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Nikon Advanced NEW

● Get more from your

Nikon SLR camera

Handbook Expert guides to improve your photography

● Step-by-step tutorials ● Learn to master flash

and filters

● Creative projects to try

– indoors and out

● Pro masterclasses

228

second edition

Digital Edition

100% UNOFFICIAL

pages of expert advice

Step-by-step workshops • Free video guides • Pro tips and tricks


Welcome to

Nikon

Advanced Handbook The Nikon Advanced Handbook is your 228-page guide to using your Nikon DSLR in more exciting ways. Now that you’ve mastered the basics of photography, it’s time to stretch yourself. Inside you’ll find all you need to know to really feel inspired and confident to take amazing photographs of a range of subjects. Over the following pages you’ll discover how to improve and expand your repertoire of camera techniques – from taking slow shutter photos with ND filters to mastering your camera’s histogram. See how to use a range of camera settings, tools and accessories, including a whole section dedicated to flash. Follow our experts’ tips for shooting smooth seascapes, vivid action, interesting macro images, making movies and more. We even guide you through setting up your own portrait studio and taking professional-quality wedding photographs. There are also free video guides, which you’ll find on FileSilo. We hope you enjoy reading this Nikon Advanced Handbook and it helps you to start improving your Nikon DSLR setup and techniques today!


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Editorial Editor Rebecca Greig Assistant Designer Madelene King Editor in Chief Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International International Licensing Director Matt Ellis matt.ellis@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Operations Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Editorial Director Paul Newman Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9060 Nikon Advanced Handbook Second Edition Š 2018 Future Publishing Limited Nikon is a trademark of the Nikon Corporation. We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from responsibly managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. The paper in this magazine was sourced and produced from sustainable managed forests, conforming to strict environmental and socioeconomic standards. The manufacturing paper mill holds full FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification and accreditation All contents Š 2018 Future Publishing Limited or published under licence. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used, stored, transmitted or reproduced in any way without the prior written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. Registered office: Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All information contained in this publication is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. You are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this publication. Apps and websites mentioned in this publication are not under our control. We are not responsible for their contents or any other changes or updates to them. This magazine is fully independent and not affiliated in any way with the companies mentioned herein.

Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR) www.futureplc.com

Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Chairman Richard Huntingford Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244


CONTENTS Outdoor Camera Skills Broaden your horizons

10

Say hi to a bluer sky!

14

Control bright skies

16

Shoot sunsets successfully

18

Take it slow with seascapes

22

How to get your landscapes sharp

26

Better bird shots

30

Get multiple exposures

33

Shoot wide open

34

Shoot the Northern lights

36

Shoot movies

40

Create a time-lapse

44

Discover the drama of black and white

46

Automate your ISO

49

Use histograms for perfect exposures

50

Play with fire!

54

Shoot the breeze

56

Take things steady

58

Indoor Photo Projects

6

Spin your own Spirograph effect

62

Backlight your macro

67

Shoot super-sharp close-ups

68

Make a splash with high-speed flash

70

Go crazy with colour

75

Get started with fine-art nudes

76

Magnify your subject

80

Set the mode for U!

82

Nikon Advanced Handbook

22 98

100


118

Master Flash

18

Fill faces with flash

86

What is Auto FP?

88

CTO is go!

89

Spotlight on snoots

90

Go slow with flash

92

Perfect the strobist look

94

Make bounce flash easy

96

Ring flowers with light

98

Shoot stunning studio portraits

100

Put speed into a shot

106

Freeze action with flash

108

The pop-up way to strobist drama

110

Arty lighting with gels

112

Shoot a shadow portrait

114

Photography Masterclasses

67

Close encounters of the natural kind

118

Whatever the weather

130

Take it real slow

142

Welcome to shooting stars

154

The actor’s portfolio

164

Food glorious food

174

Weddings

186

Creative Photography Degrees of separation

200

Create a look

206

Really change viewpoint

212

Become a colourist

218

Free on FileSilo 206

How to view your free assets

226

Nikon Advanced Handbook

7


Grab your Nikon gear, embrace the elements, and take your outdoor photography to the next level with our step-by-step tutorials. In this section we have included essential tips that will help improve your landscape shots. We’ll teach you how to master the art of stunning seacapes, capture a beautifully blue sky as well as tips on how to photograph sunsets sucessfully. Harness the power of your Nikon DSLR and discover how to use the histogram in order to take the perfect exposure and automate your ISO to save yourself time when out shooting. Learn what it takes to shoot movies, time-lapse sequences, multiple exposures and so much more!

8

Nikon Advanced Handbook


Broaden your horizons

10

Say hi to a bluer sky!

14

Control bright skies

16

Shoot sunsets successfully

18

Take it slow with seascapes

22

How to get your landscapes sharp

26

Better bird shots

30

Get multiple exposures

33

Shoot wide open

34

Shoot the Northern lights

36

Shoot movies

40

Create a time-lapse

44

Discover the drama of black and white

46

Automate your ISO

49

Use histograms for perfect exposure

50

Play with fire!

54

Shoot the breeze

56

Take things steady

58

Nikon Advanced Handbook

9


Outdoor camera skills

the mission ■ Shoot and stitch panoramic images

time needed ■ 2 hours

Kit needed ■ Nikon DSLR ■ Tripod with a three-way head ■ Photoshop Elements

10

Nikon Advanced Handbook

Broaden your horizons

free assets on filesilo See page 226 for more information

You don’t need much special kit to capture amazing panoramic images, as we reveal in this look at shooting and stitching a landscape shot Panoramic images are a great way to showcase spectacular, sweeping landscapes. By shooting a series of overlapping images and combining them on your computer, you can take in a much wider angle of view. This technique also means you don’t need an expensive wide-angle lens – the 18-55mm lens that comes with most Nikon DSLRs is fine. This ‘stitching’ technique is much better than taking a wide-angle shot and simply cropping it, because it

produces a picture with a much higher resolution. Stitching photos together in this way might sound complicated, but it’s not. All you need is a tripod (to keep the camera level as you take your sequence of shots) and the right software. We’ve used Photoshop Elements for this tutorial because it has a Photomerge Panorama tool that makes combining images really easy. If you’ve ever tried lining up images manually, you’ll know there are all sorts of issues with perspective and

distortion. Thankfully, Photomerge resolves these problems for you, producing seamless panoramas automatically. You may need to crop off a few untidy edges, but the process needn’t take more than a few minutes. Even though shooting panoramas is straightforward, there are still a few things you need to do to make sure that you get the best results. Read on to find out how to get your shots and combine them in Elements.


Outdoor camera skills

By shooting a series of overlapping images and combining them on your computer, you can take in a wider angle of view

Step by step Create a convincing panorama If you shoot your initial photographs in the right way, the rest is easy! There are two stages to creating panoramic images. The first stage is to take the series of overlapping shots that are going to be stitched together in Elements. This is the most important phase because Photoshop needs the right raw materials to work with. If your starting shots are misaligned or show colour or brightness shifts, the final panorama will look odd. The second stage is to stitch the images together in Elements. This is straightforward, though you’ll need to pay attention to the initial settings.

01 Get your tripod level

First, you need to get your tripod level. You can check this by loosening the horizontal pan axis and rotating the camera as you look through the viewfinder. You need to make sure the horizon stays level from one side of your planned panorama to the other. Alternatively, if your tripod has a spirit level built into the base, you can use that.

QUICK TIP! You can shoot handheld, but the risk of misalignment is higher, so you might have to crop later on

02 Switch to manual

Now switch everything to manual. In everyday photography, it doesn’t matter too much if the camera changes the colour balance or focus settings between shots. Here, it’s critical that the settings are identical for each frame. If they aren’t, you might get unwanted colour and brightness shifts across the panorama when it’s stitched together.

Nikon Advanced Handbook

11


Outdoor camera skills

You can still get a really ‘wide’ view with just two frames

ASPECT RATIOS ■ Don’t get greedy with panoramas! It’s true that the more shots you take, the wider your panorama will be, but that doesn’t always make the picture better. It’s all about aspect ratio, and super-wide panoramas have an extreme ‘letterbox’ format that’s impossible to print and makes details look small and insignificant. Two-frame panoramas are great for widescreen proportions that suit 16:9 TV screens or monitors – the image on the previous page has the perfect proportions for the subject and is built from just two frames. Threeor four-frame panoramas, meanwhile, are more than enough to simulate the aspect ratios of most panoramic cameras.

03 Play with settings

04 Focus manually

06 Launch Photomerge

07 Pick your panorama

Choose a small aperture, then pan the camera across the scene, adjusting the shutter speed while checking the exposure indicator to find a good overall exposure. Pay attention to the sky to avoid burned-out areas. Now pick a Manual White Balance preset, such as Direct Sunlight.

On your computer, launch Elements, open all the shots in your sequence and select File > New > Photomerge Panorama. In the full version of Photoshop, use File > Automate Photomerge. The process is the same from here on, as are the panorama options in the next step.

Use autofocus to focus on your subject, then slide the switch on the side of the lens to focus manually. Make sure you don’t just turn the focus ring as far as it will go and assume that’s infinity – some lenses, such as the Nikon 18-55mm, will actually focus past infinity.

Under Source Files, click Add Open Files. On the left, in the Layout area, select Cylindrical. This creates the panorama inside a virtual cylinder, which is best for landscapes. The Auto and Perspective options are more optically correct but create a ‘bow tie’ shape that requires a lot of cropping.

Key Skill Use a panoramic head If you want to take panoramas to the next level, you need one of these Our walkthrough works perfectly well with subjects that are some distance from the camera, such as landscapes, but if you’ve got objects up close in the foreground, you can run into problems with parallax. Every time you take a shot, the object is in a slightly different position relative to the background, and this can cause problems in the stitching phase. The solution is to make sure the camera rotates around the optical centre of the lens, and for this you need a panoramic head, such as this Manfrotto 303.

12

Nikon Advanced Handbook

Set your position

The panoramic head has two sliding plates, which are arranged at 90 degrees. These are used to adjust the camera position. First, the camera needs to be moved sideways so the lens lines up with the head’s centre of rotation. You can use the second sliding plate as your guide since this is centred on the tripod head anyway.


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