTAL OFFICE CONDO: 3-4 operatories, 1675 sq. ft. New in 2001 SAVE – NO costly leasehold improvements / build out. Lease or Purchase @ $2350 per month (owner finance). Contact jsdds@comcast.net. Dental Office Building: For sale or lease 3200+ square feet, one acre lot, private parking lot. Henry / Clayton county line (Mt. Zion Road) very close to I-75 exit. High traffic count. Attractive brick building, excellent condition. Seven treatment rooms, all wired for computers, N2O. Call (404) 550-3817.

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SANDERSVILLE, GEORGIA: Free standing building with 4 fully equipped operatories. Beautiful, efficient T.H.E. design. Priced below Southeast Transitions appraisal. Partial owner financing available. Ideal start up practice or satellite / specialist opportunity. Walk into a wellestablished practice of 27 years in a nice family-oriented small town. Owner is retiring but will stay to introduce. (478) 5521230 Day, (478) 552-2289 Evening.

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North Georgia Mountains: Well-established practice for sale in beautiful, consistently growing area. Modern equipment. Computers in all operatories. Mountain views. Enthusiastic crosstrained staff. Ideal for solo or group practice. Also for sale eight year old eye-catching glass professional building available separately or with practice. National recognition for office design. 10,000 square feet housing this practice plus a dental specialist and a state agency. Highly traveled highway frontage. The best of a big-city practice in a relaxed country atmosphere and a warm, friendly patient environment. (706) 745-6848.

classified listings at www.gadental.org!

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Dental Practice / Office Condo, Jonesboro, GA. Southern Regional Hospital area. Attractive office space, 1100 sq. ft., 3 operatories plumbed / 2 equipped, large lab, and private office with shower. Pay yourself rent. Move right in. Buy practice or real estate only. Close to interstate and short walk to public transportation. Contact Dean Cox (678) 584-4477. MANY GREAT OPPORTUNITIES NOW AVAILABLE: Smyrna: gross $340K; Gainesville: gross $430K; Duluth: gross $700K; Commerce: gross $1.1M; Buford: gross $500K; Cumming: gross $850K. Call Southeast Transitions at (678) 482-7305 or email info@southeasttransitions.com or visit www.southeasttransitions.com for more details on those and other opportunities.

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PRACTICES FOR SALE—for more information, call Dr. Earl Douglas, ADS South, (770) 664-1982: ATLANTA #8557: Gross $770,141; 4 days 3 operatories; 1,131 sq. ft. office space. CARROLL COUNTY #8428: Gross $609,663; 4 days 4 operatories; 2,000 sq. ft. office space. Additional plumbed but unequipped operatory. DULUTH OFFICE SPACE & EQUIPMENT FOR SALE #8393: Five (open-bay) operatory office with a Planmeca pan/ceph. Equipment will include 4 chairs, 5 delivery units, 10 computers, and misc. office equipment. LILBURN #8516: Gross $1.07 Million; 5 days 8 operatories; 3,000 sq. ft. office space. RIVERDALE #8517: Gross $836,285; 4 days 8 operatories; 4,030 sq. ft. office space. Two additional plumbed but unequipped operatories. SOUTHEASTERN GEORGIA #8172: Gross $796,640; 4 days 5 operatories; 1,732 sq. ft. office space. ALSO ASSOCIATE POSITIONS AVAILABLE, contact Vikki Howard (910) 523-1949.

SEEKING ASSOCIATESHIP / JOB (DENTISTS) / WANT TO BUY PRACTICE Georgia licensed dentist & Emory grad, with over 24 years of private general practice, seeks a position in a Greater Atlanta fee-for-service practice. I enjoy comprehensive dentistry involving both children and adults, with an emphasis on cosmetic and implant restorative dentistry. Please contact Dr. Victor Maya at (404) 543-4380 or email at vmaya@bellsouth.net.

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Inside This Issue • How the ARRA COBRA Subsidy Affects Dentists

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ACTION Suite 200, Building 17, 7000 Peachtree Dunwoody Road Atlanta, Georgia 30328-1655 www.gadental.org

• FTC Delays Red Flag Rule Implementation Until August 1

DATED MATERIAL PLEASE DELIVER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

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