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P R E S E N T S

Rock & Roll Learn the styles of the greatest ‘50s pickers & sound like a legend!

Play like Chuck, Buddy, Eddie, Scotty, Hank & many more!

Rock!

with cool jazzy chords

Roll!

with snazzy licks, fills & solos

PLAY GUITAR NOW!

Mag & CD

All lessons tabbed plus full audio & backing tracks!

PRINTED IN THE UK

£4.99


ROCK’N’ROLL

Contents 20 HANK MARVIN

4 BUDDY HOLLY

CONTACT

Future Publishing 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW Tel: 01225 442244 Fax: 01225 822763 Facebook: www.facebook.com/GuitarTechniques Website: www.guitar-techniques.com

One of the mightiest of rock’n’rollers, he made The Beatles want to write songs and inspired the Hank Marvin look!

The inspiration for a thousand British schoolboys to want to learn guitar. Hank is the archetypal Man Of Melody!

24 THE EVERLY BROTHERS

7 SCOTTY MOORE

What would Elvis have sounded like without Scotty’s cool jazzy licks and rocking, echo-laden guitar tone?

11 cliff GALLUP

28 JAMES BURTON

A true phenomenon, Gallup made session players of the day gulp in awe, and gave Jeff Beck the tools of his trade.

Phil Everly states that brother Don invented rock guitar and heralded the rise of the riff. And who are we to doubt him? Slinky solos with bendy licks that weave throughout the chords; no wonder Rick Nelson, Elvis and even Dylan wanted him!

Subscriptions For orders phone our UK hotline on: 0844 848 2852 (From outside the UK: +44 1858 438794) For enquiries phone: 0844 848 1602 (From outside the UK: +44 1858 438795) Subscribe online at: www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Licensing Licensing and Syndication Director Regina Erak regina.erak@futurenet.com Tel: +44(0)1225 442244 Fax: +44(0)1225 732275 Future Publishing Ltd Managing Director Andy Rice Chief Information Oficer Stuart Anderton Head of Music Rob Last Chief Executive Mark Wood Printed in the UK by William Gibbons on behalf of Future. Distributed in the UK by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT.

Future produces high-quality multimedia products which reach our audiences online, on mobile and in print. Future attracts over 50 millions consumers to its brands every month across five core sectors: Technology, Entertainment, Music, Creative and Sports & Auto. We export and license our publications.

31 EDDIE COCHRAN

14 CHUCK BERRY

The greatest of all rock’n’roll guitarists, Chuck invented a sound and in doing so fuelled the rise of The Rolling Stones.

The look, the sound. Cochran IS rock’n’roll! No self-respecting rockabilly guitarist is without his quiff and an orange Gretsch!

17 danny cedrone

34 YOUR USER GUIDE

Editorial Editor Neville Marten, neville.marten@futurenet.com Guitar Tutor Neville Marten Art Editors Carlton Hibbert/David Dyas, carlton.hibbert@futurenet.com Production Editor Cliff Douse, clifford.douse@futurenet.com Senior Music Editor Jason Sidwell, jason.sidwell@futurenet.com Music Engraver Chris Francis DVD interface Design Adam Crute Video Production Martin Holmes

Bill Haley’s original guitarist knew how to drive an audience to fever pitch with his incendiary jazz-tinged solos.

Refer to our terms and signs for picking and fretting instructions to help you enjoy this magazine and CD package.

Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR). www.futureplc.com

Chief executive Mark Wood Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Chief financial officer Graham Harding Tel +44 (0)207 042 4000 (London) Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244 (Bath)

© Future Publishing Limited 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Future Publishing Limited is at Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. All information contained in this magazine is for informational purposes only and is, to the best of our knowledge, correct at the time of going to press. Future Publishing Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies that occur. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers direct with regard to pricing. All submissions to Guitar Techniques magazine are made on the basis of a licence to publish the submission in Guitar Techniques magazine, its associated websites and all world-wide licensed editions of the same. Any material submitted is sent at the owner’s risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future Publishing Limited nor its agents shall be liable for loss or damage. We encourage you to recycle this magazine, either through your usual household recyclable waste collection service or at a recycling site.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

Load your CD to play the audio tracks that go with each example

welcome     Editor’s Letter

R

ock’n’roll is a great guitar discipline. Its exponents had unique styles that became the building blocks for later rock, blues and pop legends like Hendrix, Clapton, Beck, Page and of course The Beatles and Stones, much of whose early material was lifted from the rock’n’roll era. Rock’n’roll sprang from a wonderful mix of white country, black blues, and a healthy dollop of jazz - which contained both ethnicities. Where Chuck Berry’s rock’n’roll was bluescountry, Buddy Holly’s was more country-blues, while Elvis Presley went right down the middle but teamed up with a country-jazz band. It was these odd mixes and the different balances of country, blues and jazz each artist melded together, that made them all so individual. In this magazine and CD package I’ll be looking at nine of the greatest elecric guitarists of the era: Scotty Moore (Elvis), James Burton (Ricky Nelson), Cliff Gallup (Gene Vincent),

Danny Cedrone (Bill Haley), Eddie Cochran, Chuck Berry, The Everly Brothers, Hank Marvin (The Shadows) and that other cool dude famous for his specs and Fender Strat: Buddy Holly. These players were in at the beginning of the electric guitar explosion, so their techniques were formative by today’s standards. But that’s partly what makes their work so evocative and exciting. And while I’ll endeavour to clean things up where really necessary, I don’t want to rob the music of its naïve charm. With that in mind I have played with more of an eye on feel and vibe than pinpoint technical accuracy. I do hope you enjoy my delve into the styles of this group of players that pushed guitar to the forefront, and helped to change music forever. Have fun!

Neville Marten, Editor

3


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lick 3 muted rhythm and building up a solo

CD Track 3

2 Buddy Holly

This example (neck pickup throughout) uses elementary sweep picking to create a swinging rock’n’roll rhythm. It also demonstrates how playing 3rds 2 Buddy Holly 2 ExBuddy 3mutedHolly with strings, then more freely and finally going up an octave, offers three different and effective ways to play exactly the same thing.

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Scotty Moore

l Scotty playing guitar with The King of Rock’n’Roll, Elvis Presley

Scotty Moore

Elvis Presley’s original guitarist helped define the sound of rock’n’roll by creating jazzy licks drenched in slap-back echo behind Presley’s acoustic, bass and drums. Scotty’s early sound came courtesy of archtop jazz guitars with P90 pickups (Elvis’s first recordings were 1954 and the humbucking pickup didn’t emerge until three years later). He also used a healthy dose of slap-back echo. Set your guitar to the neck pickup and if it’s a Strat or Tele-type instrument, roll off some of the tone. Try a delay time of around 160ms and adjust to taste. Don’t be shy with the echo level either – this is delay with attitude! Scotty used an amp built by Ray Butts with effects built in - in the mid 50s! So a small valve combo is your best bet, or an emulation of that sound if you are using a modelling amp or software.

When a young Elvis Presley entered Sam Phillips’ Sun Studios for his first proper recordings in 1954, his band of ‘middle-aged jazz musicians’ included guitarist Winfield Scot Moore – all of three years and two months the singer’s senior. Together with double bassist Bill Black and drummer DJ Fontana (Elvis himself often slapping the side of and sometimes strumming his own Martin D-18) they made up the Blue Moon Boys, a group that would lay down some of rock’n’roll’s most important tracks. The trio toured with the burgeoning superstar, recorded numbers like That’s All Right (Mama), Good Rocking Tonight, Hound Dog, Mystery Train and many others. “It was all very informal,” Scotty told me some years ago. “We’d go in and maybe Elvis would have a couple of tunes he’d want to try, or maybe Sam would have some ideas. So we’d try different things and finally just lock into

My left hand’s doing good, right hand’s doing alright, mind’s as sharp as a tack; now if I can get all three of them working together we’ll be alright! Scotty Moore

one of them. We had no overdubbing, no splicing. What you hear is what we played.” Moore, Black and Fontana also appeared with Presley on TV and in many of his films. ‘Scotty’ was indeed a jazz guitarist, but his Tennessee upbringing imbued his thinking with a fair bit of country too. He even played in a local group calling themselves The Starlight Wranglers. He favoured archtop Gibson guitars and it was Moore’s jazzy chords, mated to Presley’s incredible ‘white’ blues singing over country-inspired songs, that helped to create the sound that we associate with early Elvis – and indeed with rock’n’roll itself. As Scotty stated, these were straight takes and often mistakes would occur. Sometimes Elvis would choose a take for its feel or vocal performance, but with Scotty playing somewhat ‘outside’ the expected norm. Here’s what Scotty told me about his outlandish excursion on Too Much. “The song was in an unusual key for us. It was in A flat and we’d done two or three cuts on it, but on this particular cut I got absolutely lost, but somehow or other I came out of it and that’s the one Elvis picked. He said, ‘That thing felt good,’ because feel was what it was all about. But I’ve seen guys play that sucker note for note.” Scotty used pick and fingers for much of his chord work and a regular flatpick for solos. He’s still playing today although his fingers aren’t so deft as they once were. But we can’t overstate the importance of this true southern gent in the making of some of the greatest tracks of all time.

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

Get the tone

TRACK RECORD Elvis Presley’s Sun Sessions contains the best of the recordings on which Scotty Moore, Bill Black and DJ Fontana played. It also features the guitar playing that shaped the lives of every great player who came after it. If you can find a copy of The Guitar That Changed The World, it has Scotty playing many of these great songs with his Gibson in the forefront! 7


rock & roll

l The one and only Chuck Berry sporting a blonde Gibson ES-350

Chuck Berry One of the most influential musicians ever to pick up a guitar, Chuck Berry’s style fuelled the R&B explosion of the 60s and heralded The Beatles and The Stones.

Chuck made me say ‘I want to play the guitar’. When I heard him, suddenly I knew what it was I wanted to do Keith Richards

of country staple Ida Red – soon to transmute into Chuck’s first chart-topper Maybellene – the die was cast for a career that would go on to impact on everyone from The Beatles and The Stones to AC/DC and Led Zeppelin. A string of Berry-penned hits followed, including Roll Over Beethoven, School Days, Rock And Roll Music, Sweet Little Sixteen, Carol and of course Johnny B Goode. In 1962 Chuck found himself behind bars again. His term lasted three years, during which time he studied business and lost no time writing more classics, including No Particular Place To Go, Nadine, You Never Can Tell and Promised Land – all of which would chart after his release. When Berry left Chess and signed to Mercury in 1966 rock‘n’roll was in decline. Despite constantly touring, Chuck never hit his previous heights except for a surprise UK number one in 1972 with the novelty song My Ding-A-Ling. His position as one of the most influential songwriterguitarists of all time, however, cannot be overstated. His songs continue to be performed around the world today. Chuck’s style is characterised by a fat and gutsy Gibson tone (he preferred the ES-300 series), the use of doublestops, blues-style major-minor ambiguity and the addition of notes such as the 6th and 9th into his lick vocabulary – much of this coming from his guitar hero T-Bone Walker. At the time his technique seemed virtually unsurpassable. His lyrics are brilliantly descriptive and highly intelligent and he is rightly often termed the ‘rock’n’roll poet’.

Get the tone Chuck’s use of Gibson semis and small Fender combos meant that most of his playing features natural amp distortion - sometimes just mild break-up and others on the verge of fuzz. You’ll rarely hear any effects on the guitar save for a splash of reverb - either from the amp or added at the mixing stage for ambience. On a twin-humbucking guitar try both pickups on together, and on a Strat or Tele style instrument select the middle position of the pickup selector and back the tone off to taste. Use more power amp overdrive than front-end gain but make sure the tone is so fat it’s almost muddy!

TRACK RECORD It has to be one of the many ‘greatest hits’ packages out there. But make sure it contains Roll Over Beethoven, School Days, Johnny B Goode, Maybellene, Nadine, No Particular Place To Go, Carol, Come On, Memphis Tennessee, You Never Can Tell, Rock And Roll Music and Sweet Little Sixteen, and your collection will instantly include most of rock’n’roll’s all-time guitar classics. 14

FRANK DRIGGS COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

Born Charles Edward Anderson Berry in St Louis, Missouri in 1926 to a schoolteacher mother and church deacon father ‘Chuck’ Berry would become the most influential of all the rock’n’roll guitarists. Although raised in one of the city’s few prosperous black neighbourhoods, trouble was never far away. In 1944 Berry served the first of three prison sentences for a variety of well documented offences; when released on his 21st birthday, Chuck renewed his love of singing and playing the guitar. Having been weaned on a diet of Muddy Waters and T-Bone Walker, it’s no surprise that Berry was first and foremost a blues guitarist. By the time he took over the leader’s role in the St John’s Trio, adding his ever more exuberant stage act to the group’s staple of blues and R&B, the band was one of the most influential around St Louis, rivalling even the great bluesman Albert King. When his idol Muddy Waters suggested Chuck visit Chess Records, and blues mogul Leonard Chess liked his rendition


GUITAR TECHNIQUES TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE MAGAZINE 126 126 GUITAR

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CD Track 13

3 vibrato you’d hear from but no one does it like Chuck. These are all really blues licks, but without the3bends and 2 2 2 or both use similar notes. The stuttering syncopated third-string bend is a direct lift from T-Bone Walker! GStevie Ray Vaughan A 9 9 Young, 7 5 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 11 Angus 11 who7 would 9 9 4 4 4 A

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15


rock & roll

l Legendary duo: the Everly Brothers playing their trusty Gibson acoustics

The Everly Brothers

Two of the most influential figures in music not only changed the vocal approach in popular songs, but arguably invented the heavy rock guitar riff too!

If you take Don’s chords and electrify them, with a lyric on top, you have the essence of heavy rock Phil Everly

Bye Love, Wake Up Little Suzie and others; a simple but powerful minor pentatonic chord riff with very similar intervals to Smoke On The Water. “I tried it on my open G acoustic one afternoon and it just happened,” recalled Don. Brother Phil goes as far as asserting that big brother Donald actually invented heavy rock by way of the standalone intro chord riff – a sequence sometimes but not always related to the song that follows it, such as Led Zeppelin’s Communication Breakdown, Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream and the aforementioned Deep Purple classic. Phil: “When you take Donald’s intro to Bye Bye Love, Wake Up Little Suzie, Bird Dog or any of the others, that was the first time that those kind of incongruous chords were used. If you take those chords and electrify them with a lyric on top, you have the essence of heavy rock, which is essentially a song written around a riff.” The great guitarist Chet Atkins, a friend of the boys’ father and a great champion of the duo, would manage many of The Everlys’ studio sessions and invariably end up playing electric guitar on the tracks. This could be in the form of a riff, broken chords or arpeggios - very commonly using tremolo effect - and even the occasional baritone guitar to beef things up in the low end. This example imagines a typical Everlys’ session guitar line-up of Don’s acoustic rhythm, a tremolo guitar playing

TRACK RECORD It’s Greatest Hits time again. There are numerous on the market but The Golden Years Of The Everly Brothers contains Wake Up Little Suzie, Bird Dog and Bye Bye Love (all of which use Don’s open G chord riffing) and of course Cathy’s Clown, Crying In The Rain, Temptation, The Price Of Love, Walk Right Back and all those other killer tracks. 24

Get the tone Don used regular sized Gibson acoustics in the studio, not the bigger Everly Brothers jumbos the brothers took on stage. Go for a mellow tone and back off the top end if you’re using a piezo. For the riffs and chords a Tele, or a semi with humbuckers or singlecoils is ideal, but any bridge pickup will do. When using Tremolo, it always sounds best with a little delay. Don’t worry about timing the speed to the track, just make sure that the depth and speed are sympathetic.

CBS/GETTY IMAGES

Think of The Everly Brothers and you inevitably imagine beautiful sibling vocal harmonies, weepy ballads about plane crashes, teenage crushes gone wrong and a host of other sad-ending songs. But would it surprise you to find that guitar riffs as powerful as Smoke On The Water, Communication Breakdown and Sunshine Of Your Love can be traced directly back to Don Everly’s innovative acoustic guitar playing on the duo’s 1957 debut hit Bye Bye Love? According to Don, the older of the Everlys, he’d heard Bo Diddley’s famous ‘dum-ti-dum-dum, ti-dum-dum’ rhythm and it affected him so much that he wanted to come up with something equally catchy but which didn’t rip the great bluesman off. Don had already got into open G tuning via his father, country singer Ike Everly, and an aunt Hattie who also played songs in this way. So the tuning and the rhythm conspired to create the sound you hear at the start of Bye


Everly brothers everyone from The Beatles, to Simon and Garfunkel and The Beach Boys. And if Phil is correct about his brother’s effect on guitar riff writing in rock music, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Cream and a host of others too! After falling out quite badly in the ‘70s the brothers made up again in the 1980s and, while officially retired, still perform occasionally, often guesting alongside other classic acts that are happy to doff their caps to their idols. It’s unlikely that there’ll ever be another Everly Brothers.

broken chords by perhaps Chet, and another guitar (not baritone for reasons of practicality) adding fills and possibly played by studio guitarist Ray Edenton. The acoustic guitar is in Don’s open G tuning (D G D G B D) but the two electrics are at standard pitch. Between 1957 and 1965 Don and Phil Everly clocked up 15 or so massive single hits, many of them topping the charts on both sides of the Atlantic and around the rest of the world. Their songs and singing style influenced

lick 1 DON EVERLY Acoustic intro

CD Track 22

You’ll need to drop your first and sixth strings from E to D and your fifth from A to G to get the right sound. Major chords are now playable by simply barring across all six strings. Notice how the first intro chord is a barre at the 12th fret and the guitar returns to this as ‘home G’ every time. Be loose and open with your strumming - the correct the 'N' Bb, Roll C and-DEVERLY chords, simply barre the 3rd, 5th and 7th frets as appropriate. GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 131 feel is everything. For Rock BROTHERS - Jason's transcription Ex 1

©»¡¶™ 2 # 4 ∑ & 4

(drums)

2

(Open G)

D B G D G D

œœœ œ

œœ œœœ œ

G

œœœ œ

œœœ œ

Bb

œœœ œ

¿¿

acoustic

3

12 12 12 12 12 12

12 12

12 12 12 12

12 12 12 12

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œœ œœ

3 3 3 3

X X

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Bb

j œœ ‰ œ œ

C

œœ œœ

5 5 5 5

œœœ œ

œœ Œ œ

G

œœœ œ

12 12 12 12 12 12 12

3 3 3 3

œœœ œ 12 12 12 12

Bb

œœœ œ

j œ ‰ n b œœ œœœ bœ œ

12 12 12 12

¿¿ ¿¿

3 3 3 3

X X X X

lick 2 TREMOLO CHORDS

Bb

j œœ œœ œ #œ œ œ

C

5 5 5 5

C

3 3 4 3

CD Track 23

Tremolo was probably the commonest effect used after echo in the rock’n’roll years and many Everlys’ tracks employ it. The idea is to move away from the main chords by using different inversions on another part of the neck. As the main guitar is in open G, I simply played a three-note ‘Dm7’ shape chord at the 8th fret for C, and a ‘D’ shape at the 7th for G and so on. This is standard practice for creating this type of part.

Nev's Nev's Rock Rock 'N' 'N' Roll Roll -- EVERLY EVERLY BROTHERS BROTHERS -- Jason's Jason's transcription transcription

GUITAR GUITAR TECHNIQUES TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE MAGAZINE 131 131 Ex Ex 2 2

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E E B B G G D D A A E E

9 9

œ

C œ œ œ ˙.

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G G

8 8

8 8

7 7

8 8

œ

C

Let ring ring Let

Let ring ring Let Tremolo Tremolo guitar guitar

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9 9

8 8

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G G

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7 7

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C

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8 8

9 9

8 8

G G

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7 7

8 8

7 7

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# ˙.

b

Let Let ring ring 7 7

b

B C G Bb C G œ nœ bœ . œ œ œ . œ ˙ . œ œ

7 7

6 6

Let Let ring ring 6 6

9 9

8 8

B C G Bb C G œ n œ b œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

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7 7

8 8

Let Let ring ring 7 7

7 7

Let Let ring ring 6 6

6 6

9 9

8 8

œœœ

œœœ

7 7 8 8 7 7

7 7 8 8 7 7

Let Let ring ring 8 8

7 7

8 8

7 7

7 7 8 8 7 7

7 7 8 8 7 7

7 7 8 8 7 7

7 7 8 8 7 7

12 12

œ # œœ

œ œ œœœ œ J œ

D D

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C C

G G

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25


4

rock & roll

GT133 - CHORDS FOR EDDIE COCHRAN ROCK N ROLL capoing the acoustic

E/B o

Capo at 4th fret

o

A

Capo at 4th fret

1

B

Capo at 4th fret

Eddie often recorded virtually all the instruments on his tracks – including drums – and so it was natural that he would also overdub more than one guitar. Many of Eddie’s biggest hits featured two acoustics – one playing regular open chords and the other capo’d further up the neck. For this track I played regular open E, A and B7 chords in the first position, then placed a capo at the 4th fret and played the shapes of C, F and G over the top (despite the capo Eddie often played E-shape barre chords and so I followed suit at the 5th and 7th frets, but feel free to replace the 7thfret barre with open ‘G shape’ if you prefer). When mixed together the two tracks gel so well that you often can’t hear which chord tones are coming from which track. Try this on your own recordings – it’s a great trick that bands like The Eagles also love!

1 1

1

2

2

3 4

3 4

1 1

1 2

B E G# B E G#

3 4

B F# B D # F# B

A E A C# E A

example 1 lead/rhythm solo

CD Track 29

Eddie’s soloing style, rather like that of Gene Vincent’s Cliff Gallup, would often consist of licks pulled out of the underlying rhythm chords. In effect he was further beefing up his double-tracked acoustics. In this solo you’ll hear rhythmic doubling of the bassline; bluesy quarter-tone bends on the third and second strings that ‘clash’ deliberately with open second and first strings; sliding 6ths with added b7ths and neat triads (D shapes at the 9th and GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 133 Rock 'n' Roll - Eddie Cochran - Jason Sidwell GUITAR MAGAZINE 133 Rock 'n' Eddie Cochran -- Jason Sidwell 11th fretsTECHNIQUES for A and B); and ending with chord of E --(G#, B, E). These are all classic rock’n’roll moves showing that, indeed, simple GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 133a 12th-fret three-note Rock 'n' Roll Roll Eddie Cochran Jason Sidwell can sometimes be best. Now try similar ideas in your own solos and see what you can come up with. In fact, why not try them now over track 30!

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2 2 2

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18 18 18

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2 2

0 0 0 0

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8 8

21 21 21

# # # # . œ œ œ œ œ œJ ‰ œ & B B

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15 15

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2 2 Rock Rock 'n' 'n' Roll Roll

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0 0

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slide slide evenly evenly up up 7 7 4 4

8 8

10 10

7 7

10 10

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

A A

Let Let ring ring slide slide evenly evenly up up 9 9 4 4

9 9

10 10 9 9

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B B

slide slide evenly evenly up up 11 11 6 6

11 11

12 12 11 11

11 11 12 12 12 12

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E E

12 12 12 12 13 13

24 24 24

33


YOUR USER GUIDE

You can get more from GT by understanding our easy-to-follow musical terms and signs...

Relating tab to your fretboard 3

2

Every transcription or lesson in GT is graded according to its level of difficulty, from Easy to Advanced. We’ll also let you know what aspect of your playing will benefit by attempting a lesson.

m

i

1

Our rating system

a c

4 T

p

Advanced Moderate-Advanced

nut & fretboard

hand Labelling

Moderate

The fretbox diagram above represents the fretboard exactly, as seen in the accompanying photo. This is for ease of visualising a fretboard scale or chord quickly.

Here are the abbreviations used for each finger: Fretting hand: 1, 2, 3, 4, (T) Picking hand: p (thumb), i (first finger), m (second), a (third), c (fourth)

Easy-Moderate Easy

Read music GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE USER GUIDE Each transcription is broken down Guitar Technique Examples - Treble Clef And MAGAZINE Tablature GUITAR TECHNIQUES into two parts... Guitar Technique Examples - Picking

œ œ Tablature œ & Technique Examplesœ - Treble Clef And Guitar Down & Up Picking

GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE USER GUIDE

GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2nd string Guitar Technique Examples - Picking 3rd fret

Chord example

Chord example (with capo)

The diagram represents the G chord in the photo. The ‘O’ symbol is an open string, and a circled number is a fretting finger. Intervals are shown below..

The blue line represents a capo – for this A chord, place it at fret 2. Capos change the fret number ordering – here,œ & the original fret 5 now becomes fret 3, fret 7 now fret 5, etc.

A major scale

Down & Up Picking

E B G

x

xD

œ

& Scale example

E B G D A E

The diagram shows the fret-hand fingering for the A major scale (root notes in black). The photo GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Examples - Picking shows part of the scale being played onTechnique the fourth string with first, third and fourth fingers.

œ

9 5 7

œ @

E B G D A E

7

œ @

œ @

&

œ bœ @ @

# œœœ

7

E B G D A E

1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E

5

Picking variations and ≥ alternatives ≤ GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Technique Examples - Picking

Up and down picking Down & Up Picking

&

œ

Tremolo picking Tremolo Picking

&

œ

œ @

@

5

@

4

@

7

8

Palm muting Palm Muting

œ bœ @ @

œ @

@

&

nœ # œœœ

œ œ œ

7

E B G D A E

5

n The first note is to be downTremolo Picking picked and the last note is to be up-picked.

&

œ @

œ @

œ bœ @ @

@

@

5

@

4

@

7

8

n Each of the four notes are to Palm Muting be alternate picked (down- & up-picked) n œœ very rapidly n œœ and continuously. œœ & # œœ

œ œ œ

œ œ

PM

34

E B G D A E

@ 5

Palm Muting

@ 4

@ 7

@ 8

E B G D A E

œ œ œ

E B G D A E

8 7 6 7

Pick Rake

0

0

0

8 7 6 7

0

n œœ œœ

0

0

0

œ œ

PM 8 7 6 7

0

0

n Palm mute by resting the edge Rake ofPick picking-hand’s palm on the strings near the w bridge.

&

¿

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rake

PM 8 7 6 7

0

E B G D A E

X

X

X

& E B G D A E

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&

¿

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E B G D A E

X

X

E B G D A E

& gg ˙ ggg # ¿˙ g gg 00 ggg 22 ggg X2

5

3rd string 2nd fret

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@

0 0 0 2 2 0

5

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4

7

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D7

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8 7 6 7

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4th string Open

œ

0

4th string Open

2 1 2 0

n œœ œœ

œ

A m7

œœ œ

0 1

@20œœ 80

0 1 0 2 0

0

0

¿

w

rake

E B G D A E

X

X

X

5

Appeggiate chord Arpeggiate Chord

w

rake

X

œ

0 1 0 2 3

5

E B G D A E

n Drag the pick across the Arpeggiate Chord strings shown with a single sweep. Often used to augment a ˙˙˙ ggg # ˙˙˙ rake’s lastgg note.

5

Arpeggiate Chord

0

Pick Rake Pick rake

PM E B G D A E

8 7 6 7

œ

œ

7 8 œ stave, œ œ Tabœ isœ an aid TABBing @ @ Under thetomusical PM to show you where put your fingersPMon the E B 8 8 G horizontal 7 7 fretboard. The six lines represent the six D 6 6 A 7 7 strings on a guitar – the numbers on the E 0 0 0 0 0strings are fret numbers. The two stave and tab examples show chords; C (C major), Em (E n œœ 4 notes andPick4 Rake minor), œœ D7 (D dominant 7) and Am7 (A minor 7).

@

PM

E B G D A E

3rd string 2nd fret 2

Em

Guitar Techniques: How they appear in written music... E B G D A E

7

1st fret

œœ

1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E

4

The left box shows an A minor pentatonic scale with added 5 tapped notes signifiedPalm by Muting ‘T’s. ≤ Above shows a Cmaj9 (no 3rd) with harmonics at the 12th fret. nœ

œ

1 E B G D A E 2nd string

C

œ bœ @ @

œ @

5 Tapping & harmonics @

≥ &

œ

R

œ

Tremolo Picking

Down & Up Picking

&

œ

2nd string 3rd fret

5

≥ &

Down & Up Picking

œ3

1E

Tremolo Picking GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Technique Examples - Picking

&

œ

2B 3 1 MUSICAL STAVE The five horizontal lines for 3G 2 C Em Picking D7 A m7 Tremolo 4D 0 5A music notation show note pitches and rhythms 6E # œ œ œ œ œœ and & are divided by œœbar lines. œ œœ œ b œœ

7

A E

8

1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E

&

2nd string 1st fret

ggg # # ˙˙ gg ˙ gggg 454 ggg 44 g 5

˙ & gggg ˙˙˙ ggg # ¿˙ g ggg ggg gg

0 0 2 2 X 2

ggg # ˙˙˙ ggg # # ˙˙ gg ˙

ggg gg ggg

4 5 4 4 4 5

n Play the notes of the chord by strumming across the relevant strings in the direction of the arrow head.

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Guitar sampler  

http://www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/music-bookazines/play-guitar-now-rock-and-roll/

Guitar sampler  

http://www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/music-bookazines/play-guitar-now-rock-and-roll/